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Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work

Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.

Electro-Harmonix’s Memory Man was one of the most popular solid-state delays ever, and even with its meager 5 to 320 milliseconds delay time was little short of revolutionary upon its introduction in 1976. At around $150, it was something of a bargain, too, though not dirt-cheap by any means—considering that at that time you could buy a new Stratocaster for just a little over three times that figure. The Memory Man was launched with Reticon SAD1024 chips, but E-H switched to quieter, better sounding and more adaptable Panasonic MN3005 ICs when these became available, and the latter is the chip found in the better-known Stereo Echo/Chorus and Deluxe models.


Numerous classic guitars made by the likes of Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, and Guild are worth thousands, sometimes tens of thousands; a little expensive for the average player, and often these are the preserve of investors and collectors. Early versions of the Gibson Les Paul, SG and Flying V guitars, or the Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster. But there are still very many affordable, great sounding, and exciting to play vintage guitars that offer something simply not available in a new guitar. A well-built vintage instrument, although expensive can actually be superb value for money in comparison to some of the new guitars available at that price.
While the bulk of new players will likely want an amplifier for their electric guitars, acoustic-driven music is still plenty popular amongst players of all skills. And while acoustics are fairly loud on their own, some players still want to pump up the volume from time to time, as well as shape their sound. And you can do all that without sacrificing the warmth of your guitar’s sound with the Behringer Ultracoustic AT108. Perfect for home practices and coffee shop performances, this amp was specifically designed to enhance the volume and tones of an acoustic guitar (or, more accurately, an acoustic-electric). It also has a secondary microphone input to amplify your voice alongside your guitar.
Amazing unit! I loved using my POD XT Live for years and wanted to upgrade. This unit totally exceeded my expectations. Sounds amazing and it's incredibly flexible for routing processing and effects chains. They built the hardware better and it's got a better set of pedal buttons too. Absolutely recommend! (Plus, they announced at NAMM that there will be more model packs, so that's great too!)
The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.

Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.


It is an obvious fact that all those great guitarists must have had a humble beginning, having started with the best beginner guitar that suits them. Some of these artists started with guitars inherited from their parent, friends and/or relatives while others ordered theirs from guitar shops. If you are a newbie yet a guitar enthusiast and you are seeking to buy one among the best guitars for beginners, then there are tips and facts you will have to put into consideration.
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Some big ideas there Mike! Not too sure about copper wire being magnetised though, last time I checked that was only ferrous materials… As for grounding, you should check out the “star-grounding” scheme described over at GuitarNuts: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php Some great info on that site, you should have a browse around!

In 1944 Gibson was purchased by Chicago Musical Instruments. The ES-175 was introduced in 1949. Gibson hired Ted McCarty in 1948, who became President in 1950. He led an expansion of the guitar line with new guitars such as the "Les Paul" guitar introduced in 1952 and designed by Les Paul, a popular musician in the 1950s and also a pioneer in music technology. The Les Paul was offered in Custom, Standard, Special, and Junior models.[15] In the mid-50s, the Thinline series was produced, which included a line of thinner guitars like the Byrdland. The first Byrdlands were slim, custom built, L-5 models for guitarists Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Later, a shorter neck was added. Other models such as the ES-350T and the ES-225T were introduced as less costly alternatives.[16] In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335T model. Similar in size to the hollow-body Thinlines, the ES-335 family had a solid center, giving the string tone a longer sustain.
It’s quite interesting to look into the psychology behind our behavior when it comes to how much we pay for things in connection with how good we think they are. In one experiment, restaurant guests got served the same dish. Some of them payed a high price for their dish and some a normal lunch price. Did the guests think that their food tasted differently? Yes, they did. The guests who payed the high price thought that their food was much better than the people who got it for cheap.
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”
The ’55 hollowbody line consisted of no less than eleven guitars. Models included the EP-4, EP-5, EP-6, EP-7, EP-11, EP-12, EP-13, EP-14, EP-15, EP-16, and EP-23. Clearly, in these instances, the numerical designation indicates appointments, not the number of pickups. Some of these are likely to be thin-bodied archtops with no cutaways, some thinlines with a single cut, and some full-bodied archtops with a single cutaway, with either one or two pickups, and probably no vibratos.
After the success of the DD-500, RV-500 and MD-500 units, Boss's GT-1000 is a floorboard combining all three. Sleek and modern, it's a formidably robust beast. To the rear, there’s the usual array of inputs and outputs, including USB recording out and an input for an additional expression pedal plus jacks to insert two mono pedals, or one stereo external pedal and a nifty send for amp channel-switching. In terms of editing, it’s not the most intuitive. For example, when you switch between patches in a bank, you’re not just turning off, say, a ‘Tube Screamer’, but switching to a different chain that doesn’t have a gain block - standard in rack-style processing, but tough for beginners. Sounds-wise, the 32-bit, 96khz sampling finds the GT-1000 punching above its weight, and on the effects side, there’s a wealth of modulations, delays, reverbs and drives. If you run a larger, more traditional pedalboard, perhaps the so-called ‘Bossfecta’ of the MD, RV and DD 500-series units would provide more flexibility, but for most players, the GT-1000 is a highly practical solution. 
In 1960, Gibson experienced a decline in electric guitar sales due to their high prices and strong competition from Fender’s comparable but much lighter double-cutaway design, the Stratocaster. In response, Gibson modified the Les Paul line. This 1961 issue Les Paul guitar was thinner and much lighter than the earlier models, with two sharply pointed cutaways and a vibrato system. However, the redesign was done without Les Paul’s knowledge. Although pleased with the sound, he asked Gibson to remove his name from the instrument until they fixed a design issue with the neck.[18] This separation occurred in 1960, but Gibson had a surplus stock of “Les Paul” logos and truss rod covers, and so continued to use the Les Paul name until 1963. At that point, the SG guitar’s name was finally changed to “SG“, which stood simply for Solid Guitar. In addition to the SG line, Gibson continued to issue the less expensive Jrs and Specials (and the Melody Makers) with the newer body style. These, together with the Firebird, were the standard Gibson solid-body models until the reintroduction of the Les Paul Standard Goldtop and the Les Paul Custom guitars to the market in 1968.
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Many guitars (even new guitars) need the frets leveled in order to play buzz-free with low action. Most electric guitars with bolt-on necks come from the factory with high tongue frets. Doing great fret work is a learned art, and I guarantee that you will be happy with mine. All my fret work jobs are performed with the guitar mounted in a neck jig that simulates string tension. This allows very accurate work. Re-fret jobs include leveling the fretboard if needed.


Can be useful after the distortion pedals to shape the sound, and they can also be used as a boost pedal. Remember that boosting here will increase the signal going into the following pedals, and in some cases this may cause 'clipping' (unwanted distortion if the input to a pedal is too high). I don't tend to use EQ much these days, but this is where I placed it when I did, just be careful with how much you boost.
Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth used a Kent Polaris I solid body (with lots of duct tape on it) and several Kent 800-series guitars - a white 820 and a sunburst 821 12-string with 10 strings on it, shown at left. Since the B and high-E strings on a 12-string set are normally tuned to the same note, he left the duplicate strings off. He uses several alternate tunings with his guitars.
Well, I’m glad you asked. Don’t be fooled by the price and the size of this thing, as it’s a veritable Pandora’s box of effects waiting to be unleashed upon the world. You have over 75 onboard effects to choose from including distortion, compression, modulation, delay and reverb modelled on some of the biggest hitters in the industry, like the Boss DS-1, Metal Zone, Fuzz Face, Big Muff, Pro Co rat and many, many more. The team at Zoom have also thrown in a simulator to allow your guitar to sound like an acoustic.
Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Sunburst
Here we have e very nice example of a great sounding and beautiful Vintage Martin D28 style copy acoustic guitars made by the master luthiers at Yamaha Japan Nippon Gakki. This is a high quality example folks not to be confused with the Taiwan China made versions.. this is the top of the line made famous from the last 1960's... The workmanship is excellent as is the woods chose he fit & finish is still 90% or better which translates to very good to excellent used vintage condition all-round .. The guitar plays with ease and has been upgraded here at JVG with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Martin strings for its new owner who is going to love this classic no nonsense full sounding Boomer!... Here is a link to more pics of this fine Japanese crafted Yamaha: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/80sYamahaFG200TanLable4?authkey=Gv1sRgCO-azJ2orZPeLw#slideshow/5617864934522537362.
If you do record the bass both via a DI and a miked-up cab, and combine them later, as suggested above, you’ll want to pay attention to the relative phase of the two tracks. Even if the mic is placed very close (an inch or so) to the amp’s speaker, that track will still be slightly delayed (on the order of milliseconds), due to that small distance, relative to the DI track. Small delays like this can cause comb-filtering when the tracks are combined (at close to equal levels), which produces cancellations and reinforcements in the frequency spectrum that can impart a nasal, hollow, or slightly “flangey” sound, weakening the tone. You can see the time difference if you line up the waves in the DAW and zoom way in. You can either advance the amp track (via editing) or delay the DI track (via editing or a plug-in) until the two line up—the resulting tone should be fuller, and ultimately sit better, with a more solid low end, in the mix.

Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Orange


In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.
I have a very unique Lyle guitar. It is apparently a 1972 but on the headstock it has the pearl from Gibson and it says Gibson on it as well on the headstock. It has the tail trapeze and the adjustable saddle. I recently had it set up and there is absolutely no fret buzz, it looks like it just came off the wall, stellar condition. My tech was stunned at the body condition and even the frets were like a new guitar? This is the only guitar I have seen that is definately a Lyle but it has Gibson, correctly done on the front of the headstock? I went in to the acoustic section and played a Gibson new hummingbird next to mine and it sounded cheap! I was stunned. I have no idea what this is worth but is like the perfect guitar. No dents, nicks, scratches, just and old guitar that has been babied, no warping anywhere, I think this will play another 30 years easy. If anyone knows about a Lyle with a Gibson logo and Gibson written on the headstock, please let me know
By 1964, most of Orbison’s early rock and roll contemporaries were either dead, strung-out on drugs, in jail or making crappy movies, but Orbison’s musical career still hadn’t reached its peak. In between the ballads, he recorded singles like “Mean Woman Blues” (check his wild guitar solo) and “Oh, Pretty Woman” that showed upstarts like the Beatles, the Animals and the Rolling Stones that Americans still could rock harder than any Brit.
The Fuzz-Tone connection hints that we need to look further back, and across the pond, for earlier examples of recorded guitar distortion. Gibson, and hence Maestro, was given the circuit that became the Fuzz-Tone by studio engineer Glen Snotty. Snotty, in turn, had devised the transistorized fuzz-generating design to replicate the sound that occurred when a tube preamp in the channel of a mixer he was using to record Grady Martin’s short-scale bass solo for the 1961 Mary Robbins hit record ‘Don’t Worry’ started to fail and yield a distorted tone. Whoever decided to stick with the track rather than re-record it through a properly functional channel was on to something; the result was Nashville’s first recorded fuzz guitar (a Danelectro bass, in fact). Courtesy of Maestro, Snotty’s fuzz circuit soon made the trendy new sound available to the world.

The Fender Stratocaster is a model of electric guitar designed in 1954 by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Freddie Tavares. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has manufactured the Stratocaster continuously from 1954 to the present. It is a double-cutaway guitar, with an extended top “horn” shape for balance. Along with the Gibson Les Paul, it is one of the most often copied electric guitar shapes.[2][3] “Stratocaster” and “Strat” are trademark terms belonging to Fender.
Early valve amplifiers used unregulated power supplies. This was due to the high cost associated with high-quality high-voltage power supplies. The typical anode (plate) supply was simply a rectifier, an inductor and a capacitor. When the valve amplifier was operated at high volume, the power supply voltage would dip, reducing power output and causing signal attenuation and compression. This dipping effect is known as "sag", and is sought-after by some electric guitarists.[46] Sag only occurs in class-AB amplifiers. This is because, technically, sag results from more current being drawn from the power supply, causing a greater voltage drop over the rectifier valve. In a class-A amplifier, current draw is constant, so sag does not occur.
From a fledgling studio that sold second hand music equipment back in the late 60s, Orange grabs the top spot in this list with their highly rated guitar amplifiers. Orange amps are easy to spot with their picturesque design, but what's interesting is how successful they continue to be, while veering away from amp modeling technology. By limiting the features of their amps, they made it easier for users to appreciate their brand of quality and tone, which translates to high ratings. Obviously, the influence of popular artists helps their cause, this includes Jimmy Page, Noel and Liam Gallagher, Billy Gibbons, Chino Moreno and many more. In addition to their distinct combo amplifiers, Orange amps is well known for their lunchbox size tube amps.
The hollow body electric guitar rose to prominence when Gibson introduced the ES-150 back in 1936. Fully hollow body electric guitars (sometimes referred to as “Jazz Box” guitars) tend to have arched tops and large, deep bodies that allow the sound to fully resonate to produce an incredible full-bodied voice with amazing projection and depth. Jazz players and blues players really love the sound fully hollow guitars deliver. While the classic, larger-bodied fully hollow electric guitars definitely still exist, there are also a substantial amount of thinline fully hollow body electric guitars that guitar players may find to be more comfortable. Guitar brands such as Gibson, Gretsch, Ibanez, D’Angelico, Guild, and Epiphone provide guitar players with a fantastic array of fully hollow body electric guitars.
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