Pre-1929: All size 1 and larger guitars, from any year, have 6" long pyramid bridges. All size 2 or 2 1/2 Martins have 5 3/4" to 5 7/8" long pyramid bridges. Most pyramid bridges before 1900 are roughly 7/8" wide, and most after 1900 are 1" wide. The average length of the wings on most pyramid bridges is roughly 1 3/8" During the 1880's and 1890's, however, there is more variation, as much as from 1 1/4" to 1 1/2" On the earlier 7/8" wide bridges, the wings have a very long, narrow, elegant appearance, with a gentle curve to the inside angles of the pyramids, that looks nothing at all like the harsh angles found on many copies. There is no difference between the dimensions of ivory and ebony bridges from the same period.

{ "thumbImageID": "V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Transparent-Blue/519468000012000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ibanez V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Transparent Blue", "sku": "sku:site51274115042822", "price": "179.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Transparent-Blue-1274115042822.gc", "skuImageId": "V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Transparent-Blue/519468000012000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Transparent-Blue/519468000012000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51274115042831", "price": "179.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black-1274115042831.gc", "skuImageId": "V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/519468000001000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/V70CE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/519468000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Read Full Review This electric guitar offered by Epiphone is absolutely on the budget when it comes to and looking for a markdown price decent sounding Les Paul style electric guitar. The guitar can be bought individually to pair it with an amplifier of choice or as part of the Epiphone Les Paul Special II guitar package that comes complete with a strap, guitar cable, plectrums, gig bag and a small 10 watts Electar amplifier to already begin playing right out of the box.
The best guitars?  Look at what the best players use.  Certainly Gibson and Fender are in the mix, but these are typically priceless, early production or highly customized one-off units.  If you want something more or less off the shelf that is in the same range of build, tone and feel quality look at the following (BTW, you can't get these at Guitar Center, which is probably why they haven't been mentioned yet):
Octave/Pitch Shift – A frequency-based effect that takes the input of your guitar tone and shifts it in pitch anywhere up to an octave above or below. This is useful to simulate a bass guitar line or the higher pitched strings of a twelve-string guitar. Some octave or pitch shift pedals double your guitar tone before shifting making them more akin to Harmoniser pedals.

The TG-64 was definitely a boss guitar, but even cooler was the TRG-1 transistorized guitar, also introduced in ’64. This guitar did Nat Daniels one better and, instead of putting the amp in the case, put a transistorized amp and speaker in the guitar! To be fair, Danelectro did produce some guitars with a miniature tube amp built-in, but it’s not known if these ever made it to production status. But the TRG-1 is a remarkable guitar available in a confusing number of variations.

I tried very hard to work with this book. And I think the author went to a lot of trouble to make the information presentable and understandable. But it didn't work for me. Today I made a second run at the book to see if I could make sense of it. I remain very disappointed. I am an electrical engineer, and perhaps that is my problem. The author must have created his own wiring diagram and components system which he understands well. But I don't. The basic problem is that he uses shades of gray (in lieu of color) to illustrate the circuitry and components. In the book it talks about colors, but all is shades of gray.
The Ampeg Bassamp Company, founded in 1949 by Everett Hull, responded to the growing demand for electric bass equipment by producing a line of bass amplifiers. Ampeg bass amps were widely used by electric bass guitarists in the 1950s and 1960s. The first bass amplifier offered by Ampeg was an 18-watt model with a single 12" speaker and a rear ventilation port called the Super 800. In 1951, they introduced a 20-watt version with a 15-inch speaker. In 1960, they introduced the B-15 Portaflex, a flip-top 25-watt tube bass amplifier with a single 15" speaker. While the Ampeg Portaflex had a pleasing bass tone, and was used by studio bassists such as James Jamerson and Carol Kaye, it was not powerful enough to be used in a stadium or arena concert.[3]
Marr, once a member of Electronic with Bernard Sumner of New Order and Neil Tennant of Pet Shop Boys, has played on a number of records and contributed to numerous other high-profile projects, including his recent stint in Modest Mouse. This weekend, Marr returns to Denver in support of his debut solo album, The Messenger, and in advance of the show, we spoke with the charming and intelligent guitarist about how he got the sound for "How Soon Is Now?" and his signature model of the Fender Jaguar.

Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.

The “quacky” tone of the middle and bridge pickups, popularized by players such as David Gilmour, Rory Gallagher, Mark Knopfler, Bob Dylan, Scott Thurston, Ronnie Wood, Ed King, Eric Clapton and Robert Cray, can be obtained by using the pickup selector in positions 2 and 4. The neck and middle pickups are each wired to a tone control that incorporates a single, shared tone capacitor, whereas the bridge pickup, which is slanted towards the high strings for a more trebly sound, has no tone control for maximum brightness. On many modern Stratocasters, the first tone affects the neck pickup; the second tone affects the middle and bridge pickups; on some Artist Series models (Eric Clapton and Buddy Guy signature guitars), the first tone is a presence circuit that cuts or boosts treble and bass frequencies, affecting all the pickups; the second tone is an active midrange booster that boosts the midrange frequencies up to 25dB (12dB on certain models) to produce a fatter humbucker-like sound.


Teisco's very FIRST solid body electric guitar, the 1954 Teisco, Model J-1. 1 single coil Pickup. Front plate says, "NIHON ONPA KOGYO CO. LTD TEISCO". Back plate says, "TEISCO ELECTRIC GUITER MODEL J1". Yes, Guitar is misspelled as "GUITER"!. Maple neck is a "ball bat" with very pronounce "V". Guitar is currently set up for slide with "flat-wounds". VERY ROUGH CONDITION and lots of "character". Where to start, hm....? Firstly it has termite, yes, termite damage to the back. Don't ask me how, I don't know. The top is veneered with a beautiful quilted maple, but is missing a big section on the front. The tailpiece is missing it's cover. The wood bridge is partially inverted and sagging, due to string tension. The pick guard is warped (normal to many vintage guitars). We're pretty sure the brown bakelite knobs, while cool, are not original. Some of the frets have been changed, mostly by removing from the last 6 slots and relocated. 95% of the veneer is missing from the back. The tuners are mostly original with a couple of replacement gears. A couple of the tuner button shafts are bent, but tuners still function. The great thing is the way it is currently set up, it makes a heck of a "slide guitar". The original pickup sounds incredible through both our shop Trace Elliot and Marshall JCM-800!!! No case included.

If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.
Cort Guitars is known as a South Korean centered guitar manufacturing brand, which provide almost all kinds of guitars for the better music melodies and tunes. They are regarded as among the largest manufacturer of guitars in the world. The company was founded in 1973. Bass, electric and acoustic guitars are produced by this brand. The best models of guitar includes Classic Rock, Aero Series, Hollowbody series, VL, Performer, G series etc. Available price is Rs. 10,449/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit www.cortguitars.com.
Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.
One line bouncing is an "echo." Many lines bouncing randomly is "reverb." If they bounce around for more than a second, it's called reverb. If they bounce around for less than a second, it's Kosher to call it "room ambiance." If the radiating lines are in a room with no reflective walls, they wouldn't bounce back at all, and the room would be called "anechoic." By the way, my imaginary room is only two-dimensional. Real-life rooms are three dimensional.

Naturally, if a seller can get more money by calling what they have a “lawsuit guitar”, they’re going to do it. Unfortunately, some writers who should know better have taken to using the term for any old Japanese lookalikes, copys, knockoffs, etc, of (mostly) American guitars. Some sellers are using terms like “lawsuit era” or “pre-lawsuit” which don’t mean anything at all.
Now we switch gears to a company called Unicord, which was owned by Sid Hack. At some point in the early ’60s (probably in around ’64), Unicord purchased the Amplifier Corporation of America (ACA) which was located in Westbury, New York, a northern suburb of New York City. ACA made Haynes guitar amplifiers and an early distortion device powered by batteries.
To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy electro acoustic guitars at the lowest prices in India.
I have a problem with the way the neck bows going down from the low to high e strings. I have a Gibson les paul with the recent change in seasons I notice it on all my guitars I can adjust it out but it will some times just do the same thing, I see this on my fender and my Acoustic guitars as well when I adjust this I have a lot of problems with tuning I know this is not exactly what we were talking about but jut a question I wanted to ask I hope I made what I am saying plain enough I am pretty new to all of this. Thank you for all the great info.
{ "thumbImageID": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Soda-Blue/J18871000006000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ibanez TMB100 Electric Bass Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Flat Walnut", "sku": "sku:site51500000037119", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Flat-Walnut-1500000037119.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Flat-Walnut/J18871000009000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Flat-Walnut/J18871000009000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Soda Blue", "sku": "sku:site51418053839849", "price": "159.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Soda-Blue-1418053839849.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Soda-Blue/J18871000006000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Soda-Blue/J18871000006000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "White", "sku": "sku:site51418053839859", "price": "159.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-White-1418053839859.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-White/J18871000008000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-White/J18871000008000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Mint Green", "sku": "sku:site51418660057607", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mint-Green-1418660057607.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mint-Green/J18871000005000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mint-Green/J18871000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51418660057427", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Black-1418660057427.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Black/J18871000003000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Black/J18871000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ivory", "sku": "sku:site51418660057317", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Ivory-1418660057317.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Ivory/J18871000002000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Ivory/J18871000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Tri-Fade Burst", "sku": "sku:site51418660057447", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "285.70", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Tri-Fade-Burst-1418660057447.gc", "skuImageId": "TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Tri-Fade-Burst/J18871000004000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/TMB100-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Tri-Fade-Burst/J18871000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Amazing guitars, specially the Custom Series full solids. You can choose from variety of tonewoods and soundboard combination and 4 different shapes. Offering almost every player's preference. You can also choose options such as soundport off-the-rack. Great craftsmanship, amazing tone, and superb playabality at an amazing price. Great guitar, and definitely not an OEM brand. They only make their own guitars.
A range of other effects are used in various genres. "Wah-wah" and "synth" bass effects are associated with funk music. As well, since the 1960s and 1970s, bands have experimented with "fuzz bass" where the bass is distorted either by overdriving the amp or by using a distortion unit. Fuzz bass was used by psychedelic rock bands in the 1960s and early 1970s and in traditional heavy metal bands (Led Zeppelin) during the same era. Octave-generating effects, which generate an octave below the pitch being played are also used by bass players. Many bassists in modern-day hard rock and heavy metal bands use overdrive pedals specifically made for bass guitar. Since the late 1980s, bass-specific overdrive pedals have been available; these pedals maintain the low fundamental pitch. Using a regular guitar distortion pedal for bass would result in the lower frequencies being greatly lessened. Well-known overdrive effects for bass include the BOSS ODB-3 Bass Overdrive[1], Electro-Harmonix Bass Blogger[2], Tech21 Sansamp Bass Driver[3][4], the DigiTech|DigiTech XBD Bass Driver [5], and the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff.
A Flanger simulates the sound effect originally created by momentarily slowing the tape during recording by holding something against the flange, or edge of the tape reel, and then allowing it to speed up again. This effect was used to simulate passing into "warp speed," in sci-fi films, and also in psychedelic rock music of the 1960s. Flanging has a sound similar to a phase-shifter, but different, yet is closely related to the production of chorus.
Launch price: $4,200 / £3,235 | Body: Mahogany with carved figured maple top | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.594" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 58/15 LT Treble humbucker, 58/15 LT Bass humbucker | Controls: 2x volume, 2x tone (with push-pull coil-splits), 3-way selector switch | Hardware: PRS two-piece bridge, Phase III locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: McCarty Sunburst, McCarty Tobacco Sunburst, Orange Tiger, Trampas Green, Violet, Antique White, Black, Black Gold Burst, Blood Orange, Champagne Gold Metallic, Charcoal Burst, Emerald, Faded Whale Blue, Fire Red Burst, Frost Green Metallic, Gold Top, Gray Black
The construction allows the soundwaves to resonate freely within the body’s hollow airspace as well as around the violin-style F-holes and throughout the solid glue joints. Everything – from the body wood and construction to the neck wood and pitch – contributes to the tone of the 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured guitar. This model boasts impressive depth and sustain in addition to an exceptional resonance that you can feel through the guitar’s body.
And that’s about that. After ’93 Martin Stingers, like their previous Martin-brand cousins, started drifting off into solidbody byways of guitar history. The Stinger ST-2, basic fulcrum-vibrato Strats with pickguards and three single-coils, in black, red, and white, and the now ubiquitous droopy pointy headstock, was still listed in the 1996 Martin catalog, but these were pale reflections of the peak years.
Every year we bring a new opening act on tour with us, and every year I have the harsh task of going on stage after some of the finest players in the business. This summer’s tour was no exception. With Montgomery Gentry in the support slot of the Toby Keith Biggest and Baddest tour, I had my work cut out for me. Two of the best axe slingers the music scene has to offer—Frank Bowers and Bo “two-timechampion” Garrett—have some of the greatest chops and sounds on the circuit today.
When you are shopping for effects pedals, a good feature to look for is true bypass. Your overall signal path is vulnerable to noise and impurities introduced by the circuitry of anything between your guitar and your output device (such as your amplifier/speaker). Pedals without true bypass, or ones with buffered circuitry, will contribute to some signal degradation as your signal passes along the path because the signal is routed directly through the pedal circuitry. Pedals that have true bypass direct your signal around the pedal’s circuitry, or bypass it, when you switch the pedal off, thereby maintaining the integrity and cleanliness of the signal. Your amplified guitar will sound more robust as a result and you won’t be required to crank up your volume as much to compensate for lost signal. The only disadvantage of pedals with true bypass is that sometimes, when you're playing with distorted or high-gain amplifier tones, you might notice switching noise when you switch the pedal off and on.
It’s ironic that Leo Fender, the creator of the most influential instrument in rock music, wasn’t actually a fan of rock ’n’ roll; he preferred country and western. But it goes to show you that once something new is out there, you can’t stop makers and players from reinventing it, adapting it for new purposes, taking it apart and putting it back together in new ways. The electric guitar is a prime example of unintended consequences. Initially, it just wanted to be a bit louder, but it ended up taking over and reinventing popular music and culture. Will we even recognize the sound of the electric guitar 10 or 20 years from now? I, for one, hope not.

This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.
The rotary speaker effect is based on an actual rotating speaker system invented by Donald Leslie called the Leslie speaker. It was often paired with a Hammond organ, but in the 60’s guitar players also began using it for the unique tone and effect it gave the guitar. The original Leslie speaker cabinet used a two speaker system with a rotating horn and bass woofer drum. This created a cool, swirling effect where the music seemed to move around the room. Obviously, guitar pedals can only simulate this rotatary effect, which can be enhanced with a stereo amp setup. Of course you could use an actual Leslie speaker (or one of the newer competitors), but costs are high and it requires lugging around an extra speaker cabinet.
The Builder’s Edition V-Class K14ce - one of four new 2018 V-Class launches that also include a K24ce, 914ce and PS14c - is quite a statement of intent. It combines the new V bracing with a notably different, more comfortable, Grand Auditorium style. Of course, its build-quality is nothing short of exceptional as we’d expect, and not least at this price. We’re also reminded of the K14ce’s high-end lineage, however, by the paua ‘spring vine’ inlay that lies down the majority of the black/dark brown ebony ’board, while a lighter koa purfling stripe sits just inside the ebony edge-binding and continues around the headstock, which is again ebony-faced with a relatively demure paua inlay. The aged-gold Gotoh tuners perfectly fit the slightly worn-in vibe - hugely understated class, just like the green abalone dots in the ebony bridge-pins. While there’s plenty for those who love details to admire, the modern Taylor guitar is hugely sorted in terms of playing feel. V-Class, Builder’s Edition? Get used to those terms. Taylor has upped the ante. Considerably.

{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: sx","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"sx","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
I’ll give your guitar a thorough inspection inside and out, letting you know what is correct and what may need attention now or in the near future. Frets, neck, action, bridge and bridge plate, truss rod, tuners, and internal bracing are some of the things that are assessed. This service is provided as a courtesy to my customers and there is no obligation or pressure to buy anything.
Featured specs include a solid sapele back and sides, solid Sitka spruce top, birch laminated (Stratabond) neck, Richlite fingerboard and bridge, white Corian nut and compensated white Tusq saddle. The neck shape is actually the same as that of the hugely popular Performing Artist Series. The neck also features Martin’s High Performance taper that makes it extremely ergonomic.

In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.
Replace or upgrade your guitars pickup selector and other switches with the highest quality switches available from Switchcraft, CRL, Fender, Oak Grigsby Gotoh, Philmore and other top brands. Lever/blade style switches, toggle switches, mini switches, rotary switches, slide switches and other styles. For pickup selector and mini switch technical data, visit our Pickup Selector & Mini Switch Connections page to view drawings with the internal switch connections of each switch position. And if you are upgrading or replacing your pickup selector switch with a different type or style, check out the Pickup Switch Terminal Cross Reference page to view the corresponding terminals of the most common pickup selectors and switches.

Do you have an old guitar that requires knowing how to repair a damaged guitar body? Read on and learn some neat tricks for repairing body damage on a guitar. Body damage on a guitar ruins the acoustics. Body damage on a guitar body really make it useless in the playing arena. If you are looking to bust out that old guitar but need some handy advice on how to repair some old damage, MadeMan has the fixes for you. This article will give you the fixes for larger damage and the annoying little nicks and teach you the way to repair them.
The Supro aluminum Hawaiian lap steel was similar to Beauchamp/Electro’s “frying pan,” with a round body and guitar-like neck, very similar to the Rick, but with the top carved away to allow a little more access. Given the close nature of the L.A. guitar world, it’s entirely possible that all these aluminum guitars were cast at the same place. The head was three-and-three with a single cutout in the middle. The Supro had dot inlays on the fingerboard, with an alternating two/one pattern and four dots at the octave. A rectangular Supro logo plate sat between the pickup cover and the fingerboard. The pickup – the single-coil version of the Stimson design – was mounted under a raised cover (part of the casting) with a slit to reveal the bar polepieces. It had one volume knob on the treble side and was housed in small form-fit hardshell case. This was closest to Beauchamp’s patented electro guitar design, making the Supro brand a direct descendent of George Beauchamp. An important point to remember is that these cast aluminum guitars were made in Los Angeles.
I have a epiphone sg 50th edition and it does great by me in all I do. I play a lot of 60's music and otherwise all I want. It's very versatile and not to mention the cherry red wood grain finish makes it looks really awesome. Everyone I've ever met has bragged on it and I've been offered all kinds of guitars from Washburns to fenders. Just recently I went to a old guitar player of 30 yearsiin my grandfathers neighborhood and he absolutely loved the tone and playability. He said the only thing it might need to make it better was a professional setup which I'll soon be getting. When I first got it I complained a lot that the strings were a bit harder to push down due to the longer scale of the neck (the neck on it is pretty long) however. If you' work with it for about 2 days off and on its no problem. I love epiphone and judging from what I've played in ibanez guitars I might soon invest in one of them.
I couldn’t find a professional review of the Les Paul Express. The last time we checked, it had earned an average of just 3.8 stars out of 5 in 17 user reviews on Amazon, but most of the complaints I found on Amazon and elsewhere were from people who got samples that weren’t set up well at the factory. This wasn’t true of our sample, but it was true of the other Epiphone sample we received—and it was true of many of the cheap Epiphones I played in stores.

This is because you won’t have to go through all the hassle of doing research on pickups, then finding a way to mount them without damaging your guitar. While magnetic pickups are surely quite easy to install, contact pickups or blended systems with microphones and preamps might require removing the top, drilling, using all sorts of screws and plates, etc.
{"eVar4":"used: guitars","eVar5":"used: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars: supro","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"used","prop2":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] used: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"condition","prop11":"used","prop5":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] used: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] used","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] used"}
@Michele – Thanks for checking out our blog! 🙂 If you are going to be using both multi-effect units in your setup, you will need to decide which of these has a better compressor that you will be using. If you like the PEU5’s Compressor and Overdrive, I would place it near the beginning of the chain in front of your existing MojoMojo overdrive. This way, you can use the RP100A’s Delay and EQ within the effects loop of your amp. But keep in mind, there is no wrong way to set this up. I encourage you to place them in different locations of your signal chain to find what sounds best for you.

Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965. Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars. Martin ukes are considered to be the best for craftsmenship and sound. The Koa wood models are more collectible than mahagony models. The fancier style 5 models are worth more than plainer styles 0 to 3. All sizes are collectible.
Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb is one of the most comprehensive ways to learn music theory from a book that we can recommend. This book, and the combination of online audio that accompanies it, has helped many aspiring guitarists learn theory after being frustrated with trying to learn how to play the guitar. One reason that might be is because Tom uses very plain language to explain theoretical concepts that are often confusing and can come off as complex. Further, the book includes diagrams frequently, which really helps visual learners.
Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
SOLD OUT: Here we had a 40+ year old 1972 Alvarez 5080 Acoustic guitar that was built by the master guitar builder Kuzio Yairi. He used 30 year old vintage aged tone woods when they built this guitar over 40 years ago.. that would make this wood arround 70 years old... Thats right...you can say that about a new Martin can we... not going to get tone like this from a new Martin either. This is one high class example replica of the Martin 000-28 this model is quiet rare and beautifully adorned with exotic tone woods plese refer to the pics. Just have a look at the beautiful exotic old growth Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back, sides, fingerboard...headstock overlay .., ebony pins with MOP and brass ring all high end classic detailed appointments... notice the real patina this guitar plays real well and has been played and it shows... in a good way to my eyes.. I love it. So will you just have a look... no visable issues, no cracks to be found, inlays, bindings, pickguard, tuners,frets.....all good..and sound is rich and has a nice sustain and is a pleasure to play... fresh from the JVG shop with a fresh bone saddle & nut & new Martin Marquis strings sweet! A must HAVE 40 YEAR OLD VINTAGE YAIRI 000-28 STYLE, Claptons favorite for good reason... SORRY THIS GUITAR HAS SOLD gr8bids@comcast.net Thank you for your interest.
The first guitar amplifiers were relatively low-fidelity, and would often produce distortion when their volume (gain) was increased beyond their design limit or if they sustained minor damage.[3] Around 1945, Western-swing guitarist Junior Barnard began experimenting with a rudimentary humbucker pick-up and a small amplifier to obtain his signature "low-down and dirty" bluesy sound. Many electric blues guitarists, including Chicago bluesmen such as Elmore James and Buddy Guy, experimented in order to get a guitar sound that paralleled the rawness of blues singers such as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf,[4] replacing often their originals with the powerful Valco "Chicagoan" pick-ups, originally created for lap-steel, to obtain a louder and fatter tone. In early rock music, Goree Carter's "Rock Awhile" (1949) featured an over-driven electric guitar style similar to that of Chuck Berry several years later,[5] as well as Joe Hill Louis' "Boogie in the Park" (1950).[6][7]
You have 16 different modulation effects including chorus and flange, 12 overdrive/distortion effects including high gain monsters and smooth creamy overdrives, 14 mono and stereo delays and reverbs and 22 amp models including tube and solid state amps from Fender, Marshall, Orange, Diezel, and mesa Boogie. It’s safe to say, you’ll find it hard to get bored of this thing!
Flanger: A flanger creates a "whooshing" "jet plane" or "spaceship" sound, simulating a studio effect that was first produced by recording a track on two synchronized tapes and periodically slowing one tape by pressing the edge of its reel (the "flange"). When the two tapes' audio signals are later mixed, a comb filter effect can be heard. Flanger units add a variably delayed version of the audio signal to the original or signal, creating a comb filter or Doppler effect.[73][74] Some famous uses of flanger effects include "Walking on the Moon" by The Police, the intro to "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love" by Van Halen, and "Barracuda" by Heart.[75][76]
This guitar master knows wood. He understands its rhythm. He's a master woodworker and began building acoustic guitars when he was a child. "I couldn't afford the ones I wanted," he says, "so I built them." Perretta Guitars is the result of his experiments. But it wasn't until he toured with the guitars that he'd receive some of the best advice of his life from George Gruhan, a guitar master in Music City, whose customers included Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Johnny Cash and George Harrison: "If you want to work in this business, do repair work."
The Jameson Left-Handed Black is an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a slick appearance, a smooth body, and an impressive sound. With its thinline frame and cutaway design, this model is good for both amateurs and seasoned guitar players. You get a guitar that sounds just as awesome regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amp.
Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.
Its very obvious very few on this list have never picked up a guitar in their life as this looks like a what brand does my favorite band play list... Considering Gibson these days are garbage and only were good for a few style to begin with no way they're number one... Fender has very solid build quality, but to diversify them to play numerous styles takes heavy modification. As far as electric are concerned there is a number that can top the list, as schecter, esp and Jackson are too low on the list and I've heard good things about rickenbacker. Ibanez is also excellent. Its really a toss up for me...I haven't played much esp do I phased them out...I have extensive time with Ibanez schecter and Jackson... Ibanez is gone because the build quality is no better and the playability is pretty much the same as a Jackson but the Jackson gives you far more bang for the buck... As for schecter and Jackson they put out some fully loaded guitars that are only going to rock you maybe a weeks ...more
My first recommendation is Epiphone. It is not just one of the best but it is the best guitar brand for beginners who are looking to buy a guitar to learn the ropes. I have included a few recommendations from this brand in this post. If you don’t know which one to buy and you are a beginner then buy one from this brand and you won’t go wrong for sure.
Great guitar for the aspiring 4-10 yer old. This Lotus 20.25" scale, Kid's Strat copy is in excellent condition! Featuring a maple neck, an unbound rosewood fret-board, simulated mother of pearl fret marker, dot side markers, graphite nut, 6 "in-line" head stock, and an adjustable truss rod. 3 strat style, single coil pickups with 5 position selector. Volume and tone controls. (While not photo'd, the guitar does include the whammy / tremolo bar). This guitar is in great shape with virtually no wear to the original gloss black finish. I actually special ordered it when I worked at Colorado Springs Music Company for my son. I think he took it out of the gig bag a couple times. Comes with a thick padded "codura" gig bag.

Just wanted to get back with a thank you note. I received the kit last week and installed it in my Stratocaster with Texas Special p'ups. It's absolutely brilliant. Not only is the Blend control a superb new addition to the tonal options, but the pots also feel so sturdy and smooth. Feels like I have some custom build now. Just amazing, thank you! In addition, the treble bleed mod is the icing on the cake. I’m no longer afraid to roll down the volume knob." - Andrei Custom Blender Mod for Strat®  
Taylor’s 214ce Grand Auditorium acoustic guitar has undergone a few changes over the years. One of the latest improvements added in 2017 concerns the wood used for the body. Because of the restrictions on the importation of rosewood, Taylor no longer uses it for their 200 series of guitars, which the 214ce is a part of. Instead, the company used the next best wood for a great, balanced tonal response: Hawaiian koa.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, bass and harmonica for 46 years - and I don't find a $4,300 Martin D 41 to be affordable (Guitar Center price). I play a Taylor 402ce and a dozen other instruments. I believe Taylor is the best instrument for the price..Alvarez Yairi guitars are very good too. Martin and Gibson make fine guitars but they are overpriced. I have a Chinese Maple Guild that sounds fine but the fretwork is amateurish. A Chinese Takamine New Yorker is very well constructed and sounds great.
You want a guitar that isn't going to fight you - If you're a smaller person, you'll want a guitar with a smaller body. And if you have particularly small hands, it might be worth looking into a 3/4-size guitar to start out. The way the guitar looks is going to matter a fair bit as well. If it doesn't look good, you aren't going to be as inspired to pick it up and practice.
Oh man.......... back to that Firebird 12. It is luscious. I have several tracks from 1973 where I used metal finger picks when tracking that thing and playing high up on the neck with a bit of compression.... heaven!!! I then did some standard chaka chaka rhythm parts with the 12 through a Marshall 50 watt.... heaven x 100. The guitar is SO comfortable to play, sits in ANY mix perfectly and dominates the "oooohhhh" factor with its sound. Please please please sell it to me!!!!!!
I'm not sure if the same applies to LPs, but on my BC Rich Mockingbird (which has the same tone/volume setup) if one volume knob is all the way off it'll only mute the guitar in the center position. Say the bridge volume is at 10 and the neck is at 0, I'll still get sound if the bridge pickup is selected but I won't get sound if both or just the neck are selected.
I have a vox valvtronics amp I bought a while ago it has a real preamp tube and loads of very accurate effects great reverb 3 kinds good modulation effects awesome distortion and tube overdrive and very important it is easy to adjust effect level and a power knob that lets you adjust output 1 to 60 watts like a pr attenuator its great so you don't loose that sound of a cranked up amp when you don't want it to loud it also has a easy to use tuner this amp is very user friendly unlike some modeling and effects carrying amps and you can easily adjust effects levels with separate knobs no confusion also a pedal to control effects is available for about 50 dollars is a great studio or small gig still amp and saves a lot because all of the effects it offers its like having a vox tone labe on top of a amp exactly you can sound like van halen led Zeppelin pink floyd lady gaga or the beatles and more and the price is very competitive to all others in its category
I have played a ASAT Telecastor Bass for about thirteen years. I keep purchasing other bass guitars for many other reasons. But I have sold them all. I am down to just one bass that's all I need with my G&L, it very responsive, it has many opitions with pick ups and the action is good. It took along time for me to figure out how to use the pick ups because there is so many different ways you adjust it. They are built with better quality parts than a fender. They are numbered from the factory in america. But watch out for the Tribute series that is fake or cheap want to be G&L. A real G&L will be a little more expensive but the quality is excellent
These samples are released under the GNU GPL license. The source code being the sf2 files (of which contain the audio samples and settings). The samples and settings can be accessed within Viena and Translator Free on windows or Swami on linux. This license means that you can do what you like with them but if you create any samples from them or improve on them then you have to use the same license in your projects. This way it keeps it open source (and therefore free). This license is only concerned with the source code. Any music you create with them is nothing to do with me (i.e. you take all the royalties and use whatever license you like).
{"pageName":"[mf] pdp: fender deluxe players stratocaster electric guitar","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","events":"event3,event50,prodView","evar51":"default: united states","prop5":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","prop6":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","products":";511597","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","channel":"[mf] shop","prop7":"[mf] product detail page"}

For 10" speakers, the most common combo amp and speaker cabinet configurations are 2x10" and 4x10". For speaker cabinets, 2x10" and 4x10" are the most widely used, although 8x10" cabinets are used in stadium concerts, especially in louder rock genres. Other configurations with 10" speakers do exist, but they are less common. For example, there are a small number of 1x10" and 3x10" combo amps and speaker cabinets, and a small number of 6x10" cabinets. Bass speakers are usually made with stiff paper cones. Hartke combo amps and speaker cabinets are unique in that the cone is made from paper, except for the middle, which is made of aluminium. Gallien-Krueger's MB210-II combo amp uses ceramic speakers.


Today's use of Torres and post-Torres type guitars for repertoire of all periods is sometimes critically viewed: Torres and post-Torres style modern guitars (with their fan-bracing and design) have a thick and strong tone, very suitable for modern-era repertoire. However, they are considered to emphasize the fundamental too heavily (at the expense of overtone partials) for earlier repertoire (Classical/Romantic: Carulli, Sor, Giuliani, Mertz, ...; Baroque: de Visee, ...; etc.). "Andrés Segovia presented the Spanish guitar as a versatile model for all playing styles"[5] to the extent, that still today, "many guitarists have tunnel-vision of the world of the guitar, coming from the modern Segovia tradition".[6]
The Blackheart Killer Ant is another slightly unconventional choice. Features wise, the Killer Ant does not have even the basics found on most beginner amps, yet it costs more money. The only controls on the Killer Ant are a power switch and a volume control. However, what sets the Blackheart Killer Ant apart is the fact it is a tube amp, rather than the cheaper solid state amps used for most beginner amps.
Gibson: These guys have been making musical instruments for well over 100 years. Founded by Orville Gibson back in 1890 and not producing guitars at the time (and certainly not electrics because those hadn’t even been invented yet), Gibson has had plenty of time to cement itself as one of the leading guitar companies. They are one of the few to keep their main brand name as a prestige-only brand and applying a different brand name (Epiphone) to their imported, lesser-priced instruments. They invented the arch-top guitar and created some of the most iconic instruments in guitar-history. These includes their by far most famous model, the Les Paul. Other iconic models are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-175 and the Firebird. The ES-175 was to become the first really popular electric guitar. This happened before solid body guitars had even been invented. To this day, the Gibson Les Paul remains one of the most desirable and expensive guitars in the world. In order to tap into various price-points, Gibson creates less expensive Les Paul models around the $1,000 range, like the very popular Les Paul Studio. The more expensive models such as the Les Paul Standard are up in the $2,500+ range. Finally, there are even more expensive models such as the Les Paul Custom in the vicinity of $3,000+. Off course, they also create some very special limited run guitars than can easily fetch close to the $10,000 mark. In line with the car analogy earlier: While not Italian, I’d be happy to call the $2,500+ Gibsons the Ferraris of the guitar industry.
That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Green

Most bass speaker cabinets employ a vented bass-reflex design, which uses a port or vent cut into the cabinet and a length of carefully measured tubing or pipe to increase the low-frequency response and improve the speaker system's efficiency. To give an example, if one compares two bass cabinets, each with the same type and power of power amplifier, one cabinet being a sealed box and the other being a vented or ported cabinet, most listeners will perceive that the ported cabinet produces more bass tone and deeper bass tone. Less commonly, some bass speaker cabinets use one or more passive radiator speakers, a voice coil-less "drone cone" which is used in addition to a regular woofer to improve the low frequency response of a cabinet. Passive radiator speakers help to reduce the risk of overextension. Acoustic suspension designs with sealed cabinets are relatively uncommon because they are less efficient. Some cabinets use a transmission-line design similar to bass-reflex, and in rare cases, some large cabinets use horn-loading of the woofers (e.g., the Acoustic 361 18" speaker cabinet from the late 1960s).
Of course the most talented and creative guitarist in the World. Guitarists like Slash can give stunts but cannot be such creative like Gilmour. I don't know why people cannot understand and like silly stunts rather than real talent. A layman can listen to the guitar solos of Echoes, Dogs, Coming BAck to Life, Comfortably Numb, Time... Of Pink Floyd and they will easily know his vast talent. Gilmour must be ranked higher.
If you are a beginner then you probably don't know what a ‘floating tremolo' is. Have a look at Floyd Rose, who made the first models. If you are looking at a guitar that has little tuners on the bridge, then it's probably a floating tremolo. For a beginner, they are a total pain in the butt. They are very hard to tune and a real pain to change strings. The cheaper ones go out of tune a lot too. If you know why you want one, then fine, but locking tremolos on budget instruments are usually rubbish, so stay clear of those for now!
The main thing to keep in mind regarding vintage guitars: A guitar is worth what somebody will pay for it. There aren’t necessarily rational reasons behind the value of a particular model. Rarity is only really relevant if the guitar in question is part of a group of guitars that are lusted after by many collectors, and many of those collectors are also considering investment potential, so those guitars will never be played and may end up in museums in Europe or Asia. In other words, Rarity means nothing without demand. A rare crappy guitar is still a crappy guitar and if nobody wants it, it’s just firewood. Condition counts for more.
I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.

This is sort of a corollary to the DI+Amp suggestion. While effects on bass aren’t as common as with guitar parts, some bassists will come in with these big rigs of effect boxes, and want to record “their sound”, which often is clearly overprocessed for the song. Rather than argue the point, let the player hear the sound he’s used to during tracking, but be sure to also grab a nice clean signal, prior to all the effects, usually straight off the bass via a DI. That way, if your concerns prove all too true come mixdown, you can turn to the dry track, and recreate those favored effects to a more appropriate degree, with studio tools. Even if the effected bass sounds good to you, many pedals and MI effect boxes are noisy, and you might have to recreate the sound anyway, to avoid problematic buzz or hiss from the player’s cool-but-dirty toys.

The more solid wood there is, the better the overall resonance, sustain and tone of the acoustic guitar. Solid wood, specially those used on the tops of acoustics, also resonate better as it ages. The downside to solid wood is mainly its more premium cost, and not to mention it uses more wood resources than laminate wood. Solid wood is also more prone to damage, so they require extra care especially from changing weather and humidity. Laminate woods are more affordable, and they are also more sturdy and resistant to damage. On the flip side, they will lack the resonance and sustain of solid wood, but this can be a good thing if you're looking for vintage mid-range focused tone.

It is definitely an opinion based list, ask 100 people, and get 100 different answers. But please, 99 out of those100 would have Clapton on it, the list loses credibility without him. Pictures of “Clapton is God” tags around England stick in my mind. Even among his peers he is revered, he just has to be here! Page should be higher, but of course, that’s just my “opinion”.


I have many Behringer pedals.Used them gigging.Have had many people ( lots of musicians ) asking me what I am using to get my tone and effects .They are all surprised when I tell them Behringer pedals.And almost all say the same thing."aren't they made of plastic"? Yes they are made of plastic.But being someone who has worked in the plastics industr.for 25 + years I know Plastic can be very strong .I have done hundreds of gigs with these pedals and never had a problem.You would really have to jump ontop of these hard to damage them.And if you did that with the non plastic pedals I am sure you would also have a problem .That said.I have 5 fx600 pedals because I found a site selling them for $14.A super bargin for so much effect.As far as battery power nowadays batteries cost more than pedals so anyone ... full review
As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.
The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
Many Sixties rock acts made political statements, but the MC5 were among the first rockers to make a serious commitment to revolution, aligning themselves closely with the White Panther Party (a Black Panther offshoot organization) and effectively serving as the White Panthers’ agitprop machine. Their blue-collar Detroit roots lent a certain gritty gravitas to their stance. These weren’t effete rock stars dabbling in left wing chic but working-class guerrillas with ammo belts strapped across their bare chests and guitars brandished as rifles.
Paul Landers, of Neue Deutsche Härte band Rammstein has a signature guitar based on his custom-built guitar. It features a mahogany body with a maple cap finished in satin black with silver binding only around the front of the body. The neck is also made of mahogany and features an Obeche fingerboard with no inlays or binding. Hardware includes a hardtail tune-o-matic bridge and Grover locking keystone tuners. The guitar also feature chrome-covered EMG pickups; an 81 in the bridge, and a 60 in the neck. It also only has a single volume control and a 3-way pickup toggle switch.

This tonewood is nearly always seen in the material used for a fretboard on the neck. The various species of Rosewood add their own harmonic overtones with Indian Rosewood being the most warm. In general, Rosewood provides incredible harmonic complexity, personality, and resonance that’s worthy of stage and studio recording as can be seen on the solid Rosewood body of the Yamaha A3R A-Series Guitar.
Since they're usually not sure if they'll stick to it I wouldn't spend a ton on it. Make sure it at least plays well. Learning on a poorly constructed guitar can really take the fun out of the whole process and may even convince you that guitar is harder than it really has to be. You can also fix many issues with less-expensive guitars by bringing it to a luthier.

I wonder if this list shouldn’t be renamed as Best Electric Guitar Brands, since there does seem to be a strong focus on electric guitars in this list. Yamaha does make a very good line of acoustic guitars, and Ibanez and Epiphone also manufacture acoustic guitars, and the Gibson Hummingbird would make any top 10 list of acoustic, but it’s the only one on this list that seems world class for an acoustic manufacturere(other manufacturers on the list may also make acoustics, but I’m not familiar with them) I doubt if they would be considered the best guitars or the most highly respected brands.
We recommend you choose the headstock shape that appeals to you most. The shape of the headstock does not significantly affect the sound or performance of the instrument. Some of our headstock shapes are pointier, which means they can get damaged more easily when dropped or bumped. Choose from our existing shapes, or, send us a drawing of your original design - we can build that, too!
Morris D-41 copy vintage 1980s Japanese high end hi class Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood tone woods body it has detailed fancy inlay perfling and in in amazing condition. Here we are proud to present to you a Classic dreadnought high quality Guitar made of vintage aged tone woods with impeccable workmanship and top quality materials fit and finish rivals the best of the best. This guitar was made by the premier custom shop builders of Japan in the Terada factory and are well known for making Ibanez's top of the line series guitars like the Artists - musician- the George Benson line as well as many others Some of the great Aria's top of line guitars and a few other makers they have the great woods and skills to make some of the finest instruments made period and this Morris is one of them. Just have a good look and you'll see for yourself. One of the finest D-41 type guitars made She's approaching 40 years old and in superb vintage condition I'm looking for dings still and don't see them it's really in sweet condition WOW it's rare to find such fine examples like this all round nice I suspect this beauty will not last long. She is currently in our JVGuitars shop for a full set up and will receive a JVG-Martin upgrade which consists of new fit Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set a full fret dressing and polishing and a beautiful resonant set of solid ebony bridge pins with brass ring and inlaid Abalone detail as well as a new set of Martin 80/20 phosphorus bronze strings and a full body polish. Just in pics soon to come. To enquirer contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com .

Large-scale traffic in guitars between Japan and the United States began in the very late ’50s. Jack Westheimer of Chicago’s W.M.I. corporation has published his recollection of having begun to bring in Kingston guitars purchased from the Terada Trading Company in around 1958. The Japanese themselves began advertising their wares to American distributors as early as July of 1959, when Guyatone ran a small space ad touting small pointed single cutaway solidbodies more or less resembling Teisco’s mini-Les Pauls.

I'm going to break the electric guitar setup guide into five parts, which are all in the links below. It's important to note that the five parts be done in the order in which they're presented. If you have a truss rod that's out of whack, it makes no sense to move on and adjust the bridge. I realize this may be painfully obvious, but for the one person who may not get it, I'm talking to you. Good luck

Vacuum tubes were the dominant active electronic components in bass amplifiers manufactured from the 1950s until the early 1970s, and tubes continue to be used in the 2010s for expensive bass combo amplifiers, amp heads, and preamplifiers (as well, tube amps continue to be used by audiophiles for some expensive home hifi stereo systems). Tube amplifiers for bass almost always use class AB1 topology for efficiency reasons.

Marr, once a member of Electronic with Bernard Sumner of New Order and Neil Tennant of Pet Shop Boys, has played on a number of records and contributed to numerous other high-profile projects, including his recent stint in Modest Mouse. This weekend, Marr returns to Denver in support of his debut solo album, The Messenger, and in advance of the show, we spoke with the charming and intelligent guitarist about how he got the sound for "How Soon Is Now?" and his signature model of the Fender Jaguar.


Several years after his last adventure, retired fortune hunter, Nathan Drake, is forced back into the world of thieves. With the stakes much more personal, Drake embarks on a globe-trotting journey in pursuit of a historical conspiracy behind a fabled pirate treasure. His greatest adventure will test his physical limits, his resolve, and ultimately what he's willing to sacrifice to save the ones he loves.

Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
The auctions continue on our eBay store, including last remaining production samples of several models, and other unique instruments, including made in Japan JP models, Triturador basses, Tony Campos Signature Tremor basses, acoustic guitars and accessories. Check out the current listings, there will be new items posted every week: http://bit.ly/1caL5ah
Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]

I got the idea for this column while reviewing Universal Audio's Ox Amp Top Box for the May 2018 issue. Ox is an ingenious hybrid of speaker load box/power attenuator and cabinet/mic/room/effects modeler. You use your regular amp, but instead of miking it, you send a direct signal to the DAW or mixing board. You record the sound of your amp, while Ox simulates speakers, mics, and effects.
The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.

This list is insanely bad! First of all, John Mayer is only as good as your typical high school amateur. And before anyone starts spouting off, I’ve tried to find some obscure videos of him to prove myself wrong. But I can’t, it’s all Minor Pentatonic stuff with nothing innovative added to it. Secondly, how about some finger pickers on the list: Doyle Dykes, Scotty Anderson, Chet Atkins, Merle Travis, Tommy Emmanuel. Let’s not forget DANNY GATTON the greatest guitar player you’ve never heard. Also, if we’re talking about the best of the best, BRENT MASON should ALWAYS be in a Top Ten list, although he never is. But, you’ve heard him on all sorts of Nashville recordings. Acoustic guitar players like Andy McKee, Ewan Dobson, Don Ross, (I wish I knew more than that but I only recently discovered their Chuck Norris like awesomeness). Never limit yourself to the mainstream! There are many guitar players that are mentioned only because they are famous and have influence because of that. They may come up with a catchy riff or played in a well known band. But, that doesn’t make them a truly great guitar player.
Gibson gave this guitar a comfortable V neck profile, which together with shorter 24.75" scale length and 1.725" nut width make this guitar one of the easiest instruments to play in this list. My only complaint with this guitar is its bank breaking price, but this steep price point and exclusivity play an important role in making this iconic instrument more appealing. Start saving now if you want to be one of the privileged few who can play this guitar.

On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.
The Hi-Flier guitar, which was possibly built in the Matsumoku factory, underwent multiple phases during the course of its production. Each of the Hi-Flier’s four manufacturing phases came with a variety of feature changes, ranging from simply switching the color of the pickguard to actually fitting the guitar for humbuckers rather than the P90-style pickups it originally came with.
Consider how many transformations take place during the production of sound from an electric guitar. The guitarist picks a string with a plastic plectrum, which produces vibrations that are picked up by coiled magnets directly positioned behind the strings, inducing an alternating current (hence the name “pick-ups”). The current’s signal is then transmitted through a wire lead, after which it’s amplified by either a vacuum tube or solid-state amplifier, and then reshaped into audible sound by a loudspeaker. Depending on the sound that a guitarist is seeking, he or she may place guitar effect pedals, or stompboxes, in between the pick-ups and the amplifiers. These small, intermediary devices further manipulate the guitar signal to produce a multitude of effects.
Started in 1997 by Steve Suhr and Steve Smith, this Lake Elsinore, California-based guitar-building brand is the finest in a relatively new wave of manufacturers. They do not have a line of guitars, per se. Instead, they make every single guitar to order. This high-end boutique style manufacturing in a large-scale format was all but unheard of until the internet changed the world. Now, this brand can offer dozens of shapes, pickup combinations, finishes, etc. reasonably. But don’t let the fact that their guitar shapes seem like knock-offs of other long-standing brands fool you. Any Suhr guitar you’ll encounter is going to be of the utmost in quality of construction and sound. There simply is not a better custom brand out there with the same vast catalog of offerings. There are literally thousands of possible combinations, so if you are looking for a unique and superb instrument and are willing to pay for it, it’s hard to say there’s anything better.
To create a thicker rhythm guitar sound, overdub the same part one or more times. Depending on the desired effect, the overdub can be treated as one mono signal and mixed to the same stereo position, or panned left and right for a stereo double-tracked sound. Alternatively, treat the original track with an ADT (Artificial Double Tracking) effect. This can be done with a digital delay set to around 40 milliseconds. Again, the delayed signal can be panned or mixed as one with the original guitar track.
Phase Shifter pedals found their way into the guitar community in the 70’s with pedals like the MXR Phase 90, Mutron Phase Shifter, EH Small Stone, Foxx and others. The sweeping sound it produces is unmistakable and a legendary trademark of many guitarists sound. The MXR Phase 90 can be heard all over Van Halen 1 and II. Brian May used the Foxx phase on “Sheer Heart Attack,” The Eagles “Life In The Fast Lane”, and Led Zeppelin’s “The Rover” to name but a few.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
Rock ’n’ roll is an industry that’s continually pushing musical, social, and cultural boundaries, and the electric guitar is its iconic instrument. The acoustic version has been around since at least the 16th century. So when I first started working with co-curator Gary Sturm on an exhibition about the invention of the electric guitar at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, our driving question was: Why electrify this centuries-old instrument? The simplest answer: Guitarists wanted more volume.
: I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
New, used, nylon or steel string — or electric — for your first guitar take your time, choose carefully and never be afraid to ask for advice. Best of all, search for a good music shop near you and actually pick up the guitar, pluck the strings, listen to the sound. The people behind the counter want to help you, so that you come back for another guitar — and another, not to mention strings, string cleaner, capos… Don’t forget, this isn’t just buying any old guitar. This is the beginning of your dream coming true.
As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.
The Les Paul guitar line was originally conceived to include two models: the regular model (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom model, which offered upgraded hardware and a more formal black finish. However, advancements in pickup, body, and hardware designs allowed the Les Paul to become a long-term series of electric solid-body guitars that targeted every price-point and market level except for the complete novice guitarist. This beginner guitar market was filled by the Melody Maker model, and although the inexpensive Melody Maker did not bear the Les Paul name, its body consistently followed the design of true Les Pauls throughout each era.
your right brian i been a acdc freak since u all been out in the early n mid 70s the greast band of all time. and i seen acdc 37 times through out the united states. i love my memories with the band and still watch and listen to the cds and dvds of the band. brian johnson is the best thing that happen to acdc since bond scott death. keep rockin guys i love u with a passion. mark
SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor allows you to monitor your hybrid IT applications and systems. Monitor Microsoft® Office 365 Exchange side by side on your on-premises Exchange server and other applications. Check, track, and report on O365 user/shared mailbox growth, users over quota, archived mailboxes, inactive mailboxes, mobile device, mailbox groups, and more. You can also monitor Microsoft portal access to help ensure you're meeting your SLAs.
Midco International, a former musical distributor, sold the Lotus brand as an exclusive trademark of guitars during the 1970s and 1980s. Like many other distributors, Midco commissioned a manufacturer in Asia to build guitars under a unique brand name. However, many of these factories in Asia received requests to build guitars for multiple manufacturers/distributors, meaning the same guitar could essentially end up under multiple trademarks. This isn’t much different from what Harmony, Kay, and other house-brand jobbers from the Chicago area were doing in the 1940s through the 1960s.

The shadows are his home and keeping Gotham's citizens safe is his sustenance. Darkness envelops his every move and his legend lives in the whispers of each passerby. Known by many names — the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, Batman — this man lives to protect. But by pitting himself against the criminals of a city, he has only made his laundry list of powerful enemies grow. One after another, a new and nefarious threat has risen up and one after another Batman succeeded in bringing them down. But what happens when those menacing masterminds join forces? Who will rescue Gotham when a deadly roster of depraved lunatics gangs up on the shadowed warrior? Who will save us all? The finale to the legendary Arkham series explodes onto your screen in the most adrenaline-pumping storyline yet. The Scarecrow has returned to Gotham City and he has united a terrifying team of super villains, including Penguin, Two-Face and Harley Quinn. For the first time in the franchise, you get to step behind the wheel of the iconic Batmobile as you harness the power of Batman and scramble to outwit the wicked gang after your blood. Tear through the streets and soar across the skyline in heart-pounding gameplay that will suck you in and force you to ask yourself if you have what it takes to save Gotham. Do you have it within you to be the hero the city needs? Or will the villains of Gotham overtake the Dark Knight once and for all?
Hum in pedalboards is usually “ground loop hum.” You have two paths to ground, your audio ground and your power supply ground. You could use an expensive power supply with isolated grounds. But all you have to do is break one of the ground connections. You could disconnect the audio ground at one end of each of your patch cords. Or better, if you use one power supply, connect the hot and ground to only one of your pedals. Clip the ground wire on all the other pedal connections in your daisy chain. The power connections will then get their grounds through the audio grounds. No more hum

Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.
Freshly Realeased from the JVG Vintage Vault..... Just serviced with fresh set up & cosmetic clean up remove grime etc, lube & adjust tuning gears, rehydrate the woods and polish out to the Beauty you see now...detailing & set up here at the JVG shop she's 100% ready NOW and a real rare style beauty too. She's a very clean example of a real Vintage guitar its over 35 years old and is a Japanese Vintage Acoustic guitar. She Plays like butta now! .

One of the quirkier instruments to emerge from the JMI/Vox operation in the 1960's (And that's saying something!) The Mando-Guitar never really caught on in a big way but remains a very cool and actually quite functional oddity. This is essentially an double-strung octave guitar; some describe it as an "octave 12 string guitar" but the strings are actually tuned in unison, not the octave arrangement of a conventional 12-string. The idea was to make an instrument that played in the mandolin range but was tuned as a guitar, as few of the Beat-era guitarists who were JMI's customers had a clue how to play mandolin! A few of the first Mand-Guitars were produced at Jennings' Dartford, Kent factory but the great bulk of extant examples were built by Eko in Recanati, Italy. With its small artist-palette shaped solid body and short 15" scale neck this is a very handy instrument, and with two Vox pickups has a fairly wide range of tones. There have been a number of similar instruments inspired by this design created in more recent decades, but the Vox Mando-guitar remains the original and coolest of all mini-guitar efforts.


A tremolo effect simply alters the volume of a signal at a preset interval, within a preset range. Some amps have this effect built in, and in some cases it’s called vibrato (a misnomer that caught on long ago and has stuck around to this day). Tremolo sounds much like hitting a note and then turning your volume knob up and down rapidly. Most tremolo effects have two controls: speed and depth. Adjusting speed changes how rapidly your volume fluctuates. Adjusting the depth controls the range of volume from loud to soft as the tremolo fluctuates.
Generally, guitarists with an array of pedals like to put their drive pedals first. This includes your overdrive, distortion, fuzz, or boost pedals. Some guitarists have more than one of these, and they usually go at the beginning of your chain. The reason for putting them first in your pedalboard order is because you will be distorting or boosting the purest version of your guitar tone. Putting a delay pedal before distortion means that the echoes from the delay pedal would themselves become distorted, resulting in an unnatural and messy sound. If you’re using an overdrive and a boost, it’s wise to put the boost first – that sends a stronger signal into the overdrive to get the most out of it.
How a guitar feels is highly subjective – after all, even guitarists come in all shapes and sizes. While the acoustics in our list are all made in such a way that most guitarists will find them comfortable and easy to play, there’s still no beating being able to try several models out so you can choose which one feels like it’s a part of your body.
The thing is, if you aren’t a pro (and if you’re reading this, you probably aren’t) you don’t need to concern yourself with every element of the electric guitar. You just need a briefing on body styles and pickups, arguably the two most important pieces of a guitar’s build. More importantly, asking yourself a couple simple questions about what you’re after will help you immensely. We’ve got all that right here, plus a few great axes that should at least serve as starting points on your search. As for the Ziggy Stardust jumpsuit and the perfect rock-god pose…look elsewhere.
Ironically, the sound of certain synthetic reverbs is now such an established part of music history that most convolution reverbs come with some IRs taken from existing hardware reverb units or from old mechanical reverb plates. Also, if you have a convolution reverb, it is worth checking the manufacturer's site, as additional IRs are frequently available for download.
The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]
Like many engineers, I learned the basics of recording guitars by doing live sound and occasional session work. But my "higher education" began when I was hired by a blues/R&B-oriented mail-order record company, and I "had" to listen all day long to recordings from the '40s, '50s, and '60s. No matter how primitive or poor the recording quality on those old discs, I was constantly amazed by the array of exciting sounds produced by electric guitar. Later, when I started recording blues sessions in my own studio, I learned firsthand about the key elements that contributed to the great tones that I'd heard on those classic recordings.
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. Guitars may have a fixed bridge or a spring-loaded hinged bridge, which lets players "bend" the pitch of notes or chords up or down, or perform vibrato effects. The sound of an electric guitar can be modified by new playing techniques such as string bending, tapping, and hammering-on, using audio feedback, or slide guitar playing. There are several types of electric guitar, including: the solid-body guitar; various types of hollow-body guitars; the six-string guitar (the most common type), which is usually tuned E, A, D, G, B, E, from lowest to highest strings; the seven-string guitar, which typically adds a low B string below the low E; and the twelve-string guitar, which has six pairs of strings.
×