The brand’s biggest boom through the fifties and sixties was largely down to the birth of rock n’ roll. Thanks to their excellent hollow and semi-hollow models, Gretsch guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender's Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.
I also didn’t mention a tuner, but that’s because a tuner really isn’t an effect. If you use one, the ideal location is in the very front of the signal chain right after the guitar as you don’t want the signal going into the tuner processed by any effects that might affect the tuner’s accuracy. Even better, get a loop switcher with a separate tuner output that keeps the tuner entirely out of the signal chain until you need to use it and that will mute the signal so the audience doesn’t need to suffer while you make adjustments.
Many of the modulation type effects pedals are made to approximate some aspect of the original rotating speaker.  That’s correct, you heard right.  The Leslie Cabinet was made as a companion to the Hammond B3 Organ and literally had a rotary speaker that could produce all of the common modulation effects depending on the speed setting.  Many companies now offer digital pedal versions that mimic the Leslie sound very well, so lugging around a huge speaker cabinet isn’t necessary, unless you are a purist or have a crew of roadies available.
Now we switch gears to a company called Unicord, which was owned by Sid Hack. At some point in the early ’60s (probably in around ’64), Unicord purchased the Amplifier Corporation of America (ACA) which was located in Westbury, New York, a northern suburb of New York City. ACA made Haynes guitar amplifiers and an early distortion device powered by batteries.
If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 
This effect gives a guitar that ska/reggae sound. It works by varying the cutoff frequency of a low-pass or bandpass filter (the same filter that's in a Wah-Wah effect, hence the Envelope Filter is also called an Auto-Wah) using an envelope follower which watches the signal for amplitude changes. So it wahs your attack, and then gives less and less wah as the signal attenuates. So the sound has a crunchier attack and the tone is very sensitive to varying dynamics.
Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.
1966 Yamaha FG180 Nippon Gakki Japan crafted over 50 years ago early RARE light GREEN LABEL in top vintage condition WoW Now at JVGuitars we are very proud to present such a SWEET and RARE FIND folks... This is an excellent example of the Japanese Vintage Yamaha FG180 is from 1966 Folks that right an oldie but a real goodie for for sure she is about 51 years old and as you can clearly see from our high resolution pictures it has been very nicely taken care of for over 5 decades just for you today thats AMAZING!!! WoW She's one of the very first of the highly sought after original first FG180 run with its light green label FG180 prototype to the later 1970's FG180 Red Label, She's HERE NOW at JVGuitars its been Pro set up and polishing and is all round vintage excellent condition no cracks no issues no warps no pulling no funny business from what I see and thats a lot of guitars this guitar is far above average for such a vintage piece. she's in top playing condition and the cosmetics are very good as well with natural play wear and patina of such a well loved guitar. Here are the General Specifications Scale Length 650mm (25 9/16") Body Length 505mm (19 7/8") Total Length 1038mm (40 7/8") Body Width 412mm (16 3/16") Body Depth 100 - 118mm (3 15/16" - 4 5/8") Nut Width 44mm (1 3/4") Top Material Sitka Spruce Back Material Mahogany Side Material Mahogany Neck Material Mahogany Fingerboard Material Rosewood Fingerboard Radius R400mm (15 3/4") Bridge Material Rosewood Nut Material Urea Saddle Material Urea Bridge Pins Black ABS Tuners Open Gear (Chrome) Body Binding Rosewood + Cream + Black Soundhole Inlay White + Cream + Black Pickguard Black Body Finish Gloss Neck Finish Gloss Color Natural Case FREE Original Marigold lined Semi hard Chipboard case. This Rare FG180 has been treated with care and respect and love for 5 decades and someone is going to be very pleased in deed. To purchase this rare beauty. contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com quality .
This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970s. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970s. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.
The Telecaster is known for its ability to produce both bright, rich, cutting tone (the typical telecaster twang) or mellow, warm, bluesy tone depending on the selected pickup, respectively “bridge” pickup or “neck” pickup. The bridge pickup has more windings than the neck pickup, hence producing higher output, which compensates for a lower amplitude of vibration of the strings at bridge position. At the same time, a capacitor between the slider of the volume control and the output, allows treble sounds to bleed through while damping mid and lower ranges.[3] A slanted bridge pickup enhances the guitar’s treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings’ tone. This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. These characteristics make the Telecaster a versatile guitar, usable for most styles of music including country, blues, rock, and jazz.
Usual general wear. Some noticeable impression marks on face. Piece of decorative trim missing from headstock. Plays but Action is high. Neck truss needs adjusting. There is a slight buzz with action as it is (sounds like it's from bridge area). Frets look good. Not perfect but a classic in good condition in need of a little tune up. SOLD AS IS. Ships wrapped and secured inside a Road Runner hard shell case which itself will be plastic wrapped. Ships Priority from Alaska.
Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.
Our 4 yr old grandson picked this guitar out and we purchased it for him as his Christmas present, he absolutely loves it. His dad has been teaching him to play it and he said that you can actually plug the guitar into his amp instead of the one that came with it. Our grandson will most certainly grow into this guitar and will get many hours of playtime with this guitar.

Seagull Maritime The Seagull Maritime acoustic guitars are made of all-solid tonewoods, making them a great option for those looking for the best acoustic guitar with a full sound. The top is made from pressure-tested solid spruce while the sides are made of solid mahogany wood for a well-balanced tone. The craftsmanship is superb and it has the sound quality to match.


Versatile- many of the practice amps today have “AUX” (Auxiliary) inputs for your electronic music devices like your iPod, phone, or tablet computer. This is essential for learning songs because you can pipe your song from your device into your practice amp and play along either out loud or with your headphones in private. With so many music apps out today for iPhones and Android devices, you can also connect the headphone jack of your practice amp to your personal device to learn new songs and/or record your performance! Check out Ultimate Guitar Web on Google Chrome
WARTUNG Herzlichen Glückwunsch und vielen Dank dafür, dass Sie sich für ein Produkt von Ibanez entschieden haben. Ibanez legt bei seinen Produkten die höchsten Standards an. Alle Ibanez- Instrumente werden vor der Auslieferung unserer strengen Qualitätskontrolle unterzogen. In dieser Anleitung wollen wir beschreiben, wie Sie das Äußere Ihres Instruments pflegen und Ihre Gitarre in dem Zustand halten, wie sie bei Auslieferung ab Werk war.
Yamaha is one of those names that you don’t often see outside the realm of keyboards and digital pianos. While their footholds in fairly limited on the stringed instruments market, their quality is well known. Yamaha builds some of the most balanced and best performing electric guitars in their respective categories. That is simple the truth. Now, they might not be as popular as other brands, but that is a whole different story.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.

In the mid-1950s, guitar distortion sounds started to evolve based on sounds created earlier in the decade by accidental damage to amps, such as in the popular early recording of the 1951 Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm song "Rocket 88", where guitarist Willie Kizart used a vacuum tube amplifier that had a speaker cone,[12][13] slightly damaged in transport.[14] Rock guitarists began intentionally "doctoring" amplifiers and speakers in order to emulate this form of distortion.[15] In 1956, guitarist Paul Burlison of the Johnny Burnette Trio deliberately dislodged a vacuum tube in his amplifier to record "The Train Kept A-Rollin" after a reviewer raved about the sound Burlison's damaged amplifier produced during a live performance. According to other sources Burlison's amp had a partially broken loudspeaker cone. Pop-oriented producers were horrified by that eerie "two-tone" sound, quite clean on trebles but strongly distorted on basses, but Burnette insisted to publish the sessions, arguing that "that guitar sounds like a nice horn section".[16]


Not the first commercially available flanger pedal, but probably the first that really worked properly with the full sonic depth of the effect, the A/DA Flanger was made possible by the advent of the SAD1024 chip (others were used through its lifetime, depending upon availability). It hit the shelves in 1977, and was shortly followed by Electro-Harmonix’s equally beloved Electric Mistress, and MXR’s big, gray Flanger. Nearly every big maker slapped its own flanger on the butt and sent it toddling down the pike within the next few years. These were serious pedals in their day, the big boys requiring their own regulated onboard AC power stage to run all that thirsty silicon. Most required a serious investment on behalf of the impoverished guitarist, too. A/DA’s unit retailed at $199.95 when introduced, and others went for even more. Not a steal, when you consider that minimum wage was $2.30 an hour in 1977.
The legendary ES-335 is a widely used element in practically every genre imaginable. Often equipped with double humbuckers, the ES-335’s semi-hollow body delivers a warm, woody sound. And when players like Larry Carlton or B.B. King get their hands on one, the sound can be likened closer to silk or butter. Despite being closely associated with blues artists like King, the ES-335 isn’t just a blues guitar. You can find them in the hands of just about anyone in any genre—from rocker Dave Grohl to Latino sensation Trini Lopez.

The first of these guitars was the Slash “Snakepit” Les Paul Standard, which was introduced by the Gibson Custom Shop in 1996. It has a transparent cranberry red finish over a flame maple top, a relief carving of the smoking snake graphic off the cover of Slash’s Snakepit‘s debut album, It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere, hand carved by Bruce J. Kunkel (owner of Kunkel Guitars – kunkelguitars.com), and a mother of pearl inlay of a cobra wrapped up the length of the ebony fretboard. Production was limited to 50, with Slash receiving the first four including the prototype, the only one with the carving on the body turned 90 degrees to be viewed right side up when displayed on a guitar stand. In 1998 Slash’s studio was broken into and his guitars were stolen, including the “Snakepit” prototype, so the Gibson Custom Shop built him a replica. These guitars are by far the rarest and most collectible of any of the Gibson Slash signature guitars, they sold for around $5,000 when new, the Hollywood Guitar Center was asking $20,000 for one in 2002.[citation needed] In 1997, Epiphone released a more affordable version of the “Snakepit” Les Paul, featuring a decal of the smoking snake logo and standard fretboard inlay.[32]


Filters are also great for use on drum loops. One trick I like is to send the drums to a modulated resonant filter set up as a send effect, with a narrow band-pass EQ beforehand. This creates a rather bizarre metallic melody that accompanies your drums. It can get fatiguing if over-used, but brought in at a low level in some sections of a song, it can create plenty of interest, particularly if followed by a modulated delay. Matt Houghton
Distortion pedals is responsible for many of the sounds that you think of when you think ‘electric guitar.’ It’s absolutely classic, and you’ll find that the majority of effects are some flavor of distortion pedal. The results you can get from these stompboxes vary from overdrive-like breakup to smooth melodic power, so it’s important before you take one home that you check for the type of sounds that specific distortion pedal is designed to create. Doing your homework really pays off when it comes to distortion pedals.
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.

OCTAVACIÓN (FAT20) Cada una de las silletas está provista de un tornillo de bloqueo para impedir todo movimiento. Para ajustar la octavación, afloje el tornillo de bloqueo de la silleta con una llave Allen de 2 mm. (D) Para ajustar la octavación, introduzca una llave Allen de 2,5 mm en el tornillo de la silleta situado en la parte posterior del trémolo.
I have an acoustic Decca and a brand new Fender acoustic. Not only is the Decca easier for me to play because I have tiny little doll hands, I think it would hold tune if I threw it out of a moving car. I put both the Fender and the Decca into storage for two years - I just got them out recently. The Fender popped the B string and took a good twenty minutes to tune. The Decca was *STILL* *IN* *TUNE*. Plans have changed; I am selling the Fender and keeping the Decca!
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That's what I'm hoping to address in this post along with clearing some common misconceptions too. The guitar world and community is very big on the vintage thing, and that has filtered down to replacement parts of course too. It is very easy to get lost in the world of 'vintage' style parts making an improvement in tone, so let's cast those notions aside here and look at the facts of why in some cases that's both correct and incorrect. Tim McNelly of McNelly Pickups put it really well in a recent social media post '..New electronics won’t necessarily make your guitar sound any different than it does now. New pots won't NECESSARILY change the tone if you don't know the exact value of the pots coming out..'. I think this is a really great way to put it and a great starting point for this post and discussion (feel free to comment too!).
We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!
The volume knob can act as a boost which can take your guitar from clean sounds for rhythm playing to dirty overdrive tones for soloing. When playing a song keep your volume knob at 6 or 7 when playing chords or verse parts and when it’s time to deliver a rockin’ solo roll up the volume to 10 and you will not only hear a boost of gain (overdrive) but also a volume lift over any other instruments in the song.

A great app for playing and basic editing of general midi files is Sweet Midi Player which includes a lyric viewer for midis with lyrics/chords. You can load one of the General Midi SoundFonts above to greatly improve the sound quality. For Windows PC use the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth to install a new GM SoundFont (Get the latest version 2.1.0 for Windows 10).
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
At first it sounds kind of like a buzzsaw, but after listening to the song, people usually have a hard time getting the catchy riff out of their heads. The best part? It's one of the most fun beginner guitar songs and anyone can play it! The riff is played entirely on one string, the A string and consists of only three notes. Fun fact, the riff was supposed to be a placeholder for a horns section, but they loved the fuzzy guitar tone so much they never got around to the horns.

You don’t need to be the new Bob Dylan of lyrics to write a song. Writing a song with your own lyrics and vocal melody will help you learn how your guitar fits into songs. Phrasing, space, when to play rhythm, when to think about any solo (see 13), chord changes etc. You don’t have to share it. But do it for yourself. It will help you understand songs much better.


If you think not using any pedals makes you more “real” or “natural” of a player, you’ve got to be kidding me. Let’s think about what is physically happening when we play electric guitar. The sound is created when a guitar string is plucked by a pick, likely made from some polymer (oh wait, the “real” guys use their thumb, okay) causing it to vibrate. This vibration also creates a corresponding vibration through a magnetic field above your pickups. The pickup converts this into electric current, which passes through a simple low-pass filter tone circuit and a passive volume attenuator (we presume you’re not using an active pickup, being that you’re keeping it “real”) that does some equalization before it even gets to the cable. The standard cable consists of stranded, >99% oxygen free copper wire usually measuring between 18-24 gauge thickness, creating another filter in conjunction with the guitar circuitry based on cable capacitance.

For example, if the note E (the open sixth string) is played over the A minor chord, then the chord would be [0 0 2 2 1 0]. This has the note E as its lowest tone instead of A. It is often written as Am/E, where the letter following the slash indicates the new bass note. However, in popular music it is usual to play inverted chords on the guitar when they are not part of the harmony, since the bass guitar can play the root pitch.


That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).
This is an American Gibson Les Paul electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This soundfont has the same presets as the Fender Jaguar above (except it does not include the slaps and slides preset) and is also recorded with the volume on the edge of break up on the amp (read the Fender Jaguar above for description of amplifier setting). This guitar is suited to jazz and blues but can easily be used for rock if used with more distortion. It has a very full rounded sound with good sustain and when played harder has a bite to the attack. This guitar is a classic that has been used in alot of types of music.
It depends on what purpose the noise suppressor will fulfill. You may need more than one placement depending on your purpose. If you position it behind the tuner, it will remove any unwanted noise from the guitar signal before it gets modified with the pedals (this is the most common placement). Guitarists also use the noise suppressor or noise gate pedals after an overdrive to cut the riff sharply.
I had a 1984 Jackson Randy Rhoads Custom with a serial # in the low 400′s…that thing would sing on a note with high gain and boost with a TS-808 Tube screamer like a Sustainiac guitar…problem was the bridge was mislocated and it wouldn’t intonate correctly…sent it back…made them replace it with a new guitar (didn’t want plugs in it)…the new one had (ermmm…still has as I still own it) the EXACT same pickups, hardware down to the tuning machines, etc…EVERY single piece of hardware was moved over to the replacement (and in the case of the bridge pickup it is a proven fact as that was/is a retail version of an SH-6 wired for series/single coil/parallel…along with the pickguard with the additional hole for switch)…same types of wood used (3 piece maple neck through construction with poplar wings) yet the replacement has NEVER sung on a note. So what does that say? I have to say that the replacement does sound “better” overall in some intangible way…glassier I guess…longer sustain…yet it REFUSES to go into a sustained feedback loop.
This was my first attempt on building pedal. Now I'm hooked. It was such a joy putting it all together and quite a learning experience. I cannot emphasize on reading/studying the instructions thoroughly. I would rate the included instructions a 10, a 5 STAR. Very clear and easy for a novice pedal builder to understand and walk through. Very well illustrated as well. Take your time as you can easily overlook soldering connections. The main problem I encountered was a shorting problem. The two soldering terminals along each side of the tube socket were located very close to the tube base socket and volume/gain pots. Follow the instructions by running a wire between the volume and gain pots, as well as the tube socket. Once, I've addressed this problem, it was clear sailing from there.
1939: The #1 brace inside near the neck block changes from 5/16" wide to 1/2" wide, making it roughly twice as wide. This happened at the same time as the popscicle brace addition. The neck block thickness was also reduced by 1/4". About the same time neck width reduced from 1 3/4" to 1 11/16" at the nut, and the bridge spacing reduced from 2 5/16" to 2 1/8".

Here we have yet another fine 1971 Yamaha FG75 made in Japan Nippon Gakki Red Label Grand concert like Gibson LGO-1 but sounds better for less New Arrival: Be sure to ask for "Clean Boy" This example is just like our other 71 FG75 Nippon Gakki but this guitar is much cleaner and is JVGuitars rated in very good + condition- Excellent vintage for a 42+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. its one of the nicest we've seen, this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its good action, and it sounds absolutely great... upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins .... for a good volume transfer and superior tone over the old plastic parts,,,, we dressed the frets as well. not a crack anywhere to be found, great vintage patina but no structural damages or abuse or neglect this instrument has been well taken care of as one can tell from its condition and playability ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song Original Specifications: - Year(s) Sold: 1968-1974 - Top: Spruce- Back / Sides: Agathis - Neck: Nato - Fingerboard: Indian Rosewood - Bridge: N/A - Notes: Folk Guitar Classic Type - Upper Bout - 11-1/8” - Waist - 9-5/8"- Lower Bout - 14-5/8" Ok so thats what the official specs are but here is what we se and have seend with 2 other fg75;s we have had, one I had to refinish its back and when sanding off the mahogany finish it was blond flamed maple sides and back,,, as this one surely looks to be just look at that flamed back and sides this example is kind of special looking. She;s got it going on just check her out. Yamaha Nippon Gakki guitars are highly respected at being well made and of great value and after 40+ years this example has stood the test of time and is still a formidable player you can compare its sound to a much more expensive guitars tone they are simply wonders to find one this nice is RARE… get her before she’s gone. Any questions or to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest..
Reverb – The best analogy for reverb effects would be playing your guitar inside a pipe. That’s an extreme level of reverb, of course, and these pedals will allow you to go from there all the way back to subtler effects like the natural reverberation of a concert hall. This effect sounds great with a clean tone, but beware of using it with heavy distortion or else you might lose too much definition from your sound.
The sound blew away guitarists when units first popped up in guitar stores. If the dizzying harmonic swirl didn’t just make you puke, it really sent you tripping. Interestingly, many tired of it a lot quicker than they did the phaser’s subtler, less imposing “swoosh”, and consequently it’s difficult today to name a fraction as many great guitar tracks with flangers slapped all over them as with phasers. For the latter, we’ve got the Stones’s “Shattered” (or just about anything from Some Girls), the Clash’s “Lost in the Supermarket” from London Calling and loads from Sandinista, and heavier rockers from early Van Halen to recent Foo Fighters. In the flanging corner, we’ve got The Pat Travers Band’s “Boom Boom, Out Go The Lights” and… well, I’m sure there’s another somewhere. Okay, maybe the intro lick to Heart’s “Barracuda” redeems it some.

In 2008, Gibson USA released the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, an authentic replica of one of two Les Pauls Slash received from Gibson in 1988. It has an Antique Vintage Sunburst finish over a solid mahogany body with a maple top. Production was limited to 1600.[35] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Inspired By” Les Paul Standard. This guitar is a replica of the 1988 Les Paul Standard and it features a carved three-piece maple top, one-piece mahogany back, and rosewood fingerboard, with a Heritage Cherry Sunburst finish. Two versions were made available—the “Aged by Tom Murphy,” aged to resemble the original guitar (a limited number of these were signed by Slash in gold marker on the back of the headstock), and the “Vintage Original Spec,” created to resemble the guitar as it was when Slash first received it.[32][36]


List of guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
Guitar is well made. Sounds awesome. The overall height of the strings (in relation to the frets) were not bad. However, it needed to be setup. After having the guitar setup at my local shop, it is so much easier to play (don't have to press as hard on the strings). The Guitar gig bag that comes with the bundle offers zero padding. The Tuner works well, however, since the guitar comes with a built-in tuner, you don't need a separate one. I have not used the dvd that came with it. I use a different set of instructional dvds (purchased separately). Overall a great guitar. Definitely recommend it.
4.  Cracked end block because customer used a drill bit meant for steel to enlarge hole for the jack used on an acoustic.  Fix:  This can be tricky.  First you have to assess the damage and that can be challenging.  Some of these miniature cameras work great.  I’ve had success using a point and shoot on a timer to take a snap.  If the crack is small you might be able to use cyano to repair it.  If the end block is cracked all the way through, the back may need to come off and the block replaced… Again, not something you’re going to do on a cheap guitar.   The proper way is to use a step reamer to get the correct sized hole.

The solid body electric guitar was a major design advance introduced by Leo Fender in the early 1950s. The solid body guitar helped remedy the feedback problems of hollowbody instruments. They were also easier to make, which led to mass market production. Fender introduced the iconic Telecaster and Stratocaster. Soon Gibson also introduced their first electric guitars in a partnership with Les Paul to produce what would become the equally iconic Gibson Les Paul.
225 Parsons St, Kalamazoo, MI, 49007 1917–1984 Also located next to railroad tracks, this facility had major expansions in 1945, 1950, and 1960.[83] Various brands were produced there, including Gibson, Epiphone, (1957–1970)[84][85] and Kalamazoo. During the depression of the 1930s, children's toys were produced there, and during WW2 it produced materials to support the war effort in addition to producing guitars.[86] Between 1974 and 1984 Gibson moved its manufacturing out of this facility to Tennessee. Most of this move happened in 1974, leaving only acoustic and some semi-acoustic production for this plant.[87] In 1985, Heritage Guitars began production, renting part of this facility.[88]
It mostly comes in black color. it is a right handed 6 string electric guitar. The body is given a polyurethane finish whereas the neck is given a satin finish. The fret board is composed of 24 frets and has a master white tone. The guitar is relatively affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 15,642. For stage performances, this guitar will give you a nice experience and a classical feel.

Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
Artwork: George Beauchamp's original "frying-pan" electric guitar design from 1934. On the right, you can see a top view of the guitar with the pickup unit shown in dark blue and the pickup coil (green) sitting underneath the six strings (shown in orange). On the left, there's an end-on, cross-section of the pickup unit (looking down from the head of the guitar toward the bridge). You can see that Beauchamp has used a pair of horseshoe magnets, with their north poles (red) and south poles (blue) aligned and the strings threading between them. The pickup sits between the magnets under the strings. From US Patent 2,089,171: Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument by George Beauchamp (filed June 2, 1934, issued August 10, 1937). Artwork courtesy of US Patent and Trademark Office.
Some acoustic guitars, regardless of the body style, feature a cutaway in the upper bout to allow players to more easily reach the higher frets on the guitar neck. Phil Keaggy, a prolific and highly celebrated American guitarist, usually uses an acoustic guitar with a cutaway. If you plan to play leads on your acoustic, or are used to playing an electric guitar, you may prefer a guitar body with a cutaway.
When someone says: "I've got a Gibson Les Paul with Bare Knuckle Pickups" I tend to think well, you don't really have a "Gibson" Les Paul at all then, because you've removed the elements of the guitar that make it sound like a Gibson. But guitarists are a conservative bunch and tend to hold on to their beliefs, biases, and myths. I've not long managed to let go of mine and it's made me happier with the guitars I now have, and has saved me a lot of money!
The Wave is a versatile stand-alone, tube driven analog spring reverb unit kit. It can be used in front of your guitar amp or as a line-level analog reverb effect for the recording studio. Two controls allow you to serve up a wide range of wetness from just a touch to over the top psychedelia. The "dwell" control adjusts the input signal level driving the tank and the "reverb" control adjusts the level of output reverberations from the tank.
I have a similar guitar to the one you bought. It was my grandmothers and I'm estimating it at over 30 years old. Very folk style. She told me she actually had the original strings from when she bought it! I believed her when i tuned the thing and the day after found that the 4th and 6th had snapped. From what i know, Decca just made guitars around that time, 60's to 70's. Mine says it has a steel reinforced neck and it is really heavy compared to others. its still in really good shape and I actually play it. I'm not planning on selling it but I know its well worth its age. It has a hand chissled Ser. # on the bridge.
Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
In late 2013, it was announced that Absara Audio of Port Jefferson Station, New York, had purchased the rights to the Supro trademark from noted electronic engineer Bruce Zinky.[7] Zinky himself had used the Supro name for a series of amps beginning in 2005 from his company, Zinky Electronics. Absara announced in January 2014 that a series of new Supro amps would debut at the Winter 2014 NAMM Show in Anaheim, California.[8] The new Supro amps are cosmetically reminiscent of their progenitors from the 1960s.
• Why size matters: Fret width and height affect playability considerably. Fret wire measures at .078 to .110 at the crown, or top, and runs between .035 and .055 high. Taller frets, at .45 and up, tend to make for easier string bending and produce clear notes without much pressure. The latter makes them ideal for high speed playing. The furthest point of that concept is the scalloped fretboard, employed most notably by Yngwie Malmsteen and John McLaughlin, who played a specially designed Gibson J-200 with scalloped frets and drone strings with the group Shakti.
I took lessons with him when i was 8 years old. I stopped taking lessons when i was 12 years old. In those four years i have learned so much about guitar in such a little time. Patrick is an amazing teacher and by the time i left his teaching, i joined 4 bands and played at the whiskey twice, the house of blues four times, and the grove once. All amazing experiences and it all started from Patrick. I am 16 now and i will never forget what he has done for me. If you are thinking about eventually taking on guitar at all, Pat is your man.
The guitar is just a small step on being a guitar player. Having a budget friendly guitar to practice and learn with is suitable enough at this stage. The key to success really depends on how you practice and dedicate yourself on learning how to play. As long as you have a decent sounding playable guitar to begin with and has the quality that can last you in years to come. You’ll be all set.
The irony with guitars is that an original 1950s Gibson, for example, whilst capable of producing the most amazing sounds, and playing like butter - may not stay in tune, or intonate quite as well as a modern day equivalent. Consequently old guitars have very often been 'upgraded', with original parts lost. But this can seriously down-grade their value. Replacing missing parts with original or period-correct ones can very much improve a guitars collectability, saleability and therefore value.

Music enthusiasts can find a wide range of new and used guitar amplifiers on eBay, often for deep discounts.  Buyers who want to explore a wide range of possibilities should simply enter the keywords "guitar amplifier" into the eBay search bar, while those with more particular needs can refine their search by adding keywords associated with the make and model of the amplifier, as well as its color or condition.  The "ask the seller a question" feature will enable the buyer to ask additional questions pertaining to style, sound, and condition (if the guitar amplifier is used).
Paul Reed Smith Guitars (better known as PRS) is a Maryland-based manufacturer, and relatively new in the world of guitars – founded in 1980, when they began making a series of hand-built guitars. Today they have a wide range of models, which are built in both Asia and America, as well as a full roster of artists playing their guitars; including Mike Oldfield, Dave Navarro, Carlos Santana, and Mark Tremonti.

Normal people define cool as laid-back, excellent or highly skilled, but most guitarists define cool as Jimmy Page circa 1975 in a black velvet bellbottom suit decorated with embroidered dragons, playing a Les Paul slung down to his knees. As the musical mastermind behind Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest rock bands of all time, Page elevated the guitar riff to an art form, crafting orchestrated overdubbed parts that bludgeoned listeners like the hammer of the gods.
One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.
A combo amplifier is a unit in which both the amp and speaker is integrated. You plug a guitar into one of these, turn it on and you are ready to play. The obvious benefit of a combo is that you have everything you need in one standalone unit, while the sound tends to be optimized by the manufacturer to be the best it can be – there’s no worrying about matching it with a good speaker. Combo amps also tend to be cheaper than heads and, as such, are excellent for beginners. While some are very capable of small to medium-sized performance, the drawback is that combos are limited in power compared to a head. They also tend to be much heavier, which can be a pain when regularly transporting it.
When you shop the huge selection of combo guitar amps at Musician’s Friend we make it easy to hone in on what you’re looking for. Just select the type ( tube, solid state, or hybrid), brand(s), and price range, and voila—up pops a selection fine tuned to your specs. To really fine-tune the process you can also dial in the wattage, type (combo or stack), and speaker size/configuration.
Okay first of all yes, John Mayer deserves to be on this list. I would've probably put him even higher. I understand if you don't agree but go listen to his Where The Light is album and get back to me on that. I think Eric Clapton should've made the list though. And, although I'm not a big fan of metal I can say as a guitarist anybody can go up and down scales and embelish notes and sound like a metal genius. The artists above put real soul into their music. I think you have an amazing list though. Many people probably would've have thought of some of the people on here… but what about Derek Trucks?
@Danny – As an EQ is used to filter and tweak the tone of the signal passing through it, this can be placed anywhere in the chain. For example, if you want to tweak the overall sound before the amplifier, place the EQ at the end of the signal chain. If you want to adjust the tone of your guitar before it hits your effects pedals, place the EQ at the front of your signal chain. It just depends on what you are planning on doing with the EQ and where in the signal chain it sounds best to you.
If you plan to use your delay in conjunction with other stompboxes, it’s important to consider where to place these effects in the chain—especially if you’re using an overdrive, distortion, or fuzz pedal. The most common setup is to place dirt before delay. This is important because it means you’ll be delaying the distorted signal as opposed to distorting a delayed signal, which will sound mushy and indistinct. Because a distortion pedal has the strongest impact on your fundamental tone, it’s typically placed early in the chain, whereas delay is usually placed toward the end of the chain so it can produce repeats of all of the effects added to your guitar sound. Of course, you should experiment for yourself to see what you prefer.
Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite. 

With a delightful dreadnought shape, this steel-string acoustic is made with a pressure-tested solid cedar top, with solid mahogany back and sides, all with a semi-gloss custom polished finish that allows the guitar to sing – and sing it does! The tonewoods combine to deliver a rich and bright sounding instrument, with plenty of warmth that would please the most demanding of guitarists.
Another factor that may need to be considered is the length of the speaker cable. Very long speaker cable runs may affect the performance of the system, either by causing line loss of power or by affecting the impedance. For best performance and highest wattage output with bass stacks or combos with extension speakers, bassists typically use the shortest possible speaker cable.
Distortion is an important part of an electric guitar's sound in many genres, particularly for rock, hard rock, and metal. A distortion pedal takes a normal electric guitar signal and combine harmonic multiplication and clipping through the use of analog circuitry to create any number of sounds ranging from a fuzz sound to the sound of an overdriven tube amp and beyond! Distortion is essential to Heavy Metal Music.
I have a 12-string Lyle in really good shape. Bought as a b-day present from me back in late 1970's from a pawn shop. I need to take it to a luthier to have it set up better, but it sounds really good. Just right now the action is a little high, but not that much wear. For a long time, I put it away, finding it hard to chord as a relative newbie back then. But now, I am more than ready. It does say it was made in Korea ~ which makes it seem a little more rare. The sound is still great or maybe even better! Wish I knew what it was worth, but I hope the guy I find to set it up will know more.

We will use the remaining pole to switch tone pots. Typical strat wiring has two tone controls – one for middle and one for neck pickup. We want to switch neck/middle tone control on when neck/middle pickup is on. To do this, common terminal of the second pole is connected to the common terminal on the first pole (pickup output) and neck and middle terminals of the second pole are connected to their respective pots. When neck pickup is on, the second pole will switch the output to the neck tone control as intended. What happens in position 4 (both neck and middle pickups on)? Both pots will be switched on and will be in parallel. Moving any tone pot would change the overall resistance to the tone cap and change the tone. The result is below:


Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
@Frank Drake - I have your solution in an amp - a Vox Valvetronix! I love it, and when I need silence, I can just use the headphone jack. But my friend was looking for an inexpensive solution and this offered more than the Vox. I prefer the tube-infused tones of the Vox, but I would love the looper, drum machine, expression pedal, and USB interface of the DigiTech! – gomad Jan 18 '11 at 17:15
Conventionally, guitarists double notes in a chord to increase its volume, an important technique for players without amplification; doubling notes and changing the order of notes also changes the timbre of chords. It can make a possible a "chord" which is composed of the all same note on different strings. Many chords can be played with the same notes in more than one place on the fretboard.

To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its
Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
Modelling/digital amps: This type of guitar amp uses digital technology to stimulate old-fashioned technology. They are able to emulate old amplifiers using software, and this feature enables them to combine several amps into one. Their programmable nature enables the user to switch digital effects such as the chorus, delay, and other features. Some models of these amps have a digital or analog output that goes directly to a recording or PA system through speaker simulation.
You will agree with us that the journey to the Canaan land of guitar mastery isn’t always one with bed of roses. Rather, it seem very daunting, especially with so many different types, styles, shapes and sizes in the marketplace—all craving for the bulging eyes of your wallet. But as with anything, the options before you can become clearer if only you can endeavour to filter out the unwanted options—that is, those that aren’t compatible with your immediate needs.
PRS really took off back in the ‘90s when it seemed just about everyone had swapped out their Les Paul for a PRS. Eventually they capitalized on this trend and made the PRS more accessible by introducing the SE line of lower-budget guitars. But these aren’t beginner’s guitars. Even though they cost less than a standard PRS, they’re still high-quality instruments.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
With that in mind, we would like to preface this article with the statement that a certain body style doesn’t necessarily mean that the guitar will be a good fit for the genre it’s associated with. However, we have also included some info on pickups. With knowledge on how the combination of pickups and a guitar’s body style impacts your end tone you should be ready to start shopping!
Unfortunately, there is very little documentation or early catalog literature on the Kingston brand, so it is nearly impossible to date their guitars or group them into series. However, we do know that these guitars were likely built by Kawai, Teisco, and/or Guyatone (other manufacturers are possible as well). At the time, Kawai was building guitars in the style of a Fender Jazzmaster as well as the uniquely shaped Burns double-cutaway. Your guitar has more of a Strat-shaped body and I have seen it called a “Swinga,” but I wasn’t able to find another exact comparison in my research. I think your guitar was made by Kawai in the mid-to-late-1960s, because Westheimer was likely done with Teisco when this guitar was built, and it doesn’t really look like a Teisco from that era anyway.
Think of Stevie Ray Vaughan, and you’ll have a good idea of what overdrive effects can do. They’re based on the ‘broken’ sound that vintage tube amplifiers would make when they were fed a signal too strong for them to handle smoothly. Modern overdrive pedals can also have circuitry that emulates the same effect even when connected to a solid-state amp. Because they work by boosting the signal, experimenting with the effects of an overdrive pedal can be as simple as adjusting the volume and seeing what happens.
McCarthy's probably one of the toughest guitar masters on this list. His craftsman's hands know not only how to help your instrument make magic again but also (we assume) how to put you in an arm or leg lock and make you scream "Uncle" if you mouth off too much about your guitar's condition. It's probably why guitar tough guys like Zakk Wylde of Ozzy Osborne and Black Label Society, Izzy Stradlin of Guns 'n' Roses and Jason Newsted of Metallica gravitate toward his repair shop. (Not to mention the guys of Motorhead). They know they're dealing with a true master.
Now I’ve heard people say they can’t tell the difference between the two when they’ve played both. From a strictly tone perspective, that may or may not be true. And maybe for me it’s just the placebo effect (I know its a Gibson - or not - therefore I feel an ethereal change in quality), yet it seems awfully subjective to base a $2600 difference on a report that lacks concrete research.
Its the type of clipping you would expect to hear from a tube amp that been naturally gained up by cranking the volume levels really high.  Some players refer to this sound as Crunch.  These Overdrive pedals, such as the famous Ibanez Tube Screamer, can also be doubled up to give two gain stages:  Slight Crunch and Creamy Velvet Lead.  They sound as good as they might taste, if they were flavors of cereal or ice cream.  Many players found their tone by using two overdrive pedals back to back.
Although not as dominating in amp modeling, Guitar Rig takes the top spot in our guitar effects software list. It leads the pack with its meticulously detailed effects modeling. Its 54 modeled effects closely follow the behavior of legendary stompboxes and studio racks. Even professionals are having a hard time picking out the real pedal against this guitar effect software in a blind test. Its versatile design allows you to chain effects together in virtually any manner, without the hassles of cables, space and budget constraints. It is truly a truck load of gear in one software package. Retail Price: $199.00
While most single-coil pickups are wired in parallel with each other, it is possible to wire two or more of them in series, producing a fuller and stronger sound not unlike that of a humbucker.[26] This is a popular modification for instruments with two single-coil pickups like the Fender Telecaster and the Fender Jazz Bass. For the former, special 4-way switches are available to replace the stock 3-way switch and provide a series wiring position.[27]

Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]
I one day hope to be the man my dog thinks I am.WORDS OF WISDOM FROM VARIOUS MEMBERS"most often the guitar will rise or fall to the level of the player""people overthink ****************""Sometimes you gotta know when to shut the **************** up and have a little class. Not you, you're special.""If it sounds good to you then it sounds good"The bull**************** and myths in the guitar world are stacked very high.
Ovation Guitars, in conjunction with the DW Music Foundation (DWMF) will debut the RS Rockstar™ guitar. This six-string, “RS” model guitar will be donated to each Notes for Notes location along with a DW drumset and an LP cajon to equip each studio with professional level musical instruments. The DWMF will also work with other partnering charities to donate RS Rockstar™ model guitars to music education programs in underserved communities worldwide.

The Pocket Pal is a recent addition to the Hohner standard line of harmonicas. It is somewhat unusual because it is slightly shorter in length than most harmonicas, leading to its namesake of being pocket handy. It is Chinese made, which is unfavorable to most harmonica players, but the Pocket Pal has caught on as an inexpensive, yet quality harp. Like the Old Standby, the Pocket Pal is designed for use in country music.[26]


It is definitely an opinion based list, ask 100 people, and get 100 different answers. But please, 99 out of those100 would have Clapton on it, the list loses credibility without him. Pictures of “Clapton is God” tags around England stick in my mind. Even among his peers he is revered, he just has to be here! Page should be higher, but of course, that’s just my “opinion”.
We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
Nickel trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Hi Dan! Thanks for the kind words! As somewhat of a newbie, you may find a semi-hollow-body guitar more flexible and versatile, especially if you are still finding trying to figure out what genre you are going to focus on. If you are set on the hollow-body go for, but ,if you are on the fence, the versatility of the guitar is something to consider. Those are my thoughts. Good luck!
Double bass players performing in genres where the bass is slapped, either by pulling the string until it snaps back onto the fingerboard or striking the strings, such as traditional blues, rockabilly, psychobilly jazz, folk, and bluegrass often blend the sounds picked up by a piezoelectric transducer with the sounds picked up by a small condenser microphone mounted on the bridge. The microphone picks up the resonance coming from the body and the sounds of the strings being plucked, bowed, or slapped. The two sound signals are blended using a simple mixer and then routed to the amplifier. While many upright bass players use combo amplifiers, bassists in genres that use high stage volume, such as the punk-rockabilly genre of psychobilly use "bass stacks". Some jazz bassists and other bass players who play in small venues use specialized, expensive upright bass amps, like the Acoustic Image combo amplifier.

Instruments with built-in effects include Hammond organs, electronic organs, electronic pianos and digital synthesizers.[19] Built-in effects for keyboard typically include reverb, chorus and, for Hammond organ, vibrato. Many "clonewheel organs” include an overdrive effect. Occasionally, acoustic-electric and electric guitars will have built-in effects, such as a preamp or equalizer.[20][21]
While vintage guitars tend to hold a reputation as the best ever made, there are more high-end boutique makers turning out truly magnificent instruments than ever before. Following the wake of trail-blazers like Paul Reed Smith, the current class of boutique guitar makers includes the likes of Knaggs, Kauer, Swope, Fano, Huber, Koll and many many more. Keep an eye on this page for the latest and greatest luthier-made new and used electric guitars to hit the pages of Reverb.
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There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings. For a six-string guitar in standard tuning, it may be necessary to drop or omit one or more tones from the chord; this is typically the root or fifth. The layout of notes on the fretboard in standard tuning often forces guitarists to permute the tonal order of notes in a chord.

Few non-American guitar brands have meant so much to so many American guitar buffs as Teisco guitars. Indeed, through their mid-’60s connection with the Sears and Roebuck company, many a modern guitar player learned his or her first chops on a Silvertone made in Japan by the Teisco company. Nevertheless, for years Teiscos were the object of ridicule, the penultimate examples of “cheap Japanese guitars” (a reputation more based on cultural chauvinism than objective analysis, truth to tell). Even Dan Forte, who essentially began the category of writing about off-brand guitars (and who has given me many an entertaining moment in my life), chose Teisco Del Rey as his nom de plume, with more than a little tongue-in-cheek humor in the selection, no doubt.
Every guitar player has their own distinctive sound, and many guitar companies have created artist and signature electric guitar models that were inspired by and/or designed in collaboration with the very best guitar players from the past and the present. Some of the most popular signature electric guitar models we offer here at Sam Ash are the Eric Clapton Strat guitars from both Fender and the Fender Custom Shop, ESP Kirk Hammett guitars, John Petrucci guitars from both Ernie Ball Music Man and Sterling by Music Man, and many more!
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