Chorus pedals can provide a nice subtle doubling effect to the guitar or an extreme “watery” effect when maximized. Famous tunes that use chorus is “Come As You Are” (1991) by Nirvana, and “Brass in Pocket” (1979) by The Pretenders. But basically almost any clean guitar sound in the 80’s had some chorus on it! Certain effects are timeless such as overdrive, reverb and delay. Other effects like chorus can evoke certain time periods such as the 80’s so that is something to keep in mind when using an effect.
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Back in the good ol’ days, guitarists had to crank their amplifiers to eleven in order to obtain a nice and creamy distortion. Today, this is no longer the case. Thanks to overdrive pedals, you can basically drive every clean amp into overdrive – at any volume – and choose the amount of gain and shape the tone precisely as desired. The overdriven or crunch sounds are commonly used for rock, to slightly get that “breakup” clean tone or to play blues licks and solos. During the last two decades, guitarists found out that overdrive pedals are also perfect for boosting the crunch channel of their amps into total distortion – a technique often used during guitar solos, to give the sound that extra weight and girth – or, as with the famous Tubescreamer, to tighten up the bass response of the amplifier gain channel. The Boss SD-1 is a very popular choice for overdrive pedals, capable of great sounds. The legendary TS9 by Ibanez is also worth a mention – even considering that it’s available in Mini and Deluxe formats. And while we’re at it, why not give the Harley Benton Ultimate Drive a try? This little screamer can boost your amp into full overdrive at a very competitive price.

Been meaning to try this for years.... Should have done it earlier! It really works well for me, despite a puny Atom cpu in an HP netbook and a kludged lead from an electric Ukulele stuck into the microphone socket. Yes, this lash-up can be noisy - the impedances are mismatched, the signal levels too, but a very respectable result indeed. The processing is highly effective and the presets are (of course) variable in their suitability (not every effect is ideal for a ukulele) with gems that include a really decent and surprising choice of autowah effects. Never thought I'd say that. The user interface is logical, but there is a lot of it. That's because it can do so much. Fortunately there is a 'Random' button that creates random new patches for you - keep pushing it and some fun stuff can emerge. Documentation is helpful - press F1 and have a look, it even includes hardware suggestions and hints. I intend to follow that religiously so as to get the best from this gem - and I'll be spending money to get the suggested full fat Behringer interface (~£20) from Amazon, and trying a less-compact machine with some more CPU to see if that adds to the experience. Problems? A couple of the presets do seem to crash Rakarrack - but apart from that irt has been solid. Recommended to give it a go, if you have not already done so. Both guitar an uke work well with this.
Marshall's current best rated amplifier is the humble 1-Watt DSL1HR, an all-tube, dual channel amplifier head that gives you genuine Marshall tone and appeal in a more compact and practice friendly format. It is based on the JCM2000 Dual Super Lead (DSL) series that the company released in the late '90s, but with some modern enhancements to make it more user friendly. What's cool about this amp is that it can go lower than 1W via its built-in attenuator, which lets you switch to low power mode that has a 0.1W power rating. This means that you can crank the amp's dual ECC83 preamp tubes and ECC82 power tube at very low volume levels, great for quiet practice and for recording. Speaking of recording, Marshall equipped the DSL1HR with a speaker emulated Line out, using Softube's cabinet simulator technology. Other features include having two channels: classic gain and ultra gain, built-in reverb and pedalboard friendly effects loop in and out. More importantly, this tube amp is affordably priced and comes bundled with a footswitch.
In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]
It looks cheaper the more I examine it... super easy to play though. the truss adjustment bolt is far enough back from the sound hole that I could only reach it with the longer end of the crappy allen wrench I found, and then the tiny end I had left couldn't really leverage. I'll have a few more of those (better ones) once I clean my place though. The saddle barely pops out from the bridge but the bridge has this weird curve that makes the string angle like normal to the pins. Just poked my hand in and its not even X-braced. I'm sorta confused. It's different.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
Bass guitar tabs are basically meant to be plucked with fingers. One should try to pluck with all the four figures and if not possible then first two. One should also try to understand the rhythm of the drum and the tempo of the song, while reading the bass beginner guitar tabs mentioned below. The technique used to play these tabs is that the alphabets mentioned to the left of each string, is the string name, and have to be used. And the number represents the fret number. Try jamm'n with the bass guitar and the bass guitar tabs for beginners, that are mentioned below.

Before recording commences, make sure that all of your equipment is in good shape and not producing crackles, hums and buzzes. If you are having problems, they can often be dealt with by using noise-filtering units such as gates and expanders. These are best used before post-recording effects – compression and reverb, for example – are applied, as a compressor will emphasise noise, while a gate might chop off the natural tail of the reverb.
Guitar players who haven't done much recording tend to comment that the sound coming back over the studio monitors isn't the same as what they hear when standing in front of their amp at a gig. This is hardly surprising, since studios seldom monitor at that kind of level, so the question they should be asking is whether the sound you hear over the monitors is comparable with the guitar sounds heard on similar records.
If you want to take your tracks to the next level, a multi effects processor can do the trick. For a high-end example of what one of these units can do, check out the Eventide H8000FW 8-Channel Ultra-Harmonizer Effects Processor. It supports 24-bit audio and comes with an impressive 1,600 pre-set effects. Some are even pre-customized for 5.1 surround sound, so production for home theater playback is a cinch. Its smorgasbord of I/O options includes AES/EBU, ADAT, S/PDIF and FireWire with sampling up to 96kHz, so whatever you're looking to connect to the H8000FW, it's a safe bet that you can get the job done. Of course, not all of the processors here are quite as advanced. There are plenty of setups out there that just need a straightforward solution, and if that sounds like yours, don't worry: you'll find plenty of those here as well. Take the TC Electronic M350 Reverb and Effects Processor, for instance. This single-space rackmount is easy to fit into any budget, living up to TC's reputation of delivering amazing bang for your buck. It's loaded with 15 different effects plus 15 reverbs, and even includes control software for your AU/VST environment.
From a fledgling studio that sold second hand music equipment back in the late 60s, Orange grabs the top spot in this list with their highly rated guitar amplifiers. Orange amps are easy to spot with their picturesque design, but what's interesting is how successful they continue to be, while veering away from amp modeling technology. By limiting the features of their amps, they made it easier for users to appreciate their brand of quality and tone, which translates to high ratings. Obviously, the influence of popular artists helps their cause, this includes Jimmy Page, Noel and Liam Gallagher, Billy Gibbons, Chino Moreno and many more. In addition to their distinct combo amplifiers, Orange amps is well known for their lunchbox size tube amps.
The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.
JVGuitars is very proud to present to you yet another wonderfully aged High end Law Suit guitars out of Japanese it is a hand crafted acoustic guitar built well almost 40 years ago, what many may not know is that Takamine on these high end exotic tone woods models were master built by using well aged tone woods of 25-30+ years of age at the time when built making this a true vintage guitar in its own right. This example has been very well maintained and taken care of as you will see, this is a California guitar and has not seen much of the ravages of extreme weather and other extreme changes that can damage 0 warp – dry our and Split – crack and otherwise severely damage a perfectly good instrument so this guitar shows no evidence of any of those common afflictions on the contrary this guitar is rather CLEAN over all,Its beautiful solid spruce top is pretty flat and its bridge is nice and tight as well and its bracing ( same as Martin D-28 ) is all good throughout so this guitar has good bones!, bindings too are all good, frets are good and we dressed and polished the frets and they are good for another 20+ years of play, its neck is excellent!.. Fresh install of a new Martin bone nut and compensated saddle and this guitar is set up with Martin Marquis strings and plays beautifully. The original tuning gears are in place and working excellently too. This guitar is a pleasure to play its action is very good at medium - low more on the lower side of medium and it plays with ease and sounds incredible and has even more saddle room to go lower in future if wanted . This guitar has the LOOK it just has it… its absolutely GORGEOUS with the breath taking 2-piece center seam Brazilian Rosewood back & sides - fingerboard and headstock overlay its truly stunning ,as stated it’s exotic TONE WOODS are of the Brazilian Jacaranda verity and its presence overall is stunning perhaps surpassing that of the Original Martin D-28 they copied/ I will suggest that you be the judge of that see for yourself and have a good look At some old Martins as well this guitar stands toe to toe with any of them. This example is nice and deep sounding and its volume is excellent. This guitar is JVGuitars condition rated at 9/10 vintage excellent , it is not new or mint it has a few minor dings as its over 40 years old, it has patina aging that of the color showing on the bindings have Ambered naturally with age this is what make a vintage guitar beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder. These exotic TONE WOOD series guitars in this kind of condition are hard to find these days this one is A real GEM!…… Let me know if interested Thanks for Looking Joe Email me at: JVGuitars@gmail.com excellent recording possibilities.. Pics soon to come ! any questions let me know: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Spruce has historically been the wood of choice for acoustic flat-top guitar soundboards. However, Luthiers and other large guitar manufacturers very often choose more economical and readily available woods rather than top-quality spruce. Redwoods and cedar, for instance, are often used in soundboards by American guitar-makers to great effect. In some cases, two different woods are used together to give the guitar a distinctive appearance and tone.
Guitar strap: If you intend to stand up while playing on guitar during live shows (and most people do), then you need to practice in the same position like when you’re playing live. Your muscles and hands are in a completely different position when you’re sitting down and when you’re standing, and that’s why you MUST get a strap right from the start and practice standing up, as well as sitting down. Price: $10 – $15 should do the trick.

Teisco first began importing guitars to the United States under their own brand in 1960. In 1964, the company then switched the name of their U.S. brand to Teisco Del Rey. The company was then sold in 1967, and the Teisco brand name stopped being used for guitars sold in the United States in 1969. Guitars were still sold under the Teisco name in Japan until 1977.


The Website attempts to display product images shown on the Website as accurately as possible. However, The Top Guitars cannot guarantee that the image or color you see displayed on your monitor represents the actual product or conforms to the specifications of the product you have selected. If you have any questions about product appearance/specifications, please contact us before placing your order. The Website does not contain images of each offered item because some of them are Custom and not built and/or modified yet.
If you have ever played or listened to metal, you probably know about Ibanez. This brand has been around for a while and has become a patron saint of those who like harder sounding music. Built for speed, Ibanez guitars bring are finely tuned instruments which enable the player to explore the limits of their skill. On top of that, any Ibanez guitar is going to be great value for the money.

Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.
In this style, the guitarist aims to render an entire song — harmony, melody and bass — in something like the way a classical guitarist or pianist can. Chord roots cannot be left to the bassist in this style. Chords themselves can be used sparsely or more densely, depending on both the individual player and his or her arrangement of a particular piece. In the sparse style, a full chord is often played only at the beginning of a melodic phrase.[4] The denser chordal textures, in contrast, approach chord soloing (see below). A third approach is to maintain a steady, busy bass-line, like a New Orleans pianist. Here, no more than two or three notes are played at a time, and the full harmony is indicated by arpeggiation. Exponents of this style often come from a country, folk or ragtime background, such as Chet Atkins, although it is also sometimes employed by straight-ahead jazz practitioners, for instance Martin Taylor. Chord-melody is often played with a plectrum (see Tal Farlow, George Benson and others); whereas fingerstyle, as practised by Joe Pass, George van Eps, Ted Greene, Robert Conti, Lenny Breau or hybrid picking as practised by Ed Bickert, Laszlo Sirsom and others allows for a more complex, polyphonic approach to unaccompanied soloing.
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Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.
Note: All versions and platforms of Rocksmith are compatible with the Real Tone Cable. It is a required 1/4-inch audio jack cable necessary for Rocksmith to detect and respond to your guitar playing. All versions of Rocksmith include the Real Tone Cable in the box, except downloaded versions and the Rocksmith 2014 Edition "No Cable Included" Version.
With 24 amp models including a digital chromatic tuner, 9 stomps boxes, 4 amps, 5 cabs, 3 mics, and 2 rack effects; AmpliTube Custom Shop is a great way to get your hands on IK Multimedia's great guitar simulation software. As the name suggests, in addition to the free units you can purchase more effects units from right inside the plugin to build your own custom guitar shop.
Solid state and modeling amps are great amps to use for practice sessions. As well to bring it for small gigs and recordings that require their services. That is the reason why it is really hard to tell which one is above and try to suggest that a particular amplifier is better than the other. Having an own thing is what really is important here, and besides if you really sound good. The gears you will be playing with will equally sound as great.
Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth used a Kent Polaris I solid body (with lots of duct tape on it) and several Kent 800-series guitars - a white 820 and a sunburst 821 12-string with 10 strings on it, shown at left. Since the B and high-E strings on a 12-string set are normally tuned to the same note, he left the duplicate strings off. He uses several alternate tunings with his guitars.
If you want free and private, other than the basic version of Eagle, there is KiCad, which is an open source tool developed by GIPSA Lab, which is a research institute out of Grenoble in France. Like Eagle, there are Windows, Mac, and Linux versions, whereas Circuit Maker is Windows only. There are also tools now being offered for free by some of the big component dealers such as Mouser.
Youngman is also known for creating some of the best Frankenstein guitars in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. One of his favorites to build is his custom built Indian Esqu-wire Custom, a monstrous guitar with an SG body, a Telecaster neck and Fender pickups. "It's taking shit and making something playable," he says. And his touch must be golden because guitarslingers like Smokin' Joe Kubek, Bnois King and Rocky Athas each own one of his Frankenstein babies.
Replace or upgrade your guitars volume and tone controls with the best quality pots available from CTS, Bourns, Fender, Alpha, Alps and more. From full size to mini pots, long shaft and short shaft pots, blend pots and stacked concentric pots, push/pull pots and more, we have the pot you need! Not sure which pot is right for your project? Then check out the Guitar Electronics FAQ Page for more info on pot values, pot tapers and more.
My sound is pretty clean with no overdrives or distortion. Besides a tuner and a volume pedal, I use a delay and a reverb pedal (TC Electronics) and I have a freeze pedal as well (EH Superego). I’m never sure if the freeze pedal should come before or after the delay and reverb. By trying both options I can’t really hear a difference in the overall sound which I guess is fine. Any thoughts or recommendations are welcome.
I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.
Choosing an electric guitar that addresses these preferences helps guarantee that new players will stay motivated as they learn to play. Musician’s Friend offers a wide selection of ¾-scale, mini, and travel guitars that are ideal for smaller, younger players. Full-sized electric guitar bodies vary considerably in size and weight, and those factors should be considered.
The F-55 was identical to the F-50 except for the addition of a bridge DeArmond humbucker, plus the attendant three-way toggle on the cutaway horn and a second set of volume and tone knobs flanking the treble f-hole. The F-55, too, had a Martin “M” trapeze tail. This series began with guitar #279831. Some 1,700 F-55s were made from mid-’62 to the summer of 1965.
The idea behind this site is to share my experience with Do It Yourself approach to guitars, amplifiers and pedals. Whether you want to save a couple of bucks by performing a mod or upgrade yourself instead of paying a tech, or want to build your own piece of gear from scratch, I'm sure you will find something interesting here. Also, this is the home of DIY Layout Creator, a free piece of software for drawing circuit layouts and schematics, written with DIY enthusiasts in mind.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
John and I weeded out a couple of guitars that arrived in far-from-playable condition because we think every guitar should be at least reasonably playable when you buy it. Avi Shabat agreed, saying, “The more messed up a guitar is when I get it, the more I have to charge for setup.” We also didn’t have the short-scale guitars set up, for two reasons: First, we think a guitar for kids—one that’s likely to be purchased at a low price and given as a present—should play acceptably right out of the box with no setup; second, all of the short-scale models we received did play very well out of the box, and all were equipped with strings of the same approximate gauges.
Boss's MS-3 is an ingenious pedalboard solution that gives you programmable loops for three of your own pedals and a host of built-in effects - 112 to be precise. The MS-3 can switch your amp channels, adjust external effects and integrate with MIDI-equipped pedals. Then there’s the built-in tuner, noise suppressor and global EQ. It’s as if Boss looked at everything players could want from a pedalboard controller and crammed it into one compact unit. There are 200 patch memories for saving your expertly tweaked sounds, each with four effects or pedals that can be switched in or out at will, or four presets that can be instantly recalled. The MS-3 is rammed with pristine modulations, all the essential delay and reverb types, as well as a load of Boss specials, such as the dynamic Tera Echo and sequenced tremolo Slicer. Then there’s the niche yet useful effects, such as an acoustic guitar sim, Slow Gear auto fade-in and that sitar sim you never knew you wanted. The drive tones don’t live up to standalone pedals, but for most players, we’d wager those three switchable loop slots will be used for analogue drives, with the ES-3 handling modulation, delay and reverb. A genuinely exciting pedalboard development.
A Distortion pedal is a must, it really helps bring out those chords, solos and riffs and makes sure they stand out. It gives you the volume jump when you need it and changes the overall sound of your guitar, giving it power and aggression. Of course, you don’t always have to dial in the pedal for bone crushing riffs as a distortion pedal can provide a smoother sound, but at least the option is there!
Wengrow said that Gibson got outmaneuvered by its competitors. “In the 1950s and 60s, it was really just Fender and Gibson as the two main guitar makers and they became the standard bearers. But other guitar makers such as Ibanez, Jackson, Yamaha and Paul Reed Smith, came to existence and copied their standards but continually updated many features and customizations that better reflected the idiosyncrasies of the times, often for cheaper prices.”

The Duo-Sonic is a short-scale student model that has become highly prized for its excellent playability and tone, making it one of the best electric guitars for beginner guitarists with cash to spare. This updated model - with its slab alder body, flawless in sparkly Surf Green - features the classic offset Fender waist that gives the series its name. The three-ply white/black/white scratchplate also plays host to a chrome-tipped three-position pickup selector switch and knurled (aka easy-grip) volume and tone knobs servicing two pickups, a neck single coil plus a bridge humbucker. The latter is also coil-splittable via the push/pull tone knob. We've encountered guitars at more than twice the price that don't play anywhere near as well as this thing does. Oh, and it doesn't matter what size your hands are. If we had to use a song to describe the tonal range of the bridge pickup, we'll have Smells Like Teen Spirit, please. A clean setting here echoes the clattering rhythm voice of the song's intro while a fuzz box unleashes a racket not unlike the heavy sound Kurt craved. If it sounds like we're typecasting this guitar then rest assured the Duo-Sonic is versatile enough to handle country picking, surf, indie, classic rock, whatever. Plus, the neck pickup warms things up perfectly for clean or dirty blues lead or jazz chords.
For each slot requiring attention, I use a nut file at a slight downwards angle to widen the slot, making sure not to LOWER it (you should do this at a shallower angle than this photo might imply – you want to make sure that you are JUST slightly downwards compared to horizontal). Just take it really easily here, keeping an eye on the front of the slot to make sure you don’t go too far. Repeat this for whichever slots require widening.

“Move up to Alnico IV and the power rating comes up and the frequency response flattens out – you get a balanced and natural- sounding response from the coils, but not so it’s boosting the treble. The mid-range stays quite constant as well. And then you go to Alnico V, which has the highest power. Then the bass and treble do get boosted and the sound starts to get more aggressive – more ‘rock ’n’ roll’, for want of a better term.
After Fender’s decision in 1982 to switch Squier’s production from strings to guitars, the Stratocaster was one of the first models put under the Squier production line in Japan. It was the most commercially successful guitar Fender had produced. Originally in 1982, the headstock had a “Fender” name written in large script, followed by “Squier series” in smaller script. In 1983, this was later changed to the current 1970s large headstock featuring “Squier” in larger script, followed by “by Fender” in smaller script. Since then, there have been several variations of headstock size and Squier logos, typically based on what series the guitar is.
1) The tuning keys (machine heads) are as bad as it gets and if you're planning on keeping this guitar for a while and making it really workable plan on changing them ASAP and throwing the others away as far as you can throw them - Shame on you Yamaha, you could have at least used some half decent tuners!! These are an insult to your good name. So I replaced mine with Grover Sta-Tite V97-18NA (with brass colored gear) which are the best tuners "for the money" ($40) for any guitar especially for this one. However, be aware that you will also need to replace the Yamaha bushings because the I.D. is too small for the Grover post and, unfortunately,the Grover bushing O.D. is too small for the holes in the Yamaha headstock. The correct bushing that will allow an easy proper fit of the Grover tuning pegs to the Yamaha APXT2 is Kluson MBG65N or B bushings (Google it). If you elect to do this instead of letting your friendly Luthier do it, be advised that when you knock out the stock Yamaha bushings, since they're press fit it may have a tendency to split the wood on the top of the headstock. This one modification will bring this guitar from the level of a toy trying to be a serious contender to the best little guitar that money can buy.
Finally, there was a mysterious lap – clearly Valco – which had no real National or Supro equivalents. This had tapered shoulders that swept down, wing-like, to the bottom, which had a little concave cutout. It was covered in ivory plastic on top, with black-lacquered sides. It had a rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. The pickup was the new exposed-pole single-coil with a bolt-on handrest, in front of narrow rectangular plate that held the saddle and attaching holes. Volume and tone knobs sat on little mini-plates on either of the strings. Another atypical downscale version of the National New Yorker was offered at the same time by Montgomery Ward.
Dick Dale: Nicknamed “The Beast” by Dale himself, the guitar comes in “chartreuse sparkle” (a greenish-gold color) with a white pickguard and rosewood fretboard, with vintage 50s features and a number of custom modifications. Notably, the guitar comes with a reverse headstock and a reverse angled bridge pickup to achieve the sound of playing a Stratocaster upside-down, which was how Dale learned to play.
Now, I'm sure that you're all sensibly busying yourselves with making music, so your lives are, frankly, too short to be sifting through more than a half a million words of interviews. Therefore, I'm going to try to digest what I've discovered during this process for the benefit of those less sad than me! I'm not about to dictate which technique is 'best', though, because if reading this many interviews has taught me anything it is that people will always disagree on what constitutes a great sound. Instead I've recorded a number of different audio examples to allow you to judge for yourselves, just as I did, which techniques are likely to make a real difference to your own productions. I've peppered this article with a number of boxes giving details of these files.
Guitar Center Fort Worth provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Fort Worth area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Fort Worth can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
Muddy Waters is obviously one of the most recognized and influential blues artists of this century. When his name is mentioned phrases like "slide guitar" and "electric Chicago blues" are associated with it, but what about "wah-wah" and "psychedelic"? For a small period in history, Muddy Waters' image became one of a psychedelic icon and if there weren't records still around from then, most people would doubt it had ever happened. The sixties were a strange time for music and musicians- none felt stranger than musicians from the previous decade trying to stay afloat then. Many times in music, established artists will try to expand upon their work and take a chance with something different. They should at least be praised and encouraged when they try to experiment with their sound. If music were condemned to always following a strict guideline of rules, it would be pretty boring. Music should be allowed to grow and explore new territories because everyone can agree that it's not exciting if it's always predictable.
Gibson has issued two Signature Les Paul guitars for Joe Perry of Aerosmith. The first was developed in the 1990s and was customized with an active mid-boost control, black chrome hardware, and a translucent black finish. It was replaced in 2004 by a second, more visually distinctive Les Paul, the Joe Perry Boneyard Les Paul. This guitar is characterized by Perry’s custom “Boneyard” logo on the headstock and a figured maple top with a green tiger finish, and is available with either a stopbar tailpiece or a Bigsby tailpiece; Perry typically uses a Bigsby-equipped Boneyard model in Aerosmith and solo live shows.

My first electric was a Decca, and a friend had one too. Mine was the one pickup style and his had two pickups. This was back in 1972. These were cheap but played very well and I wish I still had mine. There's one on Ebay right now that's just like the one I had, only ten bucks so far. I remember the great sustain and feedback I could get through it playing Hendrix songs!
Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, we have decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities: the smooth oval neck grip, the well balanced asymmetrical body shape, and the neck heel allowing unrivaled playability.
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
• For the fifth insert (leave the fourth empty), go to Distortion/AmpSimulator and click on the plug‑in's edit button. For the Amplifier Model, select Crunch, and try the following parameter values: Drive at 8.7, Bass, Middle, and Treble all at 5.0, Presence at 6.2, and Volume set to 5.0. For the Cabinet, select Cabinet 2, with Lo Damping at 38 and Hi Damping at 35.

Amazingly well made and a beautiful guitar. The finish is incredible, it looks like a guitar that should cost a $1000 and up. Mine is the red color and found it in a pawn shop looking very rough, price on it was $99 and at first I thought it looked like a $99 guitar so I didn't pay any attention to it. I was looking a some Epi SG400s and a couple of Gibson's but for some reason I went back to the Samick. I had some cleaner with me and I grabbed a rag and started cleaning it up, after a few minutes of scrubbing this beautiful guitar appeared. I plugged it in along with the Epis and Gibson SGs and played them side-by-side and I was amazed at the sound I was getting from the Samick. I compared it along with the other SGs and the finish and the build quality smoked the others. I am all about American made guitars but this Korean made SG has completely changed my opinion about Asian made guitars, especially when I compared it to a $900 Gibson. I wasn't even looking for a new guitar but I couldn't let this one get away. I bought it and have played it for hours every day for the last week. It's amazing, the neck is the smoothest and easiest to play that I've ever seen, I like it much more than my Ibanez RG with the Wizard II neck I've got. I am now looking out for other Samick Artists Series guitars and if you see one for a good price try it out.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.
As I commented above, my go to method for quiet practice is a PocketPod with Shure headphones. But, who doesn't like plugging in to an amp every once in a while? I live in a house, but the neighbors are close. The amp I use is a Fender Super Champ XD, which is a 15w tube amp with some digital effects. It seemed quiet enough at low volumes, but your mileage may vary. If I were you, I would at least give one a listen at a music store and see if it can do what you need.

Is it not within the scope of eventual computational science to notate the performance aspect of playing the guitar? Sans keyboard, sans human hand - if not by bedroom producers with too much time on their hands, then by AI analysis and pattern matching logic produced by overfunded grad students spending their Silicon Valley parents' fortunes, their AI guitar-licks algorithms trained by analyzing performance records and accelerometer measurements of real virtuoso guitarists performing? Won't a well trained bot eventually turn out some licks that fall within the scope of enjoyable human performance habits?
Played by people such as Paul Simon and Richie Havens, Guild has been a top-of-the-line Acoustic guitar manufacturer since 1952. While they originally stuck to archtops, they branched off into more complicated builds. They also make solidbody electric guitars and even some semi-hollowbodies. Guild is known for their commitment to quality and tone. They were bought by Cordoba recently, but the general consensus is that the buyout is a good thing. When owned by Fender, their electric lineup was neglected and now they’re making a comeback. An additional aspect of Guild guitars is their durability. They have a very solid build and can easily shrug off some wear and tear while still sounding like it was when it was brand new.
I bought this Fender acoustic/electric guitar about 9 months ago. It has a wonderful rich tone, is easy to play and is beautiful. The grain on the mahogany is dark and beautiful. It lives up to its dreadnought name and can fill a large living room with its sound. The tone is deep, rich and mellow. Strings are separated enough for easy picking. Tuning pegs are of decent quality and once strings are broken in it stays pretty much in tune. Other than putting on some bronze phosphor strings I did not need to set the guitar up. I really haven't played it much with an amplifier so can't comment on the electronics, other than the built in tuner works well. The hardside guitar case is well padded and looks professional. I was a little concerned about buying a guitar over the

1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.


Up for auction is an approximately 1973 fender champ cabinet, grill, and Weber sig8 speaker. Chassis was removed and rehoused years ago and this cab has been collecting dust. Tolex was removed and the solid pine cabinet has a nice amber shellac finish. Good sounding cab With a great sounding Weber speaker perfect for a restoration or new build. Handle, Grill, and chassis mounting straps will also be included.
Distortion pedals is responsible for many of the sounds that you think of when you think ‘electric guitar.’ It’s absolutely classic, and you’ll find that the majority of effects are some flavor of distortion pedal. The results you can get from these stompboxes vary from overdrive-like breakup to smooth melodic power, so it’s important before you take one home that you check for the type of sounds that specific distortion pedal is designed to create. Doing your homework really pays off when it comes to distortion pedals.
One of the most impressive guitars on this list when it comes to style is this C-1 SGR from Schecter – a respected brand in the world of rock and metal. With a design that’s heavily influenced by their premium C1 models, this affordable alternative features a solid basswood body that’s arched and contoured for great comfort, allowing unhindered access to the 24-fret maple neck.
On the whole, Decca sold a lot of these guitars but the timing was awful.  By 1968 the demand for electric guitars had decreased dramatically.  MCA was about to bankrupt Danelectro, and CBS was cutting all sorts of corners on Fender instruments.  Darker times were coming folks, but for a moment, let’s rejoice in the mid 60s era of records and guitars!
If the fuzz is the grandaddy, the Arbiter/England Fuzz Face (introduced 1966) is the grand-poobah of the grandaddies’ social club. A handful of other fuzzes came first, but this distinctive round, smiling box is the one most guitarists point to when identifying the fuzz tone of the gods. Why? Two words: Jimi Hendrix. Apparently he died and took it up there with him. Oh, and two other words: germanium transistors. When these fuzz fans point to the Fuzz Face, however, they don’t point to just any Fuzz Face. They point to a good one. The quality of these pedals varies wildly, mainly because the tolerances of germanium transistors themselves varies wildly and sorting out the good ones was more work than the makers could afford to put in (or, perhaps, knew was necessary). Contemporary makers from Fulltone to Z.Vex to Mayer take the time and trouble to laboriously sort their germanium transistors, and it pays in spades in terms of tone and consistency.
Jump up ^ Miller, Jim (1980). The Rolling Stone illustrated history of rock & roll. New York: Rolling Stone. ISBN 0-394-51322-3. Retrieved 5 July 2012. Black country bluesmen made raw, heavily amplified boogie records of their own, especially in Memphis, where guitarists like Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson (with the early Howlin' Wolf band) and Pat Hare (with Little Junior Parker) played driving rhythms and scorching, distorted solos that might be counted the distant ancestors of heavy metal.
That’s not all modeling processors can do. In addition to offering guitar and amp models, most guitar modeling processors have libraries of the kinds of effects you would get from individual pedals—reverb, echo, chorus, overdrive, distortion, fuzz, etc., as well as integrated drum machines with scores of preset rhythm patterns to help your practice. You can run several effects simultaneously, combining them to create your own unique tonal palette. Most modeling processors now have USB connectivity, some even with two-way audio streaming, for use as interfaces in direct computer recording.
This book emphasizes tabs with the accompanying music notation. It’s not a long book and one that a beginner will likely outgrow at some point. However, it provides a good introduction to get you playing songs you’ll recognize fast. It does a fine job of explaining everything the newbie needs to know including how to position yourself. Build those good habits early!
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-

You would probably be better served to specify a budget, then mention the kind of music you want to learn to play and whether you want an electric or an acoustic. As general advice, within any price range probably a general-purpose guitar would be better for you than something meant for a specific purpose - e.g., no pointy lime green electrics. By general purpose I mean guitars like Strats, Les Pauls, and concert-sized acoustics. Nothing particularly fancy.

Wow, didn't expect a budget-priced instrument to perform this beautifully! I had planned to use this as an introduction into nylon-string (from electric), then upgrade to a better (i.e. more expensive??) model. That won't be necessary! The NTX700C is absolutely perfect for me and will remain the nylon-string guitar in my stable. I am a professional solo jazz guitarist and ventured into a nylon-string for my Brazilian jazz set. Being an electric player, the transition with this model has been much easier than a traditional classical. The onboard electronics are great with my Bose L1 system. I have the cedar top, and the tone is very mellow, and already opening up with only three weeks of playing.

One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.
If this is your first time picking up a guitar you may not have seen chords depicted the way they are below. You can find out how to interpret the chords by looking at how to read chords. Each of the chords below shows the chord notation and a picture of a hand forming that chord on neck for your reference. This notation is the common way for showing chords, you may find guitar songs depicted differently elsewhere. This is usually the tablature notation. Here you can find more information on reading tablature notation.
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Started similarly to PRS, Taylor was a brand that began out of passion and the back of a car. In 1974, friends and coworkers Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug joined together to purchase American Dream, the guitar making shop for whom they both worked. Geared toward producing the most high-quality USA made acoustic guitars they could muster, they changed the name of the business to Taylor Guitars, as it sounded more “American” than Listug. Though they went through some financial troubles initially, the brand eventually grew into what they are today: the number one manufacturer of acoustic guitars in the United States. They’ve also taken it upon themselves to pioneer a business model based around sustainable practices – Bob even goes so far as to travel to competitors to share with them said practices, understanding that, in order for guitar builders to continue to flourish, everyone needs to be an active participant in taking care of the environment. Or else there might come a time when there’s no more wood with which to build guitars. And that makes the El Cajon, California-based brand even mightier.
Epiphone's Les Paul series were originally designed to allow the budget crowd to experience this awesome guitar without investing thousands of dollars. That's something that hasn't changed to this day. The Epiphone Special II is among the most basic Les Paul designs on offer, making it perfect for beginners. We've chosen this particular guitar because of its neutral configuration which will keep up with you even after you've built plenty of skill.

Nice-Keys-Extreme-2.0  Still a big SoundFont set at 1gb or 1000mb (645mb dedicated to 3 pianos with 6 velocity layers). Similar to the top set but the main piano is a little less detailed so it leaves room for an extra piano (Steinways).  PC users should not have any problems or if running on iOS this set runs perfectly well on iPhone 6s or iPad Air 2. It is still possible to load this set within the bs-16i app and run Sweet Midi Player app using GM set one at the same time for midi backing if required. This set has everything described below plus the addition of guitars.


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In 2008, Gibson USA released the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, an authentic replica of one of two Les Pauls Slash received from Gibson in 1988. It has an Antique Vintage Sunburst finish over a solid mahogany body with a maple top. Production was limited to 1600.[35] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Inspired By” Les Paul Standard. This guitar is a replica of the 1988 Les Paul Standard and it features a carved three-piece maple top, one-piece mahogany back, and rosewood fingerboard, with a Heritage Cherry Sunburst finish. Two versions were made available—the “Aged by Tom Murphy,” aged to resemble the original guitar (a limited number of these were signed by Slash in gold marker on the back of the headstock), and the “Vintage Original Spec,” created to resemble the guitar as it was when Slash first received it.[32][36]
Building a rare 4005 Rickenbacker takes the hands of a master. And this master has not only built one but also created the "Jazzblaster" line of custom guitars with bodies that resemble Rickenbacker and necks inspired by Leo Fender. He also builds custom basses. "I like building beautiful things," he says. A few of his custom guitars were recently picked up to be shown to rock star royalty like Tom Petty, Lindsay Buckingham and Joe Walsh. He's played and repaired guitars. Steve Stevens, Green River Ordinance, Rocky Athans and Eric Clapton have sought out his services. He's even touched one of Jimi Hendrix's legendary axes.
Flexibility of the BOSS Katana-50 goes way beyond expectations for establishing a different path referencing to its predecessor the Roland type of practice amps. With 50 watts of power and a custom 12-inch speaker, the Katana-50 can deliver a commanding range of sound playing it clean, crunch, lead, and brown for electric and acoustic electric guitars. Moving on to other controls on the panel, it features customizable effects by using BOSS Tone Studio editor software and for adjusting sounds quickly, it has a dedicated gain, EQ, and effects controls. Tone setting memory is also included for storing and recalling all amp and effect settings.

Usually considered the big brother to the phaser, the flanger is indeed related in a sense, but achieves its heavier, some would say more oppressive sonic results by imposing more control over its placement of the notches created by the phase relationship, rather than spacing them evenly as the phaser’s sweep does. Much of the basic circuitry behind flanging, very simply put, follows the template as given above, but requires far more complex engineering to take it where it’s going. Pedal-sized units designed to replicate the sound of two big reel-to-reel tape machines sliding in and out of sync weren’t made possible until larger, more complex ICs became available to help do the job. This extra technology is needed to harmonically tune the out-of-phase notches, and therefore, relative to these, the peaks, and it’s this harmonic spacing of the spread that can make a genuine flanger pedal sound almost like it’s actively participating in the note selection of a sequence you are playing. Whereas phasers have from four to ten stages, the individual chips within proper flangers may carry hundreds of stages in themselves. Dizzying stuff.
The S2 Custom 24 features a mahogany body with book-matched flame maple top, that follows the same double cutaway shape and detailed arch as the original Custom 24. The guitar's mahogany neck is also not far off, being rafted from mahogany with PRS' distinctive 25" scale length. It has a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard that has a comfortably narrow nutwidth of 1.656". Finally, the S2 Custom 24 owes its voice to its dual humbucker pickups that include the S2 Vintage Bass and the S2 HFS Treble - which provide PRS' characteristically open and clear tone. You can push or pull the tone knob for single-coil tones should you need them.
The Pocket Pal is a recent addition to the Hohner standard line of harmonicas. It is somewhat unusual because it is slightly shorter in length than most harmonicas, leading to its namesake of being pocket handy. It is Chinese made, which is unfavorable to most harmonica players, but the Pocket Pal has caught on as an inexpensive, yet quality harp. Like the Old Standby, the Pocket Pal is designed for use in country music.[26]
Stratocasters also feature tremolo systems, where the Les Paul, SG and Telecaster have fixed bridges. Epsecially in the budget price range, tuning is typically a little more stable for fixed-bridge guitars. If you really want a Strat with a tremolo it’s nothing to be super concerned about, but newbies should be aware of the difference. A good guitar tech at the local music store should be able to set your Strat up so it stays in tune just fine.
The Effect:Reverb pedals have remained a staple pick in each guitarist’s arsenal in order to provide that extra sound refinement and enhancement when necessary. It may be tricky, learning to apply the right amount of Reverb, as too little may go unnoticed, and too much may sound silly, yet finding that sweet spot is definitely thrilling and satisfying. Great option for every beginner (or a so called must have guitar pedal) is the Boss FRV-1 63 Fender Reverb Pedal. If you want to dig deeper into the reverb effects, check out our dedicated article, the plethora of reverb pedals for you to choose from will surprise you.
This model comes in Takamine’s NEX cutaway guitar body, and features a slimline mahogany neck with 12”-radius rosewood fretboard. The result is an acoustic that plays really quickly, and is more than comfortable right up in the high frets. Ideal for virtuoso players. Takamine also use their own preamp system here, which includes three-band EQ and gain controls, mid contour switch, notch filter and EQ bypass. It all sounds great.

The Hal Leonard Folk Harp Method is a comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide, designed for anyone just learning to play folk harp. Inside you'll find loads of techniques, tips, and fun songs to learn and play. The accompanying CD contains 56 demo tracks that cover most of the music examples in the book. Covers: the harp and its parts; sitting with the harp; hand position and finger placing; key signatures and meter signatures; scales and arpeggios; the I-IV-V chords; ostinatos and slides; many classic folksongs; and much more!.
The Effect: Volume pedals are a simple, yet frequently essential piece of equipment for many musicians out there. This device’s function is quite self-explanatory – it allows the user to control the level of the sound output, allowing them to increase or decrease the volume of the instrument. Additionally, many of these products can also operate as expression pedals, or a control for some of the other effects on your pedalboard. These gizmos are typically known for being strong and sturdy pieces of gear, as they should since they get stomped on quite a lot. If you are looking for a proven solution, go for the Boss FV-500H, if not, check out our Best Volume Pedal reviews to find your perfect match.
Yea, really depends on your area. At the local Guitar Center, the guy seems to know what hes doing. Overworked and underpaid if what iveheard about GC and Sam Ash techs is true though. Theres a local tech who got his site to be one of the top results and hes busy as well. Perfect work. And even though hes busy, hes fast too. Thats why his site is one of the top results though.
While I have been able to find ways to get it to work for me most of the time, I have found that the controls for the video looping feature are not as precise as I would like them to be. There is definitely room for improvement. Another thing that I am missing is the option to control the speed of the video playback. Some competitors allow for the video playback to be slowed down or sped up while retaining the correct pitch. Guitar Tricks have been listening – Improvement have been made!This is a great help if you want to practice to play along at a slightly slower speed or if you want to review something in more detail. Luckily I have found a little helper too that allows me to control the speed of the video until Guitar Tricks are including this feature into their video player. I am using the MySpeed tool from Enounce. They advertise it to speed up videos to save time watching them. It also works a treat slowing videos down.
Compressors – The role of these pedals is to lift up quiet sounds and rein in loud sounds, compressing the dynamic range of your signal – that is, the difference between the quietest and loudest sounds. They work wonders for songs with a blend of quiet and loud parts, since they let you play hard without busting eardrums, and the soft sections won’t be drowned out by ringing ears. Compressors also have the nice side effect of increasing sustain, letting your notes sound out longer before dropping off.
A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-

TC Electronic's Hall of Fame reverb pedal is stacked with features and is easily our top recommendation from this list. The first perk is a mode selector that gives you a total of ten different reverb types, in addition to the TonePrint option. TonePrint is TC Electronic's signature feature that allows you to program tones into your pedal designed by artists and popular musicians.
Gary Moore also created his own signature Gibson Les Paul in the early 1990s. Characterised by a yellow flame top, no binding and a Gary Moore truss rod cover. It featured two open-topped humbucking pick-ups, one with “zebra coils” (one white and one black bobbin). Gary formerly owned Peter Green‘s vintage Les Paul Standard with an accidentally reversed pick-up magnet.

Most players will immediately think of the Jazz guitarist Charlie Christian, who brought the Gibson ES-150 to fame with the Benny Goodman Quartet.  Many top notch players realized that the tone these instruments could offer was unparalleled, and began to use them in their own illustrious careers, such as George Benson and Pat Metheny, alongside the other countless masters that wield these masterfully crafted instruments.
I played a gig (to an empty house) at The Haunt in Ithaca NY. A lot of up and coming regional bands play there. We, on the other hand are just a cover band from Binghamton, about an hour away. While setting up, the sound man left a mic on the floor where I’d be setting up. I let him know that I send a direct signal. I could tell he wasn’t happy. After the gig though, he came and complimented me on my sound, saying that he didn’t expect a direct sound to be that good.
The late 60s and 70s produced even more bizarre and berserk creations. The birth of Mayfield and Mullen’s VOX King Wah pedal sealed its place in guitar history during overbearingly long, Clapton-esque guitar solos. The 1978 Pro Co RAT, whose design was a re-imagining of the Arbiter Fuzz Face, arose partly from error: A botched resistor band created a harsher, clipped audio waveform. Its use has supported nearly all “alternative” rock genres in the last 30 years: 80s punk, American indie rock, Grunge (the RAT played a crucial part in Cobain’s quiet-loud-quiet-loud composition), not to mention Britpop and grindcore.
Acoustic and electric archtops are identical in design with the only difference being the addition of electro-magnetic pickups and pots. Archtops can either be full-bodied or thinline. The full-bodied archtop retains good volume and acoustic resonance when played unplugged though feedback may be an issue when amplified. The thinline body minimizes feedback by sacrificing acoustic volume and resonance.
Ah yes, the 808. It's often used and referred to as a kick, but it tends to act more as a very low tom, as it has a pitch. This thing is the Loch Ness Monster – there tends to be more under the water. The best way to deal with a true, clean 808 sample is to work around it. It's usually best to let the 808 do its thing and to get the bottom end around it the hell out of the way. If it's a fuzzy sample or has been driven and squashed, you may need to play with things above 250 Hz, but usually live and let live is the best approach.

Original plate reverbs were mechanical in nature. There was a literal plate inside the amplifier, which would transform input signal into vibration. Then you would have a pickup located somewhere near the plate, that recorded those vibrations. Today, such a contraption comes across as relatively crude, but many still love the unique mechanical sound it produces. Spring reverb uses a pretty much exact same principle, only this time you have a spring in there instead of a plate. The biggest improvement a spring reverb offers is reduction in both weight and size of the device.
Completely agree. A couple years ago I was also wanting a software guitar to play some simple chords over a track. Instead I spent about $140 on a guitar from Craigslist. A couple weeks and a couple dozen YouTube tutorials later and I was able to play the chords myself. Learning to play the instruments is a valuable skill that will separate you from others who just use software.
Gibson guitars do tend to run on the high end of the price spectrum, but for an experienced player it’s not hard to understand why. Their guitars offer top notch craftsmanship and tone that is favored by a large segment of players. However, this does make their line of guitars less practical for beginners, who will likely want to improve in skill before making that level of investment.

Still in the ’64 line was the MJ-2L, pretty much unchanged, except for the new hooked headstock in later ’64. Given the evidence of Westheimer’s Kingstons, the MJ-1 and MJ-2 were probably still available. The BS-101 solidbody bass also remained, with the new, hooked three-and-one headstock. Also still in the line were the WGs, including the WG-2L, WG-3L and WG-4L. Many of these are found with the squarish Bizarro Strat head well into ’65, but they are also pictured in the ’64-65 catalog with the new, hooked four-and-two head, so expect to find either.
225 Parsons St, Kalamazoo, MI, 49007 1917–1984 Also located next to railroad tracks, this facility had major expansions in 1945, 1950, and 1960.[83] Various brands were produced there, including Gibson, Epiphone, (1957–1970)[84][85] and Kalamazoo. During the depression of the 1930s, children's toys were produced there, and during WW2 it produced materials to support the war effort in addition to producing guitars.[86] Between 1974 and 1984 Gibson moved its manufacturing out of this facility to Tennessee. Most of this move happened in 1974, leaving only acoustic and some semi-acoustic production for this plant.[87] In 1985, Heritage Guitars began production, renting part of this facility.[88]
Travis adapted the syncopated rhythms of Ragtime Piano music to the guitar – (the term syncopation refers to deliberately playing off the regular beat). Travis would pick the strings alternating the bass note on the low E and A strings. This style of finger picking was given the name ‘Travis picking’ and went on to influence Chet Atkins and Scott Moore’s ‘Rockabilly’ sound.
The Neal Schon Signature Les Paul model has a carved mahogany top, mahogany back, multi-ply black/white binding on top, chrome-plated hardware and a Floyd Rose tremolo. The one-piece mahogany neck has a scarfed heel joint a “Schon custom” slim-taper neck profile. The 22-fret ebony fingerboard features pearl split-diamond inlays and single-ply white binding. The pickups are a DiMarzio Fast Track/Fernandes Sustainer in the neck position and a Gibson BurstBucker Pro in the bridge position. In addition to the standard Les Paul electronics (individual pickup volume and tone controls, plus three-way selector switch), the Schon Signature features two mini-toggles – an on/off for the Sustainer and an octave effect – along with a push/pull pot for midrange cut. Only 60 of the guitars were made, and sold it out in days upon release.

I had a single-minded desire for single-ended tone, but I didn’t want to drop insane moolah on a tweed Champ (or any of the tweed Champ clones out there, or even a tweed Champ kit), cool as they may be. Heck, even a Silverface Champ is going to set you back in the $300+ range these days. And it’s a Fender. Dependable? Yup. Great sounding? Sure. But no one is going to see it and say, “What the hell is that?” Which is part of the fun for those of us involved in the weirdoes and freakazoids of the gear world.
The Guitar Store is not only the best guitar store in Seattle, but the best guitar store in the WORLD. First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful. My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do. Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff. Can't rave enough! Definitely found my guitar store for life! Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
The “best” here is subjective. Again, what is best for me may not be best for me might not be best for you and vice versa. In general here are my recommendations for buying a guitar from the best brand of electric guitars for beginners at every level. There are several brands available in the market that claim to offer the best quality electric guitars for the beginners and for the seasoned guitarists as well. But some of them are really up to the mark if you are looking for the best guitar, you can go with them certainly. 
Guitar effects pedals alter the pitch, tone, and sound of your electric guitar or bass guitar, and as such, it is important to ensure you are armed with as much knowledge about them as possible before making a selection. The alterations made by these effects pedals include acoustic effects, compression, delay, reverb, distortion, overdrive, equalization, loopers, samplers, noise gates, pitch, octave, modulation effects, wah, multi effectors, volume, expression, and filters. They are available from brands such as Boss, MXR, TC Electronic, Electro-Harmonix, Catalinbread, and Fulltone.
With the advent of belly bridges in 1931, Martin started to compensate their saddle placement. What this does is make for better string intonation. However early pyramid bridge have straight saddles, mounted 1/8" back from the front edge of the bridge. (with the center of the pin holes 3/8" from the back of the saddle.) The 1931 to 1933 belly bridges have a compensated saddle placed 1/8" from the front of the bridge on the treble side, and 3/16" from the bass side. Then on belly bridges in the mid 1930s Martin moved the bass end of the saddle back to 1/4" from the front of the bridge.
Epiphone began in Manhattan in 1903 when Anastasios Stathopoulo set up shop (not as Epiphone). When Anastasios died of cancer in 1915 his son Epaminondas (Epi) took over the business. Epiphone and Gibson had an on-going rivalry first in banjos and then in archtop guitars. Gibson finally acquired Epiphone in 1957. Although Epiphone guitars continued to be made in America for a time after the acquisition (often in the same factory, side-by-side with similar Gibson models), Epiphone is now a Gibson brand for overseas, imported lower cost guitars, though many are based on Gibson designs.
With that in mind, we would like to preface this article with the statement that a certain body style doesn’t necessarily mean that the guitar will be a good fit for the genre it’s associated with. However, we have also included some info on pickups. With knowledge on how the combination of pickups and a guitar’s body style impacts your end tone you should be ready to start shopping!
So where do you start in a section as massive as this one? From acoustic to electric, nylon to steel stringed, hollow body to solid body, all styles are represented here, so having a good idea of what you're looking for will definitely help. The best place to start is usually with the brand, as each one has a reputation for something different, allowing you to narrow things down from there. For example, you'll instantly recognize names like Fender, Gibson and Ibanez as trailblazers of the electric guitar, while others like Martin, Taylor, and Breedlove are more famous for the unparalleled quality of their acoustic instruments. After that, you'll want to look at things like body type, tonewood, strings, size, orientation and performance level. Once you have a general idea about each of these, your decision gets that much easier. Just remember, it all comes down to personal preference, so as long as you're happy with the guitar you choose you can't go wrong. The guitar is a special instrument, with a different meaning to every player. Whether you're taking your first steps into the world of music or you're a professional rocking out in front of sold out stadiums all over the planet, strumming, plucking and picking on a guitar is a way to express yourself that can't be duplicated with anything else. So pick up a guitar here and start playing... you'll be glad you did.
List of acoustic guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Acoustic guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson, and more. What are the best acoustic guitar companies? Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.
In terms of sounds, jazz requires a balance of warmth and clarity. While many solid body guitars can do an approximation of a jazz sound using a clean tone played through the neck pickup, in reality a dedicated jazz guitar will offer this particular sound without becoming overly woolly when lines are played at any speed. Let’s take a look at our pick of the 5 best jazz guitars.
Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.
Signature Guitar was a Canadian Guitar company, which providing good quality guitars for more than 30 years. They produce high quality electric guitars, beautifully crafted and basses. Their guitars are especially made for Indian weather. The company is situated in Aurora, Ontario, Canada. They are regarded as one of the reputed Indian Guitar brand. The price range starts from 4,999/- onwards (approx).
Very disappointed! This was a gift from Santa this morning and the amp failed miserably. Would not work at all. Not with a battery or an adapter(which by the way is not included). Amp started to smell like it was burning/melting even though it showed no power at all. Son is very disappointed to say the least and so is mommy. Only thing he wanted was an electric guitar and he couldn't even enjoy it this morning. How do I explain returning it to Santa...
by pedalhaven This little board from  @andshamlian  is so sick! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 

Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.

[Attention Korg Pa3x /Pa4x owners and Korg Pa700/1000 owners- I have a special version of this 6-velocity layer piano in .set format that will load to your Korg in compressed format at 116mb (equivalent to 232mb) - This set sounds wonderful on the Korg and uses 22 oscillators for outstanding realism including resonance, key-off and pedal effects. Send me an email (see bottom right) and I can provide a download link or go to the demo on SoundCloud here Korg Pa Yamaha C5 and follow the download link]


The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.

Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.


While recording AC/DC's Back In Black, Tony Platt used a pair of condenser mics to pick up different speaker cones and give a wider sound to each guitar: "I developed a technique for recording guitars with two microphones roughly pointing at different speakers, which can be spread out in the stereo mix so it's not just a series of mono point sources. It makes for a more open-sounding guitar. That sound suited their particular technique, which involved Angus and Malcolm playing the same chords but with different inversions to get a very big unison guitar sound."
Prior to being acquired by Gibson back in 1957, Epiphone once competed with the most popular guitar brands in the market - including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being the affordable sub-brand of Gibson, producing cost-effective alternatives to many of their premium guitars. Many experienced players today credit this brand for manufacturing their first ever instrument, and their popularity in the entry level market continue to soar high.
I nearly returned this guitar when it first arrived. I'm very glad I changed my mind. When I first unboxed it I was not a fan of the sound at all, and I didn't think it could improve significantly, but I was wrong. I put my trusty Tone Rite on it and left it there for several days. It opened the sound up and made it project much better. The finish is great, and I love the dark sound of sapele. It just takes some time and playing to get it to open up. When I first picked it up, I much preferred the sound of my Seagull, but now the Martin is really speaking to me and the Seagull has been relegated to backup status. I've even picked up a couple of bluegrass tunes, just because I'm playing a Martin now. I've only plugged it in a couple of

This guitar master started building guitars when he was 12 in the early '80s when Eddie Van Halen's Frankenstein guitar inspired him to create his own beautiful monstrosities. Since then, McCarthy worked at several music shops, doing repair work on the side, and learned from master luthiers working in their dungeons before finding a home at Dallas Repair Shop. Paul also does warranty work for Fender in its custom shop, which led to repairing Buddy Guy's guitar and Ted Nugent's. "Selling guitars at a guitar shop, you really have nothing to show for it," McCarthy says. "But here at the end of the day, I can see what I've done. Work with my hands, fix problems, and it pays pretty good, too."
This is because sound in an acoustic is dependent upon the bridge, saddle, and soundboard’s (top) ability to transfer string vibration through the sound hole of the body. The top (soundboard), back, and sides makes the body of the guitar where the sound hole is designed and cut. Knowing this, you’ll not only need wood that’s strong, but wood that can offer unique acoustic properties that emphasize its ability to project differing sounds at various frequencies. Of course, your choice of strings also lends to the harmonic ranges of a guitar.

In 1959, with sales under pressure from the more powerful Fender Twin and from The Shadows, who requested amplifiers with more power, Vox produced what was essentially a double-powered AC15 and named it the AC30. The AC30, fitted with alnico magnet-equipped Celestion "blue" loudspeakers and later Vox's special "Top Boost" circuitry, and like the AC15 using valves (known in the US as tubes), helped to produce the sound of the British Invasion, being used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and the Yardbirds, among others. AC30s were later used by Brian May of Queen (who is known for having a wall of AC30s on stage), Paul Weller of The Jam (who also assembled a wall of AC30s), Rory Gallagher, The Edge of U2 and Radiohead guitarists Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien. The Vox AC30 has been used by many other artists including Mark Knopfler, Hank Marvin who was instrumental in getting the AC30 made, Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, John Scofield, Snowy White, Will Sergeant, Tom Petty, The Echoes, Mike Campbell, Peter Buck, Justin Hayward, Tom DeLonge, Mike Nesmith, Peter Tork, Noel Gallagher, Matthew Bellamy, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Dustin Kensrue, Tame Impala, and many others.
: This vintage YAMAHA is one of the greats folks and here for your serious consideration today at Joe's Vintage Guitars.... This is the Classic Vintage Yamaha FG-200 - Nippon Gakki body seems the same specs as the famous FG180...hummm? interesting She's been lovingly played for nearly 40 years,its beautifully aged now with a great feel & patina only found on real vintage guitars of this age and caliber. This guitar really has nicely opened up over the past 40 years and you just don't get booming bassy tone like this one with a new guitar thats for sure. This example is not mint but is beautiful in its own right, it does have a few nicks, dings and wear but nothing really bad at all really she just looks the part of the 40 year old Martin D28 vintage guitsr. A lot of guitar for not a lot of cash... Vintage aint goin down..get her at a great price today! Let me know...thanks for your interest, Joe email me: gr8bids@comcast.net This is an early one from the Nippon Gakki plant and has a surprising boom even for or a 200 same as our great old red lable FG180 for that matter with no real decernable diference. I cannot find a serial number but is believed to be late 60's - early 70's This old girl has Excellent low end sound!!! and tone on this guitar is wonderful - it really booms! Condition: Average vintage wear wich includes minor pick wear, scratches dents & dings for an old vintageguitar. but no cracks to be found, straight neck, trussrod is functioning properly, very good frets still playing well all the way up & down the fingerboard with no funny buzzes or dead spots... Frets 1 - 5 ( cowboy cord area )have medium play wear but still plenty of life remaining no problemo. action is very good at 3/32 1st E string @ 12th fret. Tuners are the original and in excellent working order. Bridge plate is securely fastened to top. We have just as a precationary installed A PlateMate brass plate has now been installed to any prevent further wear to bridge plate which is common among these vintage guitars. This brass plate has also contributed to its big booming tone now is even a more rich sounding competitor to a vintage Martin D-28... FRESH SET UP...with Martin Bone & Saddle... this guitar is a wonderfull fun guitar to play lots of bang for the buck factor here.. This guitar is overall a very solid well built guitar that is standing the test of time it also is a great sounding vintage guitar that plays very nicely. Ya can't go wrong with this wonderful vintage Yamaha FG Nippon Gakki guitar Has a new bone saddle and Martin Silk Steel strings. No case included but will protect and properly package for shipping. PlateMate product works very well and is easily removed if desired. To my ear it enhanced this boom-box's sound quality and is described by the manufacturer as follows: If you want to protect and enhance the sound and tones and balance out string volume of your acoustic guitar, Mitchels Plate Mate is the way to go. Mitchels Plate Mate is a small piece of brass that is applied without using or altering of tools, and is installed as fast as you can change a set of strings. This was invented and patend mainly to prevent damage caused by ball-end strings on the acoustic guitars bridge plate, it is also proven to enhance volume, tones, and balances out string volume by one of the best acoustic guitar makers in the world. Mitchels Plate Mate will protect your guitar from ball-end strings pulling up threw the bridge plate and possibly cracking the bridge or pulling the bridge off the top of your guitar which would be a very expensive repair bill. It also protects your bridge pins, and saddle by making the string windings stay down in the string holes where they belong. I have used Mitchels Plate Mate in guitars priced from $100 to $50,000 it doesnt matter the price just protect your prized posetion or investment. .
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
Hal Leonard's series of books may be more responsible than any other series of books for people learning the guitar. It may be an understatement to call it a standard for students starting to learn the guitar. This book covers introductory topics like how to read music, chords, different scales and keys. Beyond that, it moves into advanced techniques and music theory in later books. The book is available as a stand alone, but we think the 3 CDs that come with the book are really useful, especially for practicing. It is so helpful to improving timing as a fundamental skill to play along with the CDs that are included with the book.
Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.
For the uninitiated, effect pedals usually take the form of small-ish metal boxes which sit on the floor in front of you. These can be switched on and off using your feet. Hence, pedals. The technology contained within these pedals is designed to alter your tone in any number of ways. For example, cleaning it up and making it louder through to adding layers of shimmer, fuzz, whammy or ‘verb. Don’t worry, we’ll refer back to these terms later because they are genuine terms in the wacky world of pedals.
One reviewer mentioned that anyone wanting to purchase the C40 will need to change the strings to get the best sound out of this model. Another reviewer uses the C40 as their main guitar for composing, and it works quite well for the job. So, overall, if you feel the need to be cost-conscious at this point in time, but want a quality instrument, the C40 should be on your list of models for proper comparison shopping.
2. Pickup Setup: I'd like to see you add a section on this. Pickups should be lowered out of the way before any setup. If they're too high, the strings could hit them and cause buzzing. After everything all other setup steps are completed, the pickups should be raised to the proper position. One online video claiming to post Gibson specs says that the Low E should be 6/64" above the pickups, and that the High E should be 4/64".

Numerous classic guitars made by the likes of Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, and Guild are worth thousands, sometimes tens of thousands; a little expensive for the average player, and often these are the preserve of investors and collectors. Early versions of the Gibson Les Paul, SG and Flying V guitars, or the Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster. But there are still very many affordable, great sounding, and exciting to play vintage guitars that offer something simply not available in a new guitar. A well-built vintage instrument, although expensive can actually be superb value for money in comparison to some of the new guitars available at that price.

Definitely, Diary of a Madman is like…the groundwork for so many great songs out there today. And if you listen to that live solo after Suicide Solution, which is only done live, it's just crazy what he could do that you didn't think he could do. If he was still alive, even if he left Ozzy, we would have seen even better stuff from him. Crowley and Crazy Train were actually more watered down marketable songs. That's more or less why Randy was GOING to leave Oz in the first place.
Founded in 1902, Gibson began life producing mandolins and other instruments, before making hollow-body electric guitars in the thirties. Their first solid-body guitar came in 1952 – the Les Paul, which remains one of the most iconic guitars in the world. They are also well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes such as the SG, the Explorer, and the Flying V. Used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King, Gibson’s are manufactured in three American factories – two in Tennessee and one in Montana.
Here we have a wonderful made in Japan Takamine from a while back in 1990 this makes it officially a Vintage guitar next year but its tone sounds rich and vintage now! As you will see looking her over this F349 is GORGEOUS!.... better than average condition in all aspects... few only minor doinks here or there but NOTHING to detract from this Taks sound - playability or sheer playing enjoyment... Excellent ALL Mahogany build construction, high AA grade mahogany, masterfully built - fit and finish excellent, neck angle is excellent so action is very good so playing is a breeze and quite enjoyable not all can state this...its 1-11/16ths at the nut so its a nice feeling medium profile " C " shape, frets are very good - excellent can barely tell its been played in fact if you polish them they will be as new...beautiful quality rosewood fingerboard no dead spots or funny buzzes noted...This guitars wood still shines like glass and overall is an outstanding original example with an addition of the best sounding Piezo transducer cleanly installed if I didn't tell you -you may not have noticed but she is also fully electric and sounds amazing amplified I played her threw my Princeton Reverb amp and it truly sounds bold & rich and rings like a bell with the newish Martin strings I installed (I have played this guitar in my office for a short while ) so they should be done stretching and are clean and ready to perform. This guitar is nearing 25 years old so don't expect a brand new guitar this is a beautiful vintage guitar and has personality and patina of a well treated well loved professional grade instrument. Its in excellent vintage condition. JVG Rated 9/10. If you want a rich sounding great playing fun vintage Japanese Dreadnought guitar well this one should put a grin on your face when you open her up and see it. Enjoy! Let me know if interested thanks for looking. Joe contact us at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
Of all the positions GC interviews for, tech has the highest standards and is arguably more demanding in terms of hours worked and product knowledge required than store manager. The tech for the store I worked at frequently worked 60+ hours a week to keep turn-around time to a week or less and his set-ups were so good and in such high demand that the store got an exception to the chain-wide $35 set-up price to charge $50 in hopes of lightening his load/keeping his overtime down, but he still got just as much work as he did before. If you're unsure about the reputation of your local GC's tech, don't be afraid to call the other stores and ask them who the best tech in their district is, because they'll usually be pretty straight forward with you. Most GC sales people have had their instruments set up by their in-store tech at least once and if their tech isn't very good, they'll tell you who you should go to if you want good work done because it's an absolute pain in the ass dealing with a customer whose instrument wasn't set up right when the tech is gone for the day and having to deal with the tech's fuck-up.
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