I own a v100 gold top modified to fit regular humbuckers and boy it is great. I have played it with gibson lps and it holds it own. Not as nice really but damn it sounds great. I have an SG too but have never played an SG before this guitar. I am weirded out by the light body. Are they all like that? I know they are all neck heavy but this seems out of order. I do like the sg though more every time I pick it up.
Let me begin by saying this guitar is really good right out of the box. It has a booming sound, and really fills a room even when not plugged in. However, to make it really shine, you should perform a basic setup. I replaced the saddle and pins with bone and sanded the bone saddle down to lower the action. The nut is good from the factory. I also oiled the rosewood fretboard and added Martin phosphor bronze medium strings. After doing this work, the guitar sounds every bit as good as my 90’s Martin DR which is stellar. At this price range, I didn’t expect much, but what I received was a very pleasant surprise. Don’t hesitate to buy this package!
The GrandMeister Deluxe refines the German firm's best-selling compact head, with four flexible channels and a host of built-in effects. Just about everything is MIDI-powered, so you can edit and store presets to your heart's content. The rear panel includes the latest Red Box recording output, and there's also a new improved iPad app that you can use to edit and store presets, either at the end of a lead or using a wireless MIDI adaptor. The GrandMeister Deluxe 40's four channels sound quite different from those of its predecessor: they're more balanced, with slightly less treble emphasis and a smoother but no less powerful bass response. There's plenty of headroom on the clean channel, which dovetails seamlessly with the higher-gain crunch channel. Both clean and crunch are very tweed-influenced, dominated by a warm midrange that's equally flattering to humbuckers and single coils, especially when boosted and laced with a little of the GrandMeister's digital reverb, which can be combined to taste with delay, chorus, flanger, phaser or tremolo. The two American-voiced lead channels have all the gain you could possibly need for almost any musical genre, from classic rock to modern drop-tuned metal, with a nicely sculpted top-end that squeals and snarls on demand. As a do-it-all tool the GrandMeister 40 takes some beating. All of its many features work efficiently and it's hard to point the finger at shortcomings, because there really aren't any.
There are a couple of tips that can help you out, however. First – as a new learner – you don’t need a stage-ready amplifier or even a high-end boutique amp, as they are both far too powerful and pricey for someone just picking up the hobby. Second, you should look into amplifier versatility. As a new player, it’s likely that you’re still figuring out your own style – and being able to change up your sound without the need for a bunch of extra peripherals is incredibly valuable in figuring that out.
Founded by a father and son, Ryohei Tahara and the unknown Tahara. I do not know which was the father and which was the son. The company existed until the late 1979 when it was bought up by Saga Musical Instruments. In all, the company existed less than a decade as Tahara. Both the Maya and El Maya badges are attributed to Tahara. Saga Musical Instruments exists to this day.
There is a legitimate physical aspect to the gauge of your strings that will affect how well you play.  Bending and fretting becomes much easier and faster with a lighter set, but in my own experience you will have a “tinnier” tone that must be compensated for with your guitar and amp tone controls.  Speaking of tone, lets look at how string gauge affects the sound you produce.
Ultimately, his thesis is shared by every single person interviewed for this article. It simply does not appear that there’s any way to objectively measure what is “good” guitar tone. A major reason for that is the infinitely varied human element of the musician performing and the audience listening. The impossibility of proving anything doesn’t, however, change the fact that so many guitarists revere those early tones. Some argue that’s because the early days were just better. Others point out that we’re simply intransigent.
Distortion effects are really like an overdrive pedal taken to another level. Many distortion pedals are simply overdrive pedals with the ability to dial in a higher gain setting (“Gain” can be thought of as the volume going into the overdrive components of the pedal). Some pedals will also have a built in equalizer to shape the tone of the distortion.
Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.
So, to make a successful guitar company, you need to beat the best brands out there. But how would you do that? Brands like Fender and Gibson advertise themselves as the original inventors of the two most popular electric guitar models, the Stratocaster and the Les Paul. This is one of their biggest selling points. Unfortunately, you can’t reinvent something that’s already been invented, hence you can’t really beat them at brand name, especially when you’re starting a guitar company. You have to try to beat them at quality, price and novelty (i.e., introducing something new that improves a guitarists experience). Eventually, you’ll have to get some artists to try out your models and sign deals with them. If you get all of this right, I think you should be able to make it big.
Here we have another Vintage Japanese GREAT find this example a beautiful pretty much exact copy of a vntage Martin D-45 ... this is a very High Quality built Lawsuit era Aria Pro II Model AW40. Made in Japan. From information on the Internet concerning dating these, the guitar's serial number would lead to 1976 manufacture. However, I could not find the AW40 model cataloged until the late 70's... but its a 76.. is consistent with all others. THIS is one beautiful guitar! it exudes fine detailed craftsmanship this was Aria's flagship dreadnought of this time period with D41-ish features. From an original vintage Aria catalog, AW40 features include: "Dreadnought sized, Solid Sitka Spruce top, Solid Brazilian Rosewood back and sides, bridge fingerboard and veneer headstock overlay with MOP logo, Marquetry Purfling" ( Top looks to be solid with the sides & back appears to me to be laminated )The catalog can be viewed at matsumoku.org, a site that deals with the history of Matsumoku made instruments like Aria, Electra and others. This guitar has the Martin classic snowflake mother of pearl inlays, abalone binding and rosette, and fully bound headstock and gorgeous rosewood fingerboard. Headstock also has a Rosewood overlay. The bookmatched rosewood on the back side is especially easy on the eyes. The guitar is all original with no repairs and with original tuning keys. It is in JVG Rated condition as excellent used vintage 8.8/10 WoW...its 35 years old and the woods have opened up now like fine wine the tone is richer & mellowed as only time can provide. No cracks or repairs ever. It plays very well with good action and has a nice warm rich tone. The Neck is arrow straight. Frets have minimal wear with no buzzing anywhere on the fingerboard....this is the one! At this link you can view more pictures of this guitar please cut & paste the following link: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/AriaPro2AW40D45BrazilianRosewood?authkey=Gv1sRgCOmS2c3RvMGpUg#slideshow/5609409732594635106.

The written history of the classical guitar can be traced back to the early 16th century with the development of the vihuela in Spain. While the lute was then becoming popular in other parts of Europe, the Spaniards did not take to it well because of its association with the Moors.[citation needed] Instead, the lute-like vihuela appeared with two more strings that gave it more range and complexity. In its most developed form, the vihuela was a guitar-like instrument with six double strings made of gut, tuned like a modern classical guitar with the exception of the third string, which was tuned half a step lower. It has a high sound and is rather large to hold. Few have survived and most of what is known today comes from diagrams and paintings.


Then, there are the venues where all you get is a vocal mic or two, where you're left to curate your sound all by yourselves. This category accounts for the vast majority of places a young band will play, and if you can hone your tone here you can hone it anywhere. What's most important is that you keep your amps low enough to allow the drummer to play at about 80% intensity. That way, the audience can actually hear all those important vocals, and when your drummer kicks it up to 100%, and you stomp on your distortion pedal, the audience will actually feel a shift.

From the standpoint of theoretical perfection, the Baxendall tone control is the opposite of the Fender tone stack. With bass and treble variations that are mostly independent, the frequency response is quite flat when both controls are set to the middle of their range using linear pots. Using the opamp/feedback form of the controls means that there is no signal loss that needs be made up elsewhere. This is virtually the standard for hi-fi tone controls. However, there are some guitar amps which use this form of control, tweaked a bit to match the guitar frequencies.


Therefore, if you are a beginner that is still struggling to find a product that comes shipped with other accessories, you should really pay attention to this model. Besides, although this is a full-sized guitar, previous buyers of the model have stated that the unit is not particularly heavy. Consequently, it can be used by teens without worrying about its size and weight.

[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
Here we have a matching quad of late sixties Goodman speakers with green labels 25 Watts each @ 12 ohms Very rare in that EACH driver is fully functional, the cones are nice and stiff, no cone rub or any tears, just a killer set of vintage speakers. These came out of a wem cab and were also stock in laney cabinets(think sabbath tone, wem, Burman and Selmer gear Wem used odd impedances, these read 10.01 ohms on my multimeter so is treat them as 8ohms if they are wired up in a cab series parallel. Postage in the U.K. is £32 and they will be sent out in two separate parcels, you will have to arrange your own courier if your not U.K. based you can also collect in person! Any questions just ask

In October 2017, Gibson announced plans to relocate its Memphis operations to a smaller location and plans to sell the Memphis property. Gibson opened its Memphis facility 18 years before, which occupies just a portion of a massive 127,620 square foot complex. According to the Memphis Daily News, Gibson plans to search for a new facility for its Memphis operations and will stay in the current spot for the next 18 to 24 months. The facility, which sits across from the FedExForum along South B.B. King Boulevard, is expected to list for $17 million.
Certainly low action makes a guitar easier to play, and for some styles it really is a necessity. What I would like to address here, though, are the high incidences of guitarists who perpetually chase “the perfect tone”, while continually focusing on string height purely as a function of playing feel, rather than as a factor of tone, which it most certainly is. The old set-up rule that you “get your strings as low as you can without buzzing” seems to make perfect sense. Set up to that criteria, however, while your strings might not buzz noticeably, their vibrational arc is more than likely still inhibited by the proximity of the frets. Also, play harder than usual — which, if you’re like me, you will often find yourself doing in live situations, even if you’re not aware of it — and that set up does also lead to a little unwanted buzzing, though your amp settings, the energy of the live gig, and any effects in the chain might help to mask it.
However, when I’m building a guitar, there’s a myriad of small adjustments I can make to steer the instrument on a desired trajectory. These micro mods are interactive with each other and, depending upon the combination, offer a wide variety of sonic outcomes. But these little mods can also be applied to existing guitars—your guitars—in any number of permutations and to great affect. Let’s take a look at five mods that are easy enough for most players to try.

Softer Delays: I'll usually have at least a couple of delays as auxiliary effects in a rock or pop mix, but I often find that bringing the general level of the delay as high as I want it makes any transients stand out too much. When I'm sending single notes on a clean electric guitar to a delay line, say, I tend to want to hear a wash of sound, not the rhythmic 'CHA-Cha-cha-cha-cha' of a repeated note attack. For this reason, I'll often put a gate or expander before a delay, with an attack time set to 10ms or so. This is enough to 'chop off' any abrupt transients, and makes the delay sound much smoother. Sam Inglis
Also in ’65, W.M.I. produced a Teisco Del Rey catalog that offered some interesting wrinkles in the story. For starters, the guitars shown are the same as in Teisco’s catalog, but the models were all renamed with a one or two-letter prefix followed by a dash and a three-digit number. Solidbodies were designated E- for stoptails, and ET- for those with tremolos/vibratos. Basses were labelled EB-. The numerical suffix signalled the number of pickups in the first digit; the ET-320 had three pickups, the ET-200 had two pickups, etc. Hollowbodies retained the original EP- prefix and either single or double-digit suffix. Amps remained as the Checkmate line.

Shecter is known for manufacturing quality rock and metal friendly guitars at reasonable price points, and I think that they use evil model names to keep their instruments from the hands of pop and ballad players. The Hellraiser C-1 FR-S showcases what this company can give metal players in the mid-tier price point, and with its name, it is obviously not meant for choirs and church music.
In terms of how the effects and amp models sound, we give the Zoom G3X a 7 out of 10. Most effects sound great and very convincing. All but the most discerning tone snobs would be able to distinguish them from the “real thing.” As is typical for digital multi-effects units, the quality of the overdrive and distortion effects is sub-par. Conversely, delays, reverbs, and choruses sound pretty great. In fact, one recommendation many users make is to start out with the Zoom G3X, and eventually buy a separate dedicated overdrive or distortion pedal, like a Fulltone OCD or Pro Co RAT2. This comment from an owner sums it up well:
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony Gold - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

Chabot Guitars - Paul Chabot used to offer quality hand made Classical guitars (Colorado, USA) "Paul first apprenticed und er guitar maker / repairman Robert Buchanan, where he became familiar with the aspects of guitar repair, and guitar refinishing. Furthering his ability and knowledge, Paul attended Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery where he learned the basics of wood, instrument design and guitar making. Not long after graduating from Roberto-Venn, Paul was fortunate enough to apprentice under world renowned Master guitar maker Augustino Lo Prinzi. Through Augustino Lo Prinzi, Paul was able to learn some of the most proven methods and advanced techni ques of fine guitar making."
Welcome to Part 1 of a new Gibson series that will dissect a different breed of effect each week, to tell you—the player—what each does, and how it does it. Effects pedals can be divided into a range of categories of types, but there are undeniably some gray areas between these, since different designs will achieve their sonic ends via different means. The distinctions get blurrier when we throw digital technology into the brew. An analog and a digital chorus, for example, are very different circuits, approached—from the design perspective—from very different standpoints, although the sonic results may sound roughly similar (in the good ones, though, the subtleties are usually quite distinctive).
If you are new to electronics, the essential tool you most likely need to buy is a decent temperature controlled soldering station. A basic one such as a Weller WLC100 can be had for less than $40 and will do the job just fine. Really nice ones with digital temperature readouts from Weller or Hakko are $100-$150 and as much as you will ever need for a home pedal shop. The soldering pencils have interchangeable tips, so you can keep a selection of different sizes. The one that normally comes with a new station will be suitable for most through-hole pedal kits.

Guitar effects and the boxes that generate them have married theory and practice, history and material, content and form. Such strange logics, inherent to all of these simple devices, radiate sincerity in their transgressive sounds. Or put differently, those “unmistakable sounds,” which can enchant an entire generation, are not entirely intentional, but are born from the accidental collisions between transistors, tubes, wiring, and luck.
I disagree. Through the years I've owned many amps and many pedals, and played with numerous setups to get different sounds. My absolute favorite setup and sound I have had is my Les Paul straight through my JCM900. At most, I'll add a wah in there. That is my ideal setup. I've played many different styles over the years, and used many techniques. My playing has evolved as I went along, and started taking pedals out of the mix. I think pedals are a great thing, and if you want to use them, you should.
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Epiphone is to Gibson what Squier is to Fender. Meanwhile, the Les Paul is Gibson’s Stratocaster. Probably one of the most famous guitars on the planet, the Les Paul has been played by the likes of Slash, Jimmy Page, and Bob Marley. Epiphone, luckily, has made it available to the world with a price that won’t break the bank. And it’s an excellent guitar for those starting to play rock music.
Why We Liked It - Even if this isn’t the cheapest guitar on our list, we think the Schecter Hellraiser is the best bargain! To get this much guitar for so little money is almost incomprehensible and we feel like a million bucks when we play it! It not only looks good, it sounds fantastic, and you can be sure to impress everyone who hears you play with this wonderful instrument!

Rather than superfluous power, I suspect the copywriter really meant something like superior!! However, then again, maybe they did get it right, because they featured a 6A6 preamp tube that was exceptionally weak and microphonic. These amps also had a chassis built in Chicago, by Chicago Electric, with a cabinet made in Chicago, by Geib. These had performance problems and in 1937, National Dobro went back to using Webster chassis with Geib cabinets.


The Myth: Most amp manufacturers were conservative from a previous generation with a background of country, jazz and religious music. They were horrified by the anti-religious, drug driven, sex crazed rock musos of the 60s’ diving their amps at full power into hard distortion for sustain. When these amps were first designed in the 50s, it was inconceivable they would be used in this way.
Cap in series with a resistor (shouldn’t matter which comes first). Kinman recommends this for single coils but it works rather well for humbuckers too. I installed 1nF cap in series with a 130K resistor and it works awesome. Resistor is there to limit the effect of the cap and having it in series with the cap means it shouldn’t affect pot taper as much. Larger cap means wider frequency range, so treble jump isn’t as sudden. So far, this is my favorite treble bleed circuit.
Fender vs. Gibson is really not the issue. It has more to do with the weight factor as well as hard-tail vs. vibrato bar. A Telecaster will probably give you the same tuning stability and basic tonal range as an SG, but you might just as well consider an Ibanez or Charvel and get the result you want. A good guitarist can play ANY guitar and get a good result. A bad guitar, conversely, will sound awful no matter how well it’s played if the intonation, electronics, and tuning stability are bad. A Telecaster can be a large guitar. A Les Paul will generally seem lighter, maybe be more comfortable with a shorter scale length, but cost more. A Stratocaster will sound lovely to Strat fans, but then you have a lot of tuning and quirky pickup issues you won’t get with a hard-tail. You may find the Ibanez with a Floyd Rose vibrato bar may give you the best of both worlds, stability and dive bombs. The guitar I recommend for beginners is the Gibson SG, because it is comfortable in size and scale length, achieves both bright and thick tones, and is generally affordable. For prospective Whammy-bar shredders, I would lean towards a Charvel or Jackson at first, and maybe consider a MusicMan. The premium Strat or Les Paul is very desirable and very playable for anyone who has the fingers to bring out the sounds, but if you don’t have the fingers, imo, wait until you do.
The Suspended Chime has two powerful effects in one pedal - chorus and chorus/delay. The Suspended Chime features a blend knob which allows you to go from subtle to lush chorus effect in either set up. Using the selector switch, you can add a 190 millisecond delay to the chorus introducing special depth to your tone. Varying the dry/wet mix can fatten your rhythms or produce a shimmering 12-string sound. The Suspended Chime kit comes equipped with an LED indicator and industry standard 9 volt center negative power jack. MOD® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All effects pedals operate on a 9V battery.

Looking at the front (or top rather) panel of the Boss ME-80 is where it gets interesting. Don’t let the sheer number of knobs intimidate you. Shaping your tone with the ME-80 is a very tactile experience, just like you would if you had a pedalboard full of pedals. The ME-80 is made for the guitarist that doesn’t necessarily want to lug around (or spend money on) a large pedal collection, but still loves the feeling of turning knobs and instantly hearing results. The interface is actually pretty easy to understand. Every major section is surrounded by a white border, and to design a sound (a.k.a. patch) you just move through the sections and set the effects to your heart’s content. We should mention that the Boss ME-80 has 59 different effects and nine guitar preamps which you can use. The first section labeled PREAMP is where you set your amplifier model, and should feel familiar if you’ve ever messed with a guitar amp. Next you have an EQ section, REVERB, COMP, OD/DS, MOD, and DELAY. You can look at the front panel for yourself in a closeup photo to see the various effects available within each of these groupings. The 8 black footswitches along the bottom are what you use to switch effects on and off, as well as move through banks and presets. They’re not your traditional stompbox footswitch, but they feel pretty nice. As is the norm with the larger multi-effects floor units, the ME-80 incorporates an expression pedal, which is assignable to different effects via the knob next to it. Very easy to use, very intuitive.


The questions I get asked in response to people reading my stuff on guitar wiring often relate to the 5-way pickup selector switch so I thought I’d write a brief explanation of how it works. Understanding how the 5-way switch on your guitar works is key to successful guitar wiring. Knowing what goes on inside the switch may sound like a simple, maybe trivial, detail but it’s something we all need to understand and it’s not as easy as it first seems.
Though pitch-shifting is an effect, it is easier to control when used via an insert point. However, if you need to use the effect on several tracks in varying amounts, you can use it via a send/return loop, providing the shifter is set to 100 percent wet. That way, you can adjust the effects depth for individual mix channels by using the send control feeding the pitch-shifter.
In the 1960s, the tonal palette of the electric guitar was further modified by introducing effect units in its signal path, before the guitar amp, of which one of the earliest units was the fuzz pedal. Effects units come in several formats, the most common of which are the stompbox "pedal" and the rackmount unit. A stomp box (or pedal) is a small metal or plastic box containing the circuitry, which is placed on the floor in front of the musician and connected in line with the patch cord connected to the instrument. The box is typically controlled by one or more foot-pedal on-off switches and it typically contains only one or two effects. Pedals are smaller than rackmount effects and usually less expensive. "Guitar pedalboards" are used by musicians who use multiple stomp-boxes; these may be a DIY project made with plywood or a commercial stock or custom-made pedalboard.

History aside, modern-day Ibanez guitars are amazing instruments. They offer a very distinctive value and bang for your buck that is simply hard to match by other manufacturers. Ibanez has become huge in shred (fast lead playing) guitar and metal circles. High profile virtuosos like Joe Satriani, Steve Vai and Paul Gilbert have been greatly responsible for securing Ibanez’s place in super-fast, incredibly technical, shred guitar playing. Not to mention that Ibanez electric guitars simply feel “easy” to play, fast and comfortable. As far as ergonomics and playability, Ibanez guitars are hard to beat. Plus, you can get some very good inexpensive models too. If I where going to call a brand, “the Toyota of the guitar industry,” it would be Ibanez.

Acoustic guitar is the first choice of many guitar beginners. There are a lot of benefits to start with an acoustic guitar. First of first, acoustic guitars are cheaper than electric guitars. Then acoustic guitars are easy to carry, you don’t need electricity and amplifiers. The most important reason I think is a good acoustic guitar make amazing sound that different from electric guitars.
We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best electric guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
Martin guitars have been around for over 180 years, and are widely considered to be some of the best guitars currently in production. The Little Martin is a ¾ scale guitar perfect for kids and beginners with a smaller stature. Featuring professional-grade construction and hardware, the Little Martin has a big sound in a small package. Also great for travel, the compact body stows easily.
AJL: It’s a brand that specialises in making Gypsy acoustic guitars and archtop jazz box guitars. Each guitar is handmade by master luthier Ari-Jukka Luomaranta from Finland, and when I say he makes it, I literally mean he makes it all alone without any employees. I’m not exactly a classical guitar or jazz box fan but I understand why people love his guitars. He puts extreme attention to even the most minute details while making each of his guitar. Each AJL guitar is like a testimony of his art and dedication. He chooses the best quality woods to work with and by his undying passion for making guitars he creates masterpieces.
It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings, because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. But nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.

More recently, many boutique pedal manufacturers, such as the Z.Vex and Death by Audio series, have attempted to revive the analog strangeness of germanium transistors and diodes. Not bound by imitation, they continue to innovate with analog materials as if the technical innovations of the 70s and 80s had never happened. The mid-90s Z.Vex Fuzz Factory is notable for establishing internal feedback loops that are inadvertently tied to the logic of circuit bending. This means that the pedal self-oscillates, producing an absurd yet controllable noise, akin to an air-raid siren.
SolidBody (2008) – Taylor’s take on a traditional solid electric guitar. Made from a solid slab of wood with cavities only for the pickguard or direct mounted pickups, and the bridge. Designed from the ground up, each SolidBody model features solderless pickups or a solderless pickguard which permit for musicians to effortlessly change the sound of their guitar. The SolidBody line is fully customizable with a wide combination of wood, colors and electronic configurations, and single or double cutaway options which enables anyone purchasing a SolidBody to get the sound and look that they want. All options are available for customization through Taylor’s SolidBody Configurator on the Taylor website.
Soundwise, it still packs the same AudioDNA2 processor but somehow sounds 'better', I think John Johnson (founder of Digitech before it was sold to Harman re-hired to work on this RP) had a lot to do with the improvements. I think they have made this with it being used/abused in mind, from the rigid metal chasis, to the USB connectivity, line-in jack to play along backing tracks, headphone input, stereo out, built-in looper (40 seconds) and the awesome Stompbox and SoundCheck features.

Even though pickups are the main component tasked with interpreting string vibrations and indirectly turning them into sound, your choice of wood still matters. Although the effect is subtle, certain woods will give you better sustain, more definition, and so on.  And in the end it's the accumulation of all of these choices that determine your ultimate sound.


Several years after his last adventure, retired fortune hunter, Nathan Drake, is forced back into the world of thieves. With the stakes much more personal, Drake embarks on a globe-trotting journey in pursuit of a historical conspiracy behind a fabled pirate treasure. His greatest adventure will test his physical limits, his resolve, and ultimately what he's willing to sacrifice to save the ones he loves.
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If you like the traditional look of a Fender Stratocaster, but want something a bit more modern with a little more output for heavier blues, rock, and metal tones, the ESP LTD SN-200HT is a fantastic value for the money. You’ll get a great range of tones thanks to the humbucker in the bridge position, and two single coils in the middle and neck positions.
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I think that a good EQ in the loop is awesome. If you find an amp that has a great overall sound, but you wish that it was a bit brighter, darker, etc, but you find that you loose the character of the distortion when you get the tone you like you can play with both EQs to have a lot of controll over the final sound. It won't make up for a crap amp, but it can make a great amp a whole world of awesome.

In the face of this mounting conservatism, Ovation entered the solidbody marketplace with an in-your-face design consistent with the radicalism of its Lyracord bowl-backed acoustics. In ’71 it unveiled the battleaxe-shaped Breadwinner, followed by its upmarket brother, the Deacon, in January ’72. As you might expect, despite the unusual shape (rounded upper edge, deep single cutaway at the double octave, s-curved lower edge, and asymmetrically scooped out lower bout) these also featured some innovations. Both had two-octave bolt-on Ovation fingerboards, the former unbound with dots, the latter bound with diamonds. Both had mahogany bodies, the Breadwinner with a kind of spackle finish (white, black, tan or blue), the Deacon a sunburst finish. The Breadwinner had a molded plastic bridge/tailpiece assembly with adjustable plastic saddles and chrome hardware; the Deacon had a similar unit with metal saddles with gold hardware. Early Breadwinners had the jack on the back of the body, but this quickly migrated to the pickguard; some transitional examples have both jacks on the back and pickguard. These Ovation guitars were remarkably ergonomic, well-balanced when standing and cradling comfortably on the knee if you preferred to sit.


You're headed in the right direction - don't stop! yes, the keyboardist should control vibrato directly with the fingers, not automatically with an LFO. The more you rely on the technology to play the music for you, the worse your results will be in the long run. Is your intention to emulate a guitar, or to achieve a similar kind of lead expression and sound control during playing? Because these two are very different.
Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.

Sometimes a guitar needs more than a setup, and actual repairs are required. Guitar setup price is minimal when compared to the price of most repairs, so be sure that the problem is not something that can be easily adjusted before making any patch-ups. The cost of repairs can be virtually any price depending on the damage. Refinishing might be over $100, and if a neck needs replacement due to warping, then the price may be several hundreds of dollars. A cracked neck can be glued and clamped for under $100, but the quality of the guitar is unlikely to be regained with this process.
Now, you said that most people you see just crank the tone knob to the maximum and leave it there. That’s fine, and some genres of music actually have no need for a tone control. Heavy metal and hard rock and their derivatives have almost no need for tone control. Guitarists either keep the tone knob wide open and never touch it, or they just buy a guitar that don’t have a tone knob (nor a neck pickup). Guitars made and designed for metal are built this way. I think a lot of country musicians also keep the treble wide open to get that biting shimmery single coil tone.
Here's a cool tip: If you ever needed to compare sizes between two items, say tuner shafts and a drill bit, but don't have a micrometer, try this. Use a crescent wrench! adjust the jaws to fit the first item, and then see how the other piece fits! Also great for taking measurements of something round. Fit the wrench to the object, and then lay the tool on a ruler and measure the gap. It's much more accurate!
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Maple & Mahogany - Figured - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 4 - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Oil
This little beauty was built in 1991 Model: D10n- N is for Natural and is beginning to open up in sound quality over the new issues of the D-10 and is a great value we believe this one is better sounding then new and now is it has freshly been upgraded with a bone nut & new Martin Marquis strings installation just today and now it rings sweet &clear tone much like our vintage Yamaha Fg - Takamine f- Martin d, Yairi.. like tones for a fraction of that...wood & finish on this example is almost mint it virtually looks just as new...9.9 JVG condition rating...nearly 20 years old coming into its own town wise and is almost like new...No problems cracks or repairs... · # Solid Spruce Top this example has nice straight grain and is in real nice condition # Mahogany sides/back....again good grain pattern and fit and finish are very nice+++ # Mahogany neck size is medium ++ 1 11/16th" @ the nut with adjustable trussrod...beautiful grain Mahogany with a perfect fit & finish ...neck set original & excellent # Rosewood fingerboard and bridge..both nice east Indian rosewood .. rich appearance to this example # Natural/buffed thin Poly gloss body finish / wow!... very nice too # Black pickguard # Stained mahogany/buffed gloss neck..nice American size neck not thin like many made today...this one feels American med++ size.. like a Gibson or Martin... # Quality Chrome die cast tuning machines = work excellent # Multi lam top binding # Neck binding # Soundhole rosette # Width at nut: 1 11/16th # Scale length: 25.5" # Overall Length: 41" # Lower bout: 15 5/8" # Upper bout: 11 5/8" # List Price in 1991: $499.90 # Colors: Natural Note: All dimensions and specifications are given to the best of our knowledge from actual measurements and/or manufacturer's specifications. Small variances and/or discrepancies may exist. Just in and as it is priced so reasonably for a clean 21 year old vintage acoustic I believe this will not last long at this price... better snap her up while you can! Thanks for your interest any questions email gr8bids@comcast.net pics to come asap .

I believe that the best electric guitar amp for beginners is a straightforward combo amp, represented by the amps on this list. Avoid the bells and whistles of the fancier, feature-rich combo amps until you’re confident you have a solid set of playing chops. Then you can either move up to a modeling amp, or start adding effects pedals to your rig. The great thing about all the amps profiled above is that they provide a solid base for what ever effects you want to add to the mix later on down the road.

Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.
It’s probably fair to say that drive pedals of all shapes and sizes outnumber the other types of effects. This is due to the fact that they form the backbone of your overall tone. It’s also probably fair to say that it’s one of the most subjective tonal changes you can implement. One man’s muff is another man’s screamer, so to speak. There are certain classics within the genre which may act as a gateway to stronger forms of grit though. Ibanez’ famous green Tubescreamer pedal is used by countless players on account of its versatility, whereby it can form the basis of a good quality blues tone. Or it can complement a distortion pedal by ‘boosting’ or tightening up the signal. Another favourite is the Electro Harmonix Big Muff, which has been used for decades by players looking to add a distinct fuzziness to their tone.
Effects can be connected via insert points, or the effect send and return loop that is included in most consoles and DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). When effects are used in the send/return loop, their Mix control should be set to 100 percent wet, so you add back only effected sound to the dry sound, which comes directly through the mixer channel.
There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.

Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.

The company was founded in 1931 as the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (ElectRo-Patent-Instruments) by Adolph Rickenbacher and George Beauchamp in order to sell electric Hawaiian guitars. These instruments had been designed by Beauchamp, assisted at the National String Instruments Corporation by Paul Barth and Harry Watson.[1] They chose the brand name Rickenbacher (later changed to Rickenbacker), though early examples bear the brand nameElectro.[2]
The very first thing to remember about pickups is that the active option is not necessarily better than the passive choice, and vice versa. Each type brings its own set of drawbacks and benefits. Passive pickups might be limited in terms of signal strength and tone shaping, but they are much more expressive in comparison to the active pickups in terms of picking and strumming intensities.
The guitars included three bolt-neck Strat-style models, the GS-1 (one humbucker), GS-2 (two humbuckers) and GS-3 (humbucker/single/single). Most had locking Kahler vibratos, although at least one GS-3 has been seen with a traditional fulcrum vibrato. The bodies had a German carve relief beginning at the waist and extending forward to the cutaway horns. The necks had 21-fret rosewood or maple fingerboards with dots. The six-in-line heads were kind of squarish and bi-level, with a carved relief along the lower edge, kind of an Ovation trademark. The logos said Ovation Ultra GS. The GS-1 (volume only) and GS-2 (volume, tone, three-way) had pickups mounted on rings on the top. The GS-3 featured a black Strat-style pickguard. One source refers to a GSL model, but nothing is known about what this means, if it isn’t a typo. Most of these came with typical exposed-pole DiMarzios, but the previously mentioned guitar with the fulcrum vibrato also had twin-blade pickups with DiMarzio stenciled on the covers.
Australian singer Frank Ifield also owned and used a Maton guitar, which he later had fitted with a custom-made scratch plate, made in the shape of a map of Australia. Frank gave this instrument to his guitarist Ray Brett when he returned to Australia, and it has been featured on an episode of the BBC programmeAntiques Roadshow. Although these guitars are now normally worth around UK£2,000, expert Bunny Campione valued Ifield’s guitar at between UK£10,000 and UK£15,000, because Ifield had used it in songs featured in a compilation album alongside The Beatles‘ first two singles.[2]
The MS-50G lets you use up to six of effects simultaneously, from its large pool of digitally modeled effects (47) and amps (8). And all of the settings and parameters are adjusted via its intuitive interface, albeit with just a single footswitch. You can save each preset you create or edit, just store them into the pedal's 50 memory banks. This flexibility gives you an unprecedented tone options. Other noteworthy features include its built-in chromatic tuner and its versatile power options, which include 2 x AA batteries or via a USB power source.

The Hi-Flier likely is among the first of Univox's guitars. For those who don’t know, the Hi-Flier takes after the Mosrite Ventures. This guitar gained significant influence in Japan, particularly because of the Ventures’s enormous popularity in the country at that time. The Ventures were an instrumental group who rose to fame worldwide in the ‘60s, and, despite their decline in the U.S. in the ‘70s, remained “Beatlemania huge” in Japan up until today. Along with the Ventures-esque guitar, a Hi-Flier bass was designed as well, which was nearly identical to its six-stringed counterpart.
Call of Duty: Black Ops III is the ultimate 3-games-in-1 experience. In Campaign mode, you must navigate the hot spots of a new Cold War to find your missing brothers. Players can play the campaign cooperatively or solo and are now always connected to the intelligence grid and their fellow operatives during battle. Multiplayer features a new momentum-based chained movement system, allowing players to fluidly move through the environment with finesse, using controlled thrust jumps, slides, and mantling. Black Ops III multiplayer also introduces the new Specialist character system, which allows players to master 9 characters' battle-hardened weapons and abilities through a challenge-based unlock progression system. No Treyarch title would be complete without its signature Zombies offering. "Shadows of Evil" has its own distinct storyline right out of the box, set in the fictional 1940s Morg City, where four particularly troubled individuals — the femme fatale, the magician, the detective, and the boxer — star in this film-noir inspired horror story.
Wah-Wah: For swishy, rounded sounds that sort of sound like the guitar is wailing, a wah-wah pedal employs a sweeping filter controlled by a spring-loaded treadle, creating quirky frequency boosts as you work the pedal up and down. A famous version of this pedal is marketed by one manufacturer as the “Crybaby,” in an attempt to describe its tone in one word. The late Jimi Hendrix used one of these pedals to great advantage.

The main purpose of the bridge on a classical guitar is to transfer the vibration from the strings to the soundboard, which vibrates the air inside of the guitar, thereby amplifying the sound produced by the strings. The bridge holds the strings in place on the body. Also, the position of the saddle, usually a strip of bone or plastic that supports the strings off the bridge, determines the distance to the nut (at the top of the fingerboard).
This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
Higher-cost amps for professionals with an XLR DI out jack may also have a "ground lift" switch (to be used in case of a humming ground loop), a DI out level control knob, and a switch which determines whether the DI out signal to the PA or recording mixing board is pre- or post- the amp's internal preamplifier and equalization circuitry. The pre-/post- switch enables a bassist to decide whether to send the audio engineer just the signal from her bass, or to send the signal once it has been pre-amped and equalized by her amp settings. Some higher-cost amps may have a parametric equalizer (or a semi-parametric equalizer) for some frequency ranges (typically the middle frequency range), which can be used to modify the bass tone to suit different styles or performance venues. Some bass amps have a 15 or 20 dB pad which can be used to attenuate "hot" signals, such as basses with an internal preamplifier (depending on the model of amplifier, some brands may provide two inputs (high and low gain) instead of providing a "pad". This pad can be turned on using a button. Some bass amps have an even stronger pad, a 40 dB pad.
Picking out a guitar can be a bit daunting. And since there’s a lot of subjectivity involved, new players trying to pick out an instrument often find a lot of ambiguity and guesswork awaiting them. For someone buying their first guitar, the goals become fairly simple. Get a decent, budget guitar that you can afford and see if you stick with it. In so doing, avoid the worst guitars.
Ken Rosser picked the Spider Classic 15 as his favorite of the amps we tested, saying, “I think the effects on the Line 6 sounded the best. It gives you a nice range of tone options. The clean tones stay clean even at loud volume, which a lot of these can’t do. One caveat is that, when you switch the amp sound, it changes the way all the knobs work, so the sounds can really jump out at you.” Fred Sokolow liked the Line 6 in general, saying, “I could pretty much figure out what to do with it, but I could figure out the Fender more easily.”
In our testing, the Fender Champion 20 was the only amp that offered a wide variety of amplifier sounds and special effects while also keeping them all easy to access. Beginners can get a great sound easily and experiment with different effects without having to invest in separate effects pedals. Experienced players can get most of the sounds they want with nothing more than a guitar, an amp, and a cable.
It wasn't long before Southland went to hell in a hand basket. I would like to acknowledge the professionalism of people like the late Lee Ingber who was quality minded enough to know that junk will ruin any business. It's too bad that the last owners of Southland never learned that, even as their company faded into the sunset of the graveyard of greed.
A combo amp contains the amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet. In a "head and speaker cabinet" configuration, the amplifier and speaker each have their own cabinet. The amplifier (head) may drive one or more speaker cabinets. In the 1920s, guitarists played through public address amplifiers, but by the 1940s, this was uncommon. A rare exception in the 1990s was grunge guitarist Kurt Cobain, who used four 800 watt PA amplifiers in his early guitar set-up.
We as a team are always extremely inquisitive and wondered about something, which can be anything, happening around us. One day we planned to share these things which are enough to spice up soul of internet freaks and we made Coolexample.in. Here on Coolexample.in, we pick, research and display some really cool examples which hit us somewhere in our daily lives. The website let the visitors to explore chunk of daily stuff they may need to know about. You will get a bunch of trending information from around the globe. Every latest buzz, from footpath to limelight, we have it all, in Article, Charticle And Listicle way with the categories- Taza Khabar, Hottest In Cinema, Top Tenz, Education, Jobs & Career, Tech In Trend, Sports. So, if you’re a viralmaniac, quench your thirst here!
Every guitarist would love to have a place all to themselves to play their heart out, but the reality is that we can't all be so lucky. Family, neighbors and roommates are usually a factor, and they're not as likely as you are to appreciate that you finally nailed that tough passage at two o'clock in the morning. Here's another situation where headphone guitar amps come through for you: since you're the only one hearing it, you can focus on your sound completely. With a headphone amp, there's no more curfew on shredding.
Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .
The first popular humbucker was introduced by Gibson in 1955, and the world of music was never the same again. In general, the humbucker offers a thick, rich tone, with a medium to high output, which is why they are staple of heavy rock and metal (although equally popular in jazz music). You will find that humbuckers are used by everyone from Eddie van Halen and Dave Mustaine, to Jimmy Page and Dimebag Darrell. Humbuckers feature two coils wired out of phase with each other, and – as the name suggests – are used to eliminate the unpleasant 60-cycle hum that plagues many single-coil pickups. Gibson’s ’57 Classic Plus is a legend in the world of humbuckers, although be sure to check out our humbucker page for more excellent models.

The first Hagstrom electrics actually came to the U.S. beginning about 1959, carrying the Goya name imported by New York’s Hershman (Goya acoustics were made by Levin, also in Sweden). These were the now-legendary sparkle-covered hollowbody “Les Pauls” with the modular pickup units. However, while the Goya acoustics continued on in the ’60s (eventually to be distributed by Avnet, the owners of Guild in the late ’60s), the Hagstrom electrics took on their own identity and switched to Merson. The first Hagstrom I guitars were the little vinyl-covered mini-Strats with the “swimming pool” pickup assemblies – basically two single-coil pickups mounted in a molded plastic assembly looking like its nickname, with sliding on-off switches and the Hagstrom fulcrum vibrato (which was also used on early Guild solidbodies). These were followed by similar wood-bodied Hagstrom IIs, then the quasi-SG Hagstrom IIIs in the ’60s. Hagstrom electrics continued to be imported by Merson through most of the ’60s, but by the ’70s distribution had switched to Ampeg, which was responsible for the Swedes, and several thinlines, some of which were designed by Jimmy D’Aquisto. Hagstrom hung around until the early ’80s before disappearing.
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.
: I, too, am searching for more info on my Kent. It's a Model 834, violin shaped with a cutaway. Mine is red with "racing stripe" binding on the edge. It's sounds INCREDIBLE (very vintage) and plays well, though I find the neck very narrow. There was an E-Bay auction for a couple of framed ads which featured this model, plus the 833, 835 and 836 from 1967 (one of the pictures, from what I could tell, looked exactly like mine). I also tracked down a picture of one that is a Yellow 67 with a Bigsby-Style vibrato (mine lacks this). If anyone finds a source for more Kent info, I'd love to hear from you...

click on the red highlighted portion of instrument that you want to download then click win 32 for 32 bit operating system..then copy the dll file and paste it into c:/program files 86 :/imageline /flstudio/plugins/vst and paste here refresh the fl studio by going add then channel and then more plugins and start scanning ..find that instrument by name and enjoy
Although Orbison’s good friend and Sun Records labelmate Johnny Cash may be known as “the Man in Black,” Orbison habitually dressed from head to toe in black in the early Sixties, a decade before Cash adopted his dark uniform. Even Orbison’s raven hair and impenetrable jet Ray-Bans were blacker than the cover to Spinal Tap’s Smell the Glove, adding to his alluring persona as a mysterious, brooding artiste.
The Stratocaster’s sleek, contoured body shape (officially referred to by Fender as the “Comfort Contour Body”[5][6] ) differed from the flat, slab-like design of the Telecaster. The Strat’s double cutaways allowed players easier access to higher positions on the neck.[7] The body’s recessed “beer gut” curve on the upper back, and a gradual chamfer at the front, where the player’s right arm rests, aided player’s comfort. The one-piece maple neck’s wider “dogleg”-style headstock contrasted with the very narrow Fender Telecaster’s headstock shape. The strings are anchored on a through-body pivot bridge attached with springs to a ‘claw’ in the tremolo cavity on the back of the guitar.
Position 4 (inner coils, parallel connection): This is similar to position two just inverted. Pole 1 connects bridge pickup coil tap to the output through pole 2. Pole 3 grounds neck pickup coil tap and pole 4 connects neck pickup hot lead to the output. That leaves us with bridge pickup coil from ground to coil tap and neck pickup coil from coil tap to hot lead. Again, they are paralleled.
Gibson filed a lawsuit November 18, 2010 in Federal court, the Central District of California, against WowWee USA and their Paper Jamz battery operated guitar toys charging trademark infringement.[27][28] The lawsuit claimed the Paper Jamz toy guitars copied the looks of some of Gibson’s famous guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson Flying V, the Gibson Explorer, and the Gibson SG. On December 21, 2010 Gibson was granted a request for an injunction against WowWee and retailers in the United States which were selling Paper Jamz guitars: WalMart, Amazon (company), Big Lots stores, Kmart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us, Walgreens, Brookstone, Best Buy, eBay, Toywiz.com, and Home Shopping Network (HSN)[29][30][31] The case was dismissed with prejudice (dismissed permanently) January 11, 2011 by Federal Judge R. Gary Klausner.[32][33]
We’ve had a lot of fun looking at all of these great online guitar electric acoustics, and hope that among or top ten is your next instrument. There’s a lot to read through and consider, but we’ve been sure to make sure there’s something for everyone here, and all of the guitars come highly recommended. Read through the buyer’s guide if you’re new to electric acoustic guitars and aren’t 100% sure of what you’re comparing between electric and acoustic, and then make your purchase knowing you’ve made the right decision.
This is a product of Colorado USA, every detail of this guitar was hand painted with waterproof organic non led based paint. It is brand new fully functional acoustic guitar. Become the center of attention on your party with this beautifull vibrant instrument. Perfect for a present (Christmas, Valentine, or b-day) for your loved one, family or a friend. Come in to the magic world of music with this beautifull hand painted acoustic guitar. Fill the positive energy of Marcy's artistic story through your song.  The artist Marcy Snow all the way from Colorfull Colorado presents you this unique hand painted acoustic guitar .
Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.
Twelve and fourteen fret steel string models from the mid 1920's to 1944 are the most collectible of all Martin instruments. They have excellent craftsmenship, sound, and playability, and these model are of great interest to collectors and players. Some musicians prefer the sound and feel of 12 fret models, and these are close in value to 14 fret models of the same size and period. The larger size 14 fret 000 and "D" sizes from the 1930's are considered by most collectors and musicians to represent the golden era of the flat top Martin. Note war-time models (1941 to 1944) aren't quite as desirable as the 1930's models. Lack of materials, manpower, and general social uncertainty during the war contributed to this.
 The world-wide reputation of the company is not based on design data and performance alone. The real key to success of SWING is "Outstanding People". Every staff member at Swing has a background as a professional musician. Moreover, we were all career veterans in guitar engineering with decades of combined experience, well before founding our new vision; Swing Guitar Technology. If you are familiar with musical instruments companies or have seen their ads or brochures, you may notice their catch phrase like "It's about Music." Nothing could be closer to the truth, based on Swing's pedigree. From the selection of materials to their treatment and hand fitting. From mechanics to electronics. Each stage of each final product is mastered by SWINGers.
In mid-’29, John Dopyera left the National company to start the Dobro Manufacturing Company along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, and Vic Smith. National String Instrument Corp. continued operating under Beauchamp, Barth et al. In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the Dobro Corporation, Ltd., with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National’s, although in this somewhat incestuous world, both got their resonator cones, plate covers and other parts, like tailpieces, from Adolph Rickenbacker.
It comes with two 6.5-inch speakers, delving out 100 W each for a total of 200. Now, the small woofer diameter might make these units work less-than-perfect for rendering stomach-churning bass noise, but ZT Amplifiers never intended for them to be used as such. Instead, they are supposed to deliver loud and clear enough sounds in the treble and mid ranges to make the guitarist hold its own even when a loud drummer is present.    

In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
The four fingers of the left hand (which stop the strings) are designated 1 = index, 2 = major, 3 = ring finger, 4 = little finger; 0 designates an open string, that is a string that is not stopped by a finger of the left hand and whose full length thus vibrates when plucked. On the classical guitar thumb of the left hand is never used to stop strings from above (as is done on the electric guitar): the neck of a classical guitar is too wide and the normal position of the thumb used in classical guitar technique do not make that possible.
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
@Timothy Chew – This really depends on the specs of your effect and volume pedals. A buffer should be placed 1) before long cable runs, 2) in front of low input impedance pedals, or 3) in front of many true bypass effects. If your volume pedal has a high input impedance, I would recommend placing it near the front of your signal chain. If the Volume pedal has a low input impedance, I would recommend placing it after the buffer. Again, this really depends on how you plan on using the volume pedal and whether the one you have has the right spec for that usage.
Before I start, I want to mention a few things about this particular guitar. It looks and (potentially) sounds great. The neck plays well too, but it has some tuning problems and buzzes a bit more than I’d like. The tuning problems are coming from two areas. Firstly the nut slots are too tight, made evident by the strings making a pinging noise when they are tuned up or down. This means that it is difficult to fine tune, as the string’s pitch tends to “jump” up or down. The second reason for the tuning issues is that the intonation is way out. By that I mean that the saddles’ forwards/backwards positions are not set up well, and so when the open strings are correctly tuned, and we then play up the neck, it suddenly seems out of tune again.
The final stage of our ME-80 signal chain is delay and reverb. These ambience effects create the illusion of playing in a different space. It makes the most sense to have them at the end of your effects chain. If you think about it in real life terms, a sound is fully formed it goes out into any space. As a side note, delaying reverb can sound muddy, so it’s usually better to have the reverb after the delay.
"It seems a waste to me to work and work for years," Rory Gallagher told Rolling Stone in 1972, "and just turn into some sort of personality." Instead, the Irish guitarist, then only 23, became legendary for his nonstop-touring ethic and fiery craft. Playing a weathered Strat, often wearing a flannel shirt, Gallagher electrified Chicago and Delta styles with scalding slide work and hard-boiled songwriting. His fans included the Edge and Bob Dylan, who was initially turned away backstage at a 1978 show because Gallagher didn't recognize him.
I have many Behringer pedals.Used them gigging.Have had many people ( lots of musicians ) asking me what I am using to get my tone and effects .They are all surprised when I tell them Behringer pedals.And almost all say the same thing."aren't they made of plastic"? Yes they are made of plastic.But being someone who has worked in the plastics industr.for 25 + years I know Plastic can be very strong .I have done hundreds of gigs with these pedals and never had a problem.You would really have to jump ontop of these hard to damage them.And if you did that with the non plastic pedals I am sure you would also have a problem .That said.I have 5 fx600 pedals because I found a site selling them for $14.A super bargin for so much effect.As far as battery power nowadays batteries cost more than pedals so anyone ... full review
The tone controls compensate for and complement the somewhat lifeless and mostly midrange-y character of the average guitar pickup. The gain control, often designed with a pull-boost, basically excites and heats the preamp tubes, which along with judicious use of both the amp and the guitar’s tone controls will begin to produce much of the sonic seasoning and flavor that guitarists and their fans crave as it flows from the speakers.

Unlike many of the other pedals, which are designed to create dramatic or exciting effects, these units take care of the less glamorous (but still very important) jobs in creating your tone. Sound-conditioning effects are the ones that will give the finishing touches to your sound, making the difference between “amateur garage band” and “international touring guitarist.”

In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).


Although a lot of engineers prefer to mic up the single, best-sounding speaker cone of a multi-speaker cab, some blend the sounds of more than one. Steve Churchyard: "If I'm using a 4x12 cabinet, I find two of the best-sounding speakers, and I'll put an SM57 right on axis and right on the cone of both those guys. Then I'll mix them in the control room, combine the two together. It seems a little different than just using one mic. It's not twice as good, but it's just mixing the character of two different speakers."

Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
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