On regular occasion I have stuff come through to me after the instrument owner has already taken it to another shop that, for whatever reason, could not fix or solve the problem. This time, a supposedly professional and legitimate shop... and after the customer PAID FOR WORK THAT DID NOT YEILD THE DESIRED RESULTS. That just boggles my mind a bit. I would never charge a customer unless they are happy and satisfied with my work.
The world of audio effects is one that can be confusing even for experienced engineers. Especially in modern computer-based recording systems, there's a bewildering array of options, and to add to the confusion, some effects are widely referred to by more than one name. In this article, I'll take you through the most common effects, explaining how they work and where you might want to use them in your music. Meanwhile, SOS 's team of writers has contributed a wealth of expert tips and tricks, which you can find in the boxes scattered through this article.
But we can't forget that Rocksmith 2014 is designed like any other game, and as satisfying as it is to be able to pick up a guitar and play, all I wanted to do was try and level up on some of my favorite songs. I quickly found that Foo Fighters' "Everlong" was beyond my grasp, and Oasis's "Don't Look Back in Anger" would never become my jam, but I quickly got my fix trying to nail down The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop."
Guitar pedals and other effects, including an early version of the wah-wah pedal used by Jimi Hendrix and the Tone Bender fuzzbox pedal, a Vox variation on the famous original Gary Hurst Tone Bender (used by Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin and Jeff Beck of the Yardbirds as well as The Beatles, Spencer Davis and others), were also marketed by Vox and later on manufactured in Italy.
There are several kinds of bridge (located at the bottom of the guitar, where the strings are attached), but to keep things simple you’ll usually find either a fixed bridge or a tremolo bridge. Both have their pros and cons. A tremolo bridge will allow you to experiment with everything from vibrato effects right up to full-on divebombs, and can sound amazing when playing high lead solos. However, tremolo bridges can affect tuning, unless the bridge and nut locks. A fixed bridge is excellent for sustain and tuning stability, although there’s no vibrato. Again, it’s all down to personal preference.
I am a beginner player and I am a bit disappointed in both Fender and Gibson. Both entry level guitars suck, for beginners like me. Why not they make the fret board neck nut a little more wider so that its easier for learning. In the last 5 years playing both Fender Starcasters and Gibson Maestro, I cann’t play chords properly. I am still looking for entry level guitar for my chord practice without breaking my budget ($700).
The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.

Perhaps the most dramatic of ambient mic techniques, though, comes courtesy of Chris Tsangarides. His 'Vortex' involves using studio screens to build 30-foot-long walls along each side of the guitar cabinet, creating a flare shape (apparently inspired by the shape of a bass bin). Within this flare, he places a close condenser mic and typically another couple of condenser mics with different distant positionings, perhaps at 15 and 30 feet away. "I walk around while the guy's playing and find a sweet spot and put the mic there", says Chris.
electric guitar chords Acoustic guitar acoustic samples acoustic guitar loops Electric Guitar sounds Electric guitar Electric guitar loops Electric guitar samples Electric Guitar sounds guitar guitar loops Electric guitar samples drums drum loops dance dance music dance loops loops for music synth effects synth efx synthesizer sounds synth sounds synth loops synth samples digital synth digital synthesizer synthesizer synsthesizer sounds keyboard soundsSound loopsmu
GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is based on the powerful GUITAR RIG 5 PRO, providing you a straightforward and easy user interface with professional components. The advanced tag-based preset browser makes it easy to find and organize your effect settings. Drag and drop components to the rack to create custom effect chains, and adjust all settings to your needs in no time.
I start at zero and work the bridge, stopbar, neck and pickups from there until I all feels and sounds right, takes some time but not too much. I only do this with new guitars and when I total strip one down maybe once a year. Living in the North East and having 4 season you have to adjust all the time, unless you live in a climate controled home and never go out. If you can do all these adjustments yourself and become one with your guitars I think your way ahead of the game.
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 
Good questions. Firstly, swapping the saddle around has the effect of moving the tapered top edge of the saddle closer to, or farther from (depending on which way it was to start with) the front of the bridge. If you're wanting the string to be as long as possible, for example, you'd need to make sure the saddle is oriented in such a way that the tapered edge is at the tail end (farther from the pickups). If you look at my pictures above, you'll see that my D-string saddle is originally oriented in this way, but in my case I need to SHORTEN the string, so I rotate it and this gives me more forward adjustment. Since you need to do the opposite of me, you'd therefore need to make sure your saddle has the same orientation as what mine had BEFORE I changed it. I really hope that makes sense.
Ok so currently i run a Mesa 20/20 along with a GSP1101 and a MXR 10-Band EQ pedal. I love the MXR but would like to get a EQ in rack form. I see about a millon rack EQs out there but not sure which ones are made for guitar? They seem more focused on live sound/PA/Home recording..I am not sure if there all the same, Meaning a PA EQ will work for a guitar rack.
Now, as others have mentioned, there is a switch that controls which pickup (or pickups plural) you want to use at any given moment. Seeing as each pickup is placed at a different point under the strings, the vibrations are slightly different. The closer the strings are to the bridge at the bottom, the more 'narrow' and intense the vibrations get. Thus the current generated from the magnets lead to different sound characteristics.
(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.
Most guitars and basses have one or more tone knobs, which offer a simple form of EQ control. Using these tone knobs adds or cuts the treble frequencies of the instrument’s signal. Most guitar and bass amps also have some tone control available, usually in the form of a 3-band EQ section, allowing you to control bass, mid, and treble frequencies with independent knobs. These knobs boost or cut frequencies when you turn them up or down. Some amps and effects offer more precise control of equalization as we’ll see next.
Also included was the GP, an equal double-cutaway model with a mahogany body, flamed maple carved top, glued-in neck, fine-tune bridge and stop tailpiece. The only models I’ve seen, which were also advertised, had twin humbuckers and conventional electronics. One source refers to a GP-1, which by nomenclature would suggest a single humbucker, but it’s not known if this ever actually existed. Also, it’s not clear if the GPs came in parts or fully assembled.
A common complaint with the Bullet Strat among our panelists was that the single-coil middle and neck pickups buzzed too much. This is the nature of single-coil pickups. The nice thing about the HSS Bullet Strat is that you do have one humbucker, and setting the pickup selector to combine the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups will also cancel the buzz. Also, the use of a single-coil pickup in the neck position makes it difficult to get the mellow, jazzy tones that you’ll get from guitars that have a humbucker in the neck position, but we figure few beginners are looking for that sound.
This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
Maple is a very hard type of wood with good tonal qualities and good sustain. Guitar necks are traditionally made from maple, in part because of its strength, and in part because the material can highlight and amplify the wood in the body. Maple is also often used as a top for the guitar body, partly because it is beautiful (think flame, or quilted maple tops), and partly because it can brighten a sound that would otherwise be murky.
Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.
The two mini Les Pauls are also illustrated in ’60s Bizarre Guitars. These were the J-1 and TG-54, slab-bodied solidbody electrics with bolt-on necks. Both had typical Teisco three-and-three headstocks, with a point or hump in the center not unlike Kay guitars, but slightly more rounded. They had rosewood ‘boards with large white dots, except for two small dots at the octave.
"Mangoré, por Amor al Arte" is the title of the 2015 movie, the real life story of Agustín Barrios, an influential and important composer and classical guitarist from Paraguay. Born in Paraguay in 1885 talented Agustín was persuaded in his young adult age to move to Buenos Aires, the cultural hub of South America. In Argentina he began an affair with the beautiful Isabel but,...
The paper presents the results of the modal analysis of six types of structures made from plates. Firstly, was done geometrical modeling of structures, after which they were numerical modeled using shell and solid finite elements. The next step consisted in simulating the structures behavior to free vibration for different thicknesses and materials. The results were processed and compared in... [Show full abstract]
Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.

I am an SG player through and through. I own a bunch of them- mostly from the initial run of SG Special Faded with the moon inlays, because that particular run felt right to me. I am looking to have a custom SG style guitar made, but I don't know of any builders who make SGs. Can anyone tell me a boutique or custom shop builder who does SGs? Thanks!
G&L is the evolution of Fender guitars, no doubt, is Leo Fender expressed by itself, amazing axe, nice sound, in tune, good wood, my ASAT SPECIAL have bird's eye wood on fretboard that looks and feels amazing, the MFD's pickups rocks! nice playability, nice sound, I'll keep mine a lot of a time, it must be on top 10, underrated guitar in my opinion

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The first electric instrument amplifiers were not designed for use with electric guitars. The earliest examples were portable PA systems, which appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes allowed the production of economical built-in power supplies that could be plugged into wall sockets, instead of heavy multiple battery packs, since rechargeable batteries would not become lightweight until many decades later. While guitar amplifiers from the beginning were used to amplify acoustic guitar, electronic amplification of guitar was first widely popularized by the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively employed the amplified lap steel Hawaiian guitar.[2]

Here we have a matching quad of late sixties Goodman speakers with green labels 25 Watts each @ 12 ohms Very rare in that EACH driver is fully functional, the cones are nice and stiff, no cone rub or any tears, just a killer set of vintage speakers. These came out of a wem cab and were also stock in laney cabinets(think sabbath tone, wem, Burman and Selmer gear Wem used odd impedances, these read 10.01 ohms on my multimeter so is treat them as 8ohms if they are wired up in a cab series parallel. Postage in the U.K. is £32 and they will be sent out in two separate parcels, you will have to arrange your own courier if your not U.K. based you can also collect in person! Any questions just ask


My father's Yamaha was bought in the 90's, and was the first guitar steel-string I ever played as a kid. (If you were curious its equivalent to today's model would be the LS6 ARE). To this day I still find myself going back to it. It's little quirks makes it really special, even though I have martins and taylors and even gibsons. There's little nicks and chips in the paint in some places, which really shows it's history. It's also stood the test of time. It still plays great after almost 30 years of being lugged around from place to place, dropped, hit against walls, etc. It's just simply great. - zabathy1
Next, squirt your cable and rub it using a clean cloth. To cleanse the amplifier and guitar inputs, compress an area of the clean magazine around a Q-tip. Next, apply a bit of contact cleaner to the cloth, and push it in and out of the inputs to all your guitar gear such as effects pedals, amps, guitar. A point to take note here is that you should use a fresh new section of the cloth for each jack input.

Marshall's current best rated amplifier is the humble 1-Watt DSL1HR, an all-tube, dual channel amplifier head that gives you genuine Marshall tone and appeal in a more compact and practice friendly format. It is based on the JCM2000 Dual Super Lead (DSL) series that the company released in the late '90s, but with some modern enhancements to make it more user friendly. What's cool about this amp is that it can go lower than 1W via its built-in attenuator, which lets you switch to low power mode that has a 0.1W power rating. This means that you can crank the amp's dual ECC83 preamp tubes and ECC82 power tube at very low volume levels, great for quiet practice and for recording. Speaking of recording, Marshall equipped the DSL1HR with a speaker emulated Line out, using Softube's cabinet simulator technology. Other features include having two channels: classic gain and ultra gain, built-in reverb and pedalboard friendly effects loop in and out. More importantly, this tube amp is affordably priced and comes bundled with a footswitch.


You probably won’t have to do this, but if you do, here’s how to go about it: First, slacken the affected strings and move them to the sides of the saddles. Then take some needle-nose pliers and remove one end of the retaining spring (different styles of bridge will use different types of retaining spring – sometimes there is an individual one for each saddle, in which case you might even need to remove the whole bridge to do this).
Unfortunately, a few years prior, we were playing in a festival where there were many bands. THAT soundman flat out refused to use a direct signal and insisted on mic’ing my cabinet. I had spend MONTHS designing and programming my TWO preamps, one for the stage and the other for the board… certain effects were sent to one and not the other… My whole sound was based on two pre-amps running at the same time. This is about as close as I’ve come to physically punching anyone. I told him to plug in to the XLR output right “there.” He wouldn’t… made excuses as to not knowing which channel on the snake ithe other end was plugged into. (That made no sense at all… wouldn’t he know which channel the MIC was in? All he had to do is remove the mic, plug that end of the cable into the output of my unit.) Weeks later, people in the audience commented to me that they remembered that I played and sang the gig “fuming” over something. Half of my sound wasn’t there AT ALL.
Russell is not only one of the hardest working technicians in Dallas but also a classically trained guitarist with a degree in classical guitar performance from SMU. To supplement his income playing classical guitar, he joined the Brook Mays team before finding a home at Charley's Guitar Shop. "Having a background as a player helps with cutting through the issue," he says. "I think the real part of guitar repair is being able to observe what's going on with the guitar but also understanding what the player is going through."
Three full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by Dead by April (on some songs), Metallica in the song "Invisible Kid" from St. Anger, Asking Alexandria (G#) on their self-titled album, Damien Deadson, Love and Death, Architects and The Acacia Strain. Staind also uses this tuning (but with the 2nd string tuned up 1/2 step to emulate a 7-string guitar), as well as several other modified variations of this, such as one in which the 5th string is also dropped from D# to C#.
“Well, the legends didn’t use pedals.” Whenever somebody says something like this, and you ask them to whom they are referring, they’re often misinformed and factually wrong. “Jimmy Page”. Uh, ever see him use a Tone Bender Mk II? “Jimi Hendrix.” Please feel free to complete a Harry Potter novel while I finish laughing. “Stevie Ray Vaughan.” Ibanez and Maxon should retire a green Tube Screamer colored banner with his name hanging from their company rafters. This list goes on and on. Yes, there are lots of cool dudes back in the old times who didn’t use pedals to help them create some classic tones, but once they had the chance, they chose to.
The Ibanez Artcore AF75, PRS SE Standard 24 and Schecter PT, for example, are priced below $600 and have been highly rated. They’re not exactly cheap money-wise, but they’re definitely worth a lot more. Getting one of those from the get-go will make playing guitar a lifetime passion. “Cheap” guitars may seem more affordable at first, but many of these are poorly made and can be more costly in the long run because of constant repairs and replacements.

Compared to the guitar amp rankings, the bass amp list is largely dominated by heads rather than combos. Notably, many of the entries on this year's rankings come from the recent wave of ultra-portable, Class D bass amp—a topic we've covered before. Clearly, this subcategory of bass amp is dominating the market, and it's likely that there will be at least a few new entries under that heading at NAMM next month.
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The initial single-pickup production model appeared in 1950, and was called the Esquire. Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems. In particular, the Esquire necks had notruss rod and many were replaced due to bent necks. Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster. From this point onwards all Fender necks incorporated truss rods. The Gretsch company, itself a manufacturer of hollowbody electric guitars (and now owned by Fender), claimed that “Broadcaster” violated the trademark for its Broadkaster line of drums, and as a newcomer to the industry, Fender decided to bend and changed the name to Telecaster, after the newly popular medium of television. (The guitars manufactured in the interim bore no name, and are now popularly called ‘Nocasters.’) The Esquire was reintroduced as a one-pickup Telecaster, at a lower price.
Noise gate: Noise gates attenuate hum, hiss, and static in the signal by greatly diminishing the volume when the signal falls below a set threshold. Noise gates are often used by electric guitarist who play with vintage amps, which can have unwanted hum in the tone, and by guitarists from heavy metal who use high distortion levels, which add noise to the signal even when no notes are being played. Noise gates mute the signal when it falls below a certain threshold. This means that during bars of rest for the guitarist in a song, the hum or noise from the amp or distortion pedal will not be heard by the audience. Noise gates are expanders—meaning that, unlike compressors, they increase the dynamic range of an audio signal to make quiet sounds even quieter.[60] If used with extreme settings and combined with reverb, they can create unusual sounds, such as the gated drum effect used in 1980s pop songs, a style popularized by the Phil Collins song In the Air Tonight.[62][63]
A giant when it comes to the British amplification companies, Vox is always in the conversation when talking about great guitar gear. And that’s no different when the conversation is about amps for beginners. As far as bang-for-your-buck options are concerned, the Valvetronix VT20X definitely ranks at the top – and with good reason: it features tube amp sounds, but with the versatility of a modeling amp (which it is). This impressive hybrid boasts 11 onboard models, 13 effects, and 33 preset programs – allowing you an astonishingly wide range of produceable sounds. And you can control the whole thing from your smartphone, making it easier than ever before. Excellent work, Vox.
[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
Need a portable pedalboard for fly dates? Tech 21 has the answer in the form of the Fly Rig 5: a small but perfectly functional pedalboard, powered by an auto-switching adaptor, so it can be used anywhere in the world. What you get is the equivalent of five stompboxes. The SansAmp is at the heart of the Fly Rig. Stomp on its footswitch and its six mini control knobs light up blue. You get level and drive knobs, three-band EQ and a spring reverb emulation based on the Boost RVB pedal. In front of the SansAmp, you get the Plexi section, based on Tech 21's Hot-Rod Plexi pedal. One footswitch emulates the natural overdrive and distortion of a late-60s Marshall, with sound dialled in with level, tone and drive controls. A second 'Hot' footswitch brings in up to 21dB of boost and can be used independently of the Plexi distortion. Last in the signal chain is the DLA, a delay with tap tempo. The Fly Rig 5 is an extremely functional unit that contains arguably the most essential effects - you can plug it into a guitar amp or straight into a PA or mixing desk. It's also a life-saver should your equipment go down at the last minute, as well as being the answer to the prayers of guitarists who need to travel light.

Both guitarists have been a large part of the Montgomery Gentry sound since the beginning. Garrett had been working the bars in Lexington, Kentucky and ended up becoming the first-call guitarist for singer Troy Gentry. When he and Eddie Montgomery teamed up to conquer the Nashville music scene, Bo was the natural pick for lead guitar. When the time came to expand their sound by adding a second guitarist to embrace their Southern Rock roots, bassist Andy Bowers recommended his brother Frank. Being the consummate professional that he is, Frank did his homework and nailed the material his first day out, earning him his spot on stage with the group for more than eleven years now.

“The acoustic guitar is something you can travel with easier and make money with easier,” Salas said. “When I used to tour with Rod Stewart, we had jets and gigantic trucks but now there’s no record-company support so no there’s tour support. Record companies aren’t offsetting the tour expenses because they can’t make their money back in record sales.”

It looks like a Gibson. but it’s another Epiphone — the Epiphone Les Paul Special II. This is the other iconic shape in electric guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, and Epiphone make the budget-priced version with this one listed at $170. In another blog we’ll explain the primary differences between Gibson and Fender guitars. For now, just know it’s like an Apple versus Windows kind of debate. Really.
They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.
As the author of the article, I don’t use an Axe-Fx, but a $250 Fly Rig. But if I want to talk to an expert on modeling, I wanted to ask the company that knows it best. Sure, you have to take in to consideration a PA, but you have to do that if you own an amp too, since proper sound sends keeps the volume lower on stage to send everything through the PA.
It has a solid poplar body with a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, and based on the early reviews of the Epiphone Les Paul SL, the fit, finish and general playability are all pretty good. It’s loaded up with Epiphone’s reliable tune-o-matic bridge, a volume and tone knob, as well as a three-way selector switch to toggle your pickups and dial in tone. The hardware does feel admittedly cheap, but the general consensus is that this guitar ships well-made, well-setup and more than appropriate for a first-time player.
A younger, but very high-quality brand that's also a favorite among country artists, Taylor manufactures some truly investment-worthy acoustic guitars—with a sound that only improves over time. Its creator, Bob Taylor, tested the use of exotic tonewoods in excellent guitars, so he used oak recovered from pallet wood to craft the back, sides, and neck of the Pallet Guitar, an important model originally made in 1995. Taylor's roster of tonewoods also includes Indian Rosewood, African Ebony, Blackheart Sassafras, Blackwood, Cocobolo, Figured Walnut, Granadillo, Hawaiian Koa, Maple, Ovangkol, Sapele, Tropical Mahogany, and several others.
Some bass amplifier combos have a "whizzer cone" attached to the low frequency woofer's centre. The whizzer cone is about the same size as a dust cap, although it resembles a miniature speaker cone. The whizzer cone handles the upper frequencies that are too high for the woofer. Roland's 60 watt and 120 watt bass combos contain both a woofer and a whizzer cone.
If you’re old enough and like whacky guitars, like me, you probably remember the great Guitar Player “Off the Wall” columns by Teisco Del Rey, the nom de plume of journalist Dan Forte. His was the first, and sometimes the only, story I’d read for a long time. Dan was perhaps the first to celebrate guitars whose names didn’t begin with M, G, or F. Dan usually worked the humor angle, but for those of us with an aesthetic eye, the guitars he featured became Holy Grails. One of the holiest of those was the 1968 Teisco May Queen guitar, a rare red version of which you see here!
Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.

Fender had an electronics repair shop called Fender’s Radio Service where he first repaired, then designed, amplifiers and electromagnetic pickups for musicians—chiefly players of electric semi-acoustic guitars, electric Hawaiian (lap steel) guitars, and mandolins. Players had been ‘wiring up’ their instruments in search of greater volume and projection since the late 1920s, and electric semi-acoustics (such as theGibson ES-150) had long been widely available. Tone had never, until then, been the primary reason for a guitarist to go electric, but in 1943, when Fender and his partner, Clayton Orr “Doc” Kauffman, built a crude wooden guitar as a pickup test rig, local country players started asking to borrow it for gigs. It sounded shiny and sustaining. Fender got curious, and in 1949, when it was long understood that solid construction offered great advantages in electric instruments, but before any commercial solidbody Spanish guitars had caught on (the small Audiovox company apparently offered a modern, solidbody electric guitar as early as the mid-1930s), he built a better prototype.


The 6260 will keep the high-gain crowd happy. The V22 will satisfy anyone looking for a tube combo for rock, blues or country music. The 1960 will meet the needs of players looking for a British-type overdrive, and the 333 will nail those scooped out metal tones you might be looking for. Bugera is definitely worth checking out for players on a budget, or guitarists just looking to build their collection of classic sounds.
In the following essay I will outline the steps involved in the set up of an electric guitar. These guidelines will not address the nuances of Floyd Rose style bridge assemblies. I am presuming here that the frets on the guitar in question are level and properly seated, but it should be noted that the process of leveling and dressing/crowning guitar frets is indeed sometimes necessary before a set-up can be performed. I am also presenting this outline without an in-depth itemization and discussion of the specialized tools that are necessary for some of the adjustments.
this is literally the worst piece of cow dung in the industry. I wouldn't even call it a guitar, it's so poorly made. Management, especially the CEO, don't care a bit about quality, the only thing that matters is their unrealistically high production numbers. the production processes are so archaic they are amateur, and they have the audacity to call it the worlds finest guitar. all of this stems from the CEO and his manic psychotic neurotic management style (he has to sign off on EVERYTHING: new hires, transfers within the company, promotions, raises, budgets, any funding for new parts or machines.

Before diving in, it’s also worth mentioning the “crap in, crap out” rule, which dictates that any recorded track is only going to sound as good as the guitar and amp that it captures, however good your mic or skilled your engineering. You can’t expect elevated studio technique to convert junk tone or a mediocre performance to stellar sounds in the mix; the best you can hope for is to accurately capture the sound being made by your amp, and to do so with optimum depth, dynamics, and fidelity. Of course, it’s possible that the crappy, low-grade junk tone you capture from a scuzzball rig is exactly what the recording demanded (Jack White or Dan Auerbach, anyone?), but it will usually benefit the tune to capture it as powerfully as you can!

So don't hesitate; your next multi effects pedals, rack-mounted units and accessories are probably waiting just a few clicks away. The only thing better than a board full of great pedals is one box that combines all those great pedals into a single convenient package - and once you've got that multi effects unit onstage with you, the possibilities are virtually endless for the personalized tones and unique sounds you'll be able to bring to every performance.
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Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
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