Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.

In 1966, Vox introduced the problematic V251 GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, although this never happened.[citation needed] According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative.[citation needed]
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
The Ibanez AFC95 extends the Japanese manufacturer’s reach well into the future whilst remaining true to its roots. The elegantly styled single-cutaway hollowbody is equipped with forward-thinking appointments that extends the tonal versatility of the hollowbody further than ever before. Sublime hardware includes a delightfully nimble ebony fingerboard, whilst the ebony bridge and AFC tailpiece optimise intonation and sustain superbly.
Martin began with a 000-size guitar, which had 12 frets clear of the body. They rejected the 27" scale idea, as this would have been impractical since the high string tension on a guitar would have made the instrument hard to play. Instead they used a 25.4" scale length. To accommodate Bechtel's request for 15 frets clear of the body, they squared the body's shoulders to add 1 5/16" to the clear part of the fingerboard. This allowed 14 frets clear of the body. Since they felt aesthetically the bridge should remain halfway between the center of the soundhole and the endblock, there really was no way to make the guitar have 15 frets clear. The bottom bout was reshaped slightly to match the new shape of the upper bout (note when the 000 went to 14 frets in 1934 it retained this initial OM body shape).
Semi-acoustic guitars have a hollow body (similar in depth to a solid-body guitar) and electronic pickups mounted on the body. They work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Whereas chambered guitars are made, like solid-body guitars, from a single block of wood, semi-acoustic and full-hollowbody guitars bodies are made from thin sheets of wood. They do not provide enough acoustic volume for live performance, but they can be used unplugged for quiet practice. Semi-acoustics are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive, or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, sixties pop, and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes. These can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B. B. King's famous Lucille. Feedback can also be reduced by making them with a solid block in the middle of the soundbox.
Guitarists love to get loud. I remember when I got my first electric guitar, I took it and my amp out onto my grandmother’s back porch and did my best rendition of The Man Who Sold The World, over and over again — at full blast — for several hours. In suburbia, in the middle of the day, I didn’t receive a lot of complaints. If I tried that today, in my Los Angeles apartment surrounded by grumpy neighbors, I might not be so lucky.
Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.
I have a epiphone sg 50th edition and it does great by me in all I do. I play a lot of 60's music and otherwise all I want. It's very versatile and not to mention the cherry red wood grain finish makes it looks really awesome. Everyone I've ever met has bragged on it and I've been offered all kinds of guitars from Washburns to fenders. Just recently I went to a old guitar player of 30 yearsiin my grandfathers neighborhood and he absolutely loved the tone and playability. He said the only thing it might need to make it better was a professional setup which I'll soon be getting. When I first got it I complained a lot that the strings were a bit harder to push down due to the longer scale of the neck (the neck on it is pretty long) however. If you' work with it for about 2 days off and on its no problem. I love epiphone and judging from what I've played in ibanez guitars I might soon invest in one of them.

While other Univox brand amps may have existed during this period, these are the only ones on our radar scope. The brand was still being put on amps as late as 1976, and all of the later amps were still in a 1980 binder, though by ’79 only two Univox amps were listed in the price list. Most likely, when the Univox guitars went away in ’77 or ’78, so did the Univox amps, but supplies probably continued to be available as late as 1980. Anyhow, this sets the stage for the next development in amps to which we’ll come back…
Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]
My 15 year old daughter recently renewed interest in the guitar she had bought a few years ago but had never really played much.  She was disappointed when she noticed the strings were loose.  We brought it here and Ted was so helpful and engaging. He recommended new guitar strings; normally you can buy the strings and do it yourself, or pay them to do it.  He readily understood that while my daughter didn't know how to do it herself, she would like to know. He showed both my girls how to string a guitar, talking them through each step while he expertly strung the guitar and got it in perfect tune. Ted teaches guitar and his tutorial was an excellent recommendation of his teaching skills.  He also threw in a cleaning cloth and gave us chocolates - how much better does it get than that?!
"Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired
The Effect: Loop pedals essentially operate as recorders that have the ability to infinitely spin the recorded bits and possibly alternate them in a variety of ways. The main function of any looper is to be able to record a musical part, and then automatically put it on loop until ordered not to do so anymore. Depending on the complexity of the pedal, loopers can offer multiple layers, overdubs, as well as options of recording more than a single instrument. They range from simple single-switch stompboxes all the way to powerhouse loop workstations. Check out our full reviews to see which one is your perfect match. If you are looking for the quick winner, the Boss RC 3 is a great contender.
No, could it be!? Finally we see a brand that does not come from England nor the US, but from Germany. ENGL specializes in tube amps for high-gain and heavy-metal. Its most famous users are Ritchie Blackmore and Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Alexi Laiho (Children of Bodom) and Chris Broderick (Megadeth). Both past and present Deep Purple members even have their own signature model. And there's also the standard Powerball, Fireball, Classic, and Invader series.

I'm not sure if the same applies to LPs, but on my BC Rich Mockingbird (which has the same tone/volume setup) if one volume knob is all the way off it'll only mute the guitar in the center position. Say the bridge volume is at 10 and the neck is at 0, I'll still get sound if the bridge pickup is selected but I won't get sound if both or just the neck are selected.
The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.

A Vibe or Univibe pedal reproduces the sound of a rotating speaker by synchronizing volume oscillation, frequency-specific volume oscillation, vibrato (pitch wavering), phase shifting, and chorusing in relation to a non-rotating speaker. The modulation speed can be ramped up or down, with separate speeds for the bass and treble frequencies, to simulate the sound of a rotating bass speaker and a rotating horn. This effect is simultaneously a volume-oriented effect, an equalization-oriented effect, and a time-based effect. Furthermore, this effect is typically related to chorus. Some vibe pedals also include an overdrive effect, which allows the performer to add "tube"-style distortion. This effect is the most closely related to a rotary speaker. Some Vibe-only pedals include:


Here we have another great Yamaha Its Sound is truly WELL beyond its price point someone will be very pleased. aprox..1972-74 YAMAHA FG160 WOW! . ...This is a Gorgeous MARTIN style REPLICA and for the money compares very well to the original in quality materials used..sweet vintage SPRUCE TOP now wonderfully ambered in color from age just too cool, The Back - Sides & Neck are all made from choice AAA Mahogany just what you would expect from an expensive Martin or Gibson...only you would expect to pay much more for one of those , but this is a rare early non "Nippon Gakki" model with the Red Label from Korea.. These early issue Red Label Guitars from Korea utilize the very same materials that were made in Japan. These components were used under strict quality control and 100% assembled in Korea from the very same vintage wood - components & parts as the Japan made Yamaha's. We have had many of these Red Labeled Yamaha's in the 180's & 160's currently and over the years I see up close and in person the very high grade AA mahogany neck s sides & back & the same nice nickel tuners & hardware the very same one piece solid neck no scarf joint at the back of the headstock area like the later Korean & Chinese examples ... This era exhibits just the same just as nice woods as those Japanese big dollar players but " SOME" not all are hidden treasures and are still a real bargain today when compared to the Japanese Red Label versions or a Martin or even Japan made models of this quality...fit & finish & the materials on this guitar are very nice! This guitar does not take the back seat to the Red Label Nippon Gakki version at all. The action is very EZ to play and the TONE is simply wonderful..The Condition is very good++ to excellent vintage it is not mint,and it is not beat..it has natural minor play wear and dings associated with a well loved and played quality guitar it has all the rich patina now of a true vintage acoustic and is quite beautiful in its own right. This guitar has a good history of care its a California guitar where the climate is stable and quite favorable to guitars and was adult owned & loved. This guitar has the preferable a nice MEATY U Shaped Premium Mahogany one piece solid NECK, the frets are still good, The Rosewood is gorgeous too it looks to be Premium grade as well..You will not be disappointed with this guitar at this price the sound is rich like a an expensive $1,000+ guitar, big tone ...no repairs, structural damage..It comes with a new set of Martin strings installed ready to play out of the box. TRULY STUNNING, SEE MORE ... This baby is nice and sweet in person...very nice, , with a classic MARTIN LIKE feel & Sweet-Tone that simply is very hard to beat. The neck is STRAIGHT and the frets are fine w/plenty of life left,this baby plays real nice she stays in tune very well.. .nice workmanship & choice select materials used....You will not be disappointed with this FINE YAMAHA FG160 guitar with NICE TONE & SOUND...its a real Great Player ....This guitars condition is rated at a 8+ Very good+ or better and is very good to excellent condition only a few very minor dings can be seen. this is a real Vintage guitar" and as you can see its in Gorgeous shape!. no known problems cracks-breaks-repairs with no other known issues at all. This one is is 100% READY TO GO!!! its in very good to excellent condition a solid 8+ OR BETTER. This .
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Blue

Guild is the most underrated American premium guitar brand. Almost as good as a Martin & way better than most Gibsons, Guilds are typified by clear, crisp, even tone. While lacking the full bass & tinkly top end of a Martin, the evenness of tone is a selling point for many artists, along with the clarity. The maple models are especially bright & brassy in tone, making Guild a popular brand among rock stars in the 70s, their heydey, when some of the finest American guitars came out of their West Waverly Rhode Island plant. Top-end Guild acoustics are graced with an ebony fretboard more typically found on jazz models, slightly curved and beautifully inlaid with abalone fret markers. The Guild jumbo 12-string has been an especially prized instrument, and was for many years considered the best mass produced American 12 string available.


15 years ago a friend brought his in Miami i think. The guitar sounds amazing and the care for making it was awesome. The guitar have a cristal like sound and shines particulary well. Today i've acquire it from him by a fair trade: i purchased a new Falcon guitar, wich is the best brand here in Peru, and trade it for his Palmer. Is the best trade i've done. Not sure for him ;) My friend paid $100 for it 15 years ago and the model is PF20. Hope this information was helpfull
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.
Have you ever tried PRS acoustics before? They come with their SE line, and are fantastic quality guitars for the price. And their American acoustics are built by a small team of acoustic professionals. They only do "private stock" American acoustics now, but they used to have it as a regular lineup with about the same price tag as their custom 24. I've only ever heard them in video, but they sound amazing, and I've only ever heard good things about them. I would argue that PRS should have made that top 10 acoustic list at least over Fender or Epiphone.
by pedalhaven Band board (2x THE VALUE) post from  @ahmcginnis  &  @rdmontgomery85 ! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
The top of the guitar has the greatest impact on the tone quality of the instrument. The sound generated by the guitar's strings is transmitted by the bridge to the top where it is amplified. As discussed below under Tonewoods, the wood used for the top strongly influences the tonal characteristics of the guitar. The sound generated by the guitar's strings is transmitted by the bridge to the top where it is amplified. That is why, as mentioned above, the larger the soundboard, the larger the sound.
This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.
Anyone who wants a guitar that can handle both the expected twang and bluesy yield of a traditional Tele, along with the hard rock and punch of humbucking pickups will find a rather ideal companion in this guitar. I like it for studio guitarists in particular since it gets you a professional brand along with a wide range of tone capability that can help you be more accommodating to clients.
There is clearly a great deal that the guitarist can do for the sound by changing guitars, strings and amps, but from the perspective of the recording engineer it's also important to think about how the guitar cab is interacting with the room it's in. For example, Roy Thomas Baker mentions that he sometimes sets up the same guitar cab in different rooms because of the effect on the sound. Even if you're restricted to one room, a number of producers suggest trying out different positions of the amp in the room. Tony Visconti: "It's not so much that you're miking a guitar — you're miking a guitar in a room. I had a cellist in here recently, and I moved her until I got a good sound. Once I put her in one particular corner, her cello just sang — the room just filled up with the low end, and the sound exploded! A person who hasn't had years of experience might not have thought of doing that, but I could tell there was something lacking when she was in the centre of the room. That's mic technique. It's not so much the instrument; the room is very much part of the sound."
My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.

I always recommend spending a little more money in the beginning. If you start with a complete bottom of the line starter guitar, you are going to want to upgrade within a few months. So I recommend getting a more midrange priced guitar between $350-$800. It will be cheaper in the long run and if you decide playing guitar isn't for you, you will find it much easier to sell the nicer guitar.
What type of environment are you playing in? This is an important consideration when determining how many watts your amp should have. If you practice in an apartment surrounded by neighbors, a low wattage combo option is going to minimize potential conflicts. If you play live gigs in small club environments, it is possible to get by with as little as 50 watts. Larger venues require a larger amp that can move more air with its speaker. You should also take in to account how many other musicians you are playing with, and if there is a second guitarist, as you will want a tone cuts through the mix as opposed to getting buried.
James Burton, another famous Twin user, put it best: “If you can plug your guitar into an amp and make it sound good, that’s what it’s all about. The amp I really enjoy playing, especially when I’m traveling, is the Fender ’65 Twin Reverb. It’s got everything you need for live playing and it has great tone. That amp just works for me and it’s real trustworthy. When I travel on the road, I do use a little digital delay and maybe a little chorus, but I just like the sound of the guitar and playing something that I think people will appreciate and understand.”

Remember, when you choose to buy an electric guitar by itself (not as part of a ‘starter pack’), you’ll also need to buy an amp, guitar cable, and a tuner. These are extra costs that you should budget for on top of the cost of your new guitar. I recommend that beginners keep their first amp purchase conservative–both in price and size. Here’s what I’d recommend:
Another way of categorizing bass equipment manufacturers is by which part of the market they are targeting. While Peavey and Yorkville products are aimed at the generalist mass market, some bass equipment manufacturers, such as Acoustic Image or Walter Woods make expensive "boutique" equipment that is aimed at a niche market within the professional musician market. Acoustic Image amplifiers and speaker cabinets tend to be used by professional acoustic folk and jazz musicians, and Walter Woods amplifiers are associated with professional acoustic jazz bass players.
My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.
In the 2000s, new developments in bass amplifier technology include the use of lightweight neodymium magnets in some higher-priced cabinets and the use of lightweight, powerful Class D amplifiers in some combo amps and amp heads; both of these innovations have made transporting amps and cabinets easier. As well, some 2010s-era bass amps and heads have digital effects units and modelling amplifier features which enable the recreation or simulation of the sound of numerous well-known bass amps, including vintage tube amplifiers by famous brands (e.g., Ampeg SVT-Pro amp heads) and a range of speaker cabinets (e.g., 8x10" cabs). Digital amp and cabinet modelling also makes transporting bass amps and cabinets to gigs and recording sessions easier, because a bassist can emulate the sound of many different brands of very large, heavy vintage gear without having to bring the actual amps and cabs. Another trend for higher-priced and higher-wattage amps and cabinets aimed at professionals is providing Speakon speaker jacks in addition to, or in place of traditional 1/4" speaker jacks. Speakon jacks are considered safer for high wattage amps, since the bassist cannot accidentally touch the "live" parts of the cable end and they lock in, so there is less risk of accidental disconnection. As of 2017, a few digital amp and cabinet modelling amplifiers have a USB input or other computer input, to enable users to download new sounds and presets.
Guitar amp modeling devices and software can reproduce various guitar-specific distortion qualities that are associated with a range of popular "stomp box" pedals and amplifiers. Amp modeling devices typically use digital signal processing to recreate the sound of plugging into analogue pedals and overdriven valve amplifiers. The most sophisticated devices allow the user to customize the simulated results of using different preamp, power-tube, speaker distortion, speaker cabinet, and microphone placement combinations. For example, a guitarist using a small amp modeling pedal could simulate the sound of plugging their electric guitar into a heavy vintage valve amplifier and a stack of 8 X 10" speaker cabinets.
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
Gate – A dynamic effect that cuts off or lowers the volume of the output when the input is below a certain volume threshold. Once the input reaches the threshold the gate opens and allows the entire signal through. This is handy when placed in an amplifier’s effects loop for helping to eliminate hiss caused by high gain distortion when the guitarist is not playing.
MAKE YOUR OWN BODY BLANK Another neat trick to create your own body blank for $10 is to get a 3/4" thick peice of Birch Plywood that comes cut into a 4' by 2' board. Simply cut out two rectangular sections of the board that will accomodate your desing and wood glue them together. Be generous with the glue to make sure there aren't any spaces between the boards when you press the two together, clamp and stack weights on top of it so the two peices are joined firmly and let dry overnight. This gives you a a 1 1/2" thick body blank that is rigid and works great for electric guitars. You will have to go with a solid color paint when you finish it but you won't be able to tell the difference between it and the solid wood blank. Plus you'll save a good chunk of change that you can use towards good pickups and hardware. If you want to make the body a little thicker, you can get a 1/4" peice of birch and glue it between the two thicker peices. It's also a good idea to prerout any wire cavities in that 1/4" peice before you glue them together. That way you don't have to worry about drilling them later and ruining the top of your guitar body with the drill.
The RockJam RJEG02 is coming from the hills of RockJam’s successful 15 years of producing some of the best and highly selling brands in the market. This full size, quality guitar contains a whammy bar, a guitar strap, a 10-watt amp, spare strings, electric guitar picks and a gig bag—making it a complete package suitable for the beginner and professional electric guitar player.
From an appearance perspective, at least, the most important aspect of the guitar is the body’s finish. The finish of most electric guitars is either a nitrocellulose lacquer, a polyester, or a polyurethane. Nitrocellulose, for the unfamiliar, is highly flammable and also known as gun cotton. It is obtained by the nitration of cellulose, an important structural component of plants. In guitar coatings, nitrocellulose is blended with other compounds and organic solvents to create a lacquer. The solvents evaporate as the lacquer dries.
The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable."
I Shopped for a long time looking for a suitable nylon for both around the house and live performing. I ordered this Yamaha sight unseen and couldn't be happier with it. Fit and Finish is top notch. Price for value is incredible. playability is remarkably nice. Sound is great. I love the 14th fret to the body configuration vs my other nylons. The dual volume controls on the preamp give me a chance to glisten the high end in a band situation when my lines call for it. Honestly, i am a big fan of the Fishman electronics in my other acoustics, but this yamaha system leaves little to be desired. I did call yamaha support tto order a fitted soundhole cover and it took them a couple of days to get to me, but eventually called me until i
When considering the guitar from a historical perspective, the musical instrument used is as important as the musical language and style of the particular period. As an example: It is impossible to play a historically informed de Visee or Corbetta (baroque guitarist-composers) on a modern classical guitar. The reason is that the baroque guitar used courses, which are two strings close together (in unison), that are plucked together. This gives baroque guitars an unmistakable sound characteristic and tonal texture that is an integral part of an interpretation. Additionally the sound aesthetic of the baroque guitar (with its strong overtone presence) is very different from modern classical type guitars, as is shown below.

One difference today is the number of big-name guitar brands that make affordable acoustic and electric guitars, which are often versions of their pro-level instruments. These days, you can own a Les Paul or a Stratocaster as a beginner or intermediate player. Of course, they aren’t the same as the Gibson or Fender flagship models, but they are still darned good guitars based on those designs.


A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:
Kadence is an Indian manufacturer of musical instruments. They provide high-quality guitars at affordable prices. The wide range of guitars offered by Kadence starts from low-budget Frontier series of Acoustic guitars. The Slowhand series of premium Acoustic guitars having superior sound high quality finish. Kadence has become a favourite and one of the best guitar brands in the Indian market with its good quality products. The great look and feel and available at affordable prices make these guitars invaluable.
So, which are the best budget electrics guitars available today? We've gathered a selection of the electric guitars that we reckon offer the best bang for the buck in the sub-$/£500 market. You may recognise some of the perennial budget classics (hello - again - to the trusty Yamaha Pacifica), but there's a raft of high-scoring options out there for the more adventurous.

The original Les Paul featured a solid mahogany body capped with a maple top, which produced an instrument capable of many tonal variants with maximum sustain.  Although the first Les Pauls included two P-90 pickups, they are most well known for their two PAF humbucking pickups.  While many variants are produced, the double humbuckers put the Les Paul in a league of its own, separate from the offerings of Fender’s Telecaster and Stratocaster.
It was late 1969 early 1970. I was 13 years old and had been learning guitar for about a year when I was given what I considered to be the key to a world of freedom. Mum & Dad said it was ok for me to setup my room in a shed inside Dad’s garage. The shed was the size of a small bedroom, about eight by ten in the old measurements. It was originally built from scraps of recycled building material from a 100 year old house and was initially used as a tool shed.
Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.
Martin flat top guitars were made in various sizes. The bigger the guitar body, the better and more collectible the guitar. This is why guitar body size is so important to identify on a Martin flat top guitar. Starting in October 1930, Martin stamped the guitar body size right above the serial number inside the guitar. This makes identifying body size on October 1930 and later guitar very easy. For flat top guitars made before October 1930, the easiest way to figure out the body size is to use the flat top guitar body size chart below. Body sizes, pretty much from smallest to biggest, include O, OO, OOO, OM, D.
Palmer is a U.S.A. company based in Miami, FL. They contract out the building of cheap guitars to China and such; while reserving the high end, high priced guitars for those made in the states (like most guitar makers today). I had one that had a broken head stock. I paid $50 for it, just as a camp guitar. It sounded fair, but I could tell it was made cheap. I'd compare them to a cheap Cort, Mitchell, or Fender.


There’s an old proverb that goes, “If you can’t afford a Fender Strat, get a Fender Standard Strat.” We can’t agree more. This is the guitar company that changed the world of electric guitar, so you can’t go wrong with any Fender. But, if you have the money, go with the Standard over the Squire as that’s truly a beginner guitar. The Standard has features such as three single-coil pickups, synchronized tremolo with high-mass bridge block, and a ‘70s-style headstock logo. While some sites are selling this guitar close to $400, it’s more commonly found just under $500. 

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Other notable effects include the tube-driven Leslie speaker series, which originally modified the sound of electric organs (such as the Hammond B3) until guitarists like George Harrison (and the Beatles more generally) began to use it for spacey chorus, tremolo, and phaser tones. The classic 60s model, the Leslie 122, was housed in a huge 41-inch wooden laminate casing and comprised of two motors (essentially two electromechanical horns) that had been rotated to create a Doppler-effect-based vibrato. These horns were, in turn, picked up by the dual speaker units. The Leslie 122 wasn’t even built to connect to a guitar, but bull-headed technicians fudged the electronics and made it work anyway. The laminate wood wasn’t just for aesthetics, either: It functioned as a partial enclosure, ensuring mellower tones, and different woods created different vibratos.
The EB-28 bass was very similar to the guitar in appointments and controls. It had a 22-fret ebony fingerboard, 33.825″ scale, a DiMarzio P-style neck pickup and a DiMarzio J-style pickup at the bridge. It, too, carried a Schaller bridge and Schaller M-4 tuners. Around 4,854 each of these 28 Series guitars and basses were built between January 1981 and February 1982.
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
The wonders of digital delay arrived on the pedalboard in the early 1980s with what seemed massive capabilities of long delays, clean signal reproductions, and the endless fun of one, two, or up to 16 seconds of looping delay. In many cases, in the early days, reproductions weren’t really all that clean (or were cleaner than analog, but colder and harsher too), and many delays were prone to digital distortion if pushed, or poor resolution on the decay of the signal. Even so, the techno-power of the new technology stamped all over the bones of the old analog delay units, and for a time threatened to bury them entirely.
I'm going to break the electric guitar setup guide into five parts, which are all in the links below. It's important to note that the five parts be done in the order in which they're presented. If you have a truss rod that's out of whack, it makes no sense to move on and adjust the bridge. I realize this may be painfully obvious, but for the one person who may not get it, I'm talking to you. Good luck

A significant cosmetic change occurred in Japan in ’65, which can help determine dates. Previously, almost all models had plastic pickguards. In ’65, most models switched to striped metal guards, with the alternating matte stripes etched into the metal. Thus, if you find a guitar Teisco with a plastic guard, it’s probably from ’64 or early ’65. If it has a striped metal guard, it’s probably from ’65 or later.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.
So the actual vibrating length of the string should be the same in all cases, and if that's all that affects the magnetic field then none of the other things mentioned above should affect that signal. Do a simple test protocol such as plucking each string with the identical pick, record the waveform, overlay them and look for differences in the waveform.
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-02 is based on the iconic Telecaster electric guitar. It comes with a single-cutaway body that's crafted from paulownia, a China native wood that's known for being light. The pickguard is already set into the body when you get the package, but you'll need to solder the input jack, the volume and tone knobs, the bridge pickup and the selector switch before you start using it.
I have a genuine UK built carlsbro guitar combo amp. No cheap Chinese built chipboard here. Combo amp has twin channels,with twin master channels with footswitch selector pedal and a 12" celestion G12 speaker. Excellent condition. Good sparkling clean sound. With a boost overdrive switch on the clean channel as well. Has a separate distortion channel. And dual switch A/B selectable master chann ...

Speaker simulators are switchable filter sets designed to reproduce the EQ curves of a variety of speaker cabinet configurations (with varying degrees of success). The subsequent coloration is meant to replicate typical speaker sound and behavior, softening the harsh upper-midrange edges associated with amplifier distortion. Speaker simulator boxes are designed with direct  guitar-amp recording in mind, and are intended to remove the speaker cabinet and microphone link from the signal chain.
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I got this guitar just a couple months ago, not knowing much about guitars and not really knowing much about quality or anything I did a lot of research about what would be the best purchase for the right price for a beginner guitarist.. and I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG700, Fantastic reviews and ratings for beginners with great overall quality and overall sound, especially for the cost. I did a bit more research, comparing instruments and what not just to be sure I didn't purchase something that was made out of cardboard and shoe strings when I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG800, which was said to be the upgrade of the 700. I did some reading and though it didn't have as many reviews it was said to have improved sound and durability for the exact same price. Knowing that Yamaha has pretty much always been rather good quality
Frank Zappa was a lot of things. A writer of hilariously satirical lyrics. A composer of technically brilliant music. And a player of some of the most innovative and inventive guitar heard to date. His lightning fast fretting hand gave rise to some truly remarkable guitar improvisation. One of his best performances can be heard on the song, “Watermelon in Easter Hay.” “Muffin Man” is another great example of his titanic ability.
We don’t have many cutaway styles or Jose Ramirez guitars in our review list, but this is one of them, and it just happens to be a “hybrid,” or a classical guitar with an electronic pickup. Handcrafted in Spain, the 4NCWE model is a cedar-top with Indian rosewood on the back and sides. Like the other Ramirez guitars we have listed, this comes with a hard-shell case, so you won’t have to worry about the guitar being broken in transit.
The two common guitar amplifier configurations are: a combination ("combo") amplifier that includes an amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet, and a standalone amplifier (often called a "head" or "amp head"), which passes the amplified signal via a speaker cable to one or more external speaker cabinets. A wide range of speaker configurations are available in guitar cabinets—from cabinets with a single speaker (e.g., 1×10" or 1×12") or multiple speakers (e.g., 2×10", 4×10" or 8x10").

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This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.

You wouldn’t guess that this is a low-end electric acoustic, even on close inspection, because the build quality is superb. This translates to some great tone. While it might not have quite the same ring and sustain as an expensive model, only real audiophiles are likely to notice. You get a solid spruce top, good quality hardware, and Fishman electronics.
I have been a musician for many years now. I have played in everything from metal bands to acoustic coffee house sets to worship/praise bands. I feel that with these many years of playing I have earned a sharp ear, no pun intended. By that I mean that I have developed an ear not only to hear pitches, tones, and notes, but I can also hear good and bad timbre. I feel that Taylor guitars simply produce the best timbre of any acoustic guitar I have played. Naturally, all of my acoustics are Taylor! With that, thanks to Bob Taylor for doing it best and doing it right the first time!

On a Gibson type (like the Les Paul, 335 or SG) there are four knobs, one set of volume and tone controls for each of two pickups. The top two are volume and tone for the neck (Rythm) pickup. The bottom two are for the bridge (Treble) pickup. In the middle switch position, both sets of controls are available. If you have a Gibson type with three pickups the control layout can vary from instrument to instrument. The Epiphone Les Paul SG with three pickups has three volumes (one for each pickup) and a single (or master) tone control just next to the output jack. The Ace Frehley Les Paul (3 pickups) layout is such where the neck (Rythm) pickup is controlled by the top pair, the bridge (Treble) pickup is controlled by the bottom pair and the middle switch position activates the bridge and middle pickups that are controlled by the bottom set (Treble) of knobs.
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best electric guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
Certain guitar brands are renowned and respected worldwide, and you don't have to be a player to be aware of them. Companies like Fender, Gibson, Epiphone, Ibanez, Yamaha and many others have built a solid reputation for providing exceptionally crafted guitars. In fact, these names are consistently endorsed by the greatest players of all time. However, you'll find more than enough guitar brands from lesser known manufacturers as well; these smaller companies take enormous pride in offering models of equally extraordinary playability, tone and construction.
Then, there are the venues where all you get is a vocal mic or two, where you're left to curate your sound all by yourselves. This category accounts for the vast majority of places a young band will play, and if you can hone your tone here you can hone it anywhere. What's most important is that you keep your amps low enough to allow the drummer to play at about 80% intensity. That way, the audience can actually hear all those important vocals, and when your drummer kicks it up to 100%, and you stomp on your distortion pedal, the audience will actually feel a shift.

This is a tricky one, because I’d hate to see anyone miss out on a bargain. Unless you really know what you’re doing, buying a used guitar is a risky venture. Definitely, you shouldn’t buy a second-hand guitar without seeing or trying it out. Again, sticking with well-known brands is wise. Look carefully for worn fret boards (pitted holes under frequently-played notes) and grooves in the frets themselves. Check along the neck to see if it’s not too bent— it’s supposed to be slightly curved. Getting problems like these fixed professionally can be expensive and you might as well buy something new in the first place. The bottom line here is that high-quality instruments that have been properly maintained don’t lose any value. A good second-hand guitar should cost you as much as a good new one — but yes, those bargains are out there, too.
2. Orange Micro Dark w/1x8 Cabinet ($288): Who doesn’t love tiny yet mighty lunchbox amps and the speakers they rest upon? The Micro Dark head uses a tube front end to push 20-watts of power and coupled with a 1x8” speaker, you’ll be able to get awesome tube tone for a fraction of the price and size of a bigger rig. This little duo is well-equipped to handle clean and overdriven tones whether you are cracking the volume on the speaker or playing through your headphones.
Then I remembered Kent Guitars. I thought it would be pretty cool to have a guitar with my last name on it. Although they didn't appear on the U.S. west coast very often, if at all, (I would remember them if they did), It turns out there is a whole crapload of them out there. Information is scattered around the internet in bits and pieces and nobody who was making them at the time is talking about it. So I have started gathering information, limiting myself to the 500,600,700, and 800 series models. The only ones I am interested in owning are the 700 and 800s. I have a 740, an 820, 823, 833, and 834. I may never get the chance to buy another.
To understand the difference between parallel and series wiring of two pickups, check out the two diagrams. In the first, the two pickups are wired in parallel, so both pickups’ inputs and outputs are connected together. This is one of the main reasons why a Strat usually has a very bright tone—parallel wiring allows the signal from each pickup to reach the output jack by the shortest possible route. The result is that the high frequencies reach the output jack almost unchecked, giving your Strat that sparkling sound we all love so much.
That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.
Two-hand tapping AKA Emmett Chapman technique involves both hands tapping single notes (less often) or chordal (more often) instances. Even if you’re experienced tapper of one or more approaches, two-hand tapping is a whole new world. Keep in mind your pick hand will need time to develop compared to your fret hand, which by default has had a massive head start on fretting notes.
With a history dating back to 1833, Martin acoustics rank as the most historic and iconic guitars ever made. From the small-bodied parlor guitars of the 19th-century to the landmark dreadnoughts of the 1930s and beyond, Martins have and continue to define the form and sound of the instrument. Take a look here for examples every type of vintage Martin acoustic including icons like the D-28, D-35, 000-18 and many more.

For several years now Godin have been producing some of the most sonically versatile guitars available with their combination of regular pickups, piezo pickups and synth pickups built into their higher end guitars. Note that the synth pickups are 13-Pin and compatible with the Roland GR series guitar synths - if you want MIDI you have to first plug into a Roland synth then take the MIDI out from the synth.


A significant cosmetic change occurred in Japan in ’65, which can help determine dates. Previously, almost all models had plastic pickguards. In ’65, most models switched to striped metal guards, with the alternating matte stripes etched into the metal. Thus, if you find a guitar Teisco with a plastic guard, it’s probably from ’64 or early ’65. If it has a striped metal guard, it’s probably from ’65 or later.

OM-28: Similar to the 000-28 model in body size and ornamentation, but uses a 25.4″ scale, 1-2/4″ nut spacing, and 2-3/8″ string spacing at the bridge. Also known as the “orchestra” model, so named because of its association with banjo players transitioning to guitar in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The 14-fret neck-to-body design was designed to allow greater upper fret access, and thus feel more comfortable to banjo players accustomed to full acces the length of a 24-fret + neck.

I think Washburn is one of the best out there, From their A series, to HM to x series they all rock. I've had a a-10 since 1980 and it plays great! I have also got the reissues still great quality over the years. The only issue I've seen is Washburn's commitment to catch/keep some artist. Either they can't keep um or they don't want to. Can't see it being the later. Its very difficult to try one of their pieces out as their are very few stores that even stock them. In the 80's early 90s they were everywhere, now?
The Orange Crush is all about style and portability. It’s distictive look is due to the Orange basket weave Tolex, woven speaker grille, beading and legendary hieroglyphs (PiX) and of course the Orange signature ‘picture frame’ edging. It’s not as feature rich as other models, but that’s the point. It’s simple, portable and just a good basic combo amp. It’s also available in black (why?) and retails for around $99.

Interesting cosmetics and great playing 4-string, Factory, but "custom re-built" Fretless bass. Appears to be re-finished. I had to buy this, as I recognized it immediately as a great "player", fretless bass. Adjustable P-J passive / dynamic pickup configuration sounds great. Separate volume and tone controls. Appears to be a "re-finish", in interesting "Fleck-Tone" gray paint. We think it is not the original finish, but it could be original. Someone did an incredible job it if is a re-fin, as the routed edges are perfectly finished and all parts had to have been removed with room made for the extra finish thickness. No worries about finger prints with this one. Un-bound, graphite? or other synthetic material, ebony black fingerboard  w/ dot inlay side markers on a solid mahogany neck with a 4-bolt neck joint. Black anodized tail piece perfect and rust-free. Finger board near new condition. Features 4 high quality, "sealed" tuning machines that work perfectly and hold tune. Plays and sounds great! Lots of fun. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!). 34.5" scale length. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .040 "Round-wound" strings (yes I know flat wounds are more correct for fretless, but I prefer a bit more brightness. You are free to install flats once you own it). No case or bag included.

C.F. Martin & Company is a U.S. guitar manufacturer established in 1833 byChristian Frederick Martin. Martin is highly regarded for its steel-string guitarsand is a leading mass-manufacturer of flattop acoustics. Martin instruments can cost thousands of dollars and vintage instruments often cost six figures. The company has also made several models of electric guitars and electric basses.

Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.
Every beginner guitarist deserves to learn on an instrument that's built by experienced craftsman who use only the finest materials. However, for many novice players, it's difficult to know for sure what's considered a high quality instrument. To make things easier, many popular guitar brands offer guitar value packages. These packages consist of all the essential pieces of equipment that a learning guitarist would use in the developmental stages of their playing. Within this section, you'll find more than enough guitar value package options to choose from.
Once you’ve gotten your needs squared away, you’re still going to need to pick an amp. And even if you’re certain as to what you want, it can still be difficult to choose. But that’s where we come in: we’ve rounded up the following 10 amps we believe are the top-tier options for beginner guitarists. So skip the hassles and heckles of guitar store salesmen and choose from one of these superb starter amps.
To build an electric guitar, start by cutting out the guitar body from a piece of wood like maple or swamp ash. Then, bolt a pre-made neck onto the body and attach the bridge. Next, install the pick-ups, volume control, and guitar cord. Finish by putting your strings on the guitar and testing out your instrument. If you want to make the process easier, you could try purchasing an electric guitar kit.
I have been playing Guitar and Bass for over 40 years. The items in this article not only enlightened me by explaining things that I did not even know, It helped me decide to make some changes to my current guitar, rather than spend a bunch of money on a new guitar that would probably be inferior to what I currently own. THANK YOU to the folks who furnished this information.

This guitar sounds tighter and is less loud than a dreadnought. But its construction warms its tone considerably. Its owners say that its tone is well balanced – clear and punchy but still warm. It offers clarity in the higher registers, but some boom in the lower registers. For that reason, the LL16 is suited to almost any style of playing. It will not, however, be as punchy as the Taylor 210 or as round sounding as the Blueridge.

Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.


Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.
Two solidstate Tempo beginner amps were offered in ’71. These had black tolex covers, front-mounted controls and a rectangular logo with block letters on the grille. The Tempo No. 158 ($65) had an 8″ speaker, 10 watts of power, tremolo with speed control, reverb with depth control, three inputs, volume, tone and a black grillcloth surrounded by white beading. The Tempo No. 136 ($31.50) offered a 6″ speaker, six watts, three inputs, volume and tone. The grillcloth was dark (probably black) with horizontal flecks.

First Act is a very peculiar guitar company. They have guitars that sell at Toys R Us that will literally fall apart in your hands. They sell pedals that are a complete joke, leaving you with the impression that they must be a bad, bad joke. Then something strange happened, I did a little research and found some info that was stunning. First Act has a couple of guitar lines that are some of the finest guitars I have ever seen, heard, or even read about. They have guitars that go for $3000 plus and are better guitars than any person commenting on this board will ever have the opportunity of even being in the same room with (including myself) Who would have thought?! Go figure.
When it comes to classic British amp manufacturers, Orange is certainly one of the most legendary. And while many of their amps are pretty inaccessible unless you have many many zeroes in your bank account, they do offer a few superb inexpensive options – one of the best being the Micro Terror half stack you see here. Sold as a set, this tiny titan of an amp has all the brand’s classic style and sound in a package that’s just a fraction of the size. You might think that, with such limited functionality, it’s a bit of a one trick pony – and it is, except it does that one trick better than anyone else. Of course, if you’re looking for a more aggressive hard rock sound, you could always opt for the Micro Dark version for the same price.
4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
Joan Armatrading, Roy Clark, Jim Croce, Kevin Cronin, Neil Diamond, Al Di Meola, Robert Fripp, Mick Jagger, Greg Lake, Adrian Legg, Paul McCartney, Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Jim Messina, Steve Morse, Eddie Rabbitt, Kenny Rogers, Richie Sambora, Tom Scholz, Seal, Bob Seger, Paul Simon, Rick Springfield, Eddie Van Halen, Josh White, and Nancy Wilson;[32]
Of course, as with most signature guitars, it’s the looks that really steal the show. You do of course get the beautiful diving bird inlays that PRS are known for, and then the top has this beautifully clean look to it that just screams quality. The sound is still gorgeous though, with a really nice crisp feel to it that lends itself to more technical fingerwork that you’d expect of Lifeson.
Effects and effects units—stompboxes in particular—have been celebrated by pop and rock musicians in album titles, songs and band names. The Big Muff, a fuzzbox manufactured by Electro-Harmonix,[49] is commemorated by the Depeche Mode song "Big Muff" and the Mudhoney EP Superfuzz Bigmuff. Nine Inch Nails, Pink Floyd, George Harrison, They Might Be Giants and Joy Division are among the many musicians who have referenced effects units in their music.[50]
I love squire guitars because they are cheap and affordable. I love the fact that I now have a stratocaster so if you think that they suck think again. I can play under the bridge and scar tissue etc on my squire stratocaster honestly for those that can't afford a fender this is the best thing that has ever happened to me because I can now play an electric guitar which is not only good but it is brilliant
Vibrato design is slightly changed and enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding a fair amount of firmness to the tone. Likewise, they also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Talking about pickups, pac 112v is equipped with 5-way blade pickup selector. Similarly, master tone and volume controls are also provided for the neatest output.

You’ve decided to pick up an axe and learn to shred like one of the pros. While mastering the guitar is no easy feat itself, before you even start jamming you’ll probably find yourself looking through site after site trying to find the right instrument. It’s hard. There’s an expansive list of components to be taken into account: body styles, wood types, pickups, bridges, necks — and that’s just scratching at the surface.
For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.
Mundt Music of Longview, LLC is your one stop guitar shop. Located at 2312 Judson Road, we have everything that you need whether you’re buying your first guitar or adding to your growing collection. Make sure to join us in store on October 10, 2016 at 6:30pm, for our “Taylor Road Show” event. Guests will enjoy an evening of guitar talk and demos with Taylor factory staff and guitar makers from El Cajon, CA. It’s an event that any guitar enthusiast won’t want to miss.

Browse guitar sheet music for all levels of guitar players. Whether you're a beginner starting from a clean slate or a guitar shredder gigging on a nightly basis, our guitar sheet music collection has everything you need. Find thousands of guitar method and guitar etude books as well as your favorite guitar songbooks from Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Metallica, The Beatles and more. Looking for digital guitar music, guitar chord books, guitar play alongs and guitar transcriptions? No problem. Take a load off, put up your feet and browse and buy guitar sheet music today.
This one SOLD pictured has been SOLD OUT: This is one of my favorite vintage Alvarez guitars and is always truly a very good surprise just how great these sound / impressive and I have collected more than several over the years of this very model vintage era lawsuit guitar in AMAZING Condition. Here we have a wonderful and very clean example of a Vintage Japanese Acoustic its a late 1970's great Alvarez 5056 with the most intricately detailed inlay work everywhere on the body.... the front & back in Abalone & the fingerboard is rich - dark and wavy grained it looks to be Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood and has the Gorgeous Tree of Life in mother of pearl & abalone inlayed into the rich rosewood fingerboard WoW!,even the bridge has Mother of pearl inlaid, (you should have a real good look to come to your own conclusions if its something you like ) and the frets are in very good original condition... action is very good nice & low adjustable either way with no buzzing anywhere on the fretboard real nice playing example here folks.. The finish has a natural golden patina as seen to it and this guitar is strikingly beautiful. No cracks, no repairs, very good - excellent vintage used condition and is JVG rated at 9/10 WoW!... She's very EZ on the eyes to say the least and a premium performer this vintage piece has had over 33+ years to age and mellow and was a one owner California guitar in above better than average condition... no splits or cracks or separations or repairs ever... I believe this to be the cleanest best playing vintage 5056's we have ever had in JVG or seen for that matter. This one is a real pleasure to play! HERE IS A LINK TO CUT & PASTE TO SEE MANY MORE PICS OF THIS INSTRUMENT: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/Alvarez5059TreeofLifeVintage?authkey=Gv1sRgCNLn6LnEg8bmCQ#slideshow/5613001158042817730 .
7) Yamaha quality can't be beat. I just returned from my friend's house and noticed his $1,000 Martin box splitting because of the dry Las Vegas climate. And, no I'm not a believer in guitar humidifiers because I believe a guitar should be made for the real world and not so delicate that it needs a humidifier. My friend and fellow old-time musician who has been working at Guitar Center here in Vegas for many years has seen them all come back over time because of splitting or warping except one brand that is... You guessed it, Yamaha! The reason you find them back ordered from time to time is because Yamaha actually gives their wood time to cure properly unlike other manufacturers who tend to rush their products out the door. And, this guitar is for my kid and for travel which means it needs to be exceptionally tough and well-made:)
A Customer brought this guitar into us in horrible shape. He had stored this guitar in the basement for a number of years with no issues, however in the fall of 2007 a large flood swept through our area filling his basement, and in turn his guitar, with water for almost a week. Needless to say, by the time he was able to get the guitar out it had been heavily damaged. When he brought this guitar into us it was completely covered in mud and river residue, the electroics were completely shot, and the hardware had begun to oxidize. We began by completely taking apart the guitar. We thoroughly cleaned each part of the guitar, inside and out. Once completed we were actually able to save all the original hardware from the guitar and the finish had withstood the flood. The electronics had to be completely replaced however. Staying true to the guitar we used as much era specific parts as we could find. As you can see, by the time we were done with the guitar you could hardly tell anything had happened to it!

Cole Clark guitars are made largely using Australian indigenous timbers. Solid timber is used in preference to plywood.[2] Clark’s discovery of the best type of wood for his guitars came whilst searching in Australia in 1998. He came across Bunya Pine, and found out that it had the perfect characteristics for the sound board on an acoustic guitar. Whilst researching this type of wood, Clark also discovered that Bunya is about 18% stronger than Spruce wood, which a traditional choice when constructing a guitar. Blackwood is also another favourite material of Cole Clark’s for building their guitars (http://www.coleclarkguitars.com/technology.asp).


No-load pots – also used by Fender, these pots have the clockwise lug disconnected from the resistive strip within, resulting in infinite resistance between the wiper and the other outer lug when turned fully clockwise. These are sometimes used as tone controls, to remove the load on the pickup(s) presented by the pot and the tone capacitor when turned to 10.[10]

To load a SoundFont in sforzando you can just drag and drop to the desktop or click Instrument, import and navigate to your SoundFont. Another good free program for PC is MuseScore and loading a new SoundFont is done by putting the file in the default Musescore SoundFont folder then selecting View, Sythesizer, Add and Set as Default. Musescore has basic editing capabilities as well as an excellent sheet music/score viewer and editor.
Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.

ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.


While known primarily for their acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars, Takamine produced a limited run of very high quality solid body electric guitars in the early 1980’s.[1] These are the GX100 (Gibson Explorer body style), GX200 (proprietary type body style similar to a Stratocaster, stop tailpiece bridge), GX200-T or TB, (same as GX200 only with a tremolo bridge) GZ300 (proprietary design) and GZ340 (proprietary design). The GX200 and GZ340 contain factory DiMarzio made pickups.[2]
Shimming a neck: The best shims are one piece and the full size of the neck pocket. For this veneer from the hardware store works well. However, it is very hard to get an even taper on these. The next best option is to use masking tape. Masking tape is paper which is wood fiber so it's almost as good as a solid shim, and much better than the smaller shims which leave large gaps which impedes the transfer of vibration, and could cause problems later on. To make a tape shim, lay strips of tape side by side perpendicular to neck, and add layers to provide the taper. i.e. stripe 1- 1 layer, stripe 2- 2 layers, stripe 3- 3 layers. Place the neck in the pocket, mark outline of pocket, and trim just inside outline.
Chorus pedals actually make your guitar sound like there are a variety of different guitarists playing the same thing that you are playing, but with a different guitar and slightly out of time with you. This effect makes everything you play sound a little bit ‘warbly’ and thickens up your guitar or bass lines. We recommend experimenting with these as you can use them subtly to add weight to your sound or as a full-blown effect that completely takes over your signal.
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.

This Ibanez has a flamed sycamore top, and delivers a well balanced sound unplugged or plugged in. It has a great finish that is referred to as vintage violin. Owners of this guitar say it sounds great as the similarly priced Seagulls and Yamahas. The price has recently dropped on this guitar, which was a pain point for many owners. At $250 it’s a steal given the quality. The onboard pre amp contains a tuner, which is nice for beginners to always stay in tune. The slim neck will also make for great playability. Click here for more pictures and details.

Gibson has produced three Jimmy Page signature models. The first was issued in the mid-1990s. It was based on a stock Les Paul Standard of the time (rather than the more prestigious and historically correct 1958/1959 re-issues issued by the Gibson Custom Shop). The modifications were based on Jimmy Page‘s “#2” 1959 Les Paul, which had been modified with push-pull potentiometers on all four control knobs, as well as mini push-pull switches under the pickguard. This first version of the Jimmy Page Signature did not have the mini-switches under the pickguard, nor did it replicate the custom-shaved neck profile of Jimmy Page’s guitar, but it did include the four push-pull pots. With all four pots pushed down, the guitar operated as normal. Pulling up the volume pot for the Bridge or Neck pickup turned the respective pickup into a single coil, rather than humbucking pickup. Pulling up the tone pot for the Neck pickup changed Bridge & Neck pickups wiring from series (stock) to parallel. Pulling up the tone pot for the Bridge pickup put Bridge & Neck pickups out of phase with each other. The first iteration of the Jimmy Page Signature utilized Gibson’s then-current high-output humbuckers: a 496R in the neck position and a 498T at the bridge.
What makes this one of the best electric guitar amp for beginners is Peavey’s TransTube preamp technology which provides a realistic tube amp tone and response, with the price and stability of a solid state amp – the best of both amp styles. Loud enough to rock, yet the headphone jack allows you to rock in isolation without disturbing others. The line in lets you plug in a CD player or mp3 player to jam with your favorite bands. It currently retails for $79.99.
The company was within three months of going out of business before it was bought by Henry E. Juszkiewicz, David H. Berryman, and Gary A. Zebrowski in January 1986.[18] Gibson's wholesale shipments in 1993 were an estimated $70 million, up from $50 million in 1992. When Juszkiewicz and Berryman took over in 1986, sales were below $10 million.[19] New production plants were opened in Memphis, Tennessee, as well as Bozeman, Montana. The Memphis facility is used for semi-hollow and custom shop instruments, while the Bozeman facility is dedicated to acoustic instruments.[20]

Get a custom drawn guitar or bass wiring diagram designed to your specifications for any type of pickups, switching and controls and options. Just complete the guitar wiring diagram order form with your custom specifications and our designers will do the rest. Our custom diagrams are easy to read, affordable and delivered by email for FREE! To order a custom diagram, select the number of pickups on your instrument below and complete the diagram order form.

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There are any number of different variations which can give a guitarist his or her tone. The combinations and possibilities are mind-blowing. You can take your pick from the type of guitar used, the hardware and technology used in the guitar, the amplifier you’re plugged into, the room in which you’re playing, the level of technique within your fingers. The list goes on. Typically any one of these factors could make the exact same rig sound completely different in the hands of another player. Yet technical mastery and high-end or vintage equipment are usually a by-product of having played the instrument for A Very Long Time. What about when you’re at the start of your playing career, and you’re looking for a quick shot in the tonal arm? Or you’re more accomplished and looking to experiment with different sounds and textures. It’s here that guitar effect pedals start becoming more and more attractive. But what are they?
Often the names and appearances of these pedals will give you a clue as to what types of sounds they produce. Otherwise it's a good idea to look at interviews and endorsements to learn which distortion stompboxes your guitar heroes are using. Also, be sure to check out our videos and audio clips to get a sense of each distortion pedal’s capabilities.
Cap in series with a resistor (shouldn’t matter which comes first). Kinman recommends this for single coils but it works rather well for humbuckers too. I installed 1nF cap in series with a 130K resistor and it works awesome. Resistor is there to limit the effect of the cap and having it in series with the cap means it shouldn’t affect pot taper as much. Larger cap means wider frequency range, so treble jump isn’t as sudden. So far, this is my favorite treble bleed circuit.
When making solder joints to switches and pots, the lug and wire should be heated by the tip of the iron and the solder pressed (or flowed) onto the joint. In this manner you can avoid cold solder joints as both components are properly heated prior to the application of solder. Melting solder on the tip of the iron does not insure the actual components are being heated properly.
Frankly, learning to play a song the Rocksmith way is exhilarating. If I (Carl) had looked up the chords online, I could have played the song just as easily. But I might have stopped to scroll down on the computer screen or to relearn the first half of the song until I got it down pat. After a few progressively more difficult play-throughs on Rocksmith, I'd memorized the song without even thinking too hard about it.
Understandably, the Blackstar ID:Core Stereo 20 V2's main selling point is its versatility, and this is reflected in the reviews. Sound quality also got a lot of thumbs up, with many describing the amp as full sounding, thanks to its stereo speaker configuration. For something this versatile, the amp's ease of use also gets commended quite often, with some finding it easy to dial in different sounds. Finally, a good number of users find the amp's overall build quality to be solid and reliable.

The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.
Anyone without the skills and ability to shred well technically should not be on a top list ever. Any top list without Buckethead is incomplete since he has the highest ability. Anyone that says Buckethead can not play with soul/feel/emotion/blah blah blah are misinformed and have not listened to enough of him them self. Buckethead has over 50 albums so it is hard to find the good stuff since a lot of his work is experimental, but his good stuff is the best stuff. Oh wow just before pushing post I just found yet another awesome older Buckethead song… Brazos.
Some early Valco instruments continued to make it into the marketing pipeline – early on, at least. Probably as a sign of the increasing difficulty in getting product, the Spring/Summer 1942 Sears catalog sported a full complement of Supro guitars, essentially the ’41 line, all labeled with the newly-chosen Sears brand name, Silvertone. Shown in the ’42 Sears catalog were the Supro Capitan and Supro Rio, now renamed the Silvertone Crest (carved torch logo) and Silvertone Spanish (no logo), respectively. The Capitan had a standard trapeze tailpiece rather than the Dobro variety, with permanent cord coming out of the top of the lower bout!
With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:

Now, for most players, deciding what should go where on a signal chain simply came through trial and error along with a good dose of common knowledge. And while a player’s signal chain should be his or her own, those of you out there new to creating a solid signal chain can benefit from some of the general 'rule of thumb' type of advice that can get you started in the right direction.
Just in...We are proud to offer this fine rare example of a Washburn vintage instrument .... This is super guitar! .. Wow talk about some beautiful exotic woods have a look at the Koa sides & back ,its a Solid Sitka Spruce top, Super high AAA grade 3 piece flamed Ribbon Mahogany & walnut neck with the Martin style Diamond Volute on back.... bone nut & saddle this is first class sound & playability & craftsmanship for a song.... Just look at that workmanship.... Great Tone woods with some ager to her now she a real Singer all right... rare to see one of these with such exotic woods makes it specially beautiful. I would compare the feel & tone and volume to that of the Old FG180 Yamaha's very similar ...Just in and its SUPER CLEAN collectors example so get her before she is gone... any questions .... ask please Thanks for your interest and looking....
I think I understand the value of not being tied to those things so your own technique can flourish -- not relying on anything, really. I think that it's cool to keep an eye on your purism sometimes. I'm glad I can pick up an acoustic guitar, and if it's not sounding too good, I just put it into a tuning until it does. I also have an appreciation for the almost novelty factor of being able to hit a couple of switches and go from one amp sound to another.
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.

If you want to invest in a guitar that replicates the famous ’70 guitars, look no further than the model offered by Fender Vintage. This product was designed to feature a basswood body that is a replica of the famous workhorse Fender guitars. Moreover, the device has a “C” shape neck that was constructed from maple, and that is said to be quite resistant.
Bruce Springsteen has always had a not-so-secret weapon: "I got signed in the pack of new Dylans," he told Rolling Stone, "but I could turn around, kick-start my Telecaster and burn the house down." Springsteen didn't make any technical breakthroughs on guitar, but few players are better at coaxing emotion from steel and wood: witness the surf-rock recklessness of the "Born to Run" solo, the junkyard-dog bite of "Adam Raised a Cain" and the melancholy twang of "Tougher Than the Rest."
It has been stated repeatedly that the CEO is a challenge, toxic whatever and yes, all of it is true. Many if not most people who take a management position here don't last a year. This is especially true at Corporate where at any given time half of the positions are open because employee turnover is off the charts and they are horrible at recruiting talent to get replacements hired. That's a really bad combination to have in a company. So the first question you have to ask yourself is: do you want to show a job that only lasted six to twelve months on your resume with a company that has a positive, almost cult like global brand image? Or another way, how will you explain your short tenure to the next company you interview with and make them believe you weren't the problem? When I was outside Nashville and told people I worked for Gibson 100% of them said "that's a great company" even though they had no clue. It's highly likely your next potential employer will think that way as well.
Tonhöhe ebenfalls gehoben und kann auf die gewünschte Tonlage eingestellt werden. Der Ibanez DOWNSHIFTER erlaubt es, die Tonlage einer Saite durch einfache Hebelbetätigung auf eine vorgegebene gewünschte Position zu senken. Um präzises Tuning für sowohl Auf- und Ab-Positionen zu erzielen, müssen Sie beide Hebeleinstellungen vor Betätigung des Downshifters voreinstellen.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Maple & Mahogany - Figured - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 4 - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Oil
The core of this guitar is its twin horn double cutaway mahogany body, which follows after the original SG. But as expected in this entry-level price range, they exchanged what's supposed to be a mahogany neck for maple with 12" radius rosewood fingerboard. Specifications remain faithful to the original, with a scale length of 24.75" and 1.68" nut width. The generic pickups installed sound surprisingly good for the price, but like many have done, the pickups can be easily swapped out for more hard hitting humbuckers to get more out of the guitar.

Another name that is usually associated with PRS is Carlos Santana. He has a number of guitars that bear his name, and this one is probably the most popular one. It’s affordable, sounds great and plays like a dream. After mere hours playing it, I’ve realized just how expressive you can be with it. It impressed me enough to take a high place on my list of guitars that I have to get. Needless to say, it didn’t take me long to make one a part of my collection.
Epiphone does a great job of making instruments for all levels of guitar players, especially those looking for affordable acoustic and electric instruments. Epiphone is owned by Gibson, and therefore can make official copies of Gibson guitars like the Les Paul, SG and Hummingbird. Many are good enough for pro players to use in the studio or onstage.
One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.

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“It was just a different world,” Ford says. “There was ‘Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert,’ Ed Sullivan, Dick Clark, and they would have one band on and you would wait all week to see who that band was going to be. And you could talk about it all week long with your friends — ‘Saturday night, Deep Purple’s going to be on, what are they going to play?’ — and then everybody’s around the TV like you’re watching a football game.”

Best Answer:  Half of playability is how your hands interact with the neck. Me, for instance, I've found that BC Rich necks are just too big... I can play it, but it's uncomfortable enough to make it a little akward. On the other hand, ultrathin necks like those you find on many Jacksons (Dinky's, etc) are a little too thin, over time my hands actually hurt from playing them. I discovered that I was playing them too hard, but even beyond that they're just too thin. For me, LTD necks are where its at for me. Rather inexpensive ones, EC-50 and EC-100QM, but once I upgraded the electronics, got a setup, and replaced the pickups, I was happy with them.

Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.
A switch is a device that segments networks into different subnets. Segmenting the network into different subnets keeps one network from overloading with traffic. Therefore, a switch forwards all data in the data layer and sometimes the network layer as it filters the data. A switch allows a connection to be established and it terminates a connection when there is no longer a session to support. Prior to switches there were hubs. Hubs also connected multiple independent (connected) modules in a network, but they were not as efficient as switches. Since most switches work in Layer 2, and not in Layer 1 like a hub, they are better at filtering data. A switch looks for Ethernet MAC addresses, keeps a table (the bridge forwarding table) of these addresses, and navigates the switch between ports. The switch prevents collisions and gives full bandwidth to each connection at the switch port. Switches save bandwidth by only sending traffic to destinations that have traffic. When a switch switches Ethernet frames, they monitor the traffic for the response from that frame and see what device, on what port, responds to that flooded frame. There are different types of switches that range from "dumb" switches that lack manageability and can monitor only 4-8 ports to "managed" switches that can get statistics on switch traffic, monitor connections, and hard-code up to 96 port speeds and duplex. Then again, there are "chassis-based" switches with blades or cards that perform not just switching, but routing and intrusion detection too! If you are interested in this, look into Cisco's Catalyst 6500 Series. Another type of switch preferred by large enterprises is the "Layer 3 Switch," because it has the functionality of a router .

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The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is still a relatively inexpensive option for a beginner amp. In terms of the basic features, it isn’t quite the best value on the market. However, it delivers a better made, better designed beginner amp at a very reasonable price. Beginners that can afford to spend a bit more, but want a standard beginner amp might find the extra cost worth it for the extra quality of the Orange Crush PiX CR12L.
P good...So Fun...Like most console gamers, I have greatly enjoyed the "Arkham" Trilogy by Rocksteady Studios, I say that because I did not complete Arkham Origins (Dev by Warner Bros.), however I did beat that now infamouse Deathstrokeboss fight but after that the game felt very recylced and I told my self I would for next-gen Arkham installment by Rocksteady....I was a fan of all three Batman games that came out last gen. Arkham Knight changes the formula just enough to keep it fresh, along with amazing graphics (best water effects ever) and Dual Shock 4 controller options, I know I'll be playing this game for quite some time.
Overdrive / distortion pedals are one of the most important effects on your board and are very much a personal taste. The ones on my pedal board change all the time, I have more than a few that I really like; Analogman King Of Tone, Pete Cornish SS-3, Ibanez Tube Screamer, Boss Blues Driver, Nobels ODR-1,  Zen Drive, MXR Distortion +... and I like and use all of them. Probably my all-time favourite os the King Of Tone, but on a budget, the Nobels ODR-1 is great value and runs with the very best!
So, which are the best budget electrics guitars available today? We've gathered a selection of the electric guitars that we reckon offer the best bang for the buck in the sub-$/£500 market. You may recognise some of the perennial budget classics (hello - again - to the trusty Yamaha Pacifica), but there's a raft of high-scoring options out there for the more adventurous.
As mentioned above, the Martin DSR2 comes with an all-solid wood body, with traditional solid spruce as its top. In conjunction with the solid sapele back and sides, this configuration produces premium level Martin dreadnought tones, albeit with stripped down aesthetics. The neck is as familiar as it gets, with its 1.75" nut width and 25.4" scale length.
Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Antique Electronic Supply makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.
Next popular guitar brands are Gibson Corporation which deals with highly appreciated guitars. It is increasing growing day by day due to its innovative characteristics and awesome product quality. If you are looking for high quality guitar at higher price, then go for Gibson Acoustic Guitar which will fulfill both the requirements. There prices are starting from Rs 49,000 in market.
I have a 12-string Lyle in really good shape. Bought as a b-day present from me back in late 1970's from a pawn shop. I need to take it to a luthier to have it set up better, but it sounds really good. Just right now the action is a little high, but not that much wear. For a long time, I put it away, finding it hard to chord as a relative newbie back then. But now, I am more than ready. It does say it was made in Korea ~ which makes it seem a little more rare. The sound is still great or maybe even better! Wish I knew what it was worth, but I hope the guy I find to set it up will know more.
Any experienced professional guitarist will tell you there’s usually a big difference between what works on the live stage and what works in the studio. Most discovered early on that the carefully honed live tone they were so proud of just didn’t work on the recorded track, for any of several reasons, or not without a lot of tweaking and readjustment, at least. The first thing you’re likely to discover is that it’s a lot harder to record satisfactory overdriven and distorted guitar sounds than it is to record clean or mildly crunchy sounds, a revelation that often goes hand-in-hand with the fact that big amps tend to be more difficult to record satisfactorily in general.

hi-its the standard wiring for a strat-i have the push pull in the middle position-i have two wires going from two lugs on the push pull pot- one   giong to neck position on 5 way selector swich and the other to voloume on selector switch-when i have select     brige position when  i pull  middle pot i get neck and bridge -next position all three – middle position neck /middle .next neck middle and first position -neck=also if you put two tone  caps on one pot will it effect the pickup sound when it maxed to ten  and willit sound too bassy–thanks sean


For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
The Deluxe was among the “new” 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured “mini-humbuckers”, also known as “New York” humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson (actually just a cut-out P90 pickup cover) in order to use a supply ofEpiphone mini-humbuckers left over from when Gibson moved Epiphone production to Japan. The DeLuxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson’s US-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck in late 1968. The “pancake” body (thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) came later in 1969. In late 1969, a small “volute” was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the “i” in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the “i” had returned, plus a “Made In USA” stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be special ordered with full-size Humbucker T-Top pickups, these full size versions of the Deluxe were “Standard” spec. They were also available with “Gibson” embossed pickups in 1972 only and considered rare, as only 9 were produced. David Bowie Can be seen playing one of the 1972 “Standards” in his 1972 release Jean Genie video. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977. Inte reintroduced rest in this particular Les Paul model was so low that in 1985, Gibson canceled the line. However, in 2005, the Deluxe was with more popularity due to its association with Pete Townshend [1] and Thin Lizzy.

So there you have five good beginner’s guitars. Bear in mind that while the quality of these instruments is good—it’s a fiercely competitive area—they’re at the bottom of the market. You get what you pay for (as they say). At the same time, “cheap” guitars like these have come a long way in the last ten years and they’re excellent for starting out, before deciding to mortgage your house on that expensive vintage Fender or Les Paul Gibson mentioned earlier.


It's impossible to ignore the British brand, which has been linked to the most famous names in rock history for several decades. Who hasn't seen "Marshall walls" stacked on the stage behind their favorite bands? Unlike Fender, their typical sound is not clean but rather "crunchy" and a bit sandy, like you can hear on some albums by The Who and AC/DC. Their first prototypes were Fender Bassman replicas that slowly found their own personality. For instance, Marshall decided to split the amp from the speaker cabinet (4 x 12" Celestion) to create the famous "stack". The use of tubes to provide more gain is also noteworthy, and it translates into more overdrive than the Bassman can offer. And so the JTM 45 was born, followed by many legendary models like the JCM 800 and 900, as well as the Plexis series.

We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.
Shop Hourly Rate is $60.00 per hour. Since each guitar is unique, prices quoted are estimates and may be adjusted based on actual time involved. A final price will be submitted prior to actual work and price may need to be adjusted in the case of repairs that get more involved as the work progresses. (Please see the article on the 1975 Gibson Hummingbird for a good example of this.)

If that were true, you'd have to take into consideration everything that vibrates after the string is stuck (the strap, the plastic of the knobs). You vibrate as well. So in essence, what you're saying is...the contents of your stomach affects the signal going to the amp. Hell, what wood your floors are made of affects the tonal quality. Maybe if you hit it hard enough you can get the ceiling involved.
Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.
In the early 1980s, some performers began using two-way or three-way cabinets that used 15" woofers, a vented midrange driver and a horn/driver, with an audio crossover directing the signal to the appropriate driver. Folded horn bass guitar rigs have remained rare due to their size and weight. As well, since the 1990s, most clubs have PA systems with subwoofers that can handle the low range of the bass guitar. Extended range designs with tweeters were more the exception than the rule until the 1990s. The more common use of tweeters in traditional bass guitar amplifiers in the 1990s helped bassists to use effects and perform more soloistic playing styles, which emphasize the higher range of the instrument.
The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.
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