The old ones were SOLD as cheap guitars. These new ones, at their price points, are probably decent instruments at the very least, and possibly even very good ones. I doubt they have much in common with the Kays from the 70s aside from how they look, which as other people have detailed, is probably just for nostalgia purposes. Lots of aging rockers with fat salaries who might've learned on those guitars a few decades ago!
Ok I know Hondo? .... But this is a good one folks its got a lot going for it really have a closer look, its actually built well it is a beautiful vintage guitar in its own right its condition and patina good looks good sound and easy playability make it an excellent entry or back up choice into vintage guitars, The Top appears to be solid 2 piece center seam spruce top you see grain going from top to bottom with really beautiful straight grain with flame type figuring that is surprising on a Hondo it's unique in that feature and it has that patina I love it caught my eye big time as I got close I couldn't believe it was a Hondo, it's logo has that same font as old Martin & Takamine used this one has the look and feel, but it's action was a little off spec , so I fixed all that it has great action now it's neck set and angle was excellent and I ended up changing its nut & saddle out for Martin born nut & saddle set and a new set of 80/20 strings, this guitar has good volume and sweet tone it rings clear and true with good intonation. It's in very good to excellent vintage condition, it's body & neck has no cracks , no finish checking and still shines like glass it's beautiful just have a look, it's not new or mint it has a couple drinks on its top and a couple on its back too but besides those it's exceptional vintage and plays easy with good low action with plenty of saddle left to lower more down the line of ever needed it's set up to meet or exceed Martin specs for playability. This is a lot of vintage guitar for this kind of price WOW! .
This should give you an idea of when the majority of the production for any one model occured (majority meaning more than 5 instruments per year). Note this does not mean a model can not exist outside of these years - it certainly can. Just these are the years recorded by Martin in their ledgers. Note this list (for the most part) does not go past 1969.
With that in mind, the quality of said effect is satisfactory, to say the least. You maybe won’t see the same level of refinement as you would in some stand-alone models, however its reverb comes across as fairly organic. On top of that, you are presented with several decent options. All of that aside, the real value of this Zoom comes from its ability to combine up to 6 effects at any given time.
Like most things involved with creative pursuits like making music, there isn’t a steadfast right or wrong way to do things, but if you encountered any of the problems above you’re definitely doing things wrong (unless you play in a German nihilist industrial noise band, in which case, go nuts). This article will help you avoid those scenarios by describing some of the basic rules and suggestions for placing different effects in the ideal order in your rig’s signal chain and how to achieve the best possible tones when using several stomp boxes together. If you’ve ever wondered how to put together your own pedal board, this info will give you a good start toward obtaining the best sound and most versatility out of your rig.

In addition to building world-class custom basses and guitars, our luthiers also perform a wide variety of guitar repairs, restorations, modifications and upgrades. Whether you have an electric guitar, acoustic guitar or a bass, new or old, feel free to bring it by the shop for a free assessment. We have the experience, skill and equipment to provide maximum playability.
Prior to being acquired by Gibson back in 1957, Epiphone once competed with the most popular guitar brands in the market - including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being the affordable sub-brand of Gibson, producing cost-effective alternatives to many of their premium guitars. Many experienced players today credit this brand for manufacturing their first ever instrument, and their popularity in the entry level market continue to soar high.
Vacuum tubes (called "valves" in British English) were by far the dominant active electronic components in most instrument amplifier applications until the 1970s, when solid-state semiconductors (transistors) started taking over. Transistor amplifiers are less expensive to build and maintain, reduce the weight and heat of an amplifier, and tend to be more reliable and more shock-resistant. Tubes are fragile and they must be replaced and maintained periodically. As well, serious problems with the tubes can render an amplifier inoperable until the issue is resolved. In the 2000s, high-end tube instrument amplifiers (along with a small number of hi-fi power amplifiers used by audiophiles and high-end studio microphone preamplifiers) survive as the few exceptions, because of their perceived sound quality.


We noticed in our last article, 10 best Acoustic Guitars Under $500, some readers mentioned the Luna series of guitars. Thank you all for pointing these out! What a truly beautiful line of acoustic and electrics. The Luna Ash, an acoustic electric hybrid is a sleek, responsive guitar ready for any setting: playing live, recording, or jamming with friends. With a mahogany body and rosewood fretboard, this visually stunning guitar is just one in the line of Luna guitars that provides ridiculous eye candy and amazing sound quality and playability. The Ash goes for around $499, and that’s a steal! 

I'd never heard of this brand but was recently in a store in North Carolina looking for a nylon string guitar. The salesman asked me if I was "open minded" and if I'd be receptive to trying a brand that I probably had never heard of. He handed me a really pretty instrument with a very different looking headstock. I immediately figured he was showing me a very expensive instrument. I asked how much it cost, but he didn't answer. He simply replied "Try it, then let me know what you think." I had no idea how much this guitar would cost, and honestly I hate guessing games, but the guitar was really beautiful. I played several classical guitars there that day. A Yamaha, a Cordoba and an Alvarez, but the Merida was unquestionably the best sounding (and looking).
Great guitar for the aspiring 4-10 yer old. This Lotus 20.25" scale, Kid's Strat copy is in excellent condition! Featuring a maple neck, an unbound rosewood fret-board, simulated mother of pearl fret marker, dot side markers, graphite nut, 6 "in-line" head stock, and an adjustable truss rod. 3 strat style, single coil pickups with 5 position selector. Volume and tone controls. (While not photo'd, the guitar does include the whammy / tremolo bar). This guitar is in great shape with virtually no wear to the original gloss black finish. I actually special ordered it when I worked at Colorado Springs Music Company for my son. I think he took it out of the gig bag a couple times. Comes with a thick padded "codura" gig bag.
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega Electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet to rehearsals and shows. 1n 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp which added the feature of metal corner protectors, which keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]

After these is the overdrive/distortion, in this case our ST-2 Power Stack. The CS-3 Compression/Sustainer (and the PW-10 V-Wah) can improve the ST-2’s sustain and tone by increasing the signal to it, so they’re placed before the ST-2. Many players use a compressor just for this reason, and the “fixed wah” sound, which is a wah pedal turned on but not continuously swept, is very common in rock and metal lead tones.


Another important factor to consider is speaker size, which impacts overall loudness and tonality. Bigger speakers can push more air and have more low end, while smaller speakers have limited pushing power, while emphasizing the mids. In addition to size, different speaker models and cabinet types also introduce subtle differences to the overall sound.


In contrast, wiring two pickups in series produces a longer path with increased resistance, adding volume while preventing the highest frequencies from getting through. With series wiring, the output of one pickup goes into the input of another pickup, while with standard parallel wiring, each pickup takes its own path to the output. Besides being noticeably louder, series wiring emphasizes low and midrange tones, and this is a perfect combination to drive any tube amp into saturation without the help of a booster.
Variable 2: Speaker configuration. In Clip 2 you hear cabinets with varying numbers of speakers. First comes the 1x12 sound of a midsized Fender combo amp. Next is a 2x12 Fender-style cabinet. After that is the distinctive sparkle of a tweed-era 4x10 Fender Bassman. The last phrase is a classic 4x12 Marshall stack with 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks. These sounds represent a single mic on a single speaker, yet you can differentiate single- and multi-speaker cabinets due to leakage from adjacent speakers.
A spring reverb unit is really a small amplifier in itself, that sends the guitar signal through a tube circuit to a small output transformer (or through a transistorized circuit) and from there to one end of the springs in a spring can rather than to a speaker. This signal vibrates the springs, is picked up by a transducer at their opposite end, and from there is blended back with the dry signal by degrees determined by a “depth” control, and sent on to the output (or the power tubes, if part of a guitar amp). As you can image, it’s a bulky effect when achieved in this way, requiring at least a couple of transformers, two or three tube sockets and a spring can, but the circuit itself is fairly simple.
A brilliant musical tool, guitar is one of the most familiar instruments widely preferred by majority of people. Are you looking to buy a perfect guitar? If yes, then check the given Best Guitar Brands In India throughout this page. At some point of time, you must have thought to learn guitar because it not only provided inner sense of pleasure but also impress others. If you are a beginner and passionate to learn this brilliant musical instrument, then must consider below provided popular acoustic, electric and bass guitars. Most importantly the sound and price of guitars are mostly considered by the buyer. Even many Indian musicians have opted them .While it is very tough to choose perfect guitar brand at the beginning learning time.
CALIFORNIA PLAYER models express unique personal style with bold looks and inspiring sound. The satin finish mahogany neck features an easy-to-play, slim-taper “C”-shaped profile suitable for any playing style. When it’s time to plug in, solid-top California Player models also feature a Fishman pickup/preamp system for incredible amplified performance with pure, rich and resonant tone.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
Terada was one of the smaller Japanese manufacturers of acoustic guitars during the period of 1960 to 1980, producing products for Epiphone, Fender Japan, Grapham, Gretch and Vesta. Terada produced some Kingston badges until 1975. Other badged guitars produced by Terada include some Burny badges and interesting Thumb guitars. Terada has been in continuous operation since 1912.
These electric guitar tone tips from Guitar Control are money saving and time saving tips you can use to create great guitar tone without investing in anything other than the guitar you already own. Your volume control, your tone control, and your switches are a wealth of guitar sounds. Also, the way you play your guitar -- the dynamics. All of these elements can be used separately or together to build guitar tones into any of the solos you play. This is an awesome lesson for beginners because you can put these tricks to work immediately to get the results you’re looking for, and if you’re short on cash, these guitar tone tips will allow you to express yourself with tone without having to spend money.
Another classic yet quite rare tone wood, Korina, has a lengthy Gibson pedigree. This elegant, fine-grained wood, also known as African limba, was chosen as the wood for the super-collectible Modernistic Series guitars of the late 1950s, and lives on in the ’58 Explorer and ’59 Flying V available today from the Custom Shop. Korina possesses some similarities to mahogany, particularly in its warmth and resonance, but it also yields degrees of clarity, definition, and sustain that are all its own.
Silvertone starter pack is incredibly hard to beat. The candy blue finish gives the guitar a gorgeous aesthetic that looks fully professional. The pickup selector has 5 positions, and there are two tone knobs to give even more control over the sound. Stratocaster fans will love this guitar! Also included in the set is a gig bag, small Silvertone amp, strap, 5 picks, Allan wrenches, strings, a clip-on tuner, and a tremolo bar.
If you’re paying attention, you probably noticed that I forgot to mention EQ and volume pedals. Actually I didn’t. Placement of these particular pedals depends more on what you want to achieve with them than any hard and fast rules. For example, you may want to place a volume pedal at the very front of the signal chain to perform dramatic fade in and fade out effects or to better regulate the guitar’s level before it hits any effects (or you could just do what I do and use the guitar’s own volume control). Placing the volume pedal near the end of the signal chain just before the delay and reverb effects allows you to perform professional-sounding fades or mute the guitar’s signal without cutting delay or reverb tails short. If you use a loop switcher, a volume pedal can be paired with a single effect, and you can use the volume pedal to blend or mix that effect independently.

Collectors grade 1964 Harmony H-59 Rocket near mint condition. These guitars are so hard to find in this excellent condition. This one is a 9 out of 10. Great action, straight neck, Gold Foil Pickups, and that rocket look too. She has a few very small edge nicks on rear of headstock, a few slight tiny cracks on center of back in grain, and one small edge ding. Also some very slight age checking but this guitar looks great! All are nothing to be alarmed about and not obvious when looking at guitar. This is the finest example of an H-59 we ever came across. Guitar is completely original with great color and grain. Comes with chipboard period case. Just reduced to $1,299.99 complete.
After Fender’s decision in 1982 to switch Squier’s production from strings to guitars, the Stratocaster was one of the first models put under the Squier production line in Japan. It was the most commercially successful guitar Fender had produced. Originally in 1982, the headstock had a “Fender” name written in large script, followed by “Squier series” in smaller script. In 1983, this was later changed to the current 1970s large headstock featuring “Squier” in larger script, followed by “by Fender” in smaller script. Since then, there have been several variations of headstock size and Squier logos, typically based on what series the guitar is.
Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”
Based on the popular Les Paul Jr, the Saga LJ-10 DIY electric guitar kit follows after its streamlined aesthetics and electronics. It comes with the popular LP style body, crafted from basswood and pre-drilled for complete assembly. It has a bolt-on neck that you have to screw into the body, and a headstock that you can carve into your preferred shape.
Built-in mics aren’t necessarily the budget option as they can be seen on some high-end guitars. They’re extremely helpful when you need volume but not so much where the acoustics of your setting, say in a concert hall, carries sound projection for you. However, the internal mic can raise problems for the performer as they’re prone to producing unwanted feedback. Multi-blend pickup and preamp systems allow you the flexibility to switching out from the mic when it proves to be problematic. However, if you’re going to install one yourself, look for one with a high feedback resistance of exceptional quality.
Muddy Waters is obviously one of the most recognized and influential blues artists of this century. When his name is mentioned phrases like "slide guitar" and "electric Chicago blues" are associated with it, but what about "wah-wah" and "psychedelic"? For a small period in history, Muddy Waters' image became one of a psychedelic icon and if there weren't records still around from then, most people would doubt it had ever happened. The sixties were a strange time for music and musicians- none felt stranger than musicians from the previous decade trying to stay afloat then. Many times in music, established artists will try to expand upon their work and take a chance with something different. They should at least be praised and encouraged when they try to experiment with their sound. If music were condemned to always following a strict guideline of rules, it would be pretty boring. Music should be allowed to grow and explore new territories because everyone can agree that it's not exciting if it's always predictable.
hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is  normal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have  installed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it up when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five  way switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds— ignore speeling in previos messege–thankss ean

All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.

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I wish I had a cool story to attach to this guitar, but really this one is a history lesson regarding the development of Japanese guitar manufacturing.  Plus, it’s an example of some rare component combinations (like the pickups) that make guitars like these worth buying.  THEY’RE SO CHEAP!!  Hell, buy one of these for $200, send it to Dano and sink another $100 into it, and you’ll have yourself one hell of a player!  It’s like recycling, dude.
Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.
At one point, Fender switched to producing guitars with the bridge pickup located farthest from the highest-amplitude portion of the vibrating strings, slightly “over-wound”, thus increasing the signal output from that pickup. Even more overwound pickups (“hot-wired” designs) became popular, either for all three pickups (a “hot” configuration), or for the bridge position only (so-called “Texas Hot” due to its popularity among Southern Rock guitarists).
Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.

“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”

Custom 24 series have been the bread and butter of PRS for a long time. This guitar has proven to be a really capable axe that can keep up with you no matter where you go in terms of music. A good friend of mine used to own one for a long time, which allowed me to play it numerous times. It’s one of the smoothest and best sounding guitars I’ve ever had a chance to play.
Desolder the 9V battery connections and attach a 9V centre-negative DC plug to the correct poles on a 3PDT switch; if you’re not sure where to start, purchase a PCB for this online or search for the correct wiring layout. Lead a live and ground wire out from your switch to your vero, and solder them in place where the 9V battery clip was previously soldered in.

Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
Boogex is a guitar amplifier plug-in with a variety of sound shaping features.  With Boogex it is possible to get heavy distorted sound as well as slight distortion sound.  Boogex is also able to apply any speaker cabinet impulse response (selection of built-in impulses is available).  Processing latency is very modest - 96 samples (2.1 ms at 44.1kHz).  Boogex comes with several example factory presets.
Despite its high production figures, Fernandes is better known in the United States for its Sustainer system, which uses electromagnetism[1] to vibrate a string for an extended period, so long as the user continues to fret a note.[2] Unlike the similar manual E-Bow sustainer, the Fernandes Sustainer can be used with a standard plectrum, because the sustainer is imbedded in the body of guitar. Fernandes' custom shop has installed numerous Sustainers into guitars built by other manufacturers.
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