For more balanced tone and increased sound quality, the Agile AL-3010 comes with two tone and two volume controls, plus three-way pickup switch.The guitar comes with professionally installed strings sitting tight on an ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and solid abalone trapezoid inlays. This gorgeous guitar is highly recommended for the beginner and even the professional alike.
TonePad – provides ready-to-use layouts and circuit boards for effects and amplifier projects to the do-it-yourself music community. All layouts are provided free of charge and are subject to the limitations set forth on their legal page. Parts are available from Small Bear Electronics, and ready-made PCBs for many projects are now available directly through tonepad.
Electric guitar strings are thinner than acoustic guitar strings and closer to the neck and therefore less force is needed to press them down. The ease with which you can bend strings, clear access to the twelfth position, the use of a whammy bar and the manipulation of pots and switches whilst playing has led to the development of a lead guitar style that is unique to the instrument. Fret-tapping is a guitar technique for creating chords and melody lines that are not possible using the standard technique of left-hand fretting and right-hand strumming. The sustain, sensitive pick-ups, low action and thin strings of the electric guitar make it an ideal instrument for fret-tapping.
{"eVar4":"vintage: guitars","pageName":"[gc] vintage: guitars: silvertone","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop18":"skucondition|0||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop1":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"classical & nylon guitars","prop5":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop6":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop3":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop4":"[gc] vintage: guitars","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
With so many guitar manufacturers hot rodding the Stratocaster, it is refreshing to see brands like ESP going after the other popular guitar shape, resulting in the "Super LP" guitar like the ESPT LTD EC-1000FM. This souped up version of the classic single cutaway body combines traditional looks with modern tones and playability, resulting in a fast playing axe that's easy on the eyes, and not too edgy.
Flanging can be a subtle effect, thickening the sound and imparting a spacey feeling. Or it can be extremely dramatic when cranked up, to the point of making the original signal unrecognizable. This broad range makes a flanger a fun stomp box to experiment with. Jimmy Page used a flanger to good effect on Led Zeppelin’s “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” and “Kashmir, ” as did Jimi Hendrix on “Bold as Love.”

As with many of our services, we do more than just pull and replace your frets when doing a refret. Full refrets include a resurfacing of the fingerboard to proper level (even more precisely done than many factories), repair to any damaged fret slots, nut removal and reuse (when applicable), and full Calibration and Reset service (which includes a full traditional set up). Strat style tremolos add $10 to the price, Floyd Rose style bridges add $30.
What style of music do you play? While there are many versatile guitar amps that can be used for many styles of music, if you play a particular style of music a majority of the time, then you should get an amplifier that best suits it. Do you play acoustic or electric? Certain guitar amplifiers are designed specifically for acoustic guitars although it is possible to play an acoustic through any amp. In terms of styles, jazz players typically do not need an overdrive option as clean tones are best suited for that style of music. Blues aficionados will be happiest with a clean channel plus an overdrive channel with plenty of sustain, such as one finds on many vintage Fender models. Shredders will require an amp that will accept distortion pedals without losing signal quality. Do your research regarding which guitar amps are best suited for the type of music you play.
Is it fine if I buy an electric guitar that’s worth <900$ as my first e.guitar? I don't know why it's recommended not to buy a guitar that's more advanced than my level. I mean this guitar will last me for years, so why not go for the best from the beginning? Also, I need to learn how to differentiate between the various guitars if some are better for lets say metal. I listen to a lot of Children of Bodom, Korn, Metallica and more.
What made him truly special was that, unlike other guitarists of his time who stuck to one style of playing, Jimi combined styles and used strumming alongside licks and other additions to create a fuller and more organic sound. Amazingly, he also used his thumb to do do a moving baseline whilst he was playing chords – he wanted to do what no other guitarists were doing, or were able to do and he succeeded. The way he dressed his chords with so many different sounds and rhythms just shows how naturally talented a guitarist Jimi Hendrix was. His guitar was like an extension of his body, a part of his left hand that had no boundaries.
You might have previously dropped your jaw at another stunning performance taken from the same session in 2015 wherein Swift delivered a breathtaking piano rendition of "Out Of The Woods," and honestly, I can't help but feel that this is Swift in her natural element (probably thanks to her country music roots) and I want more of just her, her magnificent voice, and an instrument.
Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future. From unique models to exclusive colors, features and options, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs are redefining the concept of what makes a Gibson so unique, taking things a step further. With limited availability and an incredible demand for these unique instruments, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs have become highly collectible, sought after instruments with features us unique as the players who own them. Wildwood Guitars is honored to present our selection of these prized instruments to our exceptional customers. We invite you to find your own unique treasure among our inventory, just don’t blink… you might miss it!
Phrase sampler: Like a loop pedal, a phrase sampler will store loops or phrases of even greater length. The more expensive and sophisticated phrase samplers will save multiple phrases or loops, drum and bass, rhythm guitar, or practice solos. Some have USB connectivity and can hook up to your computer for uploading, so you never lose a loop or phrase.

Martin also developed a line of archtop instruments during the 1930s. Their design differed from Gibson and other archtops in a variety of respects–the fingerboard was glued to the top, rather than a floating extension of the neck, and the backs and sides were flat rosewood plates pressed into an arch rather than the more common carved figured maple. Martin archtops were not commercially successful[citation needed] and were withdrawn after several years. In spite of this, during the 1960s, David Bromberg had a Martin archtop converted to a flat-top guitar with exceptionally successful results, and as a result, Martin has recently begun issuing a David Bromberg model based on this conversion.
I always say that Jose Feliciano? is indeed one of the greatest guitarists that’s ever lived. Flamenco, latin, bolero, classical, rock ect ect…. You name it and Jose can play it. Why he’s not on Rolling Stone’s 100 greatest guitarist of all time, is beyond anyone’s guess. dont believe me look up on youtube purple haze, the thrill is gone, flight of the bumble bee, Malagueña under Jose Feliciano. the guy can play anything and make it his own.
In this section we look at the overall performance of the guitar. How does it feel to play and what does it sound like? The ultimate sound you achieve will largely depend on the amp you play through, but the guitar itself will play a huge part in sounding good. Do the pickups give enough clarity? How comfortable is the neck to get up and down? Is it built for speed? The more expensive a guitar, the better the performance should be, and this is taken into consideration when rating it.
The vast majority of bass amps in the 2010s can be powered solely by AC mains power, obtained by plugging the amp into a wall socket. Inexpensive practice amps may have the AC mains plug hardwired into the unit. Middle-priced to high-priced amplifiers typically have a removable cable and plug, as used with PC computer towers. The benefits of having a removable cable and plug is that if the cable becomes worn or damaged, a new cable can easily be replaced by a layperson. If a hardwired AC mains cable and plug becomes worn or damaged, a qualified technician or electrician will typically be required to replace the cable and plug. Most amps are designed to work for a single voltage. A small number of expensive bass amps designed for touring professionals have user-selectable voltage, which enables a bassist to play with same amp in North America and Europe. A small number of small combo amps can run on both AC mains power and battery power. This enables bassists to play outside where there is no access to power (e.g., for busking on the street). Amps that are battery powered may have a 12 volt input, enabling the unit to be connected to a car battery with alligator clips.
Jazz guitarist Les Paul spent years tinkering with his own electric guitar designs, but his first creations were initially rejected by Gibson’s parent company in 1946. But just a few short years later, on the heels of Fender’s success with the Telecaster and Paul’s growing popularity as an artist, Gibson struck a deal with Paul to play and endorse their new design for a solid-body electric. Gibson released the guitar as the Les Paul signature model in 1952, and since its release, it has become one of the world’s most imitated and sought-after guitars, with late ’50s vintage models being among the most prized instruments in the world.
This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Ash - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Natural Blue
TASTING NOTES: A straight-on mic always provides the strongest impact and widest frequency range. An angled mic can soften a speaker’s harsh edge while adding interesting texture. In a multi-speaker cabinet, the off-axis mic tends to pick up more sound from the non-miked speakers, adding additional texture via phase cancellation. And while you only hear two mic positions here (straight on and angled), there are multiple off-axis options, from a barely off-center mic to one pointed toward the speaker’s outermost edge. Aim at the center for maximum punch and intensity. Aim toward the edge for slightly softer, more nuanced tones.

I recently bought my first tube amp, the Marshall DSL40C, which has amazing sound for the money, but the reverb that came on it is virtually non-existent. So I started looking at reverb pedals.....who in their right mind would pay over $100 for an effects pedal that does one thing like a (Fender reverb or Hall of Fame or Holy Grail)? Then I cam across the Zoom Chorus/Delay/Reverb and almost bought it for $119 but then this popped up. With the nearly 5 star average review, I thought I would spend the extra $80 and try it out. WOW am I glad I did. Not only do I now have a great sounding reverb, but I have every other effect you can ever imagine (phaser, tremolo, chorus, delay, overdrive, distortion, filters, etc....the list goes on and on and on.

The $300-$500 price range of acoustic guitars is perfect for all levels of players. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, this price point gets you a good guitar that will sound great while not breaking the bank. While you won’t find any American made acoustics under $500, you will find some by popular American brands offering cheaper versions of their high end guitars that are made in Mexico or China.
Guitar signals cutting out is a very common symptom of a simply wiring problem. Usually when your guitar cuts out, it means that you have a loose solder somewhere. Your guitar will sound fine when the solder connection is joined, but your guitar will cut out when the loose wire disconnects for the lug. Broken solder joints are common on electric guitars especially when your output jack becomes loose and rotates in the pocket. That is why it is extremely important to keep your output jack tight and secure at all times. If your output jack is loose and rotates, it will probably break the wiring connections inside the guitar. Luckly, loose connections are easy to fix. The only problem is trying to find them.
Ibanez produces a number of signature series, but none of them even come close to Steve Vai’s JEM guitars. JEM7V is by far one of the most intriguing electric guitars Ibanez has to offer, and in general. It’s performance is legendary, just like the man who designed it. I’ve had a chance to play it once and it completely blew my mind. The thing was built to be an extension of your body, plain and simple.

The initial single-pickup production model appeared in 1950, and was called the Esquire. Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems. In particular, the Esquire necks had notruss rod and many were replaced due to bent necks. Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster. From this point onwards all Fender necks incorporated truss rods. The Gretsch company, itself a manufacturer of hollowbody electric guitars (and now owned by Fender), claimed that “Broadcaster” violated the trademark for its Broadkaster line of drums, and as a newcomer to the industry, Fender decided to bend and changed the name to Telecaster, after the newly popular medium of television. (The guitars manufactured in the interim bore no name, and are now popularly called ‘Nocasters.’) The Esquire was reintroduced as a one-pickup Telecaster, at a lower price.
Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.
By the way, the Dobro Hawaiian lap steel shown in Gruhn/Carter, with volume and tone and the rectangular string attachment, is a slightly later version probably from early to late ’35. Volume controls were added to these electrics early on, but tone controls and adjustable height pickups weren’t introduced until early in ’35, although tone controls don’t appear on Supro guitars until ’38.
Gibson carefully adjusts the action and the string height before shipping the Epiphone Dot. Don't make adjustments unless you've got clear problems, particularly with string buzzing. Exercise extreme caution when adjusting the truss rod. Overtightening can damage the neck of your guitar. If you're not sure what you're doing, do not attempt to make these adjustments; have your guitar set up by a qualified professional luthier.
A list that's bound to be disagreed with, and I do. Although I love Hendrix, Clapton, etc. I'm still most impressed with Mississippi Fred McDowell. Bass line, rhythm, lead slide, and singing simultaneously and effortlessly. Several video performance on DVD are available, in case you listen to just an audio recording and wondered "who are the other guitarists playing, they're really good together?" nope, just Fred.

I like the pseudo PTB scheme where the tone cap (I prefer .033 or .022mF) is attached to lug 3 of the pot and to ground. Lug 2 is connected to the Volume pot’s lug 1 and there’s an additional small cap (0.001mF or smaller) connected between tone pot lug 1 and Vol pot lug 2. Assume both pots are Log types: with tone at 7.5 (ie halfway along the pot’s sweep) there is no appreciable treble cut, and the volume pot gives a pretty even tone throughout its range. With tone pot higher than 7.5 bass is cut as you roll back the volume, with tone pot lower than 7.5 treble is cut. Minimum bass setting – vol approx 3, tone full up. Minimum treble setting vol full up, tone full down. I have this in most of my guitars and love it.
{"product":{"id":"L20582","stock":"backorderable","price":"899.00","name":"Slash Firebird Limited-Edition Electric Guitar","download":false,"sku_id":"L20582000001000","checksum":"565047124900","rep_id":"site51500000000211665","displayId":"1500000000211665","sku_display_id":"1500000218333","sku_rep_id":"site51500000218333","gc_pro":false},"category":"Electric Guitars","pageName":"product_detail","subcategory":"Solid Body Electric Guitars","dept":"Guitars"}

Here we have a wonderful vintage 1971 Yamaha FG75 Nippon Gakki this one is from the famous Red Label series by Yamaha well know for Quality Marty like sound made affordable by Yamaha Japan over 45 years ago this guitar has well aged woods not the Faux aged “gassed pressed” high Tech way they are trying to re-create the naturally sweet aged tone that “Old aged instruments can provide “ This one was aged the old fashioned way over decades of time and as a result a surprisingly big sound is produced by this smaller bodied Grand concert like size of the Gibby LGO- but sounds even better for less dough …..Just in Excellent vintage 45+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its real good play action, and it sounds great... JVGuitars upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins that improved its resonance too .... not a crack, plenty of patina with minor superficial nicks or scratches and such as seen absolutely but no structural damages ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song contact Joe to buy at Joe's Vintage Guitars at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
Likewise, six Folk/Country Western guitars were offered, with flat, corner-notched heads, belly pin bridges and tortoise pickguards. The 14″ GS240 Concert ($79.50) was a Spanish shape with natural spruce top, mahogany body, and dot inlays, presumably on a rosewood fingerboard. The 15″ GS350 Grand Concert ($99.50) was another Spanish with natural spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood body, with diamond inlays and wood rope binding. The GS380 Grand Concert ($109.50) was the same as the GS350 except for a Brazilian rosewood body. The GS460 Country Western ($129.50) was a 16″ dreadnought with a spruce top in red sunburst, cherry-finished mahogany body, a black pickguard, sort of mustache bridge, diamond inlays and white binding. The 16″ GS570 Auditorium ($149.50) was another dreadnought with yellow spruce and full grained Brazilian rosewood body, diamond inlays and fancier rosette. The GS680 12-String Auditorium ($185) was another 16″ dreadnought 12-string otherwise the same as the GS570.
Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker

This guitar is of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, it is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest. We have our own factory that recreates them. Our version of Custom Shop Guitars is 95% same as the original in terms of quality and design, the parts are made and imported from China, Japan and Korea in order to manufacture the best musical instruments. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. We use the best pickups; best tuning keys and other hardware. All of our guitars are custom made guitars. The Top Guitars specializes the world’s finest custom guitars, major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. Our products are exported to Southeast Asia, North America and Europe. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!
So fun...I like...Let me start off by saying I'm not even a game person I bought this game for my son than watching him play it I took over and couldn't stop playing it I played it non stop until I beat it the content and visuals are great...The only downside was that I was so addicted to this game that I finished it in about one week, but I already am planning on playing it again on a higher difficulty and with a goal of finding more of the hidden treasures that are sprinkled throughout the game.
Well technically, the floor and the ceiling do shape the tone, post amp. Room acoustics are a major factor in the quality of sound recordings. Also Dan isn't wrong. Each thing that vibrates that eventually moves the pickup (while a note is being played or sustained) will disrupt the magnetic field. In physics there is hardly ever an instance where things have absolutely zero effect on the things around them. It comes down to the significance of the effect. For example, if something moves the pickup .05 picometers six times a second, then it likely has a negligible effect on the sound (i.e. our ears are not capable of detecting any difference. There does come a point where other variables do begin to change the characteristics of the sound. Additionally, as a string is struck, due to the rigidity (or slight lack thereof) the neck and body will vibrate, changing the distance between bridge and nut. The shortening and lengthening of this distance will then change the vibration frequency of the string. This can result in the dampening of vibration or potentially slight amplification of frequencies or overtones. Overall, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty that something does not have an effect on something else in this case. The truth, however, is that the degree to which the change is noticeable may not be detectable by the human ear.
Those influences helped him develop a truly unique rhythm guitar style that no one has been able to duplicate since. Perhaps the coolest thing about Joe Strummer is no one could ever predict what he would do next. In 1981, the Clash played 17 consecutive nights at the 3,500-capacity Bond’s International Casino nightclub in Manhattan, but when they returned to New York the next year they played two sold-out shows at Shea Stadium as an opening act for the Who.

Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
There’s so many multi effects pedals out there to choose from, that finding the right one that suits your musical style and your budget can be a little difficult. depending on what your style or genre is, you’re could be wondering which multi effects pedal is best for metal, or curious if your multi-effects pedal will work with your tube amp or even which option is right for your acoustic guitar, but fear not as we aim to answer all those questions and more.
CALIFORNIA SPECIAL models mix no-compromise attitude with top-notch build quality and sound. Optimized bracing reduces mass for superior resonance, while the upgraded bone nut and saddle grant them exceptional sustain. Featuring all-solid construction, the fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and matching 6-in-line headstock give the models a shot of electrifying attitude and unconventional Fender style that loves to be both seen and heard.
Although most of this article deals with miking regular guitar amps or using various DI options, there are also some great sounds to be had using very low-power guitar amps — even battery-powered ones. You can see these in music shops, often designed to look like miniature versions of Marshall, Fender or other top-name amplifiers. While some sound pretty grim, others sound surprisingly musical and raunchy. Obviously they don't have a lot of low end, but if you mic them closely to exploit whatever proximity effect your cardioid mic has to offer, and use EQ cut to tame the inevitable mid-range resonance, you can get some really great sounds. Best of all is that these things are cheap, so you can afford to experiment, and they also come in useful for their intended purpose, which is practising, something we all tend to do too little of when we get caught up in recording technology.
Bold and brash, the chest-thumping sound of Fender's big-bodied California Series Redondo Player acoustic-electric was designed to inspire you from the moment you pick it up. The exclusive slope-shouldered Redondo body shape has a rich, commanding voice that fills any room. The gloss metallic top, back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and creme binding, give it a shot of electrifying attitude. Dynamic, unique and unconventional—like today’s guitarists—the Redondo Player refuses to be bound by the past.
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.
If you want to get this game, you have a few options. The game is $60 with no guitar cable included; this is the best bet for owners of the original "Rocksmith," as the cable that came with that game works here, too. If you don't have the cable, but have a guitar, the game costs $80. If you need a guitar, too, that'll run you $200 for an Epiphone Les Paul Electric Jr. guitar, plus the game and cable.
Most electric guitars feature multiple pickups. Some will have two or three single-coils. Some will have two or three humbuckers. Many offer a combination of single-coil and humbucker pickups. This combination offers the player a wide range of tonal options. Pickup configurations are often abbreviated by referring to single-coils with an "S" and humbuckers with an "H." The placement of each pickup is indicated from the neck down towards the bridge. Thus an SSH configuration has single-coils at the neck and middle positions and a humbucker at the bridge.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.
Chords are the heart and soul of playing guitar. Many guitar players seldom do anything else, other than strumming chords. The chord is the basic building block of guitar music. A chord is simply a combination of two of more notes played simultaneously. Different combinations give you different chords. There are different classes of chords, such as Major Chords, Minor Chords, Triads, Suspended Chords, Diminished Chords, etc...
As the author of the article, I don’t use an Axe-Fx, but a $250 Fly Rig. But if I want to talk to an expert on modeling, I wanted to ask the company that knows it best. Sure, you have to take in to consideration a PA, but you have to do that if you own an amp too, since proper sound sends keeps the volume lower on stage to send everything through the PA.
This is a good list although after owning most of these brands or at least having played all of them, I would re-rearrange the order. Gibsons although a good guitar are simply no longer the quality of Taylor or Martin. They are lagging behind these guys. Yamaha and Epiphone despite online "reviews" are also not near a Taylor or Martin for that matter. So I would drop Gibson, Yamaha, and Epiphone down the list, and although Seagull makes a decent guitar, they are no better than Blueridge, so I would drop them down and bring Blueridge up. Of course this is all subjective, but here is my list re-ordered for what its worth.
There’s such a broad range of potential guitar and amp tones out there that it’s impossible to say “this works, but this doesn’t.” As a rule of thumb, though, go into the recording experience with the knowledge that the guitar parts that work live with a lashing of overdrive (natural cranked-amp gain or pedal generated) will often work better in the recorded mix with somewhat less gain and saturation. Heavily overdriven amps tend to swamp the mix, getting in the way of other crucial instruments, and sounding surprisingly muddy and washed-out as a result. Tightening one’s tone frequently brings back the punch and drive they seek from the part in the first place, and helps the guitars sit better with whatever else is going on in the arrangement. For instances of this, listen closely to a handful of guitar parts in classic-rock recordings that we tend to think of as examples of “heavy guitar tone” – Angus and Malcolm Young with AC/DC, Paul Kossoff with Free, Pete Townshend with The Who – and you’re likely to hear that they’re actually cleaner than you recalled. Then, when you get bogged down in an effort to record a satisfactory tone, consider cleaning it up at the amp or using a smaller amp.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.

At first this may seem trivial, but a little experimentation reveals that each effect reacts very differently depending on how the original signal has been altered by previous effects in the signal chain. Initially, this can seem rather frustrating; a pedal that sounds awesome on its own can turn your sound into a real mess when combined thoughtlessly with other effects. I’m going to go into the basics of signal flow and cover the fundamentals of setting up a great sounding pedal board. As you would expect, there isn’t any one “correct” way of doing things. You may find that changing the order gives you a completely unique sound, and that’s great. However, if you’re sorting it all out for the first time, this is a good way to start ordering your pedalboard.
The clipping detector stages receive inputs from the guitar preamp and the reverb recovery amp, they act in an identical manner. The 1458 op-amp is wired as a comparator with a threshold that is near the high side of the allowable voltage swing on the associated 2N3906 preamp stage. If the transistor output exceeds this voltage, the 1458 output turns on, causing the 4011 one-shot pulse stretcher circuit to fire. The one-shot circuit activates the LED, and stays on long enough that even minor clipping on the amplifier causes visible blinking.
{ "thumbImageID": "Elitist-1965-Casino-Vintage-Sunburst/518413000015000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone Elitist 1965 Casino", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Vintage Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51275761455092", "price": "2,199.00", "regularPrice": "2,199.00", "msrpPrice": "3,665.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Elitist-1965-Casino-Vintage-Sunburst-1275761455092.gc", "skuImageId": "Elitist-1965-Casino-Vintage-Sunburst/518413000015000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Elitist-1965-Casino-Vintage-Sunburst/518413000015000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51275761455102", "price": "2,199.00", "regularPrice": "2,199.00", "msrpPrice": "3,665.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Elitist-1965-Casino-Natural-1275761455102.gc", "skuImageId": "Elitist-1965-Casino-Natural/518413000010000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Elitist-1965-Casino-Natural/518413000010000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.
   These prices reflect the opinion/perception of the editor of guitarrepairshop.com. while these are prices one could expect from a quality repair shop, repair rates can vary. A full time repairman can have as much training time and investment in tools as any mechanic. Shop overhead costs are on par with those of any other profession, so if you take your instrument to a professional shop, expect to pay professional rates. And expect professional work. While this list reflects prices one would expect to pay at a professional shop, rates will vary. Expect to pay by the hour for some extensive restoration jobs. Rates based on an hourly charge of $60.00 p/hour. Shop minimum labor charge - $60.00 Prices updated January 2014
Ideally, a steel string acoustic guitar or an electric guitar would be the best for you if you want to learn to play blues and classic rock. Classical guitar because of its nylon strings and its warm tone is best played by fingers. If you need help in what kind of guitar to buy, check out our article on different kinds of guitars available for beginners, this might help:
Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
Large-diaphragm models are popular, with Neumann mics particularly favoured. The famous U87 studio workhorse is probably the most commonly mentioned, but it's by no means the only contender. Eddie Kramer, Steve Albini and John Leckie single out its predecessor, the U67, for example, while both of the earlier U47 models (valve and FET) receive name checks from people such as Steven Street, Glenn Kolotkin, Butch Vig and Bruce Botnick (note that U47s were marketed under both Neumann and Telefunken brand-names, but they're essentially the same mics). Neumann aren't the only game in town, though: AKG's C414B-ULS is probably joint most popular large-diaphragm model alongside the U87.
And it took a long time because inevitably the tremolo would go out of time with the track because the tremolo doesn't stay in regular clock time. Also we would go out with each other's amps, so we had to keep looking up at each other after every fifteen second bursts and kind of fess up, "Oh yeah, mine kind of went out of time." It took long time, but I'm glad we did it that way because if we had cut and pasted two seconds of audio, it wouldn't have had the same dynamic quality throughout the six minutes of the song, or however long it is.
I have a Kona Signature Acoustic with beautiful inlays in the wood. I believe the body is mahogany, decent resonant tone, and once I shimmed up the saddle bridge (which technically should have been replaced all together due to notching), sounds better than my Martin in many ways, where it better distributes the low, high, and mid-range tones. The Martin is too bassy sounding, but have ordered new bone bridge saddle, which hope it improves the cheap plastic one it came with...
PRS SE Standard 24 Electric Guitar The PRS SE Standard 24 is a great first or backup electric guitar. This is a reliable workhorse that more than delivers in design, build, playing comfort and overall sonic performance. It can also be your only electric guitar, but chances are you’ll want another one along the way and give in to another model - or another SE Standard 24.
Before World War II, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors in the guitar market—especially when it came to archtops. With legendary models like the Broadway, Deluxe, Emperor and Triumph, they were a force to be reckoned with on the hollow-body electric guitar scene. In the 1940s, Epiphone went from one of Gibson's competitors to one of its subsidiaries, paving the way for Epiphone Electric Guitars to become synonymous with many Gibson models.  Despite this drastic shift, Epiphone continues to be renowned for their archtop electric guitars even today. Models like the Wildkat Royale and the limited edition ES-335 Pro are worthy throwbacks to that golden era of electric guitars, giving you authentic vintage sound that's perfect if you're into classic rock. Another Epiphone original that's still available today is the solid-body Wilshire. The impact that the Wilshire had on guitar design is so strong that it's still one of the first mental images that comes to mind when we think ""electric guitar.""

Anyone who commented that this was a good list needs to reconsider what makes up a great guitar player. It’s about being multi-faceted musician. Creativity, technicality and musicality all come in to play when your talking about the highest quality players. When I listen to a “shredder” like Steve Vai, I think..yes he is fast but his music makes me feel absolutley nothing emotionally. Truth be told…SRV and David Gilmour are probably the only players on this list that deserve to be there.
On my guitar, the bridge plate is held on by five screws. Three on the back of the plate, two towards the neck on the front. You may need to remove the intonation block things.One or all. If you decide to take any off, use your calipers and measure from the front of them to the back of the bridge plate, so that you don't lose your intonation. Mark each saddle like in the picture.
Seller: musiciansfriend (269,349) 99.5%, Location: Kansas City, Missouri, Ships to: US, Item: 163232174143 Home Guitars Percussion Accessories Alvarez RP266SESB Parlor Acoustic-Electric Guitar Sunburst Sunburst item# 1500000019429 New The Alvarez Regent Series is a high-quality, entry-level guitar line designed to provide superior instruments with many features and specifications you'll find in pro-level Alvarez models. Components such as the bi-level engineered rosewood bridge, scalloped bracing and PPS synthetic bone nut and saddle, work together to get the best tone and response possible. Regent Series has also been designed with the student in mind and has a slightly slimmer neck profile and nut, making it very easy to hold and fret. This guitar has a roadworthy, vintage vibe with a satin finish. This is a great looking guitar and for its size has a very open and warm voice. It is fitted with the Alvarez SYS250 from B-Band, a 3-band EQ with onboard digital backlit tuner. Shipping Orders are generally shipped the following business day after payment is received. For example, if your order is placed AND paid for at 1 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, Musicians Friend will ship it on Monday. We are only shipping eBay orders via standard ground shipping at this time (3-7 business days for delivery once the item leaves our warehouse) Payment Musician's Friend only accepts payments for eBay orders through Paypal. Immediate payment is required upon selecting "Buy It Now". Sales Tax We are required to collect sales tax on all orders shipped to Alabama, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. You will be charged the state and local sales tax rate for any orders shipped to these states. Colorado, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Louisiana, Rhode Island and Pennsylvania Residents: Musician's Friend is not obligated to, and does not, collect sales tax in your state. Your purchase is subject to sales/use tax in these states unless it is specifically exempt from taxation. The purchase is not exempt merely because it is made over the Internet or by other remote means. These states require that you file a sales/use tax return at the end of the year reporting all of the purchases that were not taxed on those purchases. Retailers that do not collect sales tax in these states are obligated to provide purchasers an end-of-year summary of purchases in order to assist them in filing their tax report. Retailers that do not collect sales tax in these states may be required by law to provide the Department of Revenue with an annual report of the total amount of all of your purchases above certain thresholds. Details on how to file this return may be found at your applicable Department of Revenue website. Store Policies If you’re not satisfied, neither are we. If for any reason you’re not completely satisfied with your purchase of a new item, simply return it in its original condition within 45 days of purchase (see exceptions below) and we’ll give you a full refund. It’s that simple. Returned items must be in original, brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Items must also include all original packaging, manuals, warrantees and accessories or your return may be subject to a return handling charge. Your refund will be promptly processed upon successful evaluation of your returned item from our trained category professionals in 2-3 business days. Refunds are made for product value only, excluding shipping and handling charges. If you received Free Shipping on your order, the value of the uncharged shipping cost will be deducted from your refund. Exceptions Additionally, the following items are returnable only if defective OR unopened - strings, reeds, computers, tubes, earbuds, earplugs, recorders, tin whistles, flutophones, "world" wind instruments, harmonicas, raw-frame speakers, drumheads, drumsticks, turntable cartridges, fog fluid, clothing/footwear, body jewelry, sheet music, cleaners, polishes and polishing cloths. Software/soundware, books, CDs, DVDs, and videos may be returned for credit only if they are in their original, sealed packaging. All returned woodwind and brass instruments incur a $10.00 sanitization fee. Returned bows are assessed a $4.00 restocking fee. Returned mouthpieces priced over $300 incur an $8.00 sanitization fee; the fee for mouthpieces under $300 is $4.00. Stringed instruments priced at $1999.00 or more, must be returned within 10 days of shipment. Should you decide to return your shipment, please follow the return steps printed on the back of your invoice and pack your return carefully to prevent damage in shipment. All returns must: 1. Include a Return Authorization Number; (Please contact us via eBay messages for an RA number) 2. Be in the original packaging complete with all collateral materials such as cases, straps, cables, care kits, certificates of authenticity, warranty cards, manuals, and any other materials that originally shipped with the instrument; 3. Be in brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings, or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Condition: New, Brand: Alvarez, MPN: RP266SESB, Features: Features: Mahogany Top / Vintage Sunburst See More
We have arrived at the bottom of this extremely detailed buying guide and recommended guitar reviews. If you have made it here, congrats, you are officially a guitar know-it-all. Of course, the world of electric guitars is huge and there is still a lot to learn if you want to know more. But these are the basics. If you know these, you will be able to confidently pick the best electric guitars for yourself and be proud of it.
Accompanying the Tempo guitar was the Merson Tempo Guitar-Amp. This was a tube amp with two instrument and one microphone input, heavy-duty 8″ Alnico 5 speaker, volume and tone controls, and a pilot light. The cabinet was covered in two-tone leatherette. The picture is in black-and-white, but the look is remarkably like Premier amps of the time, so a tan and brown color would not be a bad guess. The speaker baffle featured a classical guitar design (!) with “Tempo” written in little circles on the bridge! Substitute a lyre for the classical guitar and you’d swear this was a Premier, made by Manhattan neighbor Multivox, so that might, indeed, be the story there.
‘Power' Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana's Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.
The Fender Hot Rod Deluxe or its big brother the Deville come to mind. I have a hot Rod Deluxe tube mode 40 watts and it really pumps out the volume. The simple foot switch allows four settings from clean, mean, beyond mean and in your face. It really makes slide guitar sound like a male cat calling to a female in heat. Also, it can be mellow. I have seen many youtube videos with Eric Clapton playing a Tweed Model. I also own a Line 6 Duo Verb, Line 6 DT50, and of course and old US Made Peavey 5150 Eddie Van Halen Signature Model. The Peavey really pumps up the heat and the sustain is as wide as the Grand Canyon.
This tonewood is nearly always seen in the material used for a fretboard on the neck. The various species of Rosewood add their own harmonic overtones with Indian Rosewood being the most warm. In general, Rosewood provides incredible harmonic complexity, personality, and resonance that’s worthy of stage and studio recording as can be seen on the solid Rosewood body of the Yamaha A3R A-Series Guitar.
{ "thumbImageID": "G-400-PRO-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/H79038000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone G-400 PRO Left-Handed Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Cherry", "sku": "sku:site51321473136418", "price": "449.00", "regularPrice": "449.00", "msrpPrice": "748.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/G-400-PRO-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Cherry-1321473136418.gc", "skuImageId": "G-400-PRO-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/H79038000001000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/G-400-PRO-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/H79038000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Paul Simon, the great wordsmith, speaks as vividly through his guitar as his lyrics. Weaned on early doo-wop and rock & roll, Simon got caught up in the folk revival during the mid-Sixties, traveling to England to study the acoustic mastery of Bert Jansch. He has continued absorbing new influences, as on "Dazzling Blue," off his most recent album, So Beautiful or So What: "All that folk fingerpicking is what I did with Simon and Garfunkel, but [here] it's on top of this rhythm with Indian musicians playing in 12/8." At 70, he's as nimble as ever.
Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.
Great playing and sounding bass. The Ibanez BTB series in a 'very playable' 4-string version. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. We believe the pickups are actually made by Bartolini. 'Locking' 1/4 jack. Solid wood, natural finish body. Rosewood fingerboard on maple neck. Tuning is accomplished via quality, 'sealed' tuning machines. Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up great! Currently has 'nylon wound' strings for a softer 'jazz' tone. Frets show virtually no wear. Body finish has VERY little wear. Includes gig bag.

Time controls the length of time between any two repetitions of your signal. It is most often measured in milliseconds (ms). Most delay pedals don’t have a delay-time readout that would enable you to determine exact delay times in milliseconds, so you typically just adjust the Time knob to get an approximate time based on the unit’s available range. For instance, the Boss DD-7 (street $179) has a Mode knob that selects between four time ranges—up to 50 ms, 51–200 ms, 201–800 ms, and 801–3200 ms—and the Time knob then adjusts the setting within the selected range.
In general, this measurement is taken by measuring the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the 6th fret while holding the string down at the 12th fret and the first fret. This is where the capo comes in handy - put it on the first fret so your hand is free to take the measurement. Using a feeler gauge of the desired height, in this example, 0.010, hold the low E string down at the 12th fret (with the capo on the first fret), and measure the distance between the top of the 6th fret and the bottom of the low E string. If the distance is greater than the desired relief, then you need to turn the truss rod clockwise (towards your right) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. If the distance is less than the desired amount, then you need to turn the truss rod counter-clockwise (towards your left) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. The basic rule is:
Here is a list of the schematics that are exclusive to this site. We created several and we have redrawn some schematics that were already available on the internet  for readability or ease of use (these needed an easier-to-read format, corrections or part identifiers).  Many of these schematics include “modernization” that are included and explained in the “Project” for the given schematic.  You may freely post links to any of the pages or files on this site, but please do not put copies of these files on your site. We frequently update our files.  If you want to see photos of the original units of any of these guitar effects see our  “Originals” board on Pintrest  Note: All Trademarks mentioned here belong to their owners and not to General Guitar Gadgets
I love reading interviews with engineers and producers, but the more of them I read, the more I come up against the basic problem that my brain is like a sieve. I'm forever thinking to myself "I really must remember that technique", but unless I dash off and use it right away the knowledge just skips out of my ear and heads for the hills, probably glad to be free. And even if I vaguely remember reading a fascinating passage about de-essing nose-flutes, I'm damned if I can recall where I read it or who recommended it.
{ "thumbImageID": "Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red-Burst/H64297000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rogue Rocketeer RR50 7/8 Scale Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Red Burst", "sku": "sku:site51343059402612", "price": "59.99", "regularPrice": "79.99", "msrpPrice": "159.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red-Burst-1343059402612.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red-Burst/H64297000004000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red-Burst/H64297000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Wine Burst", "sku": "sku:site51343059402610", "price": "59.99", "regularPrice": "80.99", "msrpPrice": "159.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Burst-1343059402610.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Burst/H64297000003000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Burst/H64297000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51281539726430", "price": "59.99", "regularPrice": "79.99", "msrpPrice": "159.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Black-1281539726430.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Black/H64297000001000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Black/H64297000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Red", "sku": "sku:site51281539726431", "price": "59.99", "regularPrice": "79.99", "msrpPrice": "159.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red-1281539726431.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red/H64297000002000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-RR50-7-8-Scale-Electric-Guitar-Red/H64297000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.

{"pageName":"[mf] pdp: epiphone les paul special vintage edition electric guitar","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","events":"event34,event3,event45,prodView","evar51":"default: united states","list1":"silver,36-month,24 month","prop5":"[mf] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks: straps","prop6":"[mf] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks: straps: guitar straps","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks","products":";J40301","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] product detail page"}
The noise he complains about is likely ground loop hum, caused by multiple paths to ground, very common in pedalboards and I explained earlier. I do believe it’s better to get rid of noise rather than use a noise suppressor. Get rid of the noise, and you have a quieter signal path. I do use noise supressors but only to deal with noisy pedals while they are on, such as a compressor/distortion I love that can be a little noisy.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.
hey guys im just curious as i just got back from a music store that had to basses from two different brands (local luthiers) and they were virtually the same (5 string, j pickups, Aggie 3 band mahogany body, set neck) the only difference was one had a alder tone block, i personally couldn't hear a difference but the owner of said shop said tone wise it makes a huge difference, any thoughts?

I think singing with confidence without too much doubt was a satisfying thing. It was, artistically, very satisfying to be covering subject matter that means something to me. I think a little bit of that was getting to know yourself. And just the simple fact that I was ready to do it now. Everything else I'd done since going out on my own in '87 has been absolutely amazing to me, and I feel like the luckiest guitar player alive, and I am very grateful.
First off, it has three effects loops that let you control pedals (or groups of pedals) right from the MS-3. It can also be used as a foot controller for amplifiers, which allows you to change the channel on your favorite amps and employ effects in the comfort of a single compact box. This makes the MS-3 a very versatile unit, catering to vintage amp/pedal users while adding the comfort of modern digital effects processing and preset control. Since it has its own noise suppressor and global EQ, you can tame noisy pedals and shape their tone a bit more. All of these are on top of the many built-in effects that is already built into the unit, which are Boss quality good by themselves.
I had just finished signing up for guitar.com. I am a 54-year-old disabled Miner of 22 years, so I thought I would try to take up playing the guitar once again like I did when I was a kid. I forgot a lot about it through the years as life moved on, but now all I have is time. I came across your website and thought why not give it a try. so anything you suggest I will try once twice if I like it lol
In short, absolutely everything about this guitar screams quality. You can inspect the entire thing in tiny detail, and it’ll leave you amazed at how well it’s been made. And then when the sound hits you, you really feel it too. It’s perfect for chugging, powerful rhythm behind the rest of the band, but is equally adept at more sparkling highs and brighter choruses. What a guitar.
The Telecaster is known for its ability to produce both bright, rich, cutting tone (the typical telecaster twang) or mellow, warm, bluesy tone depending on the selected pickup, respectively “bridge” pickup or “neck” pickup. The bridge pickup has more windings than the neck pickup, hence producing higher output, which compensates for a lower amplitude of vibration of the strings at bridge position. At the same time, a capacitor between the slider of the volume control and the output, allows treble sounds to bleed through while damping mid and lower ranges.[3] A slanted bridge pickup enhances the guitar’s treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings’ tone. This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. These characteristics make the Telecaster a versatile guitar, usable for most styles of music including country, blues, rock, and jazz.
High-end solid-state amplifiers are less common, since many professional guitarists favor vacuum tubes.[citation needed] Some[who?] jazz guitarists favor the "cleaner" sound of solid-state amplifiers. Only a few solid-state amps have enduring attraction, such as the Roland Jazz Chorus.[15][16][17] Solid-state amplifiers vary in output power, functionality, size, price, and sound quality in a wide range, from practice amplifiers to combos suitable for gigging to professional models intended for session musicians who do studio recording work.
I only dealt with them directly on my SX Mahogany Strat w P90s. For $119 I got a really nice beginner guitar. I added cheap grover tuners, I filed a few frets and polished them, shimmed the neck, sanded (more scuffed really) the sticky finish on the back of the neck, and I've got a nice little beater that sounds awesome (to me at least), and has nice low action. I'm a relative newbie, but got some good experience with guitar setup and didn't risk trashing a expensive guitar.

“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.
I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner built-in) and if I want to play at home I plug that into the stereo. Don't have it any louder than you would a CD etc .. (ok maybe a bit ;-) ) gives you the flexibility of all the effects sounds plus because it's stereo (assuming you hve the speakers a few feet apart) you get that feeling of it being "large" when really it's not that loud.
You can think of these pedals like modulation effects that change nothing but the timing. They split up the signal in the same way, but time-based effects don’t usually make any major changes to the copied signal. Instead, they hold it back by a certain length of time before mixing it back in. This makes a few different varieties of pedal possible:
Guitar technicians must be proficient in not only playing the guitar, but also in the construction of the instrument. They need to know how to repair and rebuild guitars from scratch as well as stringing and tuning the instruments. They need to understand how all the parts of the guitar interact to produce clear musical notes. This knowledge can be obtained through formal education, experience, working under a knowledgeable guitar tech or with other experienced musicians.
"I've always thought that most people mic amps too closely," comments Alan Parsons. "They supposedly make up with an ambient mic, but I much prefer to find a mic position that works and process that, rather than mix in too much ambience." Despite Parsons' disapproval, though, a lot of the engineers I researched divulged that they use additional ambient mics to capture more of the sound of the room in which the guitar cab was recorded.
This specific review is for the full-size guitar, which is 40”, so if you read all the reviews on Amazon, many of them are for the ½ and ¾ size. If you’re an adult with smaller hands, purchasing the smaller sizes may be a better bet than trying to wrestle with a full-size instrument. Size doesn’t necessarily have to do with this guitar model’s tone, which many reviewers say is quite good for the price.
Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
To celebrate the new generation of shredders profiled in our May/June “Loud Issue,” the SPIN staff decided to find some wheedle in a haystack, taking on the impossible task of ranking our favorite guitar players of all time. Traditionally, the “greatest guitarist” timeline begins with Robert Johnson magically conjuring the blues, nears perfection with Eric Clapton mutating it beatifically, and then ultimately reaches a boomer-baiting Rock and Roll Hall of Fame apotheosis with the free-spirited Jimi Hendrix shooting it into space like feedback-laden fireworks. For this list, we veer toward the alternative canon that kicks in with the Velvet Underground trying to erase that form entirely, making guitar solos gauche and using instruments as sadomasochistic tools for hammering out sheets of white heat.
The Blue Midnight was released in 2011 with a limit to the key of C, also on the less expensive side of the market. It features stainless steel cover plates with a wider back gap for enhanced volume while playing. The unique feature of this harp is the comb, which is made out of translucent blue plastic. The comb allows for brighter tone than the black combed models. It also has a special just intonation (JI) "Chicago tuning". It is also now available in other keys.[23]
What people may not know is that they have a very affordable line of entry-level guitars.  This line continues the legacy of craftsmanship and prestige that comes with owning a Taylor. Whether you look into their line of Baby Taylors – 3/4 sized guitars that play better than many full-sized budget guitars, or you look into their entry full-sized acoustics, Taylor will not disappoint you.
Unlike the unit I am using here, the original units were large, AC powered, and the speed was controlled with an external pedal. Vintage Uni-Vibe pedals are very expensive at this point but fortunately we can find some very high quality reissues. Famous uses of Uni-Vibe are “Machine Gun” by Jimi Hendrix, “Bridge of Sighs” by Robin Trower, and “Breathe” by Pink Floyd.

The plectrum, or flat pick, is another key piece of essential equipment. For electric guitars, it tends to be a thin piece of plastic, metal, shell or other material shaped like a teardrop or a triangle. There are also thumb picks mounted on rings and finger picks on the player's fingertips; you'll see electric guitarists using both of these as well as a standard pick. 

This company really does nothing for me. Hideous designs, cumbersome shaped guitars and the fact that they keep milking dime bags name just makes me feel like they don't have much else. There are definitely worse brands out there like first act and daisy rock (shudders) but I've always thought dean just always sucked as a metal guitar company and b.c. rich isn't to far behind them in my opinion.

Is it fine if I buy an electric guitar that’s worth <900$ as my first e.guitar? I don't know why it's recommended not to buy a guitar that's more advanced than my level. I mean this guitar will last me for years, so why not go for the best from the beginning? Also, I need to learn how to differentiate between the various guitars if some are better for lets say metal. I listen to a lot of Children of Bodom, Korn, Metallica and more.

Delay/echo effects can sound pretty good when plugged directly into an amp’s input (See Example 3, above)—hell, the Edge built a whole career out of doing just that—but if you want absolutely clean, pristine delay and echo effects with no distortion, the effects loop is the only way to go. Reverb effects should always be patched into the effects loop (See Example 4, below) unless you always play through the cleanest of clean sounding amps. Overdriven or distorted reverb just ain’t very pretty, and it can destroy any semblance of clarity or definition and smear your sound like the ketchup on a baby’s face when it’s trying to master the fine art of eating a messy pile of French fries.

Play heavy rock or metal music? Listen up! These guitars feature a twin horn cutaway shape and a long-neck design. They are lightweight compared to the Les Paul, but can be difficult to get used to. They can feel unbalanced because of the long neck. They have two humbucker pickups like Les Paul guitars but have different volume and tone controls for precise settings.


Besides the recognizable brand, there’s the sound quality, that earned it good appreciation even from experienced guitarists who are used to more expensive units. It has a standard 12” speaker that allows it to render treble and bass equally well, for a good range of sound which should make it suitable for country, blues, and jazz, as well as softer rock.

The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World.
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.
Most models come with single-coil Hi-gain pickups as standard equipment. Many post-British invasion Rickenbacker players such as Peter Buck, Paul Weller, and Johnny Marr have used instruments with these pickups. Rickenbacker’shumbucker/dual coil pickup has a similar tone to a Gibson mini-humbuckerpickup, and comes standard on the Rickenbacker 650 C. Vintage reissue models, and some signature models, come with Toaster Top pickups, which resemble a classic two-slotted chrome toaster. Despite their slightly lower output, “Toasters” produce a brighter, cleaner sound, and are generally seen as key to obtaining the true British Invasion guitar tone, as they were original equipment of the era.
The pedal rocks forward and backward like a see-saw as you rest your foot on it. Move the pedal to get the wah effect. On some pedals, there is a switch under the toe end to switch ceon straight-through (no effect) to using the wah effect. This means that when you switch it on, it's always in the "aaaa" position. You can hear this in some of Hendrix's work.
In 1979, there was a benefit for Amnesty International called “The Secret Policeman’s Ball”. Pete Townshend played acoustic versions of “Pinball Wizard”, “Drowned”, and (in a duet with classical guitarist John Williams) an astonishing version of “Won’t Get Fooled Again”. Unfortunately the soundtrack for that show has never been available in the CD and digital download era, but you can often spot these performances on YouTube. Highly recommended.
Jump up ^ "Now the Gibson Guitar Raids Make Sense". www.investors.com. Investors' Business Daily. May 23, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2018. According to C.F. Martin's catalog, several of their guitars contain 'East Indian Rosewood,' which is the exact same wood in at least 10 of Gibson's guitars. So why were they not raided and their inventory of foreign wood seized? Grossly underreported at the time was the fact that Gibson's chief executive, Henry Juszkiewicz, contributed to Republican politicians...By contrast, Chris Martin IV, the Martin & Co. CEO, is a long-time Democratic supporter.

This is one of the most frustrating questions from the MIJ collector. As I've read many different guitar collector/enthusiast forums and spoken to local guitar dealers, it's clear that the layperson has little to no idea who made their badged guitar from the 1960-1980 period, also known as the MIJ golden age of guitar manufacturing. People often make the mistake of citing the American or European importer as the 'maker' of the guitar, when in fact several Japanese manufacturers were producing badged guitars out of their plants and shipping them to America and Europe to sell. Japanese manufacturers made multiple badges at the same plant, many of whom resemble each other closely. Some manufacturers merged or changed hands over the years which added to the confusion, sometime merging with another maker, only to pick up their name later. In some cases a manufacturer would farm out production to various manufacturers, making it still more difficult to know who made the guitar in your hands. Parts from other guitars would be used in the making of a particular badge for a period of time because it was all the manufacturer had to hand...which doesn't always help in identifying a maker. And sometimes, the guitar which is supposed to be an MIJ guitar is actually made elsewhere (Korea, Indonesia) because production was moved during this period in history. Sounds hopeless, right? Not always!
The Seagull Maritime Solid Wood Series of acoustic guitars are designed to offer the features and benefits of the brand’s higher-end Artist Series of guitars but at a more affordable price point. The Maritime SWS guitars are offered in a variety of shapes such as mini jumbo, folk and dreadnought, and come in two custom-polish finishes: high-gloss and semi-gloss.
"The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World."
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category.
Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
I have many acoustic guitars in the collection including Gibson, Taylor, Fender and Washburn. That said none of these guitars come close to the richness in sound of a Maton. I'm assuming this is due to the quality of the Australian timbers and workmanship. Although a little expensive I highly recommend you at least play one in a shop as a treat and hope a dead relative leaves you some money to give you an opportunity of taking one home.
Melodyne is a software application for OS X or Windows with which you can edit audio in a more musical way than was ever thought possible. In Melodyne, you work with notes – and not with a meaningless wave form. You don’t just see where the music gets louder or quieter but also where notes begin and end and at what pitch they lie. You can modify each note and thereby influence direc...
{"eVar4":"shop: accessories","eVar5":"shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts","pageName":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument parts: bridges and tailpieces: bridges and tailpieces for guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts","prop1":"[gc] shop: accessories","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"bridges & tailpieces for guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument parts: bridges and tailpieces: bridges and tailpieces for guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument parts: bridges and tailpieces: bridges and tailpieces for guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument parts","prop4":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument parts: bridges and tailpieces","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category4"}
The guitars included three bolt-neck Strat-style models, the GS-1 (one humbucker), GS-2 (two humbuckers) and GS-3 (humbucker/single/single). Most had locking Kahler vibratos, although at least one GS-3 has been seen with a traditional fulcrum vibrato. The bodies had a German carve relief beginning at the waist and extending forward to the cutaway horns. The necks had 21-fret rosewood or maple fingerboards with dots. The six-in-line heads were kind of squarish and bi-level, with a carved relief along the lower edge, kind of an Ovation trademark. The logos said Ovation Ultra GS. The GS-1 (volume only) and GS-2 (volume, tone, three-way) had pickups mounted on rings on the top. The GS-3 featured a black Strat-style pickguard. One source refers to a GSL model, but nothing is known about what this means, if it isn’t a typo. Most of these came with typical exposed-pole DiMarzios, but the previously mentioned guitar with the fulcrum vibrato also had twin-blade pickups with DiMarzio stenciled on the covers.
Wherever you purchase your first guitar from, make sure to take it to a local professional or friend with some experience and ask them to set it up for you. They may charge you a few dollars, but it’ll be worth it to have fresh strings, a good action, and correct tuning. If possible, ask them if you can watch how they set it up, so next time you can try it yourself.
Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.
Guitar loudspeakers are designed differently from high fidelity stereo speakers or public address system speakers. While hi-fi and public address speakers are designed to reproduce the sound with as little distortion as possible, guitar speakers are usually designed so that they will shape or color the tone of the guitar, either by enhancing some frequencies or attenuating unwanted frequencies.[47]
The Ibanez Artcore AS53 is a semi hollow-body guitar created for guitar players from diverse genres as blues, country, rock and jazz. The guitar feels nice and has a compact and comfortable body. The tone is rich, warm and full. If you are looking for that fat hollow body sound, this guitar makes it possible to switch from jazz to every semi-hollow rocking style of music. A combination of quality and affordability.

A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Chord inversion is especially simple in M3 tuning. Chords are inverted simply by raising one or two notes by three strings; each raised note is played with the same finger as the original note. Inverted major and minor chords can be played on two frets in M3 tuning.[56][74] In standard tuning, the shape of inversions depends on the involvement of the irregular major-third, and can involve four frets.[75]


By the time this Blink-182 hit was recorded, the majority of Enema of the State had already been written. Tom DeLonge wanted to add one more song to the album that was simple, and radio friendly so he got to work. The lyric “She left me roses by the stairs” came about when DeLonge’s girlfriend at the time left him roses on the stairs, and the singer found them late one night after recording. The “na na na” section was also inspired by the next band.

Two-hand tapping AKA Emmett Chapman technique involves both hands tapping single notes (less often) or chordal (more often) instances. Even if you’re experienced tapper of one or more approaches, two-hand tapping is a whole new world. Keep in mind your pick hand will need time to develop compared to your fret hand, which by default has had a massive head start on fretting notes.


Bold and brash, the chest-thumping sound of Fender's big-bodied California Series Redondo Player acoustic-electric was designed to inspire you from the moment you pick it up. The exclusive slope-shouldered Redondo body shape has a rich, commanding voice that fills any room. The gloss metallic top, back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and creme binding, give it a shot of electrifying attitude. Dynamic, unique and unconventional—like today’s guitarists—the Redondo Player refuses to be bound by the past.
Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo
Size & Weight: If the multi-effects pedal will stay in one place at all times, then perhaps size and weight is not a big deal. However, one of the biggest selling points of a unit like this is its portability. If you need to gig with it or simply take it to a friend’s house, make sure you’re fine with its dimensions. The good thing is that a manufacturer like Line 6 makes several versions of the same basic pedal. The Line 6 M13 is a great unit, but if you need it to be more compact you can opt for the M9, or smaller yet the M5.
Many Sixties rock acts made political statements, but the MC5 were among the first rockers to make a serious commitment to revolution, aligning themselves closely with the White Panther Party (a Black Panther offshoot organization) and effectively serving as the White Panthers’ agitprop machine. Their blue-collar Detroit roots lent a certain gritty gravitas to their stance. These weren’t effete rock stars dabbling in left wing chic but working-class guerrillas with ammo belts strapped across their bare chests and guitars brandished as rifles.
Launch price: $299 / £199 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Alnico V bridge humbucker 2x Alnico V single coils | Controls: Volume, tone (with push-pull coil-split), 5-way selector switch | Hardware: Vintage-style vibrato with block saddle | Left-handed: Yes (Pacifica 112J) | Finish: Natural Satin, Old Violin Sunburst, Raspberry Red, Sonic Blue, Black, Silver Metallic
Rather than being period-correct reincarnations, Fender's Original series aims for a ‘best of decade’ vibe. So, this Strat is alder bodied with a ‘round-laminate’ rosewood fingerboard that was implemented in mid-1962. In a mid-'60s style we get Pure Vintage ’65 Gray-Bottom single coils on an 11-screw mint-green pickguard with aged white controls. Meanwhile, a concession to modernism is the second, lowest, tone control, which originally would have been for the middle pickup, but here works on both the middle and bridge pickups. Another 'modern' inclusion is the ubiquitous five-way lever switch, which didn’t actually replace the original three-way switch on the Stratocaster until 1977. We defy anyone who opens a case and sees one of these beauts not to have an ‘OMG’ moment. The guitar that launched thousands of dreams back in the day still impresses 64 years on. You’ll find these ‘fixes’ on many Fender Custom Shop models, of course, but while these don’t come with any ageing or relic’ing they are significantly cheaper. Yet, viewed from a 2018 perspective, it gives Fender’s USA models a rare unity, a vintage nod to the escalating modernism
 of the Professional and ultra-tweaked and posher Elites. If you hanker after a new USA-made production Fender and want the most vintage-spec possible, this is now it. Vintage-inspired, yes, but with the fixes that many players will embrace.

Even with the myriad finish options, this latest model looks very much like the original Strats from Fender's original production line. As a testament to how effective the original design is, most of the specs and even the hardware design are followed even to this day. Speaking of specs, the current iteration features the same double cutaway alder body and bolt-on maple neck with a scale length of 25.5", narrower nut-width of 1.685" and SSS (Three Single Coil) pickup configuration. Giving this guitar its authentic quack and chime are three V-Mode Strat Single-coils.


I have a shecter omen extreme 7 and found that the factor strings they put on were nice for my small fingers. I had to replace because the factor set in general needed some tweaking and they changed all the strings. Now i don't really like the strings they put on. Too small. All they had listed for the strings were 24X jumbo strings. What string set should i buy since i play Ambient, soft, but also djent metal.

Shecter is known for manufacturing quality rock and metal friendly guitars at reasonable price points, and I think that they use evil model names to keep their instruments from the hands of pop and ballad players. The Hellraiser C-1 FR-S showcases what this company can give metal players in the mid-tier price point, and with its name, it is obviously not meant for choirs and church music.

If you do want to use single pedals then BOSS compact pedals come with a buffer circuit that converts your high impedance input into a low impedance output. For a more detailed discussion on the topic of single pedal buffers check out Steve Henderson’s excellent article here: https://www.rolandcorp.com.au/blog/buffered-effects-true-bypass-and-boss-pedals-by-steve-henderson
Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.
It does sound intimidating when you read platitudes like "There is no official rule on how to do it, and you should break the rules and experiment because that's what art is, and you'll invent something new." Some people even tell you to figure it out yourself, which is equally absurd. It developed over decades. No one person is going to just sort it out by themselves over night.
In a very basic sense, your pickups create a magnetic field that is disturbed when guitar strings are vibrated above it. This, in turn, converts the vibration of the guitar strings into a current. The current is then sent through to your output jack where the signal then passes through your lead into your amplifier, where it is amplified. Different gauge strings vibrate at different rates e.g. an A string will typically vibrate at 440 cycles per second (440 hertz) which creates a current of 440 hertz in the pickup.
If your interests are on the jazz side of things, the Ibanez Artcore series is worth a close look. These economical hollow-body guitars are perfect for players at any level who want a well-crafted instrument that won't break the bank. They come with a well-deserved reputation for solid stone and sustain and they hold tuning reliably, making the Artcore guitars a good choice to get the most bang for your buck.
Rule 4 – Taking sound-making devices like stompbox pedals out of the equation, there’s an order to the way sounds naturally occur in physical space. For example, guitar amp distortion is made in physical space by turning an amp up enough to cause its circuits to overload, and any echo you might hear happens after the distorted sound hits walls or ceilings and bounces back to your ears. Therefore, logic says that your reverb and/or delay pedals should be last in the signal path, since that is how the sounds they produce actually occur in three-dimensional space.
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. (JANUARY 25, 2018)—Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) today announced the all-new California Series acoustic guitars, celebrating the lifestyle and culture associated with the region and the brands Southern California roots. Energetic and independent, this family of guitars defies acoustic guitar conventions with a visible look and feel of Fender’s famous electric guitars – from the Stratocaster® headstocks and vibrant colors, to the distinctive Fender body shapes that mark players as visionary artists. Lively-sounding – California Series acoustic guitars capture the laid back, yet energetic California lifestyle – from the beach to the festival stage.
@Dax – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble with the pedals in your setup. If the pedals work on their own in front of the amplifier isolated one at a time, this is likely related to a setting or connection with the pedals. Please shoot us an email to support@strymon.net with full details on the amp make and model, the inputs and outputs used on both the amp and each of the pedals, and the setting of the switch on the back of the pedals. Also, include whether this happens on every preset or only certain presets with each pedal.
I think the best is at DiGiSTORMERS :: Online Music Studio - Home digistormers website and there is an acoustic guitar vsti which sounds like the real one in the products plugins section. I never use anything else. I used to record live guitars, but using this it is not needed anymore. Also mistakes are recorded!!! It is not perfect then, so it sounds more realistic.
I have to say I'm an Impact Soundworks fan. I haven't listened to the Archtop demos, but another one from them is Django Gypsy Jazz Guitar. The sound is stunning to me, both lead and rhythm. However, it depends on what style you're going for. It's not going to be as versatile as some other acoustic options, but what it does it does very well. I don't have it but it's on my buy list. I own Shreddage II SRP and it's my favorite electric because of the interface and playability.
This can all get a little tricky and can become overwhelming especially if you have never tackled this type of job before. If this is the case, I strongly suggest starting with one of the easier models in regards to wiring e.g. Telecasters are significantly easier to work on as the scratchplate will often be pre-loaded with pickups. However, if you purchase a kit guitar such as an LP or you want to upgrade your electrical components (which is often the case with an entry level kit) understanding some basics about guitar electronics is useful.

The SG Special by Epiphone is our hands down top pick. As you'll know by know, Epiphone is one of the best guitar manufactures in the business – so the quality of this guitar is absolutely amazing. Its epic red devilish double-cutaway design gives easy access to all 22 frets. It has a hard maple neck and a slim taper D-profile which ensures durability and rigidity. The fretboard is made of rosewood which makes it easy to learn to play. This guitar is all about that rock sound - it's equipped with two open-coil and noise-free humbucker pickups. The hardware is carved from nickel and is available in two dazzling finishes, cherry, and ebony.
The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.
You are likely to encounter phase issues when you have the same sound hitting a microphone from two different positions. The more mics you use or the more distance is put between mic and speaker in a reflective room, the more likely this will occur. The result is an effect called “comb filtering,” which cancels out certain frequencies and emphasizes others, creating an odd sound. Part of the reason for using distant-miking techniques is to obtain some “room sound” in the tone, which is created in part by such reflections, but at times these will have an adverse affect on the focus and solidity of your guitar sound. If a distant position with just one mic is sounding considerably more thin, loose, and washy than a close mic on the same amp, move it around, experiment with other locations, and see if you can eliminate these issues through mic placement alone. Otherwise, consider using a baffle or two to shield the mic from specific reflective surfaces.

If you’re a player performing live or in a studio, all of this is just the opening pre-credits sequence to your signal then being captured via a microphone, which then sends current through another cable to a mixing board, which then has its own preamplification, equalization and filtering, which either goes to the power amplifiers of a public address system or to some kind of recording device, which then involves…aw, I’m getting tired, and I think we’re getting the point: how can anyone call *any* of this “natural”? Does *any* of this occur in nature? Does any of this sound like we’re carving a flute from driftwood or clapping a couple empty coconut shells together?
If you’re looking for a decent guitar at a super affordable price, look no further. This Ibanez features Powersound Pickups as well as 5-way switching to give you a variety of tones and styles. With a contoured body, it’s super easy to get comfortable while shredding away on this puppy. If your music styles fall in line with hard rock or country, then this is the guitar for you!

What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.
Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]

This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.
{ "thumbImageID": "StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pace-Car-Blue-Maple-Neck/515512000004004", "defaultDisplayName": "Ernie Ball Music Man StingRay 5 HH 5-String Electric Bass Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Pace Car Blue Maple Neck", "sku": "sku:site51312645331323", "price": "1,699.00", "regularPrice": "1,999.00", "msrpPrice": "1,999.02", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pace-Car-Blue-Maple-Neck-1312645331323.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pace-Car-Blue-Maple-Neck/515512000004004", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pace-Car-Blue-Maple-Neck/515512000004004-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "India Ivory Maple Fretboard", "sku": "sku:site51312645326641", "price": "1,749.00", "regularPrice": "2,049.00", "msrpPrice": "2,049.02", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-India-Ivory-Maple-Fretboard-1312645326641.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-India-Ivory-Maple-Fretboard/515512000007000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-5-HH-5-String-Electric-Bass-Guitar-India-Ivory-Maple-Fretboard/515512000007000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
A vintage pickup is literally old. “Vintage-style” usually means a new pickup designed to sound like an old one. Vintage and vintage-style pickups generally have only moderate output. The term “vintage” has most often been applied to designs that originated before 1970, though as we move forward in time, so does the expiration date on “vintage.” But for now, at least, all vintage-style pickups are passive.
Being a true pro-level instrument, the Yamaha LL16 comes with a jumbo body shape and built-in S.R.T Zero impact electronics. Playability remains beginner friendly, with a low action setup that new players will easily master. And since it comes with an all-solid wood body, this guitar will only sound better and better as it ages. If you are looking for a more long term instrument at the sub $1000 level, check out the Yamaha LS16.
{ "thumbImageID": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst/430930000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rogue Rocketeer Electric Guitar Pack", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Red Burst", "sku": "sku:site51343059402611", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst-1343059402611.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst/430930000003000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst/430930000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Blue", "sku": "sku:site51275425410280", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Blue-1275425410280.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Blue/430930000004000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Blue/430930000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Wine Burst", "sku": "sku:site51343059402609", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Wine-Burst-1343059402609.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Wine-Burst/430930000002000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Wine-Burst/430930000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51275425410277", "price": "149.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Black-1275425410277.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Black/430930000001000", "brandName": "Rogue", "stickerDisplayText": "Clearance", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "Clearance", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Black/430930000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Sorry on my previous post - I meant to add that the waveform test should be done using guitars of same distance between bridge and nut so the vibrating string length is identical, and of course using identical pickups. You can then vary the woods, the hardware, the body type (hollow, semi, solid) etc. I think it would be interesting to use guitars with different overall string lengths depending on the stop piece used, whether the strings or through the body, and the arrangement of the tuners on the headstock.
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
×