Guitars in the JS series made in Japan have plates with a 6-digit numeric serial number which indicates the sequential number of JS production. These plates provide no other indication of the year of production. The early versions of these JS number plates (starting from around 1990) have a "J" prefixing the number, but the character was dropped some around J002700. The first 15 J number plates were set aside, with J000001 being used for a 1993 model which is currently in the Hoshino USA collection.[2]
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
: Values? Well, with the prices of 1960s American and British guitars through the roof, collectors and musicians turn to the next-best-thing, and that would be European and Japanese guitars. In general, any made-in-Japan solid-body electric guitar in good cosmetic shape, that's complete and playable, is worth at least $100, and any acoustic-electric, at least twice that. The more pickups it has, the more elaborate the controls, and the more flashy the pickguard, the more it's worth. Same goes for the body and headstock shape. The standard shapes that copy Fender and other manufacturers aren't as desirable as some of the weirder shapes. A Decca solidbody with an unusual body shape, with 3 pickups and an unusual original finish would probably be in the $250-350 range to the right person. An acoustic-electric with the same specs would probably be worth $100 more than that. I've seen some of the exceptional Teisco solidbodies go for $500-600, but that's uncommon. In about 2006, I saw a Teisco (one of their Mosrite copies) from about 1967 that was in flawless condition for sale in an instrument shop in Tokyo for 200,000 Yen (about $1,900). I wouldn't be surprised if it sold for that.
3/4 guitars are fine for children under the age of 11, or as travel guitars, but if you want to learn properly, then buy a full-size guitar at the start. I started on a full-size classical guitar right back when I was knee-high to a grasshopper; initially, it's hard, but your fingers adapt fast enough and you will soon develop flexibility and dexterity. For children under 11, a 3/4 guitar is an option, but even then I still feel that full-size is better. Check out all the amazing 6-year-old kids playing amazing stuff on the internet, 9 times out of 10 they are playing full-size instruments.
I'm trying to determine the worth of a korean made fender telecaster. Solid ash,butterscotch blonde,maple neck,abalone inlays,seymour duncan pick-up(the other 1 is silver?)classic bridge.It's probably about 5 or 6 years old,it seems nicer than any mexican I've seen. Serial # 04041144 I paid $500 and I want to sell but don't want to be unfair to self or buyer.Help please-QUICK.
The Sex Pistols, Steve Jones' brutish power chords and flamboyant gutter-glam solos were a perfect mirror for the taunting bile of Johnny Rotten – and a yardstick for every punk-rock noise-maker that followed. His legacy was set with indelible riffs on one record – 1977's Never Mind the Bollocks… – that inspired guitarists from Slash to Billie Joe Armstrong. It was an attitude as much as a sound. As Jones told a journalist during his days with the Sex Pistols, "Actually, we're not into music. We're into chaos."
A tung oil-finished rock maple neck, and a slightly more curved fretboard radius of 13.75 inches are the other small modifications to the ‘speed’ features on the MD200. However, it has a thinner bolt-on neck as compared to the MD400’s wider mahogany set neck. That said, both neck profiles remain a shallow “C” shape, and the guitars’ dramatically beveled cutaways give you ample room to reach the high notes.
INTONATIONSEINSTELLUNG (FAT20) Um sicherzustellen, dass keine Bewegung auftreten kann, hat jeder Sattel eine Stellschraube, die den Sattel verriegelt. Beim Einstellen der Intonation lösen Sie die Sattelverriegelungsschraube mit einem 2 mm großen Inbusschlüssel. (D) Zum Einstellen der Intonation setzen Sie einen 2,5 mm großen Inbusschlüssel in die Sattelschraube an der Rückseite des Tremolo ein.

Hello, Our rhythm guitarist had a 12- string Mark X11 guitar by Vox back in 1967. It had a protective back pad ( 8 sided) on the back that snapped on. It was only made from 1964 - 1967. In mint shape, the Italian made one is worth at least $1,000.00 and the Engish made one is worth at least $1,500.00. Remember that is for a Mint shape guitar.(Info from Blue Book of Electric guitars -7th Edition 1999) You can see our guitarists sunburst Vox Mark X11 at Myfirstband.com ,click on Indiana -(SOS) Society of Sound page. There is a group shot and a close up in color of him with it. Peace........Rockin Rory in Indiana
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
This is a beautiful example of a 34 year old Japanese crafted Ibanez acoustic guitar that has the tone and the beauty, Love the Sunburst finish on this guitar that did a beautiful job with the thin Poly finish it stands up to the test of time and still shines like glass today just have a good look. It has a Spruce top… cant tell because of the sunburst if its solid or not but will assume its laminated…. Back – Sides & neck are all very nice grade Mahogany. Fit & finish as good as a $2000 guitar of today but this beauty has well aged woods now being well over 33 years old you could spend 3 x times the money and not get a better vintage guitar . The tone is surprisingly rich and with good volume it makes an excellent strumming or fingerpicking guitar. Its playing string action is very good making it a breeze to play and fun. The neck is real nice substantial and a medium profile with a soft V it feels like a vintage Guild from the 1960's ... nice job Ibanez!...Its in very good vintage condition too with several minor doinks to its top and a couple minor on the back and so on but overall its in very good condition both structurally & cosmetically and looks very good overall. The neck's frets are still good and fingerboard and frets have been lightly polished as has the entir guitar cleaned hydrated and polished and just look at the results, a new Martin bone nut has just been fit & installed as well as new Martin Marquis 80/20 Bronze light gauge strings, nicely setup to play very well like a much more expensive guitar now. Original tuners are doing a great job to this day some 34+ years later... Here is a very good Japanese Vintage Guitar of quality for a very good price too, She is not new or mint of course it has doinks and just a couple of fine hairline checks in its top I did not see at first its very hard to see but they are not wood cracks just fine hairlines to the finish and of no structural consequence what so ever. This guitar Plays and sounds very well and will make someone very happy its condition is JVG rated at easily 8.5/10 very good vintage, neck is straight without cracks fit and finish and workmanship are all in the excellent range. Great Japanese guitar for a great price… The 1980 Ibanez V300 TV, crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This guitar plays GREAT! .
While the company officially started by importing Spanish guitars, the Ibanez that we know really started in the late '60s when they began copying popular American guitar designs. As expected they got flak for their unofficial "lawsuit" copies, but this ultimately inspired the company to improve on existing designs and develop their own. Soon, virtuosos and big name guitarists like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani and more took notice, propelling the Ibanez brand into world wide renown. Now Ibanez is as big as it gets, with a wide variety of instruments, pedals, and amplifiers under their name. They make it to this list with the high ratings that their amps are receiving, headed by their Tube Screamer Amplifier series, which comes with the circuit of their popular boost/overdrive pedal built into the amplifier section.
After these is the overdrive/distortion, in this case our ST-2 Power Stack. The CS-3 Compression/Sustainer (and the PW-10 V-Wah) can improve the ST-2’s sustain and tone by increasing the signal to it, so they’re placed before the ST-2. Many players use a compressor just for this reason, and the “fixed wah” sound, which is a wah pedal turned on but not continuously swept, is very common in rock and metal lead tones.
In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.

I use the boss me-8 for 15 years, now with the boss me-25 i have the same kick ass sound plus some more effects and customisations, also it comes with a beutifull surprise that i don't even expect, this guiar pedal is also an audio interfase that suport digital audio via USB, is really amazing you will not regret, it doesn't come whit a power supply only batteries, buy one separatly.
We’ll round this list off with a slightly different proposition, particularly with jazz in mind. The Fender Classic Series ’72 Telecaster Thinline is a semi-hollow guitar in the guise of a traditional solid body. It features the same body shape and size of a standard Telecaster but has its horizon’s broadened thanks to the internal routing of the wood and attractive ‘f’ hole on the guitar’s top. Two humbuckers – again, not traditional on a Tele – provide exceptional warmth and versatility. Combined with its high levels of construction and craftsmanship this a guitar which will last a lifetime.
The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
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I was lucky. Went into to a small local music store and they had it for a long time and were trying to get rid of it quick. Got it for about $800. The previous Rick 12 I had (with narrow neck) I bought for $400, fixed broken nut, then sold to West LA Music for $750 cash so I could get the Petty model. Transactions that were definitely worth it at the time.


Guitar amplifiers vary widely in price and quality. Many music equipment companies import small, low-powered practice amplifiers for students and beginners that sell for less than $50 USD. Other companies produce expensive custom-made amplifiers for professional musicians, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars (USD). Most combo amplifiers have a carrying handle, and many combo amplifiers and cabinets have metal or plastic-reinforced corners to protect the amp during transportation.
No guitar recommendation list is ever complete without a Fender product in the mix. Squier is Fender’s more affordable instrument range, and this set is a great place to start. The affinity series Stratocaster is available in sunburst, classic black, or candy apple red. A 10 watt Fender amp and corresponding cable are also included alongside a strap, 3 picks, snap on the tuner, tremolo bar, replacement parts and tools, strings, gig bag, and an instructional DVD to help you get off on the right foot with your playing.
A scaled down Grand Symphony travel size guitar. It features sapele laminate back and sides with an option of a solid mahogany or Sitka spruce top. It has been acclaimed for having a full size guitar sound despite being a compact size. Although it doesn’t come with an onboard Expression System, an optional ES-Go Pickup can be easily installed for amplification.

I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.


The question of how far away to place your mic really divides opinions. While Chuck Ainlay's 'just off the grille' seems to express the majority view, Bill Price preferred a position six inches away on the Sex Pistols sessions, while Steve Albini usually starts from around 10-12 inches away. Alan Parsons, on the other hand, avoids close placements: "Every engineer I've ever come across has always had the mic touching the cloth, and the first thing I do is move it away literally a foot. Let's hear what the amplifier sounds like, not what the cabinet sounds like... I might have it even further away if it's a really loud 4x12 cabinet — as much as four feet away." Ben Hillier also extols the benefits of more distant placements, up to six to eight feet, when he's trying to capture his favourite 'amp in a room' sound.

Today’s beginner guitars are far superior to the hunk of wood with strings I started with, and now there is a huge array of instruments to choose from. In fact, I’d go so far as to say if you only intend to play guitar for fun you’ll never need to spend another dime on gear beyond your starter setup, if you don’t want to. (Except for things like strings and picks, of course.) That definitely wasn’t true thirty years ago.

Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE, is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009 In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately ...more on Wikipedia
Struggling to get your guitar sounding sweet and creamy? Don't fret! STUDIO GUITARS is here to warm up your sound with a selection of certified studio-fresh guitar loops recorded by Prime Loops' own professional master of the strings! Using some of the most classic equipment around, we've covered every curve of this awesome instrument's sound with an incredible collection of acoustic and electric guitar samples.

Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 44.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Light Violin High Gloss Sunburst, Dark Violin High Gloss Sunburst
Lyndon Laney established his brand in 1967 in Birmingham (England). In those days, he was also playing in a band with a couple of guys you might've heard of: John Bonham and Robert Plant. You might also know Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath) who happened to be one of his first clients. The LA100BL is a must among heavy-metal guitarists, while the KLIPP aims to be more versatile. The AOR (Advanced Overdrive Response) series provides more gain every time, contributing, in part, to the brand's constantly growing reputation. Among Laney addicts, we could mention Ace Frehley of Kiss and Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits.
Agreed too that almost any guitar will benefit from a good setup, but there's no getting around plywood and cheap pickups. If I pick up a guitar and the action is so bad you need vice grips to play it, it can't speak well for the manufacturer. Yes, you can make plywood sing I suppose, but I can make mahogany, adler, korina, maple or just about any other wood sing a heck of a lot easier than plywood.
This is the brand of guitars manufactured by a Japanese company and are available in India. The company creates incredible custom – shop instruments and high-quality original designs, liked by some of the best professionals on the planet. They produce electric guitars that provide high performance and are long-lasting in terms of duration and quality. E-10 is one of the most popular guitars of this brand. The starting price of ESP electric guitar is 16,000 INR approximately.

Many guitarists with instruments that have more than one pickup spend most of their time on the bridge unit. Using a variety of pickup positions when recording will thin or fatten the sound as required, but also help free up space when it comes to the mixing stage. Think of a recorded mix as a layer cake; too much density in one frequency range will cause a headache for the mixing engineer.
This Yamaha Pacifica features a Strat sound that is very good, especially since the humbucker can be tuned into a single pickup by lifting up on the tone control. Like with every other strat, it has a five-way switch which allows the player to select the bridge pickup, the bridge+middle pickups, the middle pickup, the middle+neck pickups, or just the neck alone. In the event that you are tired of the strat sound and you would like to return to Led Zeppelin, simply flip to the humbucker and get set to go!
Route the body. You’ll need to make a cavity (a hole that goes partly through the body of the guitar) in the back of the guitar to fit the electronics for the volume, tone, pickup selection controls. You will cover it later with a bit of material (usually hard plastic). You’ll also need one cavity in the front of the guitar for each of its pickups. Rout the pickup cavity (or cavities) to the depth recommended by the manufacturer.[9]
If any item fails to meet your expectations at any time, please return it for a refund or exchange. From tuners to endpins, everything we sell at Stewart-MacDonald is backed by our rock-solid guarantee of satisfaction. This is how we do business, ever since selling our first 5-Star Banjo Head in 1968. We proudly continue this tradition by offering quality products and standing behind them.
Second in your chain are usually wah or EQ pedals. These tend to do well when directly affecting a distorted signal, and without much else in the mix. If you plan on using a compressor you have a choice: for a more natural rock tone, the compressor works best right after the distortion or wah/EQ effects. If you’re going for that thick classic country sound however, try putting your compressor right at the end of the chain so that it squashes everything.

This is why I’m nervous when I see a free guitar plugin that actually wants to replace a guitar, which Cute Emily Guitar attempts to do. Now, Cute Emily is the most guitar-sounding of the bunch, but it also has the least amount of controls. This gives you a relatively singular sound and while I commend Big Cat efforts, I stopped using this free electric guitar plugin faster than I did the others.

Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
I am new to guitar but had played Baritone in grades school thru high school in a small school with a band teacher who went on to Iowa State. So I wasn’t finding where notes were and started watching guitar/music theory and found several who headed me to learn my Pentatonic E minor scale before I have finished with chords. I wanted to know where notes are on fretboard.
Here you get a very bright sound but the output will be less than if it were wired in series and you no longer have hum canceling. Since you are using just one half of the humbucker, "coil-cut" sounds best when using a high output pickup (DiMarzio "X2N", DiMarzio "Distortion", Seymour Duncan "Invader", Seymour Duncan "Distortion", etc). A coil cut switch is relatively easy to wire up and it is just a matter of connecting one end of an SPST switch to that junction that was created for series wiring and connecting the other end of the switch to ground. So, we now have another 2 tone humbucker arrangement that can easily be switched back and forth between 2 tone options.
To understand the difference between parallel and series wiring of two pickups, check out the two diagrams. In the first, the two pickups are wired in parallel, so both pickups’ inputs and outputs are connected together. This is one of the main reasons why a Strat usually has a very bright tone—parallel wiring allows the signal from each pickup to reach the output jack by the shortest possible route. The result is that the high frequencies reach the output jack almost unchecked, giving your Strat that sparkling sound we all love so much.
Solder the electronics. The pickups you purchased should come with a schematic that shows exactly how to connect these to the controls and to the input for the guitar cord. Follow this schematic, using an ordinary electronics soldering iron to complete the job. Wrap any wiring connections with electrical tape, unless the manufacturer’s instructions suggest another method.
In 1932, John Dopyera left Dobro and came back into the National fold, regaining control of the company. We can only speculate that the absence of Beauchamp has something to do with his decision. National and Dobro merged in 1935, becoming the National Dobro Company. However, until the end of the ’30s, when National Dobro finally completed its relocation to Chicago, Dobro instruments continued to be made in L.A. by what had been the separate Dobro Corporation, even though it was a part of National Dobro. Got it? Hmmm…
The Effect:Chorus is one of the most recognized pedal effects, dating back from the beginning of the 70’s, and later on popularized in the 80’s, it was the most used effect on guitar pedals back then, and no guitarists dared to step foot on stage without the classic Boss CH-1 Stereo Super Chorus Pedal or MXR Micro-Chorus, to name a few. Originally, Chorus pedals came in Analog form, however today the market is mixed with both Analog and Digital pedals, with the difference between the two being that Analog modifies the signal directly, while Digital takes the original analog sound coming from your guitar, converts and modifies it into digital form, before finally converting it back to analog form prior to its release.

However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.


Birmingham’s Table Scraps add a grunge-y Midlands mud to the garage rock sound established by the likes of 13th Floor Elevators and The Cramps. Guitarist Scott sticks to a “three-pedal limit”, using a Death By Audio Fuzz War (“a versatile monster”), Echo Dream 2 and Boss DD-3 to jarring effect to create freaky, DC59’d melodic lead bursts. As Scott says: “Once you try 12-string everything else only sounds half as good.”
What makes it truly stand out is the infinite Reverb this pedal provides. If you’re looking to get an all-around “stomp-box” featuring everything you ever wanted with remarkable sound output, this work of art by EH is designed to make you never think about getting another Reverb pedal. It can fit in any form of setup, and it is destined to conquer your flavor.
Taylor 214ce A ‘best acoustic guitar’ list would be incomplete without a Taylor in it. This Grand Auditorium guitar with a cutaway from Taylor projects plenty of volume and has a bright and defined tone that many fingerstyle players love. If you’ve always wanted a Taylor, this one with a solid top will surely stick with you for many years to come.
If you’re using temporal effects such as delay and reverb, these generally work best at the end of the chain. Putting a delay at the end allows the effect to give a more natural echo to everything that comes before it; the echo itself will not be altered by other effects. The same applies for reverb. Most guitarists leave reverb as the very last effect, occasionally using the amp’s in-built reverb over a pedal. Amps that have onboard reverb usually use a spring unit which produces a shimmery twang that works well for many types of music. However, if you’re looking for a roomier type of reverb that emulates a giant concert hall, a pedal based reverb is probably what you’re looking for. Either way, putting reverb at the end of the chain provides a spacious, natural tone that simulates a cavernous echo.

The strings movement moves the magnetic field creating current in the coil of the pickup. The string does not create the current the movement does. If you placed a solenoid beneath the pickup and moved the pickup you would also create a current in the coil. If you took the strings off the guitar, and held a hammer head over the pickup and activated the solenoid you would get a current in the coil.
The bass guitar has a long neck (scale-length) and thick strings. The open strings of the bass guitar corresponds to the four lowest strings of the guitar and are pitched an octave lower. The standard bass has four strings though five and six string basses are available which extends the range of the instrument. Though the bass guitar is the bass instrument of the guitar family and the double-bass is the bass instrument of the orchestral string family their similar roles have drawn bass players to both instruments.
Scott Baxendale has been building custom hand made guitars since 1974. Recently he settled in Athens Georgia where he is currently building custom guitars, restoring vintage guitars and teaching the art of lutherie to aspiring craftsman. Scott Baxendale’s legacy of building custom instruments began in 1974, when he arrived in Winfield, Kansas to work for […]
In 2008, Gibson USA released the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, an authentic replica of one of two Les Pauls Slash received from Gibson in 1988. It has an Antique Vintage Sunburst finish over a solid mahogany body with a maple top. Production was limited to 1600.[35] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Inspired By” Les Paul Standard. This guitar is a replica of the 1988 Les Paul Standard and it features a carved three-piece maple top, one-piece mahogany back, and rosewood fingerboard, with a Heritage Cherry Sunburst finish. Two versions were made available—the “Aged by Tom Murphy,” aged to resemble the original guitar (a limited number of these were signed by Slash in gold marker on the back of the headstock), and the “Vintage Original Spec,” created to resemble the guitar as it was when Slash first received it.[32][36]
 South Korea has been one of the largest OEM guitar factories in the world since 1980's. Nonetheless, the words "Made in Korea" still invoke visions of low cost alternatives to high-end manufacturers. At Swing, our mission is to lay these stereotypes to rest, and show the world that we can produce true professional grade instruments, made by professionals, for professionals. (Of course, company is not a patriotic organization. This is a matter of manufacturer's pride and self-satisfaction that can be called "Professionalism".)

If it helps, Schaller have very accurate drawings of all their hardware on their website. You can also get very good drawings of all Gotoh parts as well, but theirs are harder to find (hidden in the parent company's site and I can't recall the full details). It is worth having a look at those, and pay attention to the way the tuning posts are shaped. That radiused section turned into the post is important , it really helps lock the strings firmly.
Second in your chain are usually wah or EQ pedals. These tend to do well when directly affecting a distorted signal, and without much else in the mix. If you plan on using a compressor you have a choice: for a more natural rock tone, the compressor works best right after the distortion or wah/EQ effects. If you’re going for that thick classic country sound however, try putting your compressor right at the end of the chain so that it squashes everything.

A guitar is a stringed instrument that has always been a favorite amongst musicians because it creates symphonic tones that foster creative expression. Guitars are available in a variety of make and brands. In India, the guitar is the most commonly played musical instrument. Since a good guitar lasts for more than a decade, it is important to keep a few things in mind when you are buying a guitar for the first time. There are different types of guitar that are available for buying.

This is the brand of guitars manufactured by a Japanese company and are available in India. The company creates incredible custom – shop instruments and high-quality original designs, liked by some of the best professionals on the planet. They produce electric guitars that provide high performance and are long-lasting in terms of duration and quality. E-10 is one of the most popular guitars of this brand. The starting price of ESP electric guitar is 16,000 INR approximately.


The offset body style includes three main instruments: the Jaguar, the Mustang, and the Jazzmaster. While there are definite differences between them, offset guitars all generally have a “jangly” sound. When we say jangly, we mean bright and clear with a subtle mid and low-end response. These guitars are also well suited to rhythm work depending on their tone knobs are adjusted.

By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.


The Tube Screamer pedal has a long list of iconic users including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Gary Moore, John Mayer, Joe Bonamassa, The Edge and many more. As such, it is only expected for a company like Ibanez to take advantage of its popularity to extend their reach in the amplifier market - resulting in the creation of the Tube Screamer Amp (TSA) series. The Ibanez TSA15H leads the series in terms of ratings, with its compact yet versatile head profile while having the same combination of tube amplification and built-in tube screamer circuitry. At its core are two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6V6 power amp tubes, a standard configuration that sounds good on its own. Its standout feature is the implementation of a Tube Screamer circuit, which comes complete with the same controls as the iconic green pedal it is based on.
The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.
Different people have different opinions on what makes a vintage guitar. For the purposes of this site, a vintage electric guitar or vintage bass is one that was produced in the golden age of rock and roll. From the very early 1950s when Fender first produced the Esquire and Broadcaster, and Gibson the Les Paul; to the early 1980s, when both of these companies sold to their current owners.
However, in the October, 2018 issue of Premier Guitar (at least the online edition) Frank Meyers, who runs the website Drowning in Guitars, says the Kent 700s were made by a small factory called Hayashi Mokko. Frank is a true expert in vintage Japanese Guitars, so I am inclined to believe him. This is another important piece of the Kent Guitars story.
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Sure, the Teach Yourself to Play Guitar: A Quick and Easy Introduction for Beginners book is for those brand new to the hobby. But experienced players will love the chord chart that comes with it. It includes the basic major and minor ones along with the more uncommon ones for a great reference. Some of the riffs are a bit obscure, but it doesn’t detract much from its value.
JSL, I agree with you on the Mayer comment. Any one who is bashing him needs to listen to his latest live album. kid rips plain and simple. I have to disagree with you on the Van Halen comment, not that he isn't a great player, but to me his playing always lacked substance, no soul to it. Now, I can't stand Clapton, (I won't get into why), but he should definitely be on the list.
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The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
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Ash is a common body material in solid body guitars. It is harder than mahogany and very resonant. This gives the guitar ringing sustain and bright tone with a well-defined mid-range. A light colored wood with attractive grain figuring, it is often given a transparent finish. Swamp ash is a particularly appealing, detailed wood used on higher-end guitars.

We are looking at plenty of audio boom here, secured by the mahogany hollow body. The rest of the mix also includes a strong mahogany neck with an attached rosewood fingerboard, a pack of 22 frets and classic white dot markers. Audio versatility is pretty high here, and the guitar is capable of tackling everything from light jazz tones to alternative rock groove.
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review

Paul Gray (b. 1972 d. 2010) swapped his longtime association with Warwick basses for a customized version of the ATK bass series, the PGB1. He was impressed with the ATK bass after he bought one from a pawn shop and told Ibanez that he would endorse them if they put the ATK series back into production. He switched to his signature model shortly before recording of the Slipknot album All Hope Is Gone and used them until his death in 2010.

Providing all of the necessary features expected in a quality electric guitar at a budget-friendly price, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is perfect for those just beginning their musical journey or the seasoned guitarist looking for an everyday guitar for practice. The 650R humbucker pickups combined with the open coil design deliver strong and sustained tones. As seen on all Epiphone guitars, the Special II has over 500K potentiometer for both tone and volume, and a toggle selector with a 3-way pickup to focus in on the clarity of the sound and decreased excess humming. The body and neck are made with mahogany, while the fretboard has dot inlays within the rosewood design. String changing is also made easier due to the stopbar tailpiece, which helps to add more sustain in sound when combined with the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge. With all of these features at such a reasonable price point, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a strong contender included on this list.

Directional mics, such as cardioids and figure-of-eights, exhibit different frequency responses off axis — broadly speaking, off-axis sounds tend to be duller, although it's a complex effect which is different for each model. Professional producers are well aware of this, and employ the effect to refine their sounds. For instance, Chuck Ainlay comments "I'll usually start with a [Shure SM57] on the amp; but not straight on axis with the middle of the speaker; it's usually off-centre, angled towards the middle of the speaker and generally just off the grille." Jay Graydon refers to a fairly similar setup: "I position the mic about one inch left of the edge of the speaker-cone centre, using a 22-degree angle, and about one inch back from the grille cloth." Andy Johns, on the other hand, has said that "the miking technique I used on electric guitars for years was two [Shure SM57s], one straight on, and one at 45 degrees. Put 'em together, and it always works."
The phaser is an interesting pedal that has a surprising mix of uses across genres. What a phaser does is add an out of phase version of your signal with your original signal. This gives your sound a swirling effect that has many sonic possibilities. Eddie Van Halen famously used a phaser set a a low rate to add some “movement” to his solos. In funk, phasers are fundamental in creating the bright and terse rhythm sounds.
As the ’70s dawned, the market for electric guitars began to revive, significantly but conservatively. Gibson retracted its hopes for the flagship SG and reintroduced the Les Paul in ’68. Fender, likewise, was moving away from Jazzmasters and Jaguars, concentrating on its earlier successes, the Stratocaster and Telecaster. Paced by Shiro Arai of Aria, who’d been inspired by the reissue of the Les Paul (a “copy” of the ’50s classic), Japanese manufacturers were beginning to explore making copies of popular American designs, and the “copy era” was getting underway.
The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
It was also during this time that Perry Bechtel, a well-known banjo player and guitar teacher from Cable Piano in Atlanta, requested that Martin build a guitar with a 15-fret neck-to-body join[citation needed]. Most guitars of the day, with the exception of Gibson’s L-5 archtop jazz guitars, had necks joined at the 12th fret, half the scale length of the string. In keeping with Bechtel’s request, Martin modified the shape of their 12-fret 000-size instrument, lowering the waist and giving the upper bout more acute curves to cause the neck joint to fall at the 14th fret rather than the 12th. Fourteen-fret guitars were designed to be played with a pick and replace banjos in jazz orchestras. Thus, Martin named its first 14-fret, 000-shape guitar the Orchestra Model (OM). Martin applied this term to all 14-fret instruments in its catalogs by the mid- to late-1930s.

Here are the reasons why you MIGHT want to raise it: 1. The break angle (the angle change of the strings as they pass over the saddles) is so severe that the strings keep breaking as they pass over the bridge. 2. The break angle is so steep that the strings hit the edge of the bridge before they go over the saddles. I’ve never had a problem with 1 above. However, 2 often happens and it’s not something that bothers me unless it’s severe.
The first effect in our signal chain is a pedal wah. A wah is an effect known as a filter that alters the basic tone of the guitar. When you push the pedal fully forward, the filter brightens up your guitar tone and you bring back the pedal your guitar tone gets darker. For the most variety of sound, you want all the other effects to have a shot at the sound from the Wah so the ME-80 places it as close to the guitar as possible.
The F-65 was the top of the line with two equal cutaways. Other than the bookmatched cutaways, this was the same as the two-pickup F-55, with the addition of a Bigsby-made Martin vibrato in which the stylized “M” had become a similar “V” shape. Probably the strangest feature of the F-65 was the fact that the heel of the neck did not change from the single-cutaway models, creating a sort of thick chunk of body extending up to the 14th fret. The first F-65 was #179834. 1,825 F-65s were made from 1962 to the summer of ’65.
The world is full of guys who will zero in on all the details they find inferior about this guitar by noting the rather obvious fact that this is not a Gibson Les Paul Standard costing $3,000.00. There are some people who will complain that this guitar has a bolt on neck. True, the set necks of the more expensive Epiphones and Gibsons are nicer. But, considering the fact that every Fender Stratocaster ever made had a bolt on neck, is this really a big deal? Would Jimi Hendrix have played "Purple Haze" better if his Strat had a set in neck? Probably not.
Now that we covered the basic features, let’s talk about what really counts: the built-in effects, amp models, and usability. For better or for worse, people tend to compare multi-effects units with the experience and sound you get from owning a pedalboard full of individual pedals. Well, great news: the consensus is that the Zoom G3X feels a lot like using individual stompboxes; more so than any other multi-effects unit on the market. Zoom really nailed it when it comes to making an intuitive interface. If you look at the layout, you’ll notice 3 “stompbox-style” sections side by side, each with a little display and on/off footswitch. These are meant to feel like 3 guitar pedals next to each other. They’re technically 3 slots which can each hold an effect or an amp model. The Zoom has 6 slots total (you can scroll left and right to access them), and all 6 can be used at once. You’ve got LOTS of choices to shape your tone: 94 effects and 22 amp and cabinet models. Any type of effect you can dream up, the Zoom G3X has you covered. Tremolo, vibrato, compressors, filters, overdrives are all available, and many of the effects simulate popular pedals like the Tube Screamer, EHX Big Muff, Pro Co RAT, Boss DS-1, and the list goes on and on. Same goes for the amp modeling - you can emulate a Marshall, Fender, Orange, Vox, etc. and pair up different amp models with various cabinet models. You can make your effect chain in whatever order you want, which is great for the beginner who is figuring out pedal order for the first time, and the veteran who wants to experiment with unique pedal combos. From a user review:

Here we have a Taylor guitar for under $500. Taylor is known for their high quality, and expensive guitars. It’s great that they are offering a lower priced model so more players can enjoy their great sounding guitars. The Big Baby is a 15/16 dreadnought sized guitar which is slightly smaller than a full sized. Perfect for those that want that dreadnought sound but want a little smaller body. The top is sitka spruce and the back and sides are sapele. Owners are saying that the guitar has a very warm and full bodied tone, and that it does not sound like a cheap guitar. This is no surprise given that it is made by Taylor. This is another great choice for those with smaller hands, as Taylor’s are known for their great necks and amazing playability. See more info including more pictures here.
If a guitar is going to be our other half it has got to be comfortable to play. Does that fit in on this one? It sure does! It would be easy to assume that if they have spent so much time making it look good they probably didn’t have time to make it ergonomic, but that’s exactly what they’ve done! The guitar has a deep belly cut, a hidden forearm contour and a neck joint that makes it easy to play high up on the fretboard.

In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.
Fred’s wife Lynn Shipley Sokolow served as our adult student tester. She plays double bass and banjo in the Americana quartet Sugar in the Gourd but is just starting to learn her way around the electric guitar. To evaluate the short-scale/travel guitars, I also consulted a couple of teenagers who are currently learning how to play: 15-year-old Alana Wood, who helped us on our Best Acoustic Guitar for Beginners and Best Ukulele for Beginners reviews, and 13-year-old Charles Lesser.
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Recently Vox has emerged as a leader in the digital amp modelling market[citation needed] with the release of its Valvetronix line of digital amplifier modellers. Utilising Korg's REMS modelling software, the Valvetronix are driven via a low-power tube preamp stage and a solid state power amp. The latest line, the AD15VT / AD30VT / AD50VT / AD100VT, has received awards and praise[citation needed] for its recreation of eleven classic guitar amplifiers. The company did not reveal which non-Vox amplifiers were modelled in the product manual. The eleven amplifier types as named on the dial are:
CP = manufactured by ???; some speculation is that CP stands for Cort Plant or that models with this designation were made by a partnership of Cort and Peerless or perhaps even that it indicates production at Cort's Indonesian plant which is known as Cort PT (although this last possibility seems highly unlikely since the instruments are marked as "Made in Korea"). (2003–2008)
One of the most important Telecaster players was Clarence White, who, during his short career, contributed more to country electric guitar than almost anyone else, along with being a phenomenal bluegrass flatpicking guitarist and a pioneer of thecountry rock genre. He played with the Byrds, and Nashville West along with the bluegrass bands the Kentucky Colonels andMuleskinner. He enlisted the help of Gene Parsons and invented the StringBender, a device inside the body of the guitar that raises a string’s (either the B- or G-string most of the time) pitch when pressure is applied to the strap. His Telecaster is one of the most recognizable and is now owned by Marty Stuart.

The Ibanez pickup sound is great and solidly diverse throughout the 5-options, providing lots of versatility for a variety of different music styles.The tuning is nice and extremely stable, and you can even dive-bomb on the whammy without throwing it out of whack. The frets are perfect, and the action is almost perfect, with that quality feel to it.
Guitar combo amplifiers were at first used with bass guitars and electric pianos, but these instruments produce a wider frequency range and need a full-range speaker system. Much more amplifier power is required to reproduce low-frequency sound, especially at high volume. Reproducing low frequencies also requires a suitable woofer or subwoofer speaker and enclosure, with bass cabinets often being larger in size than a cabinet for mid-range or high-range sounds. As well, the open-back cabinets used on many electric guitar amps, while effective for electric guitar, do not have good bass reproduction.

Description: Body: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Top Wood: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: White - Frets: 22, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid Thumbnail - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Rocking Bar - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Schaller Tuners - Pickups: FilterTron - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Orange Stain
They are the most common effect group and are used by almost every guitar player from Stevie Ray Vaughan to Yngwie Malmsteen. Most amplifiers have channels for overdrive or distortion, but having these effects as pedals allows you greater variation in tone and allows you to “push” the cleaner channels of your amp harder, giving a different sound to the overdrive channel.
Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.

Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America
Neither should you confuse acoustic-electric guitars with semi-acoustic hollow or semi-hollow instruments. Acoustic-electrics are acoustic guitars with onboard electronics that allows them to be amplified. They can be played just as well without plugging in. Semi-acoustics are electric guitars with some acoustic properties that are meant to be amplified when played.
Started similarly to PRS, Taylor was a brand that began out of passion and the back of a car. In 1974, friends and coworkers Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug joined together to purchase American Dream, the guitar making shop for whom they both worked. Geared toward producing the most high-quality USA made acoustic guitars they could muster, they changed the name of the business to Taylor Guitars, as it sounded more “American” than Listug. Though they went through some financial troubles initially, the brand eventually grew into what they are today: the number one manufacturer of acoustic guitars in the United States. They’ve also taken it upon themselves to pioneer a business model based around sustainable practices – Bob even goes so far as to travel to competitors to share with them said practices, understanding that, in order for guitar builders to continue to flourish, everyone needs to be an active participant in taking care of the environment. Or else there might come a time when there’s no more wood with which to build guitars. And that makes the El Cajon, California-based brand even mightier.

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