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Some professional-grade amp heads, such as Ampeg's SVT400-PRO, have an audio crossover, an electronic filter that enables a bassist to split their bass signal into a low-pitched signal (which could be routed to a cabinet suited for low-pitched sounds, such as a 1x15" or 2x15" cabinet), and then send the middle and high-frequencies to a different cabinet suited to this register (e.g., a 2x10" or 4x10" cabinet with a horn-loaded tweeter). Amps with a crossover can either have a single crossover point pre-set at the factory (e.g., 100 Hz) or a knob is provided to enable the bassist to select the frequency where the bass signal is split into low and higher-pitched signal. The SVT400-PRO has a user-adjustable crossover knob. Amps with an adjustable crossover point can enable bassists to fine tune the sound of their bass sound. For example, in some halls, a bassist's usual crossover point may sound too "boomy" or rumbly; turning the crossover knob to send more of the low-pitched bass signal through the 2x10" cab may reduce this problem.
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Aaron Staniulis is not only a freelance live sound and recording engineer, but also an accomplished musician, singer, and songwriter. He has spent equal time on both sides of the microphone working for and playing alongside everyone from local bar cover bands to major label recording artists, in venues stretching from tens to tens of thousands of people. Having seen both sides at all levels gives him the perfect perspective for shedding light on the "Angry Sound Guy." You can find out more about what he’s up to at aaronstaniulis.com.
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
In jazz big bands, popular during the 1930s and 1940s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four strums to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent of this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.
A free, guided tour of the Taylor Guitars factory is given every Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. (excluding holidays). Taylor’s expansive 145,000 square foot manufacturing facility is located east of San Diego (about 20 minutes from the downtown area) in El Cajon, California. No reservations are necessary for the tour, although the company asks that large groups (more than 10) call in advance at (619) 258-1207. Taylor encourages guests to arrive at its Visitor Center, where the tour begins, 10-15 minutes prior to tour time to sign in at the reception desk. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes. While not physically demanding, it does include a fair amount of walking.
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^ “Pete Townshend: On Guitar-Smashing Regrets, Stylistic Evolution, and Becoming a Gear Aficionado”. “It’s interesting to think that the Marshall sound I helped Jim and his guys develop was built around the very low output and thin, surfy sound of the Rick. The sound I wanted was Steve Cropper, but very loud. The early Marshall with a Rick gave me that. The semi-acoustic body and a speaker stack feeding right into the guitar was what allowed me to refine tuneful feedback.”

Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.


Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!
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As you know, like most guitars sporting more than a single pickup, your Strat lets you select any pickup by itself or choose certain dual-pickup combinations. The standard way to connect multiple pickups is to wire them in parallel. This generates the classic tone our ears know from countless records, when a guitarist uses the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups in tandem (positions 2 and 4 on a normal 5-way Strat switch).

A common complaint with the Bullet Strat among our panelists was that the single-coil middle and neck pickups buzzed too much. This is the nature of single-coil pickups. The nice thing about the HSS Bullet Strat is that you do have one humbucker, and setting the pickup selector to combine the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups will also cancel the buzz. Also, the use of a single-coil pickup in the neck position makes it difficult to get the mellow, jazzy tones that you’ll get from guitars that have a humbucker in the neck position, but we figure few beginners are looking for that sound.


Seeing one in the hands of Ed Sheeran was a huge shot in the arm for the small-body acoustic market, and now players are picking these up as good-quality, usable guitars which are equally at home in the living room as they are on the stage. The Martin LX1E is perhaps the best known and best respected small body acoustic, and can hold its own tonally against many of its regular-sized peers.

"Acousterr's tab maker is a tablature maker application which can be used to write down and compose music. Users can create tabs, play them out, explore tabs created by other users. They can choose any instrument like guitar, bass guitar, piano, ukulele. The sounds are mathematically modelled to be generated at runtime for any combination of notes and effects like hammer on pull off etc for different types of instruments. This gives a beautiful listening experience. Multiple tracks can be added in a single tab which play out simultaneously, so as to simulate an entire song with various parts like bass guitar, lead guitar, rhythm guitar etc. The UX for editing multiple tracks has been meticulously designed to allow tab lines to synchronise easily. With great keyboard support, notes can be easily added and chords can be created on the fly by pressing shift key and selecting multiple notes. Scale helper is there to allow composing solos easily. Designed to work well on mobile browsers too."
Here we have old "3-hole" this is another great Japanese Vintage Guitar! this one is over 40 years old wow! ...its wonderfully aged woods contribute to its rich great sound... this example is one of the greatest Martin style Copies from one of the finest "law Suit" Acoustic instrument builders of Japan Yamaha Nippon Gakki...This model is the very popular FG-140 RED LABEL ....JUST IN!...so more info soon to come please see the detailed pics of this guitar for a link to many more pictures ( 40 ) or more from every angle Very good- excellent condition If your wondering why we call this one "3-hole" is because someone in its past life had an electric pickup of some type and it came to us with 3 tinny holes in the top... we have since filled the 3-tiny holes one on upper treble bout and 2 below the rosewood bridge... we filled & clear coated so its all solid and is very hard to see but are their also a fine hairline crack threw the finish exists at the bottom of the neck the original owner said its been their more than 20 years and has not changed and is solid...if wanted after sale for free at your request fill sand it and fill with lacquer and sand and buff smooth I expect that would do the trick to cosmetically improve the look of that but its really fine as is... What is rare about this oldie but goodie its all original and even has the original gold lined Yamaha logo Hard shell case in pretty respectable shape too...see the extra pics ( I will have a link to those pics posted later ) for those details... Great sound and pretty EZ to play too I just Cleaned it to remove the grime but leave all the original patina and also dehydrated the woods and she drank it up and after drying we finished it of with a fresh coat of wax finish was applied the woods still shine like a shinny new dime.. great old guitar.. JVG Rated in Very good Original Vintage condition with its share of natural play ware visible upon closest inspection of the neck width is 1-3/4 @ nut and the action is set good at 3-16ths @ 12th fret.. the fretboard and frets still playing well no need for a refret some fret indentations yes but its still plays just fine at 80+%, top has aged naturally with nice Patina now and has several fine finish cracks etc..same as a well loved and played 40+ year old Martin would have at several thousand dollars less than a 40+ year old martin. This guitar has been restrung with New Martin Marquis Strings and sounds great...This one you have the option of buying an original vintage Yamaha Hard Shell Case..these cases are rare and hard to find now the handle was warn and has a replacement quick fix and it works perfectly...just $69.00 additional .
Electronics.  If your guitar comes with a pickup system (either from the factory or aftermarket) we will test it before it ships.  Poor sound, uneven string balance, and just plain component failure is all checked & corrected so you don't have to fool around with it. If your guitar's system requires a battery inside the guitar, we may remove it prior to shipping.
Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.

Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.


Fender released the first successful solidbody electric guitar, the Broadcaster, in 1950. (Remember, the original Esquires were problematic.) Gibson produced the first Les Paul 24 months later. And a mere six years after that, a small run of sunburst Les Pauls flowed out of Gibson’s Kalamazoo, Michigan factory. Originally just another instrument, those Les Pauls now occupy a mythic status in the minds of guitarists and collectors everywhere. The instruments, along with a small handful of Fender Stratocasters and examples from one or two other manufacturers from roughly the same era, represent the Holy Grail in guitar tones.

The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.
You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
Yes, split sound probably won’t be as loud as the other singles. The Cool Rails is really like a single coil sized version of our Jazz humbucker, so if you are after a more single coil sound, you can try the Vintage Rails, which is more of a single coil sound in a humcancelling format. You can always move the Cool Rails to the bridge position as well.
Perhaps the most dramatic of ambient mic techniques, though, comes courtesy of Chris Tsangarides. His 'Vortex' involves using studio screens to build 30-foot-long walls along each side of the guitar cabinet, creating a flare shape (apparently inspired by the shape of a bass bin). Within this flare, he places a close condenser mic and typically another couple of condenser mics with different distant positionings, perhaps at 15 and 30 feet away. "I walk around while the guy's playing and find a sweet spot and put the mic there", says Chris.
Really loving this bit of kit. The thing that surprised me most wasn't the fourth position (which is great!) but the overall sound improvement I get from quality hardware. I have 2017 American Professional Tele and I'm amazed at the clarity that this upgrade has given me. TBH - I don't understand why Fender don't fit quality parts like this straight from the factory. Thanks guys!" - Max

As a total beginner, my wife and i visited a local music shop and spent about two hours talking to several of the employees about string instruments (acoustic guitars, ukuleles, and electric guitars). They answered our questions, taught us enough to play a few chords and let us sample their guitars and amps, stopping in every few minutes to answer our questions as they came up.
Most reviewers are simply floored by how good the Roland Blues Cube Artist sounds right off the bat, with many commending its organic tube-like tone for being so life-like. It's vintage aesthetics and familiar controls also gets a lot of thumbs up, especially from experienced players who are in it for the sound, and not for the bells and whistles. It should also be mentioned that there are many reports of it working well with different types of guitars and pickup configurations.
Another tone control we almost all come in contact with is the amplifier tone stack, as sketched out in Figure 3. A sequence of evolution at Fender led up to the 1957 Bassman becoming the prototype for most amplifiers’ Treble/Bass/Mids control knobs. Marshall and Vox used a similar system. The amplifier “tone stack” is just that – a stack of two or three potentiometers which provide treble, bass, and sometimes midrange controls.
Hello everyone. Today we’re going to do a setup on a Les-Paul-style guitar. For this post, I’ll be setting up a “Burny Super Grade” guitar, but the set up is the same for most Les-Paul-style guitars. I already have a general electric guitar setup post over here: http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-set-up-electric-guitar.html, but there are a few Les Paul specific areas I’d like to go into here.
Whether playing scabrous grindcore in Napalm Death or juxtaposing smooth, almost Pink Floyd–like blues solos over the surgically precise death-metal riffage of Carcass, Steer always managed to find a way to inject some ear candy into genres known for avoiding it. By 1993, when Carcass released Heartwork — its last true death-metal album (before embracing death’n’roll) — Steer had masterminded a hook-filled songwriting style that perfectly balanced metal virility with honest-to-God melody, something countless bands are still attempting to copy.

The pre-amplifier section of a guitar amplifier serves to amplify a weak instrument signal to a level that can drive the power amplifier. It often also contains circuitry to shape the tone of the instrument, including equalization and gain controls. Often multiple cascading gain/clipping stages are employed to generate distortion. Because the first component in a valve amplifier is a valve gain stage, the output level of the preceding elements of the signal chain has a strong influence on the distortion created by that stage. The output level of the guitar's pickups, the setting of the guitar's volume knob, how hard the strings are plucked, and the use of volume-boosting effects pedals can drive this stage harder and create more distortion.

Many players today have more than one overdrive/distortion stomp box on their pedal boards and sometimes use both at once. My personal preference is to place the lower gain pedals in front of the higher gain ones, but the opposite is absolutely fine if you prefer the sound of that configuration. Placing overdrive/distortion pedals later in the signal chain can increase noise as the noise of several effects chained together can add up, and any noise produced by other effects going into an overdrive/distortion effect will be boosted along with the guitar signal.


Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future.

Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.

Since 1998, many high-end US-made Fender Stratocasters such as the American Deluxe, American, Hot Rodded American, American Special and American Standard series came with an HSH pickup rout instead of a “swimming pool” (or “bath tub”) cavity to increase the total amount of wood that actually can resonate, producing a more complex tone. The HSH rout allows players to modify their pickups to the most often seen after-market configurations without re-routing or cutting into their guitar’s body, while maintaining more wood than a “swimming pool” rout.
I found a Decca guitar lying in my woodworks shop at school, and my teacher let me take it home. My friend and I have been restoring it, and we nearly have it finished, the only thing missing is the tremolo spring. However the model of the guitar is kind of odd as we have not found any record of what type of guitar we own. Its a double cut-away archtop, with a tobacco sunburst and 3 single coil pick ups. We have looked everywhere and haven't been able to find any record of a 3 pick up Decca guitar. We're still looking...
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SSO Strings (Sonatina Symphonic Orchestra) is a creative commons licensed library. For violin, chamber strings and flute I have taken several of the instrument samples and layered them together to allow for expressive playing over the velocity range. Flute SSO for example contains soft, hard and overblown samples from SSO. To create chamber strings I have used bass strings, cello, expressive violin and viola over certain ranges of the keyboard.
We considered more than 40 guitars for this guide, and we tested the 13 most promising models. A couple of models aside, our testing panel thought, as Lynn Shipley Sokolow put it, “These are all of good quality and are all adequate.” In fact, certain models we didn’t pick may be a better choice for beginning guitarists who are into a specific style—most notably metal, which is clearly the primary market for brands such as Ibanez and Jackson.
Keyboard players who use subwoofers for on-stage monitoring include electric organ players who use bass pedal keyboards (which go down to a low "C" which is about 33 Hz) and synth bass players who play rumbling sub-bass parts that go as low as 18 Hz. Of all of the keyboard instruments that are amplified onstage, synthesizers produce some of the lowest pitches because, unlike a traditional electric piano or electric organ which have as their lowest notes a low "A" and a low "C", respectively, a synth does not have a fixed lowest octave. A synth player can add lower octaves to a patch by pressing an "octave down" button, which can produce pitches that are at the limits of human hearing.
A little bit of history will make this clearer… The original Fender Stratocaster switches were 2-pole 3-way switches (that’s actually what I have on my schematic, I think you’ll see why in a bit) and were intended only to select either the neck, middle or bridge pickup. However these were “make before break” switches where, as the switch is moved across from one position to the next, the next contact is made before the previous contact is broken. People found that if you could get the switch to rest in between those three positions that you’d actually have both neck and middle or middle and bridge pickups connected at the same time and, most importantly, it sounded good! It became a common thing to rest the 3-way switch in between the positions, so common that in the 60’s people were filing notches in the detente mechanism of the 3-way switch. These became the “notch” positions. In the 70’s, Fender adopted this popular mod into their stock switch thus becoming what we now use and call a 5-way switch but is, in fact, a 3-way switch with 5 positions.
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Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.
1. striking the string creates the vibration and once it disrupts the magnetic field on the pickup that's it - how about when you don't strike the string at all, like when you tap on the body of the guitar? The vibrating wood imparts vibration on the strings, which in turn do their thing on the pickup. The body of the guitar, the nut, the bridge, every part of the guitar is now directly influencing the sound you hear out of the pickup. Remember, only the magnetic field disturbance is being amplified, and tapping the guitar has started the strings vibrating. How can that happen without the wood's tonal qualities affecting the waveform?

Was skeptical at first since I own a couple of vintage Martins. Aside from the LX1E being a sustainable responsibly built guitar that has HPL back/sides, hybrid neck/fingerboard, and whose soundhole smells like a Lincoln Log toy set this is an amazing find. Yup- it’s perfect for the overhead bin on airplanes, comes with a good gig bag, and sounds great plugged in. Experimented with .11 gauge string set, but this guitar is really made for either .12 gauge or a true .13 (medium gauge) strings set. This guitar is designed for the combination of heavier strings and assertive strumming or picking to create a sound that belies its small size. It welcomes being pushed, muted, and/or percussively played. Found the same to be true of Martin’s DX regular size guitars which sound amazing for what they are. While the E Sheeran LX model has his logos on it, this
I signed up for the Free GuitarTricks Trial and the first lesson that I checked out was titled something like “Blues Style Level 2 – How B.B. King Starts The Blues”.  You wouldn’t believe it. Shortly after starting this lesson I felt that my playing sounded the way it should be sounding. It sounded kind of the same as how B.B. King sounded. I was over the moon. This was simply an amazing experience and I never looked back. Today I am almost sure that I would probably be a Rock Star today if Guitar Tricks would have been around 20 years earlier ;-).
[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
It is rare for any brand, let alone an entire company, to stay in business this long and their longevity speaks volumes to the exceptional quality of their instruments. Although they did dabble in electric guitars and basses for a short time, today the company is dedicated to making the finest acoustic guitars possible just as they were over 180 years ago.

Editorial comment – I advise folks when considering fretwork to consider not choosing a size or leveling operation resulting in less than .040” height if they want to play a style with frequent fret hand slurring, i.e. rock, blues, shred etc.  Low fret height is less capable of sustaining a reasonable fret leveling in the future, making it that much closer to refret time.  You don’t have to choose a very tall size if that is uncomfortable for you, but only choose a low height if that is really what you want and are accustomed to.


It mostly comes in black color. it is a right handed 6 string electric guitar. The body is given a polyurethane finish whereas the neck is given a satin finish. The fret board is composed of 24 frets and has a master white tone. The guitar is relatively affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 15,642. For stage performances, this guitar will give you a nice experience and a classical feel.

Over the years, authentic 1950s Les Pauls have become some of the most desirable and expensive electric guitars in the world. Only 1700 were made between 1958 and 1960[citation needed]. Today, a 1959 Les Paul Standard in good condition can be easily priced between $US200,000 and $US750,000, making it the most valuable production model electric guitar ever built (however, Gibson Custom Shop reissue versions of the 1950s and 1960 Les Paul can be purchased for less, between $US3,000-$US6,000 – certain artist signature model versions of the guitars are considerably more expensive). Jimmy Page has been offered 1 million pounds (1.6 million USD) for his “number 1” 1959 Les Paul should he ever decide to sell it.[22]


The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:

The two new Fender-style solidbody basses were the Precisely and Naked. The double-cutaway Precisely U1971 had a single pickup under a chrome cover, covered bridge/tailpiece assembly, Fender-style four-in-line head, dot-inlaid rosewood fingerboard, black-white-black pickguard with fingerrest, volume and tone. The Precisely had an outlined logo decal and a sunburst finish. The Naked U1971N was the same thing, natural-finished. Both cost $250.
The original Overdrive pedals were created to mimic the sound of tube amps being cranked to 10. This will cause the tubes to be pushed to their limits, producing a crunchy and aggressive tone. The sound of overdriven tubes are certainly iconic as it gave birth to the sound of Rock ‘n’ Roll. However, the problem with bringing your volume up to 10 to overdrive your tubes is that it gets really, really loud--safety hazard loud.
With so many features, it can be tempting to just dismiss it as a low quality jack-of-all-trades unit, but even experts are convinced of its versatility and sound quality. Guitar World concludes: "Costing less than most single-effect stomp boxes, the G1Xon is an incredible bargain that provides versatile multi-effect processing power and impressive performance and practice capabilities."
#5? Are you joking? I have a PR-200 that I've owned for 15 years. I hate it. The action is ridiculous unless your fingertips are made out of adamantium or whatever the heck Wolverine is made from. The sound is muddled and a clash of midrange. Sustain is nonexistent. The frets have flattened on the high strings. News flash- I'm not spending $350 to re-fret a $279 guitar. Epiphone may make some good high end guitars but I don't trust them. If you make crappy low end guitars why should I trust your brand? You were supposed to get me to fall in love with the brand but you've made me hate it. My next guitar will be a Yamaha, Martin or Taylor.
The AC15C1X is a modern take on the venerable AC15, with improved reliability and built-in effects. Vox's familiar clean and overdriven tone is ever present, courtesy of its three 12AX7 preamp tubes and two EL84 power tubes that drive a 12" Celestion Alnico Blue speaker - a speaker that many Rock and Blues players prefer. The amp has a dedicated Top Boost input for those who want Vox' distinct jangly tone. Finally, it comes with tremolo and reverb effect to add space and texture to your guitar tone.
If the Schecter wasn’t quite fast enough, this lower priced version of Steve Vai’s signature guitar should get the job done. The Wizard III neck is a direct copy from its more-expensive variation, and when combined with the 24 jumbo frets, creates a speed machine. Because Vai himself is a versatile guitarist, though, this guitar can pretty much do it all, though if you like a chunky neck for chords, you’ll have to look elsewhere. You even get the Tree of Life inlay at twice price, which looks great.
The Effect: Boost pedals are essentially an extension of your guitar’s volume knob. Their main purpose is to give you additional gain to work with. This extra gain can be used to accentuate your solo sections, give you more girth in your clean channel, or even push your tubes into a slight overdrive. A great example of a booster pedal is the legendary Electro-Harmonix LPB-1.
:I need to know how to get parts for my old kent guitar.I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
JAZZ :Al Di Meola , John McLaughlin ,Wes Montgomery ,Pat Metheny ,John Scofield,Django Reinhardt ,Larry carlton ,Joe Pass,Herb Ellis ,Eddie Lang , and again I still have in mind at least 10 more jazz guitar players that jazz is the hardest and more complex guitar composition and it is an awesome style or kind of music to play just because not everybody play can play jazz.
Believe it or not, some thought should be given as to where the compressor goes in your signal chain. A good rule of thumb is to place any gain-type effects before modulation effects: i.e., compressors and overdrives before delays or flangers. Another one that's practically set in concrete is to put the compressor before any overdrive, distortion, or fuzz pedal. This is why most guitarists place the compressor first, in order to send a stronger, better signal to the other effects.
Woofer enclosures must be larger and more sturdily built than cabinets for mid-range or high-frequency (tweeter) speakers. As such, in the 1950s, when Ampeg introduced bass amplifier and speaker systems, bass guitarists began to use them. Similarly, Hammond organ players used a specialized keyboard combo amplifier, the Leslie speaker cabinet, which contains a woofer for the low frequencies and a horn for the high frequencies. The Leslie horns rotate and a baffle around the woofer rotates as well, producing a rich tremolo and chorus effect.
Let's start with the scenery. The guitar riff I'll use today was conceived using an effects chain made up of a delay pedal (the Electro-Harmonix Memory Boy). The pedal doesn't have a tap tempo feature, so I had to adjust the delay time by ear as precisely as possible while playing the song. Recorded in the "classic" way, without racking my brains and simply putting a mic in front of the amp, I get something like this:
The material in the neck and fretboard also matters. Some guitars have both neck and fretboard in maple, and they will typically have a bright and open sound. Rosewood has traditionally been used for fretboards, usually combined with a maple neck, because it is a hardy and oily wood that can stand up to extensive human contact. Rosewood will give a darker tone than maple alone.
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