Gretsch re-emerges with this awesome rex acoustic-like electric guitar that defines quality and perfection in terms of style and elegance. Te Jim Dandy Flat Top G9500 is one of the Gretsch best electric guitars which effectively brings back the quality and sound that characterize one of their most famous guitars throughout the 30’s, 40’s and the 50’s era.

The idea behind this site is to share my experience with Do It Yourself approach to guitars, amplifiers and pedals. Whether you want to save a couple of bucks by performing a mod or upgrade yourself instead of paying a tech, or want to build your own piece of gear from scratch, I'm sure you will find something interesting here. Also, this is the home of DIY Layout Creator, a free piece of software for drawing circuit layouts and schematics, written with DIY enthusiasts in mind.
What is it about the Japanese and the Ventures? I mean, I cut my teeth with the Ventures. They were the perfect band to learn guitar from. The Ventures took songs with often complex harmonic structures—like the wonderful Johnny Smith classic—and stripped them down to their basic melodies, gave them a simple rock groove, and played them clean. I had the sheet music to Smith’s song, but there was no way in you know where I was gong to play off that. But follow along with the Ventures’ single? You bet!
High-end builders of today have gone back to germanium en masse for their classic fuzz tones, and most of them test their transistors to sort out the few that will do the job correctly. They put them in anything from vintage-style units—like Fulltone’s ’69, Frantone’s The Sweet, and Roger Mayer’s Classic Fuzz—to way-out updates of the breed—such as Z.Vex’s Fuzz Factory.
The guitar sports an AAA flame maple top on a three-piece mahogany body, whose Translucent Black finish was picked by the man in the top hat himself. The iconic Firebird pickguard sits prominently on the axe, but this one features Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” logo. The mahogany neck comes in a custom profile, too, which is rounded but slim enough for searing fretwork. A pau ferro fingerboard with trapezoid pearl inlays completes the cosmetic concerns on the axe.
It also includes a -6dB/oct low-pass filter that’s built into the plugin’s tube/valve modeling equation, and can imitate a lower-quality tube triode.  There’s a switchable output saturation stage, which can be used to overdrive the output signal and all the standard Voxengo plugin features, such as full multi-channel operation, channel routing and built-in oversampling. It’s great for guitars and for dirtying up sounds such as vocals, drums or synths.
Marshall Chess assembled in his words "the hottest, most avant garde rock guys in Chicago" for the album sessions consisting of Pete Cosey (lead guitar, later with Miles Davis) Phil Upchurch and Roland Faulkner (rhythm guitar), Louis Satterfield (bass) Gene Barge (tenor sax), Charles Stepney (organs) and Morris Jennings (drums). Since Muddy wasn't as accustomed to this style, he only contributed vocals, but he still played an essential part in this recording. Electric Mud (1968) was mostly recorded in live takes with few overdubs and that off-the-cuff live feel that's captured on it makes it stronger. On the opener, "I Just Want To Make Love to You," pounding drums and Cosey firing out raw screaming guitar grabs your ear with Muddy's confident singing pushing the music along. The solo on this song is nothing short of phenomenal. The guitar starts playing some distorted melodic notes then morphs into this gigantic screeching feedback riff becoming louder and wilder then continues to morph from a tearing solo until it reaches this intense mind-bending groove that sounds on the brink of collapse. At this point, the guitar cuts out, leaving you breathless, with just drums and Muddy's voice building up back to the verse, then with an out-of-your-mind guitar and organ playing off each other to the end. The next song, "Hoochie Coochie Man," begins with an incoming guitar sound and has the opposite feel of the last track. Muddy's vocals seemingly come out of the speakers at you as alternating lines come from the left and then right, giving the listener a disorienting acid-like effect. A liquidy sounding guitar that washes over like a wave accompanies the verse and changes into an expressive wah-wah lead on the chorus. There's a great, fun cover of "Let's Spend The Night Together" which the Stones must have taken as a huge compliment, having their idol cover one of their songs. Muddy and the band turn it, around making it appear like he wrote it with a big mean sounding back melody, soulful distorted guitar lines and Muddy's commanding voice sounding the way he might have sung in a club in Chicago. "She's Alright" has a trippy beginning with bass notes fluttering up then swaying back down to open up to smash your head against the wall along with crashing cymbals matched by a dirty guitar that has real spirit to it. The song makes great use of cross-overs with a screeching guitar bouncing back and forth between speakers and then somehow transforms and ends with a pleasant distorted instrumental version of "My Girl." Original material was also written for this record like "Tom Cat" and "Herbert Harper's Free Press News," with the latter as a vaguely topical song about the sixties with lines like "world is moving much too fast" and "where ya gonna run to, where ya gonna hide" and a fuzzed out guitar that parallels the confusion and outrage of the lyrics. "The Same Thing" closes Electric Mud with a slow heavy blues feel to it and a stretched out, aching guitar on top.
My epi is very nice (Almost like a gibson for 1/3 of a gibson price) and obviously, my Jackson is far superior than my other guitars. But I'm just have mid end ibanez guitars and they are very good guitars. The high end ibanez are awesome and worth less than high ends of other brands in most cases having with the same quality (or superior in very cases).
For strumming, I've recently been using Virtual Guitarist Iron. They have a lot of similar strum types in each preset, but different enough that you can switch between them and it almost sounds like a real guitarist if you time it right and it is easy to use. They do a power chord type of strum. I also find if you run them through something like Guitar Rig, they sound a lot better also. 

Whereas tube amps are the traditional, solid-state amplifiers represent the modern guitar amplifier (even though they have been around for decades). While some guitarists refuse to consider solid-state amps worthy of their time, models such as the Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus are proof that solid-state amplification is not only capable, but preferable in some cases. This high-end amp offers 120 watts of power, professional-grade tone and awesome versatility. It’s a good reflection of this segment, which offers endless versatility with affordable prices, low maintenance and incredible reliability.

The Chapman ML2's classic, single-cut body, two chrome-plated humbuckers and a black pennant headstock that’s not a million miles away from Gibson’s Les Paul. But appearances can be deceptive: this instrument is a very different beast. Chapman pegs its weight at a relatively svelte 3.5kg, so it’s unlikely to see you turning over your salary to the chiropractor. It’s also heavily contoured with its cutaway and heel carved for easy access to the upper frets. It has a modern, satin-smooth C-profile neck, hewn from maple (another deviation from the LP blueprint) and glued neatly to the body. The 25" scale lends it a unique feel - and with 24 jumbo nickel frets, the ML2 Modern is hugely shreddable. Both pickups feature an Alnico V magnet at the heart (think tight low-end, brightness, a little less on the mids), but with a coil-split, accessed by pulling up on the master tone pot, you can split the signal of these humbuckers for some single-coil snap and sizzle. The ML2 Modern makes a good claim on being all things to all guitarists. With coils split or not, we love its tone. That bridge ’bucker really sings with some gain. While the neck pickup is a great ‘rhythm’ humbucker - articulate and dynamic. Whether you find the modernity in its versatility, or in a feel that’s more Jackson than Gibson, the ML2 Modern sure lives up to its name.


Absolutely love this guitar!! One great instrument for a great price. Ordering was easy and delivered before projected date. I am no professional by any means, but as I've progressed, I wanted a guitar I could grow with and play for years to come. This is it!! I've played a lot of acoustics ranging from Gibson to Taylor but absolutely love this Martin. The action is like butter and coming from the Martin collection, the sound and tone is at a minimum of FANTASTIC!! If you are looking for an outstanding piece of musical magic to add to your collection, or something to purchase to have for a lifetime without spending your life savings to obtain it, this is the one you are looking for.
The electric guitar was at the heart of popular music for the new generation. Fender released the Telecaster – the first mass produced solid body electric which made it possible for the average Joe to buy a guitar and start a band to express themselves.  With amplifiers and solid body electrics the volume could be cranked and every bit of emotion displayed through the music.
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And while he'd heard its calling, Swank didn't move into the field until death arrived at the music shop where he was working. The resident guitar repairman suffered an aortic aneurysm and died. "It was terrible," Swank says. "He was a good friend of mine, but he still had a bunch of stuff in his shop." But Swank was able to step in and finish some of those jobs, and then more jobs began pouring in. The next thing he knew he had built a reputation for himself. "I'm a [guitar] player. I know how I like things to work, how instruments should play."
In Part 4 of Gibson’s Effects Explained series we’re going to look at modulation effects. This group includes phasing, flanging, chorus, vibrato and tremolo, rotary speaker effects, and octave dividers, the latter of which I have loosely grouped in here because … well, they don’t fit in overdrive or delay, do they? Later analog versions of the first three of these—phasing, flanging, and chorus—do, as a matter of fact, use much of the same technology as echo and delay units, although with chips having shorter delay times, but it makes sense to include them here because their obvious sonic characteristics are of a type with other units made from very different kinds of circuits. Most such effects were developed in an effort to add depth, dimension and movement to the guitar’s natural sound without necessarily distorting it, strictly speaking. A few noteworthy types also developed from effects that were in use on the electronic organ. This is another big category, so we’ll split it into two chunks.

An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.


Great info. I found an interesting connection when researching a recently-acquired Intermark Cipher, as it's said here to be a Teisco, yet it bears a close resemblance to a model of Pleasant, which was credited to the obscure Shinko Musical Company. I wish i could post pics, but essentially, both have the Teisco-like headstock, identical pickups with off-white covers and square pegs, body shape is virtually identical except for the upper cutaway having a slightly different contour, the Pleasant having one more pickup and larger pickguard, both having switches above the pickups. I came upon a drowinginguitars video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-vhvYBy6os) describing in the video description how Kawai (-Teisco?) bought the "Pleasant Guitar Co." (Shinko?). This video isn't the model I have, my Cipher resembles the Pleasant sel-220.

Most guitars will benefit from an annual setup, and instruments that are kept in less than ideal climate conditions (or that are on the road a lot) may need two per year. I’ll evaluate your guitar and make a recommendation. Setups may include truss rod lubrication and adjustment, saddle lowering to adjust action, nut slot adjustments, cleaning of grimy frets and fretboard, lubricating and tightening of tuners, and checking electronics and batteries. Price is based on what your guitar needs. The price range is for labor and does not include parts costs such as strings and bone nut and saddle blanks.
The key feature that makes the GT-1000 stand out from the crowd is the inclusion of the ingenious AIRD (Augmented Impulse Response Dynamics) technology which ensures your effects respond correctly with the likes of tube amps and don’t muddy your sound. You can read more about the AIRD technology here, but in a nutshell, it ensures the dynamics of your unique amp are preserved. With other multi effects, you might find have to turn your amp emulations off if you want your effects to respond correctly to YOUR amp, but with the GT-1000 you won’t have to do that as you can select which type of amp you’re playing with and the pedal will respond correctly.
Response to the Marshall DSL1HR is overwhelmingly positive, with users praising it for its practicality and great tone. Most describe its tone as being true to the Marshall sound, while others use words like fierce and killer. A lot of bedroom rockers appreciate the amp's 1W and 0.1W switchable power rating, and complements it for being pedal friendly. Portability is also what prompted many users to get this amp.
We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.

The smallest Taylor guitar available. The Baby Taylor series has been hailed for its easy-to-transport size and affordability. Features include sapele laminate back and sides with an optional Sitka spruce (identified as a BT1) or mahogany top (identified as a BT2). A larger bodied option is also available called the “Big Baby” (BBT introduced in 2002), which is a 15/16-size dreadnought with a neck that is standard scale (25-1/2”) and narrow width (1-11/16”). The Big Baby however only comes with a Sitka spruce top.
Also, a quick note on the topic of high pass filters: use them. They can be your best friend, but be careful as they're a double-edged sword. HP filters can quickly clean mud from your mix and open things up, but too much can lead to a thin, weak-sounding mix equally as quick. When applying them, I like to come from the top down, as I find that easier to dial in properly. By that, I mean instead of rolling up an HP filter and listening until I think it's removed what I'm looking for, I start way above with "too much" HP filtering and roll it down until I feel that I have all the information on the bottom I need. I find it easier to hear the effect this way, which therefore allows me to more accurately and effectively control my low end.

With this in mind, rather than taking the category chronologically, let’s accept our good fortune in today having all of history’s distortion sounds at our fingertips—so next time out, we’ll look first at those which transform the guitar and amp’s natural tone least, working toward those which balls it up most. In other words, from the least synthetic to the most synthetic-sounding of the genre.
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.

Smaller combo amps may be easier to transport and set up than using separate amplifier and speaker units, and as such, they are a popular choice for many bass players. Bass players in quieter, more acoustic genres (e.g., jazz quartets which play in a wine bar or a folk music group which plays in a coffeehouse) may be able to use smaller, more modestly powered combo amps. Bassists who play in genres more associated with a high stage volume (e.g., hard rock or electric blues) may tend to use, larger, more powerful (in wattage) combo amps. While a gigging musician will typically only bring one combo amp to a show or recording session, some bassists in major touring bands have two or more combo amps on stage, with an "A/B" switching pedal used to select different amplifiers. In this way, a bassist could have a vintage tube combo amp and a modern solid state amp, and then switch between them to select a different tone for different songs.

As with most chords in this list, a clear G major chord depends on curling your first finger so the open fourth string rings clearly. Strum all six strings. Sometimes, it makes sense to play a G major chord using your third finger on the sixth string, your second finger on the fifth string, and your fourth (pinky) finger on the first string. This fingering makes the move to a C major chord much easier.


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Gibson ES-335 Figured Electric Guitar The Gibson ES-335 thinline archtop semi-acoustic electric guitar is a popular choice among blues, rock and jazz musicians because of its warm tone and near-zero feedback. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured model features a thermally engineered chambered maple center block, a hand-wired MTC Premiere control assembly, an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles and all-new MHS II humbucking pickups.
I sold my Yamaha Pacifica 12 and have been trying to find out more about the Italia Rimini 12, the Schecter TSH-12 Classic(which is the new version and I only saw 2 -both sold) and the Eastwood Sidejack 12. I have the money, but finding anything but the Eastwood online, is rather difficult. I still would like to try them out before buying, if I could.
the switch is to change pickups and the knobs are for volume and tone. u only need to mess with them if u want to change the sound of the guitar for various songs or styles of music. to tune the guitar u use the tuning pegs on the headstock (at the end of the neck). u need to tune it if it gets out of tune and make sure u replace the strings fairly often especially if u get a nice guitar like a les paul. old strings get tighter and can pull the neck and make it bow forward making it harder to push the strings down to the frets.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red
Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.

To capture aggressive, distorted guitar sounds, my studio partner Bart Thurber likes to use two mics in an XY configuration on a single speaker: a Shure SM57 aimed at the middle of the speaker and a Sennheiser 441 (with the high-end boost switch engaged) pointed at the edge of the cone. The SM57's signal is sent to a compressor, and the two mic signals are then mixed together and recorded to one track. This technique provides some compression for the harshest high frequencies and strong, midrange volume peaks picked up by the SM57, while simultaneously delivering full highs and lows through the 441.

If you know what you are doing setting them up, it might not be your main guitar, but if you've ever had a guitar fail on you in front of a large crowd and you need to pick another real fast (Before the solo) for the money they beat any other guit, I've had that is not top of the line and they can really take a beating and stay in tune and super easy to work on.


Masacre takes a great deal of my time, but in normal days I am also a guitar teacher in my hometown, Medellin. I counsel young rock bands as well, with the purpose of sharing my knowledge and experience with those who start in this road. I've been part of the selecting jury at several local rock festivals and when I am available and things work out, I join some of my friends and put together tribute bands to play at local clubs, paying homage to those bands that inspired us since childhood, such as Black Sabbath, Kiss, Ozzy Osbourne, Dio, and others.
So far so obvious, right? But what's easy to miss is that this same scale shape also gives you A major and D major - they are the same chord shape, just starting on different strings. Now it's true that they're not quite the same physical shape, but that's just because of the funny little tuning 'kink' between the G and B strings (See Why is the guitar tuned like it is?). Once you iron that out, E, A and D are the same shape, as are the barre F and B chords.
The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
2. You have me to help you out! I’ve sorted through a bunch of the top acoustic-electric guitars and come up with a list of what I think are five of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000. I’ve been playing for almost 30 years, so I know a little bit about guitars. But just in case you don’t believe me, check around for yourself. Every one of these instruments is highly rated and top quality.
The original dreadnought shape was launched by CF Martin, one of the big names in acoustic guitars, and was named after an old English warship. It features rounded shoulders, and the neck typically joins the body around the 14th fret. The dreadnought strikes the most even balance between volume, size and ease of playing, and for this reason it has been used by just about every big-named player you can think of.
The original switch configuration used from 1950 to 1952 allowed selection of neck pickup with treble tone cut in the first position (for a bassier sound), the neck pickup with its natural tone in the second position with no tone, and in the third switch position both pickups together with the neck pickup blended into the bridge, depending on the position of the second “tone” knob. The first knob functioned normally as a master volume control. This configuration did not have a true tone control knob.[2]
I spoke with Matt “M@” Picone, of Fractal Audio, about the increasing use of modelers for today’s biggest acts. Their flagship modeler, the Axe-FX II XL+, is used by bands as diverse as U2, King Crimson, and Taylor Swift. Increasing numbers of top-level guitarists are discovering Fractal’s dozens of effects/amps/cab/microphone models and the obsessive tweakability inherent in their designs. In the credits of Fractal’s products, Matt Picone is listed alongside Cliff Chase, the company’s founder, president and DSP/Hardware engineer, as contributing to “everything else.” He says that title suits him because it spans a range of duties including support, artist relations, brand development, sales, marketing, PR, sound design, docs & manuals, e-commerce, business development, infrastructure and much more. Their products are not just for ultra rock stars, as Matt explains:
New from Stewart-MacDonald are guitar wiring kits with the premium brand pots, switches, jacks, capacitors and cloth wiring used in original Gibson Les Paul and SG guitars. The kits make it easy to order top-quality components for wiring or re-wiring a 4-control / 2-pickup guitar with a 3-way switch. The kit components include Switchcraft toggle […]

Back in the control room, audition each mic, preferably as the guitarist plays along with the other instruments. Listen carefully to how each microphone sounds on its own and, more importantly, to how it works in the mix. Usually, one microphone will come up a winner on the first pass. Don't stop there, however. Instead, leave the "winning" microphone where it is and experiment with the placement of the other two mics. Time-and mic selection-permitting, you may also wish to do a second round of testing with other microphones.


Let’s start off with a real classic for a classic player! This Fenders vintage modified style Strat hss has captured the happy way of the 50’s, available in Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red and it’s a guitar that just makes your life a litter bit more worth living. The design is very much like the 1950’s electric guitars, from the soft V-shaped neck, maple fretboard and 8-hole pickguard down to the smaller things, like the knobs and the switch tip- everything just brings us back!
But Harmony produced a lot of instruments other than guitars: ukuleles, banjos, mandolins, violins etc; the company was proud of it's history, proudly American, and as proud of its skilled workforce, as it's use of modern technology "We've produced millions of instruments but we make them one at a time". This long history of instrument manufacture explains why Harmony had the expertise to produce so many well-built acoustic and hollow-body electric instruments; guitars like the Meteor and Rocket were very well received. They were slow, however, in committing to the solid body market; although they released the H44 Stratotone neck-through solid body in 1952, it was gone by 1957, and there were only hollow bodies until the release of the Silhouette in 1963.

Another strong point of this guitar is its African mahogany neck that has a close to standard scale length of 25.3", making this instrument very easy to transition to when coming from regular sized guitars. Also noteworthy is its innovative split bone saddle, which allows for better intonation. Finally, the CT4B preamp gives you 3-band EQ, a volume control and a nifty built-in tuner Artists that play Takamine guitars include John Scofield, Bruce Springsteen and Bruno Mars! This is a great buy if you are looking for a premium couch & travel friendly acoustic guitar that does not cost an arm and a leg.
as cool as it sounds to say that robert johnson has influenced everyone since him, directly or indirectly, is just nonsense. sure he was a legend in his own right; but a lot of that has to do with his life being shrouded in mystery. yes, he has influenced some players, way back when, but there were so many more players influenced by electric blues; chicago and texas blues, not delta blues. i understand he was somewhat of an innovator, and that is very important, but i think so called ‘music critics’ have over-blown it a bit in the reverence department for fear of being labeled un-hip. dave marsh, the ‘rolling stone’ critic is a perfect example. he claims johnson as one of the most gifted players of all time. but he dislikes david lee roth, singer in ‘van halen’, so right away edward van halen, guitarist in that group is marginalized with: “the basic 12 bar-blues on the louie-louie thump theme” to describe his playing. lol. to sum it up, whenever a critic uses the phrase ’12 bar blues’, you can pretty much assume he has no clue about what he talking about….best wishes.
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.
Right-handed players use the fingers of the right hand to pluck the strings, with the thumb plucking from the top of a string downwards (downstroke) and the other fingers plucking from the bottom of string upwards (upstroke). The little finger in classical technique as it evolved in the 20th century is used only to ride along with the ring finger without striking the strings and to thus physiologically facilitate the ring finger's motion.

This is a guitar tuning and style of playing on the Classical Guitar that has been developed by Ian Low. It was recently publicized in the form of a series of videos posted onto his YouTube channel on 14 July 2016. The 6 strings are tuned to F, G, C, E, C# and C using the standard guitar strings EADGBE strings to allow a different style of harmonic playing.

This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.
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If you’re a guitarist, chances are you’ve either owned or at least played on a Zoom multi-effects pedal. It’s basically an unwritten law! They have always and continue to make some of the best multi effects pedals known to the musical world, so naturally we had to include the Zoom G3n Multi-Effects Processor (as well as a handful of other Zoom models) in this list.
Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.
I wonder if this list shouldn’t be renamed as Best Electric Guitar Brands, since there does seem to be a strong focus on electric guitars in this list. Yamaha does make a very good line of acoustic guitars, and Ibanez and Epiphone also manufacture acoustic guitars, and the Gibson Hummingbird would make any top 10 list of acoustic, but it’s the only one on this list that seems world class for an acoustic manufacturere(other manufacturers on the list may also make acoustics, but I’m not familiar with them) I doubt if they would be considered the best guitars or the most highly respected brands.
The Last of Us™ has been rebuilt for the PlayStation®4 system. Now features full 1080p, higher-resolution character models, improved shadows and lighting, in addition to several other gameplay improvements. 20 years after a pandemic has radically changed known civilization, infected humans run wild and survivors are killing each other for food, weapons and whatever they can get their hands on. Joel, a violent survivor, is hired to smuggle a 14-year-old girl, Ellie, out of an oppressive military quarantine zone, but what starts as a small job soon transforms into a brutal journey across the U.S. The Last of Us Remastered includes the Abandoned Territories map pack, Reclaimed Territories map pack, and the critically acclaimed The Last of Us: Left Behind single-player campaign that combines themes of survival, loyalty, and love with tense, survival-action gameplay.
I think that a good EQ in the loop is awesome. If you find an amp that has a great overall sound, but you wish that it was a bit brighter, darker, etc, but you find that you loose the character of the distortion when you get the tone you like you can play with both EQs to have a lot of controll over the final sound. It won't make up for a crap amp, but it can make a great amp a whole world of awesome.
Shop our selection of guitar and bass electronics parts and supplies. Everything you need to to finish your guitar electronics project like a pro. Volume and tone pots, pickup selectors and mini switches, jacks, tone capacitors, wire, solder, shielding and more. Get the full potential from your guitar's pickups with the finest quality guitar electronic parts from top manufacturers like: CTS, Bourns, Fender, Switchcraft, CRL, and more. 
At the higher end of the market, you will definitely want to consider theGibson Memphis ES Les Paul Studio. A stunning marriage of the ES hollowbody and Les Paul solidbody shapes, this is a model that combines playability, power, sustain and tonal warmth to perfection. Equipped with ’57 Classic and Super ’57 Classic pickups and boasting solid construction throughout, the ES-Les Paul Studio is perfect for anything and everything you could imagine. Each model is supplied with a Gibson Memphis hardshell case to get you out and about in style.
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-15 JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit gives you the ultimate shredder guitar. Originally designed by Steve Vai, this style is built for speed. Innovative features like a Monkey Grip Handle and Floyd Rose Tremolo complete the unique design. All the parts needed for a finished guitar are included. This guitar kit is suitable for the aspiring or established luthier and all guitar players. A truss rod adjustment hex wrench, two Floyd Rose tremolo adjustment hex wrenches and solder are included. You will need a phillips head screwdriver and a soldering iron to fully assemble the guitar. A pack of six nickel alloy strings and a right-angle guitar cable are also included.With your purchase, you will receive one DIY JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit pictured and described above.
Dobro also sold a Dobro amplifier to accompany the Dobro All-Electric. The first Dobro amp had a large cabinet made by Bulwin of Los Angeles. The grillcover was a smaller version of the typical guitar resonator cover, provided by Rickenbacker. This had five tubes and an 8″ Lansing field coil speaker. The Lansing was probably a matter of convenience because the company was located down the street from Dobro. The rectifier tube was an 80 and the output tubes were two 42s. These apparently had two inputs, volume and an on/off switch. The chassis on these amps were supposed to have been made by Dobro itself, but more than likely they were sent out to some local L.A. radio manufacturers and assembled at Dobro.
The quarter-sawn mahogany neck has a rounded “C” neck shape and it’s topped with a smooth 22-fret A-grade dark rosewood fretboard with small block pearloid inlays. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured also features an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles for added sustain and clarity and Memphis Historic Spec II humbuckers. In addition, this classic axe now has MTC Premiere Controls.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.

We're proud to say that our best assets at Guitar Center Forth Worth are our people. When you come in for a visit, you'll find that our staff aren't just friendly folk - they're also experienced musicians. We know our way around all our new and used instruments and accessories, which is why we've earned the trust of Texan guitar slingers from the famous to the casual. If you're into percussion, you'll also love our impressive vintage drum collection here at Cowtown. Drop by for a face-to-face chat about all we can do for you, or feel free to give us a call at 817-423-3800.
You want a guitar that isn't going to fight you - If you're a smaller person, you'll want a guitar with a smaller body. And if you have particularly small hands, it might be worth looking into a 3/4-size guitar to start out. The way the guitar looks is going to matter a fair bit as well. If it doesn't look good, you aren't going to be as inspired to pick it up and practice.
Acoustically I own a Martin for the living room. Best sound but I won't let it leave the house. (Taylor people are so defensive, but lets face it Martin owners never have to say "Oh it sounds just like/as good as a Taylor") I own an Ovation, the thing is bullet proof, a little thin on sound but can take it anywhere. If I plug it in, it has amazing electronics and sounds 10X better. I own an Ibenez exotic wood, pretty but a stiff box that just does not resonate, hate it.
Based out of Scottsdale, Arizona, Fender offers a few levels of quality of guitar, depending on where they’re made. Their high-end models are all made in the United States — as is designated on the headstock — while their less expensive models are made in Mexico. Most Fender guitars feature single coil pick-ups, lending to a very distinct bluesy sound with more twang and less punch than a humbucking guitar.
The hollow body electric guitar rose to prominence when Gibson introduced the ES-150 back in 1936. Fully hollow body electric guitars (sometimes referred to as “Jazz Box” guitars) tend to have arched tops and large, deep bodies that allow the sound to fully resonate to produce an incredible full-bodied voice with amazing projection and depth. Jazz players and blues players really love the sound fully hollow guitars deliver. While the classic, larger-bodied fully hollow electric guitars definitely still exist, there are also a substantial amount of thinline fully hollow body electric guitars that guitar players may find to be more comfortable. Guitar brands such as Gibson, Gretsch, Ibanez, D’Angelico, Guild, and Epiphone provide guitar players with a fantastic array of fully hollow body electric guitars.
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