In 1970, B.B. crossed over to the white rock audience with “The Thrill Is Gone.” In 1988, he virtually repeated the trick when he recorded “When Love Comes to Town” with U2. Always the humble student of the instrument, B.B. King became jazzier and better than ever as his life and career continued well into the new century. His loss earlier this year was deeply felt by the music community and, particularly, by the guitarist he influenced.
The SG Special by Epiphone is our hands down top pick. As you'll know by know, Epiphone is one of the best guitar manufactures in the business – so the quality of this guitar is absolutely amazing. Its epic red devilish double-cutaway design gives easy access to all 22 frets. It has a hard maple neck and a slim taper D-profile which ensures durability and rigidity. The fretboard is made of rosewood which makes it easy to learn to play. This guitar is all about that rock sound - it's equipped with two open-coil and noise-free humbucker pickups. The hardware is carved from nickel and is available in two dazzling finishes, cherry, and ebony.
Most pedalheads consider the Ibanez TS-808 Tube Screamer and, to a slightly lesser extent, the TS9 which followed, to be the grandaddies of overdrive pedals—and, yes, they certainly generate an element of distortion, too. Indeed, more boutique overdrives are based on the late-1970s and early-’80s Tube Screamer template than on any other, but despite the claimed improvements and undeniable quality of many of these, original units still usually fetch far higher prices on the vintage market (ain’t it always the way?) than new units do in the stores. With all of these—and other vaguely similar units—the guts of the sound comes from a clipping amp based around the first section of a dual opamp (purists swear by the JRC4558 chip in the early Ibanez units) and a pair of clipping diodes, with transistorized buffer stages at both the input and output, and a section for tone-shaping and output level control which uses the second part of the dual opamp in conjunction with a network of capacitors and resistors.
Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.
Steve's a great technician. He's done a great job on every single guitar I've brought to him. Helpful, easy going, friendly, and extremely good at what he does. After the first setup he did for me I stopped looking for other repair shops in town. He's just too good and is a pleasure to do business with. I hesitate giving 5 star reviews, but anyone who can turn a nigh-unplayable Dano baritone into a gigging instrument deserves it. Highly recommended.
Gold trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
I believe that the best electric guitar amp for beginners is a straightforward combo amp, represented by the amps on this list. Avoid the bells and whistles of the fancier, feature-rich combo amps until you’re confident you have a solid set of playing chops. Then you can either move up to a modeling amp, or start adding effects pedals to your rig. The great thing about all the amps profiled above is that they provide a solid base for what ever effects you want to add to the mix later on down the road.
The following year the Standard model received a short-lived redesign seeking to reduce production costs and price on American Stratocasters. This revised version lacked a second tone control, a newly designed Freeflyte vibrato system, and a bare-bones output jack. A reshaped ‘Comfort Contour’ body with deeper forearm and waist contours similar to an early 1960s model was introduced. What it did retain was the 1970s-style headstock decal. The 1982/83 version of the Standard Stratocaster has little in common with the Dan Smith guitar, apart from the period when they were sold, but is sometimes informally (and controversially) presented as a “Dan Smith-era” or “redesign” guitar. After the Standard Stratocaster was discontinued in 1984, Fender Japan produced a 22-fret version with a flat 9.5″ radius and medium-jumbo fretwire until 1986.[14]

If you are feeling lucky, you can purchase any one of these guitars online. I personally like to sit in a store and play the actual guitar I’ll be taking home. That way I can see if the action is set too high, how it feels, and most importantly how it sounds. You can without a doubt find a great acoustic guitar for under $500. Don’t rule out the option of buying used. You can find a guitar that retails for $900 for maybe $500 used on sites like craigslist.org or reverb.com.
A guitar recital may include a variety of works, e.g. works written originally for the lute or vihuela by composers such as John Dowland (b. England 1563) and Luis de Narváez (b. Spain c. 1500), and also music written for the harpsichord by Domenico Scarlatti (b. Italy 1685), for the baroque lute by Sylvius Leopold Weiss (b. Germany 1687), for the baroque guitar by Robert de Visée (b. France c. 1650) or even Spanish-flavored music written for the piano by Isaac Albéniz (b. Spain 1860) and Enrique Granados (b. Spain 1867). The most important composer who did not write for the guitar but whose music is often played on it is Johann Sebastian Bach (b. Germany 1685), whose baroque lute works have proved highly adaptable to the instrument.
Another tone option for a guitarist is to put a pickup out of phase with another pickup, producing a thin "inside-out" squawky kind of sound. When 2 pickups are in phase, they work together and reinforce each other. When they are out of phase the 2 pickups are working against one another and the resulting sound is the "leftovers" from these cancelations. The closer the 2 pickups are, the greater the cancelations, the thinner the sound and the lesser the volume. Therefore, the neck and bridge pickups out of phase is the best choice for this type of sound.
So, learn chords, along with their related chords, and many, many songs will be at your fingertips, even songs you don't know or haven't played yet. As a teacher, I've shied away from teaching songs for learning the particular song's sake. There are many guitarists out there who 'haven't learned the chords to that song,so I can't play it'. Usually they actually have, but don't understand how to put them together to make that song. Also, learning a song generally means putting the particular set of chords in one order. Change key, and the fumbling starts.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
This project began as a quest to find a really good software piano. Not even the expensive commercial versions were satisfying to my ears.  Most had velocity switching problems and unpleasant tones. I came across the University of Iowa Steinway piano samples which were great but there was room for improvement in the way they were presented.  My goal was to have a selection of piano and other instruments that were pleasant to play and to keep them available for free. Using SoundFont editing programs Polyphone and Viena I have done some editing to allow for expression to give a more enjoyable and realistic playing experience where timbre changes gradually with velocity where possible and without that annoying jump that is commonly found. This was applied to many of the other instruments as well.
by pedalhaven This little board from  @andshamlian  is so sick! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 

Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.
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6.  I’ve said this before but think it needs to be said again… Customer using truss rod to “fix” action.  Result:  Broken truss rod.  Fix:  Well, the fix costs more than the instrument and the guitar was scrapped.  This one depends on where the break occurred and what kind of rod was used.  If it’s a conventional rod and the break is close to the adjusting nut, Stew-Mac has a tool to re-thread the rod and save it.  If the break is farther down the rod or double action you may have to remove the fret board and that my friend is major surgery.
@Josh – Changing the order of the effects in your signal chain can drastically change the sound you get from each pedal depending on where it was before and where it is now. Can you please send us an email to support@strymon.net with further details including a video recording of what you are experiencing so we have a better idea of what is happening?
Simon Stockhausen began his stellar musical career at the age of five. His multi-faceted and wide-ranging oeuvre has since embraced all manner of projects and styles, including jazz and improvisational collaborations, countless compositions for ensembles and chamber groups as well as work for major European theatre companies and orchestras including the Hamburg and Berlin Philharmonic Orchestras. In 2009 he further extended the range of his musical endeavors with the creation of a sound design company through which he produces sounds, patches and libraries for software synths and plug-ins, serving sound designers, musicians and post production professionals.
B.C. Rich has been scorching stages all around the world with their monstrous guitars for nearly 50 years. With bodies like a battle axe and tones that are just as brutal, B.C. Rich guitars have become staples in the heavy metal community. Inspired by the look of classic motorcycles, B.C. Rich guitars are as unmistakable as they are undeniable. If you're a fan of seriously heavy music, you've already seen these beautiful guitars around the necks of some of the biggest names around. Slayer's Kerry King, Matt Tuck of Bullet For My Valentine, Lita Ford, Ginger Wildheart of the Wildhearts, and Pat O'Brien of Cannibal Corpse are just some of the metal messiahs who crank out riff after riff on B.C. Rich guitars. If you're after a B.C. Rich of your own, you've come to the right place. You'll find guitars for all skill levels in the section, it's just a matter of taking a look around and finding the axe that's right for you. For example, if you're a beginner looking for their first killer electric guitar, you'll want to take a look at the Bronze Series Warlock. If there is one word to perfectly describe this guitar, it would be "wicked." It has a wicked look, a wicked sound, and is offered up at a wicked price. With BDSM humbucking pickups for a broad dynamic range and a beveled top, this is the kind of six string that any young rocker will want to learn on. Of course, if you're already a serious player who is looking for a truly intimidating beast of a guitar, you'll want to get your hands on the Rich Bich 10 Supreme Electric Guitar. This 10-string guitar has a look you'll have to see to believe, and a sound quality to match. With Seymour Duncan humbucker pickups and the ability to completely revolutionize your playing style, this versatile guitar is an absolute knockout. A B.C. Rich guitar is exactly what you need to get you through the rock and roll trenches. With bone shaking volume and bodies to match, B.C. Rich guitars are sure to get you noticed when you're on the stage.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
This is the main component that separates acoustic guitars from electric guitars. A pickup senses the vibration from a string, transfers it to the guitar amplifier which then transfers it to the loudspeaker. There are many pickups but we’ll cover the four basic ones. The single coil pickup has a single coil of wire with two horseshoe-shaped magnets. They produce a bright, cutting sound and are quite noisy. The P90 pickup is a single coil pickup with one wide coil that increases the surface area of the strings, producing a bigger yet less bright sound. Humbucker pickups were designed with twin coils. They produce richer, warmer, more powerful sounds but roll back some higher frequency sound. Active-passive pickups use a battery-powered circuit to produce a powerful yet balanced tone across a range of frequencies. It outputs a balanced, clean tone.

[SIZE="2"]Guitar Gear: Gibson '61 RI SG, Dean Cadillac Select, Charvel 475 Special, BC Rich NJ Bich, Gibson Faded V, MIM Strat, Warmoth Tele, LP Copy, Yamaha Acoustic, VHT Pittbull Fifty/ST, VOX VT30, Blackheart BH5H, '72 Hiwatt 4123 Cab, Traynor TS-50, POD XT, 16 ohm THD Hotplate, 80's Peavey Rage combo, Boss ME-50, Russian Big Muff, Graphic Fuzz


Launch price: £849/€850/$999 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Effects: 116 | Connections: Input jack, main output (L/MONO, R) jacks, SEND1 jack, RETURN1 jack, SEND2 jack, RETURN2 jack: 1/4-inch phone type - Sub output (L, R) connectors: XLR type - Phones jack: Stereo 1/4-inch phone type - CTL4, 5/EXP2 jack, CTL6, 7/EXP3 jack, AMP CTL1, 2 jack: 1/4-inch TRS phone type - USB port: USB B type - DC IN jack - MIDI (IN, OUT) connectors | Power: AC adaptor

Every guitarist seeks to produce an expressive and distinctive tone. Unfortunately, figuring out what kind of gear you need can be a baffling proposition. Here are the three main equipment categories that comprise your music-making rig: your electric guitar, guitar amps, and effects pedals and units. These components all work together to create your sound. And because you can swap out equipment and change settings, the creative possibilities are virtually limitless.

I have been using a Belcat tube 50R guitar amp. I've owned all the top amps,Fender, Marshall,Mesa,Peavey. This Belcat amp,with pedals, is one of the best sounds I've ever gotten. It's not heavy like a twin,and the clean sound is great, although it's hard to beat a Fender Super reverb,or a twin for pure tone,but I don't like how Fenders sound with distortion pedals. I have a Marshall Combo and a Blackstar HT Club 40,love them both,but I've been using the Belcat. It's distortion,on it's own,is a blues type, not heavy, but with a Rat it screams, or a Boss Blues driver,or Ibanez Tube Screamer,you can get just the sound you're looking for. Too bad they're not making them anymore, it's really a good amp!


If you want to invest in a guitar that replicates the famous ’70 guitars, look no further than the model offered by Fender Vintage. This product was designed to feature a basswood body that is a replica of the famous workhorse Fender guitars. Moreover, the device has a “C” shape neck that was constructed from maple, and that is said to be quite resistant.

Speaking of tiny little helpers that could fit anyone, let me introduce to another seemingly impossible amalgamation of great sound and great look. The Line 6 Micro Spider 6-Watt Battery Powered guitar amplifier has a whole lot of qualities that make it the favorite small amplifier of so many musicians who are constantly on the go or don’t have too much space. With its small form and light body it can be easily transported anywhere you go, while its battery negates the need to be constantly plugged into an outlet and hoping that you have some kind of source of energy. The best part of the amp is of course the sound of the guitar, which is quite outstanding for the price it is offered up at. One of the best options of small guitar amplifiers available for you that I want you to remember when you start attempting to make a decision on buying one. Great stuff to have, really.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber
Unlike the unit I am using here, the original units were large, AC powered, and the speed was controlled with an external pedal. Vintage Uni-Vibe pedals are very expensive at this point but fortunately we can find some very high quality reissues. Famous uses of Uni-Vibe are “Machine Gun” by Jimi Hendrix, “Bridge of Sighs” by Robin Trower, and “Breathe” by Pink Floyd.
So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.
Polytone Mega Brute, Jazz guitar amplifier fully functional. Has loads of clean head room but also has 3 settings: Warm, Edge and drive.  I think they’re rated and 65watts, into 8ohm 8” speaker. Super light and portable, approx. 22lbs. Probably from the mid ‘80s production. Hi and low gain inputs, bright switch, effects loop. Spring reverb. Mint condition and everything works like brand new. Shipped to the lower 48 for $50.00. Local pick up would be great. Return if unhappy but ship in same packing and also pay return shipping. Thanks  
The Ring Resonator Deluxe is like having two all analog pedals in one. It contains the octave-up fuzz effect of the original Ring Resonator with added LED, push-push output pot and mini-toggle switch. With the push-push output pot down, the octave-up effect is removed and fuzz-only is achieved. In the fuzz-only mode of operation the toggle switch allows you to switch between dark fuzz and bright fuzz tones.
The downside of boosting the volume of an acoustic guitar this way is the fact that every microphone adds a color of its own to the end result, not to mention the preamplifier and any compression and equalization applied. In other words, not only do you have to position the microphone correctly, but you also need to be very careful when choosing which mic to use.
Here's another guitar many people feel is a great value. This Pacifica features an agathis body, maple neck, and rosewood fretboard, with two single coil pickups, and one humbucker. The consensus is the guitar is reasonably well made, and the quality of the wood tends to be high. Those who go on to become serious guitarists might want to consider upgrading the electronics of the Pacifica HSS.
AmpliTube's effects are as noteworthy as its amp modeling capabilities. The current version comes with up to 51 effects - modeled after rare vintage gear like Ibanez Tube Screamer, Arbiter FuzzFace, MXR Phase100, MXR Dynacomp, Electro Harmonix Memory Man and many more. What sets AmpliTube apart from the competition though is its very intuitive interface. No parameter is more than two clicks away, and its realistic looking graphics are extremely easy to operate - even allowing for drag and drop operations. If you want a quick setup software, AmpliTube is your best bet. Price: usually about $200 - Check out Amazon.com for the latest price and reviews
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In 1995, an effort was made to re-introduce Rickenbacker acoustics, with factory production beginning in their Santa Ana manufacturing facility in 1996. Four models of flat top acoustic Rickenbackers were depicted in factory literature (maple or rosewood back & sides, jumbo or dreadnaught shape). Each of these four models was also available in both six- and twelve-string configurations, yielding a range of eight distinct instruments.[11] (The 760J “Jazzbo,” an archtop model, was only built as a prototype, with three examples known to exist.) It is estimated that fewer than 500 Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were built before the factory shut down the acoustic department in mid-2006.
Entitled Fine Electric Instruments, the 1964 1965 Fender catalogue was circulated from mid 1964, and despite being just eight pages long, contained a large number of guitars, amplifiers and other instruments. This was the first catalogue to show the new Fender Mustang guitar, which was available in normal or 3/4 scale at that time. This catalogue was included in the 1964 annual guitar issue of Down Beat magazine (July), massively increasing the potential readership, both in America and worldwide.
Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.
StepFilter ('Filter' category): I'm a huge fan of Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn processor. When I play with groups like Air Liquide, it's the only gear I take other than the guitar, and of course a MIDI cable to sync it from the band's MIDI master clock. You can get many of the same effects from Cubase's StepFilter.The StepFilter offers synchronised filter effects that recall Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn signal processor. StepFilter is basically a tempo‑sync'ed dual step‑sequencer, each with 16 steps, and there's a total of eight patterns. One sequencer controls filter cutoff and the other resonance. The filter response morphs from low‑pass to high‑pass, with a stop along the way for band‑pass. You can also copy a pattern, paste it into a different pattern, and create variations. All of these parameters, including pattern selection, can be used with VST host automation control. If you're into electronic guitar effects, you really should check this out — but also try the Tranceformer ('Modulation' category) and Chopper ('Other' category), which are similar, although Chopper works on amplitude, and Tranceformer syncs a ring modulator's carrier frequency to the project tempo'
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!

While it can’t be used to guide early versions of the B52 to their targets (despite looking the part) it does, however, answer all the guitar tuning and guitar amplifying needs of the modern musician. It acts like an amp during concerts, one that allows you to pre-load the exact settings the band used during studio recordings, so the fans won’t get disappointed at a live performance sounding like a bootleg version of the tunes they came to hear.


Very useful. Today I gave life to a Strat, adding a SD lil´59 in the neck, a noiseless single coil in the middle and a SD hot rails in the bridge. I used a H-S-H diagram from SD website with one volume and one tone pots (500k Alpha pots). I will add a second tone pot later on with a push/pull pot to split the little humbuckers in single coils. The guitar sounds huge now!

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I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.

Whether it costs $100 or $1000, the build quality should feel worthy of the money. Naturally with budget models you will find more laminated woods compared the solid woods and exotic materials used in expensive guitars. However, a good model will have laminates that are put together securely and cleanly, with no excess glue or rough spots. Even a good budget guitar will look and feel great.

Serial #59640 New York label Epiphone Triumph circa 1949. Blonde finish. Spruce top, tiger flame maple sides and back. Cherry neck with diamond mother of pearl inlay. Small nick less than an inch wide on left front. Original Frequensator tailpiece with nickel finish, partly worn. Grover tuners fastened with screws and glue. Edging on back body has .25” gap at connection.Blonde natural lacquer finish in good condition. Glossy and brilliant color. Shipping quote inside US only. Ask for quote outside the US. 
So the actual vibrating length of the string should be the same in all cases, and if that's all that affects the magnetic field then none of the other things mentioned above should affect that signal. Do a simple test protocol such as plucking each string with the identical pick, record the waveform, overlay them and look for differences in the waveform.
Note: The concept is buried in first understanding the other meanings of the word custom. Although “made-to-order” is a correct characterization where you can personalized the headtsock with your first or last name or initials and you can CUSTOMIZE YOUR GUITAR: Mahogany, Alder, Maple, Bass Wood, Right/Left handed guitar, Body colour, Neck profile, No dots on fretboard and Fret size. Our Custom Shop Guitars referred to in this site as drawing "inspiration" from the major guitar brands and any reference to custom shop brand names or "Inspired by" are made strictly for comparison purposes only.
You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
Clapton himself has repeatedly called Guy “the greatest living guitarist.” Hendrix literally knelt at Buddy’s feet in the late Sixties, the better to study his riffs. Guy’s secret? He combines an old-time blues feel with the technical facility of a modern guitar player. He was a youngster at the legendary Chess Records in early Sixties Chicago. Fresh up from Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy was some 20 years junior to giants like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, yet old enough and gifted enough to share the studio with them.

For the hobbyist guitarist this is a great 'bang for the buck' investment. It has practice tools for the beginner but solid tones for the advanced guitarist. For home use, maybe even a garage band it's perfectly adequate. If I were a more serious musician doing gigs with high end audio going to the audience, I'd be investing more than a hundred bucks in my stage rig.
Numerous classic guitars made by the likes of Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, and Guild are worth thousands, sometimes tens of thousands; a little expensive for the average player, and often these are the preserve of investors and collectors. Early versions of the Gibson Les Paul, SG and Flying V guitars, or the Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster. But there are still very many affordable, great sounding, and exciting to play vintage guitars that offer something simply not available in a new guitar. A well-built vintage instrument, although expensive can actually be superb value for money in comparison to some of the new guitars available at that price.
Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
In 1958, Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models: with the design change came cosmetic changes to these guitars that would later take on enormous importance. To accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, Gibson revamped both these electric guitar models with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, the Junior’s fresh look was enhanced with a new cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a new, rather yellow-tinged finish for its new design.
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Join the "Cigar Box Revolution"! This La Vox Cigar Box Electric Guitar is built from a decidedly uptown-looking round box. Neck-through construction means it is heavier than most cigar boxes, and it performs more like a standard electric guitar. Play some raw, smokin' blues, back-alley funk, or whatever else wells up from deep down inside.  More details...
Want to switch from pristine cleans, to vintage crunch, to face-melting distortion within seconds? You’ll probably want a modeling amplifier. Based on digital sound processing, modeling amps will combine many (sometimes hundreds) of iconic, vintage and modern amp sounds into a single unit, easily selectable at the twist of a dial or press of a button. Of course, the downside to modeling amps can be their recognizable digital tone, but when this means you have a whole guitar store worth of amps at your disposal it doesn’t tend to put many guitarists off.
On regular occasion I have stuff come through to me after the instrument owner has already taken it to another shop that, for whatever reason, could not fix or solve the problem. This time, a supposedly professional and legitimate shop... and after the customer PAID FOR WORK THAT DID NOT YEILD THE DESIRED RESULTS. That just boggles my mind a bit. I would never charge a customer unless they are happy and satisfied with my work.
Compressors are often applied to electric guitar tracks to bring out the guitar’s natural sustain, as well as even out the overall dynamic range. Lead guitar parts usually benefit from a degree of compression treatment, while heavily overdriven rhythm parts often require very little or none at all, as the distortion naturally provides its own type of dynamic control. In the case of unnatural sounds, such as electric guitar, compression becomes a highly subjective topic, so experimentation is key to achieving the desired effect. As a starting point, therefore, try medium-fast attack and release times – an extremely fast attack time will blunt the transient response of the note. Remember that electric guitars can be inherently noisy and compression will generally exaggerate any hums and buzzes.
Around the same time as the 700-800 series of guitars there was also a line of acoustics. The steel-stringed "Folk Guitars" featured necks and headstocks very similar, if not the same as, the electric models. The nylon-stringed "Classical Guitars" featured slotted headstocks with the curly logo squeezed into the middle. The acoustics seem to be pretty well-made and often fetch pretty good prices on Ebay. One reader of this site even found a Kent banjo made in Germany. The lettering of the name is the same as on the 700-800 series instruments without the curly thingie.

Tribute Legacy Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red Rosewood Fretboard. The G&L Legacy blends contemporary refinements from the Leo Fender-designed S-500 and Comanche models with classic Alnico V pickups. If your holy grail is faithful Alnico single-coil tone with modern refinements and superb craftsmanship, the Legacy makes for an excellent choice. The Legacy's vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ˜50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo's private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ˜50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was - and wasn't. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon's persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World. This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo's PTB (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What's more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy is...
Variable 2: Speaker configuration. In Clip 2 you hear cabinets with varying numbers of speakers. First comes the 1x12 sound of a midsized Fender combo amp. Next is a 2x12 Fender-style cabinet. After that is the distinctive sparkle of a tweed-era 4x10 Fender Bassman. The last phrase is a classic 4x12 Marshall stack with 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks. These sounds represent a single mic on a single speaker, yet you can differentiate single- and multi-speaker cabinets due to leakage from adjacent speakers.
The earliest Teisco Spanish guitar of which I’m aware was the EO-180 from around 1952. This was basically a glued-neck folk-style acoustic guitar with a three-and-three slothead, round soundhole, bound top and glued-on bridge. Essentially dissecting the soundhole was a large triangular round-cornered pickguard with a white insert shaped like a sock, toe pointing toward the head, with a white-covered pickup situated on the ankle of the sock, just behind the soundhole on the bridge side. The cord appeared to come out of the side on the lower bout.
The Neal Schon Signature Les Paul model has a carved mahogany top, mahogany back, multi-ply black/white binding on top, chrome-plated hardware and a Floyd Rose tremolo. The one-piece mahogany neck has a scarfed heel joint a “Schon custom” slim-taper neck profile. The 22-fret ebony fingerboard features pearl split-diamond inlays and single-ply white binding. The pickups are a DiMarzio Fast Track/Fernandes Sustainer in the neck position and a Gibson BurstBucker Pro in the bridge position. In addition to the standard Les Paul electronics (individual pickup volume and tone controls, plus three-way selector switch), the Schon Signature features two mini-toggles – an on/off for the Sustainer and an octave effect – along with a push/pull pot for midrange cut. Only 60 of the guitars were made, and sold it out in days upon release.

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Everything about the shape and feel of the S6 Original is meant to be as close to familiar acoustic guitars as possible, including its playability, which is brought about by its 25.5" scale length, 1.8" nut width and 16" fingerboard radius. Tone wise, you're getting a crisp yet warm tone thanks to its pressure-tested solid cedar top, which also adds to the overall earthy appeal of the instrument.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 
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Modelling/digital amps: This type of guitar amp uses digital technology to stimulate old-fashioned technology. They are able to emulate old amplifiers using software, and this feature enables them to combine several amps into one. Their programmable nature enables the user to switch digital effects such as the chorus, delay, and other features. Some models of these amps have a digital or analog output that goes directly to a recording or PA system through speaker simulation.

The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
The design, while nothing particularly special, is clean and beautiful, which will help it appeal to most guitarists - the dreadnought acoustic body being one of the favorite parts. Ultimately, just about anyone could pick up this guitar and get what they need out of it, which is why it makes our top pick. We could recommend it to anyone, and when you talk about the price, it becomes even more attractive, because this is a high-end guitar for mid-range money.
The Gibson L5, an acoustic archtop guitar which was first produced in 1923, was an early “jazz”-style guitar which was used by early jazz guitarists such as Eddie Lang. By the 1930s, the guitar began to displace the banjo as the primary chordal rhythm instrument in jazz music, because the guitar could be used to voice chords of greater harmonic complexity, and it had a somewhat more muted tone that blended well with the upright bass, which, by this time, had almost completely replaced the tuba as the dominant bass instrument in jazz music.
The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!
The previous drawing illustrates the electrical and magnetic function of a single-coil pickup. Some pickups might use six permanent magnets in place of the six pole pieces to create the magnetic field, but the idea is the same: create a steady magnetic field around a coil in proximity to the guitar string. The name "single-coil" pickup becomes more significant when compared to the humbucker or "dual-coil" pickup.
Also joining the Univox amp line in ’71 (illustrated in a ’72 flyer) was the Univox U-4100 Minimax Amplifier, already showing a different style, with dark tolex covering but still the oval logo plate on the upper left of the grille, now covered in black with vertical “dotted” lines (surrounded by a white vinyl strip). The Minimax was designed for use with bass, organ, electric piano or guitar, but really was a bass combo amp. It packed 105 watts through a 15″ Special Design speaker with 27-ounce Alnico magnet and 21/2″ voice coil, powered by 11 transistors, no tubes. The back-mounted chassis had two channels with high and low inputs, plus volume, bass and treble controls for each channel. Recommended especially for keyboards was an optional UHF-2 High Frequency Horns unit with two horns for extra bite. The flyer for this amp was still in the 1980 Unicord book, but a ’79 price list no longer mentions it, and it was probably long gone, though some may still have been in stock.
There's a sick little used Chinese Peavey going for $90 at my local guitar shop. It plays great, but nobody seems to want it. I'm already picking up a MIM strat from there, but after I save up a bit more change I think I'll grab it as well. You always have to dig for the good players, and sometimes you just happen to be lucky enough to find a cheap one on a fluke, doesn't matter where it's from.
The idea of what actually constitutes a “beginner” amp has changed over the years. Before playing electric guitar became such a widespread hobby, most guitarists had at least some aspirations of becoming a professional at some point. As a result, a good beginner amp needed to be capable enough for live performances and recording, in addition to practice.
Another way of categorizing bass equipment manufacturers is by which part of the market they are targeting. While Peavey and Yorkville products are aimed at the generalist mass market, some bass equipment manufacturers, such as Acoustic Image or Walter Woods make expensive "boutique" equipment that is aimed at a niche market within the professional musician market. Acoustic Image amplifiers and speaker cabinets tend to be used by professional acoustic folk and jazz musicians, and Walter Woods amplifiers are associated with professional acoustic jazz bass players.

The display borrows a lot of its design cues from Guitar Hero—which is probably a good thing, since so many players are already familiar with that system. Like GH, Rocksmith has vertical columns to show you which frets to hold, and the notes move toward you until they reach a line that represents the moment you're supposed to play them. However, GH's display didn't need to move since there were only five buttons. Because it has to span the entirety of an actual guitar neck, Rocksmith's display floats up and down. If you're playing primarily notes between the fourth and seventh frets, for example, it will show you just those frets on the screen, then slide up to the 10th or 11th when it's time for you to play those.
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During final construction, a small section of the outside corners is carved or routed out and filled with binding material on the outside corners and decorative strips of material next to the binding, which are called purfling. This binding serves to seal off the endgrain of the top and back. Binding and purfling materials are generally made of either wood or high quality plastic materials.
As for Acoustic guitars go, you are somewhat limited by the make and model of the guitar. You can make differences in tone by the type of picks you use and also the thickness of your strings. Actually the string factor goes for both electric and acoustic. The thicker the strings the fuller the tone. Its kinda whatever you can stand on your fingers. I like to use 11’s. Stevie Ray Vaughan used crazy thick gauges of strings and had an incredible tone. Bottom line…you have to try different things and experiment to find the right tone!

While some effects can create a drastic change in a signal’s sound, other effects act more like a coating that add subtle variations of texture rather than a huge makeover. Texture-adding pedals like time-based or ambient effects – such as reverb, delay/echo, vibrato, flanger, and chorus – work best when added to something much more pronounced instead of the other way around (which in a signal chain means they go towards the end).
More and more are finding themselves downsizing their pedalboards, if not totally swapping all their stompboxes for a multi-effects unit. There are also many who are looking to upgrade their existing guitar processor. Whatever your case may be, it is our intention to help you find one that fits your needs, or at least point you to the right direction.
Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.
do you have any iOS devices? So far Garageband and Guitarism are the most convincing guitar emulators ive heard yet. Next to that, for VST i go with RealStrat. But still, its going to track midi for notes that do not exist on a guitar. So while it wont play those incorrect notes through realstrat, it will make exporting midi to tab or sheetmusic a nightmare. Dont sleep on the iOs stuff, particularly because of the input and control methods. You have no idea the difference between a fake strum on a touchscreen versus all manner of keyboard inputs. You spend most of your time trying to emulate plucking in VST guitar apps...
B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
Jackson is a well-known guitar manufacturing company that was set up in the year 1980. Jackson guitars are considered as among the best guitars on the planet. Their guitars are known for its slender and refined layouts. Jackson guitars are also popular for their typical pointed headstock. The Jackson JS32 Kelly RW is an electric guitar which has won the hearts of many owing to its stylish design and great sound quality. When it comes to the sound quality of the guitars, Jackson is the best guitar brand to have.
Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.

Fender came up with the California Series lineup of acoustic guitars to celebrate its Southern California roots. Every aspect of this guitar is uniquely Fender, from the Strat-style headstock and vintage-style slot tuners to the slim-taper neck and preamp, which is the product of the collaboration between Fender and trusted electronics brand Fishman.


Yet you’d never find a punk rocker who didn’t want to be just like him. Whereas most punk guitarists found inspiration from the same hard rock and proto-metal players that they pretended to despise, Strummer was influenced by reggae, rockabilly, soul, ska and even early New York rap music when most of the world still hadn’t heard of the Sugarhill Gang.
A pedal itself can have an effects loop, but the most commonly used place is on the amplifier itself. You'll see on most amps (but not all) some form of output labeled as Effects Send or Preamp Out accompanied by an input labeled Effects Return or Power Amp In, respectively. Both sets of outputs and inputs refer to the effects loop that you can add between the preamplifier and the power amp section of your amplifier.
A detailed study on MIT physics students has proven that online classes really do work. Guitar Tricks results show that online lessons not only work for physics but also for learning the guitar. A GuitarTricks member survey in 2010 found that 98% would recommend Guitar Tricks. 80% reported that they were learning faster than with any other method that they had tried before. Most members found that their skills increased from 3 to 5 (on a scale of 1 to 10) within a short period of starting the online lessons with Guitar Tricks.
The neck's profile and width affects the guitar's playability and the player's comfort when fretting. While most necks are either "C"- or "U"-shaped, the width and depth of the neck in relation to the player's hand is an important consideration. Players with smaller hands should seek out narrower, shallower necks while those with larger hands will most likely find beefier neck profiles more comfortable.

The Effie U1935 thinline hollowbody ($220) was a bolt-neck ES-335 copy with a bound rosewood fingerboard, blocks, open book head with outlined logo decal, two 12-pole/slit humbuckers, finetune bridge, fancy harp tailpiece, three-way on the treble cutaway horn, elevated pickguard and two volumes and tones. The Effie was available in orange sunburst, cherry red or jet black. It is entirely probable an earlier version of this existed, since thinline versions of the ES Gibsons were already mainstays in Japanese lines by ’68. If you find one with the old plastic logo, don’t be surprised.
If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.
Festive music track with cheerful and happy mood, with “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” song melody. I’ve included in pack different logo and looped versions of this track, for your comfortable using. This celebratory track can be used for Winter Holyday projects, children arcade games, as New Year jingles, advertising and Youtube commercial video. Enjoy!
The JEM70V is a Steve Vai signature model based on early JEMs he helped create. It comes with 3 different DiMarzio Evolution pickups that were handpicked by Steve Vai himself to give him the various tones that he needs for his expressive solo work, and intricate rhythm textures. The body is crafted from basswood, while the low profile 5-pc Maple/Walnut and 24-fret, 25.5" scale length rosewood fingerboard provide the fast playability expected of the brand. Other features include the Edge tremolo, 1.69" nut width, tree of life inlay, and it comes wrapped in Seafoam green finish.
When this guitar came in the headstock was completely broken off.  Being a 12 string I knew that it would need some extra reinforcement to stay structuraly sound.  I glued the headstock in place and then started to cut away wood from the truss rod to the edge of the neck running from the 5th fret to the A string tuner.  It took hours of cleaning up gluing surfaces and precisely fitting the graft before I could glue it in place.  I then repeated that step on the other side of the neck.  With this repair the only original wood remaing around the break is directly over the truss rods making the finished product basically as strong as a new neck.  Once the neck was refinished you cant even see the original break and only if you look very closely can you see the edges of the grafts.  When the owners of the guitar came to pick it up they thought I had made a whole new neck.  Needless to say they were very excited.  -Evan

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Ibanez is a Japanese music instruments manufacturer that has produced some of the most iconic guitars of the 20th century. Established in 1908, the company started to design the first guitars in 1957. Ibanez was one of the first companies to gain popularity in the US and Europe markets. It also was the first to mass-produce 7- and 8-string guitars.


Replacing switch and jack covers. These are the plastic or metal covers that hold the jack and tells you witch switch is treble or rhythm. The switch cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced, however, a metal jack plate can never break and only will need to be cleaned. A plastic plate will need to be replaced or the screw holes need to be resized, do so properly and make sure every fastener is snug including screws and nuts.
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-15 JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit gives you the ultimate shredder guitar. Originally designed by Steve Vai, this style is built for speed. Innovative features like a Monkey Grip Handle and Floyd Rose Tremolo complete the unique design. All the parts needed for a finished guitar are included. This guitar kit is suitable for the aspiring or established luthier and all guitar players. A truss rod adjustment hex wrench, two Floyd Rose tremolo adjustment hex wrenches and solder are included. You will need a phillips head screwdriver and a soldering iron to fully assemble the guitar. A pack of six nickel alloy strings and a right-angle guitar cable are also included.With your purchase, you will receive one DIY JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit pictured and described above.
This said, the gig bag itself looks like it is top quality, with properly cushioned straps so you can wear it on your back if you need to, making it a great option for carrying it across town or campus. The only thing is, the listing says the guitar is lightweight, but at 16 lbs, some people would not say this is “light.” At least not compared with some of the more inexpensive models in this review list. After all, the back and sides of this instrument are made of mahogany, which is a hard wood. This makes the guitar more durable, but not easy for some to lift.
Thinking out loud... what defines electronics then? I've always assumed that the pickups, caps, pots, etc. inside an electric guitar constituted an electronic system. The "guitar's electronics" facilitate a deliberate flow of electrons through a circuit with semi-conductors, etc. Heck, with coils and magnets (and sometimes battery packs), they also provide the electricity that's conducted through the system.
Search through such iconic pieces of gear as pre-war Martin acoustics, ’50s-era Gibson electrics and ’60s Fender® Super Reverb amps—or perhaps you've always wanted to play an amplifier that your favorite British Invasion or psychedelic garage band used, in which case, you'll have the pleasure of browsing countless vintage amplifiers from Vox, Danelectro, Silvertone and more. Our Vintage Collection also consists of a wide range of MIDI and pro audio equipment, with everything from dynamic and condenser microphones to signal processors and stunning keyboards made by Moog, Univox and Hohner.

Dick Dale: Nicknamed “The Beast” by Dale himself, the guitar comes in “chartreuse sparkle” (a greenish-gold color) with a white pickguard and rosewood fretboard, with vintage 50s features and a number of custom modifications. Notably, the guitar comes with a reverse headstock and a reverse angled bridge pickup to achieve the sound of playing a Stratocaster upside-down, which was how Dale learned to play.
My husband was looking forward to checking this place out. When we entered a guy wearing glasses asked if he could help us with anything and my husband said "oh just browsing." So we walked around some more. When we got to the electric guitar section, my husband saw a $2,000+ guitar he wanted to try. He took off his jacket so as not to scratch the guitar and SLOWLY picked the guitar from the wall hanger. The same guy earlier suddenly came up to my husband and said "You can't just pull it out like that!" My husband was surprised and had to ask what he just said?! I was as surprised. The clerk said "You can't just take it unless you are buying it." Really?! My husband said then you should have told me earlier when we first came in. We did not see any signs nor there's any lock on the guitar hanger. Why would you buy without trying it first?! That clerk probably thinks my husband don't have the money. They just lost a customer and a bunch of my husband's musician friends.

The ‘boomer’ kids wanted their own voice and opinions to be heard, they wanted to be taken seriously – and like the quote from the 1966 film ‘The Wild Angels’ which exaggerated this rebellious angst to the extreme “…We wanna to be free to do what we wanna do…”  There was a sense of needing to rebel against ‘The Man’ – basically anyone who told them what to do or how to conform to society respectfully.
Most bass amps have only one rated wattage. A small number of amps, such as the Mesa/Boogie Strategy 88 amp head, have switchable wattage. A selector switch on the 88 enables the bassist to choose its full 465 watt power; half power (250 watts); or low power (125 watts). A bassist playing an arena on one night, then a club gig, and then recording in a studio could use full, half and low power for the different volume requirements. The Quilter 800 Bass Block has a "master control" knob which switches between various watt outputs for a similar approach.
Guitars feature many different styles of hardware which have different uses. There is usually a direct relationship between a guitar’s cost and the quality of its hardware. Better hardware can make a difference in a guitar’s tuning stability and versatility. As you can imagine, this is an area where many improvements and upgrades can bring a host of benefits to the user. The most significant hardware components are tuning machines, bridges and tailpieces.
I’m super excited for this post as it’s the culmination of some of the biggest names in online guitar lesson providers coming together to offer their advice and insights on guitar chords. Understanding the right way to play guitar chords is one of the first things you’ll learn as a beginner guitar player. It can also be quite frustrating when you are just starting out.That’s why I decided it would be a great idea to get a bunch of experts together all giving their insight into learning more about the wonderful world of guitar chords. I basically asked everyone two questions:
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From loopers to distortion, effects pedals are a major part of guitar playing these days – and there are two ways to feed these pedals to the amp. You can run them from the front through the instrument input, or you can use an FX loop. The benefit of the latter is that it allows you to insert effects between the preamp and power stage. It’s a complicated topic that relies on a lot of trial and error – not to mention personal taste – but plugging boosters (overdrive, distortion, wah) into the front and then using an FX loop for modulators (chorus, flanger, delay) tends to deliver the best results.
The first pedal-operated flanger designed for use as a guitar effect was designed by Jim Gamble of Tycobrahe Sound Company in Hermosa Beach, CA, during the mid 1970s. Last made in 1977, the existing "Pedalflangers" appear occasionally on eBay and sell for several hundred dollars. A modern "clone" of the Tycobrahe Pedalflanger is sold by Chicago Iron.Famous users of this Flanger effect include Randy Rhoads and Eddie Van Halen, coincidentally they both used the MXR M-117R flanger and Eddie Van Halen even has his own signature model now.
This is another budget guitar that is routinely praised for the excellent value for money it provides. Many reviewers point to its playability as its strongest point, which is not surprising given that this guitar is from Ibanez. There were even several people who wrote in their reviews that they liked the GRX20Z so much that they had bought it more than once.

Schecter's Diamond Plus passive humbuckers are pretty hot for what is essentially an affordable set. Their range is wide and they handle distortion rather well. This is largely what makes this such a versatile option. Schecter went with a standard Tune-o-Matic bridge for this build, making it a simple but reliable configuration, especially for those more interested in playing than tinkering.
The Top Guitars specialized only in Custom Made Electric Guitars and Basses - "We will create an instrument that will delight you with exceptional tone and great playability, optimized to your personal preferences and all with the utmost quality, beauty, and rigorous attention to detail. We are experienced builders of custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks. We craft our exquisite custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks using a variety of time tested, great sounding woods, offering options that you can not buy off the shelf. We can also build for anyone that has a custom design that they would like built to their specifications. We do our best to meet your dreams continually striving for unattainable perfection.Only the best, one-of-a-kind, and built just for you! "
Jump up ^ "The first incontrovertible evidence of five-course instruments can be found in Miguel Fuenllana's Orphenica Lyre of 1554, which contains music for a vihuela de cinco ordenes. In the following year Juan Bermudo wrote in his Declaracion de Instrumentos Musicales: "We have seen a guitar in Spain with five courses of strings." Bermudo later mentions in the same book that "Guitars usually have four strings," which implies that the five-course guitar was of comparatively recent origin, and still something of an oddity". Tom and Mary Anne Evans Guitars: From the Renaissance to Rock. Paddington Press Ltd 1977 p.24

The Articulations page exposes all of the Shreddage II articulations to the user in a fully-customizable mapping scheme. The user can activate articulations via keyswitches or velocity ranges. The Engine page reveals the back end of Shreddage II for users seeking to tweak Shreddage II into the ultimate performance tool, with controls for velocity response, transposition, pitch bend range, resonance controls, pedal behavior, and control over noises like release and pick.
Guitar amplifiers can also modify the instrument's tone by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequencies, using equalizer controls, which function the same way as the bass and treble knobs on a home hi-fi stereo, and by adding electronic effects; distortion (also called "overdrive") and reverb are commonly available as built-in features. The input of modern guitar amplifiers is a 1/4" jack, which is fed a signal from an electro-magnetic pickup (from an electric guitar) or a piezoelectric pickup (usually from an acoustic guitar) using a patch cord, or a wireless transmitter. For electric guitar players, their choice of guitar amp and the settings they use on the amplifier are a key part of their signature tone or sound. Some guitar players are longtime users of a specific amp brand or model. Guitarists may also use external effects pedals to alter the sound of their tone before the signal reaches the amplifier.

To capture two speakers in a multi-speaker cab or record a bigger sound that delivers the response of two different microphones in similar positions on one speaker, you can try using two mics in a close or semi-close placement. If you’re using two different mics on a single speaker, place the capsules of each as close together as possible, without touching, in order to minimize phase cancellation. This technique might seem redundant, but can often yield outstanding results, allowing you to blend the characteristics of two different microphones to capture one amp sound – a bright, detailed condenser and a punchy, midrange-heavy dynamic, for example. On guitar cabs carrying two or more speakers, try miking each speaker separately, placing each of two mics – same type or different – at the same distance. Some amp makers use different types of speakers in cabs to enhance sonic complexity, and this miking technique will make the most of those. Even two speakers of exactly the same type, however, will often sound slightly different, and blending them might yield great results.
Up next comes another compact model and our second Yamaha recommendation. This time around, we are looking at their Yamaha FSX830C model. Unlike all of the guitars we have mentioned so far, this one isn't a dreadnought. Instead, we are looking at a standard concert shape with a cutaway. Now, you do have the choice of eleven finishes and body types, and since the options are nearly endless we've narrowed down to our favorite configuration, but definitely look at the others, there's some neat options in there.

One of the quirkier instruments to emerge from the JMI/Vox operation in the 1960's (And that's saying something!) The Mando-Guitar never really caught on in a big way but remains a very cool and actually quite functional oddity. This is essentially an double-strung octave guitar; some describe it as an "octave 12 string guitar" but the strings are actually tuned in unison, not the octave arrangement of a conventional 12-string. The idea was to make an instrument that played in the mandolin range but was tuned as a guitar, as few of the Beat-era guitarists who were JMI's customers had a clue how to play mandolin! A few of the first Mand-Guitars were produced at Jennings' Dartford, Kent factory but the great bulk of extant examples were built by Eko in Recanati, Italy. With its small artist-palette shaped solid body and short 15" scale neck this is a very handy instrument, and with two Vox pickups has a fairly wide range of tones. There have been a number of similar instruments inspired by this design created in more recent decades, but the Vox Mando-guitar remains the original and coolest of all mini-guitar efforts.
Yamaha is likely a good place for acoustic players as well, as the company offers a number of solid entries in this category. Despite the friendly price, Yamaha consistently puts out quality instruments that feature not only sturdy construction, but sound quality good enough to give the big guys a run for their money. The FG800 is one of the best rated acoustic guitars out there, with a price tag that’s viable for just about any budget. Their acoustic guitar starter packs are great for beginners as well (5).

Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
Solid body guitars offer a fantastic platform for builders, allowing them to craft the wood into literally any shape. Naturally you’ll probably want to opt for a guitar with a single-cutaway Les Paul or Telecaster style shape, or a double-cutaway shape like a Stratocaster, Yamaha Pacifica, or Ibanez’s RG. However, the more extroverted beginner can check out some cool styles that always catch the attention, such as V or Z shaped guitars, or anything from Dean Guitars – especially if you want an eye-catching paint job!

The brand’s biggest boom through the fifties and sixties was largely down to the birth of rock n’ roll. Thanks to their excellent hollow and semi-hollow models, Gretsch guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
Marshall Chess assembled in his words "the hottest, most avant garde rock guys in Chicago" for the album sessions consisting of Pete Cosey (lead guitar, later with Miles Davis) Phil Upchurch and Roland Faulkner (rhythm guitar), Louis Satterfield (bass) Gene Barge (tenor sax), Charles Stepney (organs) and Morris Jennings (drums). Since Muddy wasn't as accustomed to this style, he only contributed vocals, but he still played an essential part in this recording. Electric Mud (1968) was mostly recorded in live takes with few overdubs and that off-the-cuff live feel that's captured on it makes it stronger. On the opener, "I Just Want To Make Love to You," pounding drums and Cosey firing out raw screaming guitar grabs your ear with Muddy's confident singing pushing the music along. The solo on this song is nothing short of phenomenal. The guitar starts playing some distorted melodic notes then morphs into this gigantic screeching feedback riff becoming louder and wilder then continues to morph from a tearing solo until it reaches this intense mind-bending groove that sounds on the brink of collapse. At this point, the guitar cuts out, leaving you breathless, with just drums and Muddy's voice building up back to the verse, then with an out-of-your-mind guitar and organ playing off each other to the end. The next song, "Hoochie Coochie Man," begins with an incoming guitar sound and has the opposite feel of the last track. Muddy's vocals seemingly come out of the speakers at you as alternating lines come from the left and then right, giving the listener a disorienting acid-like effect. A liquidy sounding guitar that washes over like a wave accompanies the verse and changes into an expressive wah-wah lead on the chorus. There's a great, fun cover of "Let's Spend The Night Together" which the Stones must have taken as a huge compliment, having their idol cover one of their songs. Muddy and the band turn it, around making it appear like he wrote it with a big mean sounding back melody, soulful distorted guitar lines and Muddy's commanding voice sounding the way he might have sung in a club in Chicago. "She's Alright" has a trippy beginning with bass notes fluttering up then swaying back down to open up to smash your head against the wall along with crashing cymbals matched by a dirty guitar that has real spirit to it. The song makes great use of cross-overs with a screeching guitar bouncing back and forth between speakers and then somehow transforms and ends with a pleasant distorted instrumental version of "My Girl." Original material was also written for this record like "Tom Cat" and "Herbert Harper's Free Press News," with the latter as a vaguely topical song about the sixties with lines like "world is moving much too fast" and "where ya gonna run to, where ya gonna hide" and a fuzzed out guitar that parallels the confusion and outrage of the lyrics. "The Same Thing" closes Electric Mud with a slow heavy blues feel to it and a stretched out, aching guitar on top.
The ’62 EG-NT, EG-K and EG-Z were fairly primitive and appear to be leftover from the mid-’50s. The EG-NT had a small rectangular body with the bass side flush with the neck and the treble sticking out a bit to handle the controls. The head was stubby three-and-three with a circle Swan logo sticker and the fingerboard had painted diamond markers. The pickup looks to be the old slotted pickup of the early J-1, but may not be, with volume control. The EG-K was the Teisco version of the Rickenbacker Frying Pan, with a round body and neck with a head wider than the neck. This, too, had the rectangular head with a circle Swan logo. Markers were diamonds, the pickup was the slotted J-1 pickup, with one volume control. The EG-Z had an asymmetrical body with a short width on the bass side and a longer width on the treble side, with diamond markers and the stubby head. This had the old slotted J-1 pickup with volume control.
You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
This Blackstar combo amp might be really inexpensive (under $80) but it’s not a cheap model, quality-wise. Ideal for house practice, this baby has two channels (Clean, Overdrive) and is also fit for traveling. The compactness and durability of the model are great for people who want to travel with their instrument and equipment. If you are a beginner who has long given up on looking at the best amplifiers at $100, you need to know where to compromise on an amp. And Blackstar seems to do the best job as compromising on some aspects to still deliver a good sounding amp that is not too expensive. With 10-watts (there is also a 15-watt model available), you can practice for hours on end and produce pretty crisp, versatile tone. Is it the best amplifier I have ever tried? Definitely not, but it sure is one hell of a good competitor in its price range and an amazing guitar practice amp.
If metal is your jam, and you want an amp that will deliver brutal high-gain tone, this is your amp. Sized in a convenient combo package, this 60 watt beast features two channels with independent three-band EQ, pre/post gain controls and presence and resonance adjustment. It’s loud and powerful, yet small enough to throw in the back seat of your car.
The clipping detector stages receive inputs from the guitar preamp and the reverb recovery amp, they act in an identical manner. The 1458 op-amp is wired as a comparator with a threshold that is near the high side of the allowable voltage swing on the associated 2N3906 preamp stage. If the transistor output exceeds this voltage, the 1458 output turns on, causing the 4011 one-shot pulse stretcher circuit to fire. The one-shot circuit activates the LED, and stays on long enough that even minor clipping on the amplifier causes visible blinking.
Well technically, the floor and the ceiling do shape the tone, post amp. Room acoustics are a major factor in the quality of sound recordings. Also Dan isn't wrong. Each thing that vibrates that eventually moves the pickup (while a note is being played or sustained) will disrupt the magnetic field. In physics there is hardly ever an instance where things have absolutely zero effect on the things around them. It comes down to the significance of the effect. For example, if something moves the pickup .05 picometers six times a second, then it likely has a negligible effect on the sound (i.e. our ears are not capable of detecting any difference. There does come a point where other variables do begin to change the characteristics of the sound. Additionally, as a string is struck, due to the rigidity (or slight lack thereof) the neck and body will vibrate, changing the distance between bridge and nut. The shortening and lengthening of this distance will then change the vibration frequency of the string. This can result in the dampening of vibration or potentially slight amplification of frequencies or overtones. Overall, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty that something does not have an effect on something else in this case. The truth, however, is that the degree to which the change is noticeable may not be detectable by the human ear.

Hendrix was known for a lot of things.The beautiful chord embellishments on Little Wing, the grit of the solo in Voodoo Child screaming off of his strat pickups, his cover of the Dylan song All Along The Watchtower, and the backwards solo in Castles Made of Sand, but known as a great innovative guitar player over and over again. His short but explosive career influenced numerous artists for many years past his death and continues to influence musicians today. To make such a difference in such a short amount of time truly earns Jimi a spot as number two. But…then you may ask, “Who is deserving of number one?!”
I decided to release the book for public download, which was my initial plan anyways. In the future there will be no official 'second edition' of The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics, as the material will live and float around here in the Internet. If time permits, I will add and edit the material on this pdf-version. This 'upgraded version' will be developed and published only here at this website. The revision date in the first page will updated accordingly on every 'new release' and the listing below will give more detailed information about the changes made to each chapter.
I had a Soundgear 5 string bass when they first came out and it was one of the worst basses I have ever owned. Crappy electronics, uncomfortable neck and the list goes on. I used it as a back up when I was touring 100+ shows per year and luckily my Tobias Killer B5 never had issues other than the occasional broken string. The best thing I can say about it is I lent it to a "colleague" and he ended up stealing it. Good riddance!

Every guitar player loves pedals. We all have at least a handful in our collection and will always try a new one we come across. When you're starting out, you probably know when you need something, but you aren't exactly sure what it is. You may not even know what flanging or phasing actually does to your signal and how that's different from a chorus effect. We're offering below some great effect choices that will add some character without overtaking your sound, so you can really distill out what each of these effects do. While distortion and overdrive have their place (and are usually the effects beginners jump to initially), the following picks offer some other alternatives that will feed your creativity and help get you started.


Other high-quality specifications include a bone nut, a molded metal jack plate that is curved and makes plugging and unplugging a guitar cable hassle-free, retooled knobs, fretwire that is slightly smaller than what you’d find on most PRS electric guitars, and PRS’s double action truss rod (accessible from the front of the headstock for ease of use).
"I've always thought that most people mic amps too closely," comments Alan Parsons. "They supposedly make up with an ambient mic, but I much prefer to find a mic position that works and process that, rather than mix in too much ambience." Despite Parsons' disapproval, though, a lot of the engineers I researched divulged that they use additional ambient mics to capture more of the sound of the room in which the guitar cab was recorded.
Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.
Even though pickups are the main component tasked with interpreting string vibrations and indirectly turning them into sound, your choice of wood still matters. Although the effect is subtle, certain woods will give you better sustain, more definition, and so on.  And in the end it's the accumulation of all of these choices that determine your ultimate sound.
hey paul. i have a dorado 6 string acoustic. they really are beautiful guitars (for the price and value). if you email me (swiver84@hotmail.com) i will send you pictures of it. i'd like to see some of your dorado as well, i've only seen a couple others on ebay. i lost one on ebay yesterday by 1$! i am still kickin myself in the butt for that one. it went for 36$.
The quarter-sawn mahogany neck has a rounded “C” neck shape and it’s topped with a smooth 22-fret A-grade dark rosewood fretboard with small block pearloid inlays. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured also features an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles for added sustain and clarity and Memphis Historic Spec II humbuckers. In addition, this classic axe now has MTC Premiere Controls.
The size and shape of the ME-80 is comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X, though the Boss measures a few inches smaller, and also weighs a few lbs less. This is a Boss product, and as such it’s built like a tank. No worries whatsoever over the build quality of the chassis, knobs, and footswitches. Starting with the rear of the ME-80, you can see the I/O is pretty basic - mono input for your guitar, stereo output, a headphones jack, AUX in (so you can plug in your iPhone and jam along to your favorite tracks), and a USB port. Like the Zoom G3X and the Line 6 POD HD500X, you can use the Boss ME-80 as a USB interface for your computer and record your guitar straight into your favorite DAW. Oh and one small inconvenience is that you’ll need to buy the power supply separately. Why Boss doesn’t just include one for a unit of this quality and price, we don't really understand. If you do end up getting the ME-80, this is the power adapter you want. It can also use 6 AA batteries which is good if you need to use this on-the-go, but we don’t recommend it as it will suck those batteries dry in no time.
Low frets aren't a bad idea, and Carvin is a very good brand for guitar, amp, etc. To me, it seems that the neck shape is going to be very important for you. Double-check what Carvin's return policy is, and if you think it will work for you (whatever it is) then I would totally say go for it! The caveat is that I would bring it to your local music store for them to do the setup, setups and intonations usually need to be done after shipping, and you'd need to have it done if you were changing string gauges anyways, so....
Just as it’s important that the guitar, amp and effects are performing to spec, make sure that all cables are functioning properly (it’s uncanny how many times a lead that was working fine yesterday suddenly develops a fault just before a take). It’s a good idea to ensure that spares are available. That goes for strings, too – valuable recording time can be lost just because a string has broken and no one has a spare. Some engineers will try to insist you use brand new strings when recording, but don’t be bullied into it if you prefer the warmer sound of a played-in set; that applies especially to bass, as new bass strings can introduce undesirable harmonic content into the sound.
If your audio track suffers from a lot of spill, or includes chords, the pitch correction may not work correctly. Where spill is loud enough to be audible, you'll hear this being modulated in pitch alongside the wanted part of the audio as it is corrected. As a rule, chords are ignored, so guitar solos, bowed stringed instruments and bass parts (including fretless) can be processed, and only single notes will be corrected.

The SG guitar kit while not as simple to assemble as an ST or TE (thanks to the pickguards or control plates being preloaded with electronics) is still a relatively straight forward guitar to assemble. This makes SG guitar kits a good option if this is your first building project and want to simply dip your toe in the water, to begin with before taking on something more challenging.
Introduced around the same time as the White Falcon, the Duo-Jet (6128) became another hit for Gretsch, especially after a young George Harrison played one with The Beatles in the early sixties. While finding an original Gretsch is very expensive, the brand still makes faithful reproductions of most of its historic models and are popular with guitarists with a penchant for vintage.

While it can’t be used to guide early versions of the B52 to their targets (despite looking the part) it does, however, answer all the guitar tuning and guitar amplifying needs of the modern musician. It acts like an amp during concerts, one that allows you to pre-load the exact settings the band used during studio recordings, so the fans won’t get disappointed at a live performance sounding like a bootleg version of the tunes they came to hear.
The only guitars that I have been able to find pictures of that have the little curly thingie on the headstocks have been Kents, Kawais and some kind of no-name guitar that looks like the factory took a red Kent 820 and sprayed black around the edges to create a “redburst” finish. The example above appears to has started as a regular sunburst finish with more red and black added. The neck, headstock, pickups, and body are identical to the Kent 820 except the name ‘Kent’ doesn’t appear on the guitar anywhere. Note that the hardware on it is the same as on the 820 shown. That bridge and tailpiece configuration is a little unusual for Kent 820s. (the 820 there is mine) The bridge and tailpiece on the Kent 823 is the more common configuration.
After you've made your selections from the best selection of guitar and bass tabs, you'll want to download the Musicnotes.com apps for your Android, iPad, iPhone, or other device to gain access to your digital library anywhere. The option to print the file is still available, and you will also have all of your sheet music stored in your personal account to access your digital file from any computer or mobile device. If any issues arise, make sure to contact our customer support of musicians, ready to help fellow musicians.
I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.

Perfect working condition Amp is an absolute beast, if you know anything about these AC30s you'll know that there tone is unbelievable. Make me an offer or trade These amps sell for close to 18k and well above that on oversees markets The amp does have some cosmetic ware but obviously does not affect the sound what so ever Gibson, fender, guitar Watssapp me 0737886874 Amp is based in Durban ...
It looks like a Gibson. but it’s another Epiphone — the Epiphone Les Paul Special II. This is the other iconic shape in electric guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, and Epiphone make the budget-priced version with this one listed at $170. In another blog we’ll explain the primary differences between Gibson and Fender guitars. For now, just know it’s like an Apple versus Windows kind of debate. Really.

The first type of distortion pedals were fuzz boxes. They produced a distorted tone that allowed guitar players to play singing leads. Like the name says, the tone was more "fuzz" than tube distortion, sounding like a damaged speaker cone. Still, fuzz pedals can be heard on countless recordings from the 60's (think of the opening guitar riff in the Rolling Stone's I Can't Get No Satisfaction or just about any of Jimi Hendrix's riffs.) Fuzz pedals remain popular today. 

For practice, tone, playback and recording the Cube series is hard to beat. Integrates with iDevices for playing along with music and gives you all the effects and amp sounds you need in one place. The Roland CUBE-10GX Guitar Amplifier Combo is super lightweight and compact making it a great practice amp for home or studio use. If you're in need of a bass amp, the Roland Cube 20XL Bass Guitar Amplifier is a great solution too.
These guitars work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Semi-hollowbodies are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, ’60s pop and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes, though these can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B.B. King's famous Lucille.
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