Ritchie Blackmore: a variety of versions, each with a 22-fret neck, CBS large headstock with 1970s-style decals and two Gold Fender Lace Sensors; some variants have the neck set into the body rather than bolted on and a Roland GK2A synth pickup. Reintroduced in 2009 with a 21-fret maple neck, graduated scalloped rosewood fingerboard, Bullet truss rod nut with 3-bolt neck plate and Micro-Tilt neck adjustment, flush-mounted Jim Dunlop locking strap buttons and two Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound Flat single-coil pickups (the middle pickup is omitted, but the pickup hole for the middle pickup is still present).[15]
The body is clearly a tweaked vintage shape, meant to evoke — and depart from — a more-typical Strat-type. It’s an exceptionally comfortable guitar and the H-S-S pickup layout allows for wide-ranging tones. They’re definitely on the airy side, as can be expected at this price, but the guitar itself is good enough to withstand future upgrades, if you should desire them.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽
Potentiometers (Pots) for audio are used to adjust tone and volume. Pots are resistors with three terminals and a sliding contact (the wiper) that creates an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used (one side and the wiper), it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Potentiometers are most commonly used as control devices, such as volume control on audio equipment. A potentiometer for Audio applications would feature very low to no introduced noise.

Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
In order to keep your guitar clean, there are some tips that you should be aware of. When taking the strings off to clean the system, do so two or three at a time. If you are not changing strings, wipe them with a dry cloth after every session. Wiping down the fretboard with a damp cloth occasionally is enough to keep it in good shape. The pickups, tuners, bridges, and nuts can be cleaned in much the same way. The pickups on your guitar should be cleaned with a dry cloth. Be sure to only use gentle cleaning products on your guitar.
Pre-delay on the reverb can help separate it out from the source sound. If your reverb has no controls for pre-delay, you can simulate this using a simple delay on an aux track before the reverb. Decay Settings: Choosing the most appropriate reverb treatment for a song can be surprisingly difficult, especially if you have hundreds of presets to choose from. So, instead of regarding reverb like the glue that holds the mix together, try adjusting its parameters (and in particular the decay time) while listening to the reverb return by itself. If the decay time is too long you'll hear a continuous mush of sound; if it's too short you'll scarcely hear it unless its level is turned right up. Somewhere in the middle you should find a setting that adds rhythmic interest to your song, without overpowering it, making the reverb work for its keep. This is also a useful technique when using several reverbs in a song, to make sure they complement each other. Martin Walker


This book emphasizes tabs with the accompanying music notation. It’s not a long book and one that a beginner will likely outgrow at some point. However, it provides a good introduction to get you playing songs you’ll recognize fast. It does a fine job of explaining everything the newbie needs to know including how to position yourself. Build those good habits early!
If you haven't tried a higher end Yairi then you have missed it. These are great hand crafted guitars with a very good neck and great sound. They are branded Alverez in the US but be sure it is one of the Yairi made. There are not lots of them made due the the complete hand crafted design. You don't find them in the music stores much but they should be there. I have owned one for many years and have yet to pick up any other guitar that can match it in my opinion
As you can see, this is simply a case where the Les Paul Custom is a feature-rich product, with more qualities that Epiphone can highlight as buying incentive. All the same contextual advice applies, as the LP Custom is every bit as versatile as the Standard (if not more) and can hang in just about any musical style. When deciding between them it's more a matter of price and aesthetics than any kind of style or playing scenario.
A free, guided tour of the Taylor Guitars factory is given every Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. (excluding holidays). Taylor’s expansive 145,000 square foot manufacturing facility is located east of San Diego (about 20 minutes from the downtown area) in El Cajon, California. No reservations are necessary for the tour, although the company asks that large groups (more than 10) call in advance at (619) 258-1207. Taylor encourages guests to arrive at its Visitor Center, where the tour begins, 10-15 minutes prior to tour time to sign in at the reception desk. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes. While not physically demanding, it does include a fair amount of walking.

Three and one half steps down from Drop D. Used by Darkest Hour on the song "Wasteland", Attack Attack!, Baroness (on their first two EPs), The Acacia Strain (on some songs), Dead by April (on some songs) and In Flames (on the song "Transparent" from Reroute to Remain). Chelsea Grin also used this tuning on their album Ashes to Ashes. Also Pantera and Whitechapel recorded Sandblasted Skin in G-g-C-F-A-D, Drop G variation with D standard.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.
Back when they were starting, Jackson guitars were only available to the elite few, mostly heavy metal artists. After being acquired by Fender, Jackson has since expanded into the entry level realm with mass produced versions of their popular guitar designs, including the Dinky shape. The JS11 Dinky does just that, making the Jackson Dinky a beginner and student friendly instrument that more players can enjoy.
A real hall-of-famer from Ibanez, which displays true rock style and lightning-fast playability in an affordable beginner-friendly package. With the classic Superstrat body in a range of colors, this RG is made of solid basswood and features a slick, thin Wizard III maple neck, with rosewood fretboard and 24 jumbo frets, making it superb for chugging powerchords and fast soloing.

When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.
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Another name that is usually associated with PRS is Carlos Santana. He has a number of guitars that bear his name, and this one is probably the most popular one. It’s affordable, sounds great and plays like a dream. After mere hours playing it, I’ve realized just how expressive you can be with it. It impressed me enough to take a high place on my list of guitars that I have to get. Needless to say, it didn’t take me long to make one a part of my collection.
I want to focus on acoustic guitar but some electric is alright. Mainly I want to build up a repertoire of songs that MOST people will know if heard and be able to sing a long. Currently I know very few songs such as this but I have been playing off and on for years. Any really popular (old or newish is fine) songs that are not impossible to play would be great. Thanks!
Aside from possible engineering advantages, some feel that in relation to the rising cost of rare tonewoods, man-made materials may be economically preferable and more ecologically sensitive. However, wood remains popular in production instruments, though sometimes in conjunction with new materials. Vigier guitars, for example, use a wooden neck reinforced by embedding a light, carbon fiber rod in place of the usual heavier steel bar or adjustable steel truss rod. After-market necks made entirely from carbon fiber fit existing bolt-on instruments. Few, if any, extensive formal investigations have been widely published that confirm or refute claims over the effects of different woods or materials on electric guitar sound.
Pickups are meant to capture (pick up) the strings' vibration. Now, the pickup closest to the neck captures the strings' vibrations at their highest amplitude, which results in a warm sound with lots of lows. Conversely, the pickup closest to the bridge captures the strings' vibrations at their lowest amplitude, rendering a bright and sharp sound. So, the same pickup will have a different sound depending on its position. That's why most guitars are equipped with several pickups.
Ah, this is an interesting subject. I could never play a Rick, nor buy back my 1966 Fender XII, so I bought a Dano, then another which I kept and could play (nut width). Then around 2000 I bought a Yamaha Pacifica 12 -the blueburst with gold hardware. I had the nut intonated, like all my other guitars (this was before Earvana which I am about to try out my first "drop in" on a new parts Strat, Epi Night Hawk and a GS Mini on layaway). The Pacifica is good tho again only 1+11/16ths " and I am ready for 1+3/4 or even better 1+7/8ths. I bought a set of Duncan Designed lipsticks for it, thinking I could easily find a neck with 1+7/8ths nut. No joy, yet, tho I have talked to a builder about one and am trying to sort out whether to do that to the Pacifica or use a really nice looking cherry stained strat body that I've had for 31 years.
Of all of the variables available to a musician, from amps to instruments, the effects pedal is king.  They can offer a player the ability to change the tone and color of their sound in a way that can create unique sonic textures never before heard, or reproduce the traditional reliable tones of yesteryear.  Many players, like U2’s The Edge, use effects to carve out their own personal identity amongst the herd.
I love this guitar! I am so happy with this axe and haven't put it down since it arrived. I don't think that you will find a better value in the Martin lineup, especially for an all solid wood guitar and a free HSC. People complain because this wasn't made in the USA, but I don't think that anyone would complain after playing this beauty. The action right out of the box was perfect, just like any high end Martin should be (plays like my HD28 and D18). This thing plays like butter and is silky smooth. Some people complain about the stratabond neck, but I love the feel of it and it is rock solid and should last forever! The finish and style of the guitar is very minimalistic, which is something that I love. It may be too plain for some people, but I love it. Something just
All I can say is quit wasting $ on new. A new guitar is like a new car it’s gonna lose 20% of its value once you take it out the first time. Unless you are buying a Gibson or fender custom shop etc Just go for what plays and sounds great. Perfect example is the Esp ltd ec401vf or 400. Used $300-400 has stock seymour duncan 59 neck jb bridge or the newer 401 has the dimarzio’s in it. Grovers tuners earvana nut mahogany body. Just an excellent setup for half the price of an epi les paul. Don’t get me wrong I have an Epi les paul traditional pro and it’s a nice guitar but for $750 nah. Since I picked up the 401 I hardly play my jag mustang or either of my epi l.p. or sg. Its just that nice of a guitar. If you are in the market for a les paul style or a new guitar in general take a look at the 400 series it’s a whole lot of guitar for the $
In our testing, the Fender Champion 20 was the only amp that offered a wide variety of amplifier sounds and special effects while also keeping them all easy to access. Beginners can get a great sound easily and experiment with different effects without having to invest in separate effects pedals. Experienced players can get most of the sounds they want with nothing more than a guitar, an amp, and a cable.
Revamp the entire company staff from the C.E.O. down to the lowest level managers. Give workers raises. Treat them like human beings. Be nicer and friendlier. Reduce stress levels and not have such a toxic atmosphere. Make the daily numbers actually feasible and actually attainable without having to work 15 hrs. to achieve them. Have accountability on all levels - checks and balances- from C.E.O. down to lower management. Recognize the workers are human, and not robots!
Interestingly, the neck is crafted from maple, topped by a 20-fret walnut fingerboard which complements the back and sides nicely. Following the specs of older Gibson guitars, the scale length is shorter at 24.75", while the nut width is 1.725", which gives the instrument a comfortable playing feel. Adding to the already good vale of this guitar is the built-in LR Baggs Element electronics for stage performance, with discrete soundhole mounted volume control. If you are looking for a handcrafted workhorse acoustic guitar that will not break the bank, then check this out.
A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
Visually, what sets this guitar apart is its distinct headstock shape, but there's more to this guitar than meets the eye. Firstly, the guitar's top is crafted from solid cedar, an interesting wood choice because this type of wood is more commonly used on nylon string guitars. The warm tone of cedar matches nicely with the bright sound of wild cherry, a staple tonewood used on the back and sides of most Godin guitars. This combination gives the instrument a more distinct appearance and sound. Other features that don't follow the usual convention include the use of maple for the neck, and its B-Band M-450 T preamp system.

Looking for a super-hot, aggressive metal tone? You need a dedicated high-output humbucker that will crush any amp. Whether passive or active, it’s humbuckers that dominate the heavy rock and metal genres, offering huge power, mix-cutting melodic lead tone, and noise-cancelling abilities – just what’s need when the volume and gain increase. For gigging metal guitarists, humbuckers are pretty much essential. This genre has some great affordable options that will turn any axe into a tone monster, as well as some high-end signature pickup sets from legends such as Dimebag Darrell and Mick Thomson, while the premium James Hetfield Humbucker Set from EMG is one of the best purchases a gigging metal guitarist can buy!
Delay pedals are among the most popular effects around, and the reason is simple: A delay pedal not only gives your sound a professional sheen and adds a three-dimensional quality—even when set for a discreet, atmospheric effect—but it can also produce a wide variety of not-so-subtle sounds and textures, ranging from ear-twisting rhythmic repeats (à la Eddie Van Halen’s “Cathedral”) to faux twin-guitar harmonies and live looping.

This is the first, and quite possibly the best reason to invest in a good miniature guitar amp. It will allow you to play with a tone that’s enjoyable at a volume that won’t get you kicked out by your condo board. Even if you live out in the middle of nowhere, and can blast your Dual Rectifier full stack as loudly as you’d like, you still have to take the feelings of those you live with into account. Few marriages remain happy when a loud instrument is in the mix. That’s also why a mini amp is a great gift for a young student guitarist. You won’t have to hear them butcher the relatively simple line from a David Bowie tune for days on end.
In 1952 the pickup selection circuit was modified by Fender to incorporate a real tone control. Between 1953 and 1967 the neck could be selected alone with a pre-set bassy sound and no tone control, in the middle switch the neck could be selected alone with the tone control and finally the bridge could be selected with the tone control. Although this provided the player with a proper tone control, this assembly did away with any sort of pickup combination. Eventually from late 1967 Fender again modified the circuit for the final time to give the Telecaster a more traditional twin pickup switching system: neck pickup alone with tone control in the first position, both pickups together with the tone control in the middle position and in the third position the bridge pickup alone with the tone control.[2]
Phaser: A phaser or "phase shifter" creates a slight rippling effect—amplifying some aspects of the tone while diminishing others—by splitting an audio signal in two and altering the phase of one portion. Three well-known examples of phaser are the two handed tapping part on the Van Halen instrumental "Eruption" and the keyboard parts on Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are" and Paul Simon's "Slip Slidin' Away".[77]
I have had Tracy do quite abit of work for me many times going back since the 90’s, however, now I am “on my own” living a long way from his shop. He is a super craftsman for sure and I wanted to watch how to do some minor things on my own as well as be able to help educate myself before finding someone locally to work on my guitars in the future. Great explanations and for my reference in future.
Does anyone know anything about Palmer based Magnum Series PGA-65 guitar amps? I live in Costa Rica and bought one new from a music shop but with the amount of moisture here the original box was destroyed along with any manuals, paperwork, etc.. The amp says it is manufactured in China and is solid state. It is supposedly 65 watts with 2 channels, clean and dirty with EQ sections on both channels. It also has send and returns and a spot to plug in your Cd player, etc.. It has a big badge on the front saying Magnum Series, Palmer Guitar Company, Fl Usa. I didn't pay alot for it and for the price it is a decent sounding amp although I probably will replace the speaker with a Celestion.

The most famous Gibson guitar is the Les Paul, which has been a mainstay in the music world for decades. The Gibson Les Paul is a high-end, made-in-the USA instrument, and it comes in a few different variations. Like Fender, Gibson has remained fairly consistent with their styles and designs. In addition to the Les Paul, other famous Gibson electric guitars include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird. Their classic acoustics include the Hummingbird.

We’ve all been there, and it’s actually pretty easy to fix once you know how. The reason we hit those walls in our playing or get bored with what we’re currently doing is that we start falling into set patterns with our playing (pentatonic scale over and over again, anyone?). Whatever we’re playing starts to feel stale and derivative because we’ve gone over it so many times, and it can end up being a pretty frustrating experience.

Taylor’s 214ce Grand Auditorium acoustic guitar has undergone a few changes over the years. One of the latest improvements added in 2017 concerns the wood used for the body. Because of the restrictions on the importation of rosewood, Taylor no longer uses it for their 200 series of guitars, which the 214ce is a part of. Instead, the company used the next best wood for a great, balanced tonal response: Hawaiian koa.
You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.

One of the best and most affordable gigging amps I have ever played. Blackstar accommodates all styles and budgets and should be in place of line 6. Too many people want traditional tone, but Blackstar brings a new edge to the table and builds extremely reliable tough as nails amps with new ideas like the ID series amps, I own an ht40 and am extremely impressed. Get one.


And that's a wrap. If you're new to the pedal game, don't let anyone tell you that there are no rules. There are some very strict rules that apply if you want to sound professional, and these rules quickly reduce the amount of options down to very few, indeed. The honest and realistic among us will tell you the truth that there is a very firm effects pedal order you should connect your pedals in that you don't want to stray from unless you want to ruin your tone and appear to not know what you're doing. Guitar pedal order matters!
Just like in a conventional guitar, an electric guitar also has 6 strings with tuning knobs and frets. However, unlike the hollow body and cavity of an acoustic guitar, a solid body usually forms the lower part of an electric guitar. The long neck of the electric guitar consists of magnetic pickups, parts which produce the magnetic field and which are located just below the metal strings. The magnetic pickups are connected to the amplifier with an internal electrical circuit. The long neck of an electric guitar also consists of knobs for adjusting the elasticity of metal strings.
Johnny Marr is a chief architect of the post-modern rock-guitar aesthetic. As the guitarist for seminal Eighties poetic pop stars the Smiths, he created a tonal palette and crisp stylistic approach that still forms the roadmap for much modern rock guitar playing. It was Marr who created the orchestral guitar soundscapes that enhanced the moody drama of Smiths singer Morrissey’s introspective lyrics and ironically detached vocals.
There are two basic tremolo circuits found in classic amps; power tube tremolo and photocell tremolo. They produce basically the same effect, a fluctuation in volume. For the best definitions I have come across I’ll borrow from the Strymon website: “Power Tube Tremolo utilized the LFO signal to directly influence the power tube bias of the amplifier’s push-pull output stage. The power tubes are biased into lower and higher idle currents, creating the fluctuating gain that produces the tremolo effect. The effects of crossover distortion at low tremolo volumes, increased power tube harmonic distortion at maximum tremolo volumes, as well as the influence of power-supply sag, all add up to the boggy and dirty nature of this tremolo circuit.”
The Quantum pickup configuration of H-S-H offers a wide variety of tones, and since this isn’t a Telecaster, having a humbucker in the neck position is especially nice, I find. That single coil in the middle should be used more as a coloring device on selector positions two and four than as a straight-ahead choice. Augment the natural fullness of the humbuckers with a little jangle from the single coil and you’re in business.
The first burst of interest in Explorer-style guitars in the 1970s, led by players such as Rick Derringer and Sammy Hagar, was followed by a hiatus at the end of the decade when guitarists followed an Alembic-style lead. However, natural-finished neck-through guitars with sophisticated electronics didn’t cut it with the heavy metal bands that became more popular in the early 1980s with the New Wave of British Heavy Metal and the subsequent American response, chiefly out of Los Angeles. Poofy hair and skin-tight spandex begged for guitars with in-your-face style. The radical Explorer shape was perfect for making the right kind of personal stage statement. Manufacturers jumped on the bandwagon. Baby Deans, Ibanez, Aria, Cort… Even Gibson offered Explorers in cool custom graphics.
The 2555X Silver Jubilee reissue has the same silver vinyl covering used on the originals, and looks just as handsome. The controls are pleasingly familiar, with a simple front panel layout featuring controls for bass, mid, treble, presence, together with a preamp gain and two master volume controls - one for lead and one for rhythm. A push/pull switch on the output master volume changes channels, while another on the gain knob flips the 2555X into rhythm clip mode, changing the clean channel into something a lot more aggressive. The third rocker switch changes the output stage mode from pentode to triode, dropping the power from 100 down to around 50 watts, and softening the attack a little. The sparse rear panel also features a series effects loop, a fixed-level frequency-compensated DI output, and a jack socket for a single-button footswitch, used to change channels. Overall, the 2555X is built to last and look good for a long time, with Marshall's typically high build quality and attention to detail. Apart from its association with Slash, Joe Bonamassa, and various other high-profile users, the main reason why 2555s are so sought after is their sound. We're pleased to report that the reissue amp is tonally as accurate as it possibly could be, with perhaps a touch more gain and low-end punch than the original. The 2555X accurately reproduces the original tone - and with a few minor exceptions, the look - of the original, at a price that's very reasonable compared with the competition, especially for a UK-made product.
Chabot Guitars - Paul Chabot used to offer quality hand made Classical guitars (Colorado, USA) "Paul first apprenticed und er guitar maker / repairman Robert Buchanan, where he became familiar with the aspects of guitar repair, and guitar refinishing. Furthering his ability and knowledge, Paul attended Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery where he learned the basics of wood, instrument design and guitar making. Not long after graduating from Roberto-Venn, Paul was fortunate enough to apprentice under world renowned Master guitar maker Augustino Lo Prinzi. Through Augustino Lo Prinzi, Paul was able to learn some of the most proven methods and advanced techni ques of fine guitar making."
After you have good coverage, let it dry for a few days or until it has hardened up enough. Inspect the surface for and runs or imperfections. If there are any runs them you can wet sand them flat with 800 grit wet sand paper and a sanding block. Usualy you will be able to see if there is any grain showing that you might not have filled up when you preped the body. If there is them apply a few more coats to cover it up and wet sand it to make it level.

Rule 4 – Taking sound-making devices like stompbox pedals out of the equation, there’s an order to the way sounds naturally occur in physical space. For example, guitar amp distortion is made in physical space by turning an amp up enough to cause its circuits to overload, and any echo you might hear happens after the distorted sound hits walls or ceilings and bounces back to your ears. Therefore, logic says that your reverb and/or delay pedals should be last in the signal path, since that is how the sounds they produce actually occur in three-dimensional space.
Been meaning to try this for years.... Should have done it earlier! It really works well for me, despite a puny Atom cpu in an HP netbook and a kludged lead from an electric Ukulele stuck into the microphone socket. Yes, this lash-up can be noisy - the impedances are mismatched, the signal levels too, but a very respectable result indeed. The processing is highly effective and the presets are (of course) variable in their suitability (not every effect is ideal for a ukulele) with gems that include a really decent and surprising choice of autowah effects. Never thought I'd say that. The user interface is logical, but there is a lot of it. That's because it can do so much. Fortunately there is a 'Random' button that creates random new patches for you - keep pushing it and some fun stuff can emerge. Documentation is helpful - press F1 and have a look, it even includes hardware suggestions and hints. I intend to follow that religiously so as to get the best from this gem - and I'll be spending money to get the suggested full fat Behringer interface (~£20) from Amazon, and trying a less-compact machine with some more CPU to see if that adds to the experience. Problems? A couple of the presets do seem to crash Rakarrack - but apart from that irt has been solid. Recommended to give it a go, if you have not already done so. Both guitar an uke work well with this.
You can set an octave to play the higher or lower notes or both at the same time. This is ideal for those who want to really thicken up their sound and are often used by heavy metal guitarists to make solos and riffs sound really cool! The Valeton OC-10 Octave pedal is a budget friendly choice and the Electro Harmonix Nano Pog is an industry standard option.
G&L, owned by Leo Fender, is yet another brand producing quality guitars. (Of course, when it is owned by the same owner as that of Fender, one can expect the extent of quality of these guitars.) Many of the G&L guitars seem to relive the Fender classic designs with some improvisations in style. Thus, this brand can indeed be considered an excellent alternative to Fender. Instead, in many instances, you will find G&L outnumbering Fender.

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We have already covered one Behringer reverb, which was the epitome of affordable and functional simplicity. However, this brand has a couple more aces up their sleeve, including the more advanced RV600 (click for full review). What this pedal offers is a significantly more versatile solution that brings you additional flexibility at a bargain price.

Introduced in 1987 and discontinued in 1994, the Ibanez RG550 remains the childhood sweetheart of many players. Designed as a mass-appeal version of Steve Vai’s famous JEM777 model, it had character in abundance. For this reboot, Ibanez has skilfully managed to extract the very essence of what was so popular about the original RG550 and piece it back together in a way that enhances its legacy. The Japanese-made 2018 vintage is, essentially, a masterclass in everything that is good about shred and metal guitars. The neck feels lithe - your hand glides, rather than simply moving - while the Edge vibrato is rock-solid and the overall craftsmanship is exemplary. Tonally, the RG550 covers a lot of bases. It always did, despite its pointy appearance, meaning you could comfortably stray into all kinds of genres without too much fuss. The US-designed V7 bridge humbucker delivers the razor-sharp riff platform you’d hope it would, while the V8 neck ’pup offers a hint of compression at higher gain settings, which levels lead lines nicely. It is, in the best way possible, everything you remembered from the original, and that makes it one of the best shred guitars available today.
Designed to be the greatest all-rounder, the Grand Auditorium shape was the perfect blend of size, shape, volume and comfort, and its modern-day incarnation has seen the likes of the biggest pop star on the planet these days, Taylor Swift pick one up. People forget that before mega-stardom, Taylor was a respected country artist, and it was on a Taylor Grand Auditorium that she plied her trade.
1. Blackstar ID:15 TVP ($229): This is one of the best combo amps on the market and with good reason: it comes with a variety of options to not only get you playing in no time. It also allows you to record very easily with a built-in USB option. You can select from six different power responses modeled after popular tube amp sounds (via Blackstar’s True Valve Power system) and even when turned down, the amp doesn’t lose its bite. The built-in multi-effects allow you to experiment with the world of effects and the Insider Software allows you to edit up to 128 user storable patches to further your sonic crafting.
Like his conversational singing, Willie Nelson's guitar playing is deceptively laidback, playfully offbeat and instantly recognizable. Amazingly, Nelson has been playing the same Martin M-20 classical guitar, nicknamed Trigger, since 1969; it has defined his sound, a nylon-stabbing mix of country, blues and Django Reinhardt's gypsy jazz. Though the guitar now has a large gaping hole, Nelson still plays it nightly. "I have come to believe we were fated for each other," he said. "The two of us even look alike. We are both pretty battered and bruised."
By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
Read Full Review The brand ESP that we all know today started its roots as a shop in Tokyo Japan selling custom replacement parts for guitars that quickly gained a good reputation for its high quality. Soon came after the brand manufactured fully assembled guitars that burst in the trash metal seen of the 80’s signing in big name bands to carry their guitars and basses.
Taylor Guitars is an American guitar brand based in California. The company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and it has since grown into one of the largest and most respected acoustic guitar companies. Taylor guitars are recognized for their incredible quality, craftsmanship, and innovation, while still being an accessible guitar at a reasonable price.
The Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo also features USB connectivity allowing you to hook it up to your computer or DAW software for easy recording. If you don’t already have a DAW, you can utilise the free downloads of Fender FUSE and Ableton Live software suites to create your own music and take advantage of all the great features within the amplifier when recording. An intuitive, easy to use control panel allows you to see and change your sounds and footswitch connectivity (sold separately) ensures you can have complete control without the need for a pedalboard. A fantastic amplifier for beginners and players of all levels.
There are lot of great amp out there, but there are overpriced. Peavey prove they can do almost as great as other for a really more decent price. Moreover, they have great features and technical improvement that the "classic" manufactureres avoid to be focus on vintage sound and their reputation... The bandit 112 is a bargain. The valveking series was great budget valve amp for metal. Classic 30 and 6505 are interesting too. Vypr series was also great but it seems their recent series have issues... Anyway they build great amp and doesn't scam people as others do... check it out!
The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!
Hello all. I have a brand name guitar, which was very popular in the 1980s, and still is being manufactured under Gibson today. I didn't see it in your list though. It's a Kramer Stagemaster. It's a beautiful guitar, which I may never part with. Strat-Style with Neck-Thru-Body & Floyd Rose Trem. The headstock states Kramer American. These were passed off as American made models, however I understand that they were actually made in Japan. The style and appointments are strikingly similar to my Ibanez Proline 2550 from the same era, which has 'Crafted in Japan' written on the headstock. I know that Kramer made a lot of American made guitars out of Neptune, New Jersey, however these were all bolt-on neck guitars. Does anyone know where these Neck-Thru Kramers were made, or why they have American printed on the headstock if they are not tues American made guitars?
You have all the control you need over your effects and you can use all three at the same time, too – ideal for those who like to create big walls of sound. The delay features a tap tempo control, whilst the FX loop connectivity allows you to hook up any other effects pedals you might have before the delay, which ensures the tonal qualities of those pedals are intact.
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One oil finish that many luthiers use and recommend is Tru-Oil, which was originally formulated for finishing gun stocks. It is the oil finish that Luthier's Mercantile carries, and if you Google for Tru-Oil you will find plentry of information about using it on guitars including some very good instructions. And those instructions will help you with Danish Oil as well.
The use of "full range, flat response" (FRFR) amplification systems by electric guitarists has received an extra impetus from modeling amplifiers. Before widespread availability of modeling, guitarists did not commonly plug electric guitars straight into PA systems or powered speakers, because most genres relied on the tonal coloration of a regular guitar amplifier setup—from the preamplifier, equalization filters, power amp, guitar speakers, and cabinet design. The FRFR approach assumes the tone is shaped by sound processors in the signal chain before the amplifier and speaker stage, so it strives to not add further coloration[20] or dedicated combo-style amplifiers with a broad frequency range.[21] Such processors can be traditional guitar effects, a modeling amplifier (without power amplifier), or a computer running tone-shaping software.[20] Using a modeling amp or a multi effects pedal used with line level output, a guitarist can plug in the guitar into a flat response mic input or into a keyboard amplifier.
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Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
IK Multimedia are good friends of ours and we’ve watched them grow from a small plugin company to a world-beating manufacturer of amazing widgets for getting sound in and out of your iPhone or iPad. Amplitube Custom Shop is the software you need to buy their premium plugins. However, it comes with a load of amazing stuff out-of-the-box, including 9 stomp box emulations, 4 amps, 5 cabs and more.

Established over a century ago as a piano and reed organ builder, Yamaha has since expanded into building other musical equipment and even went on to successfully expand into other industries. But in all this success, Yamaha continues to stay true to their musical roots, producing highly rated instruments, amps and other gear. While they are not primarily a guitar amplifier builder, Yamaha's extensive reach and resources give them an almost unfair advantage over the competition, as exemplified by the success of their THR line of desktop guitar amplifiers. This line of portable amps combines Yamaha's penchant for student friendly features and modern studio functions that many guitarists appreciate, ultimately securing Yamaha a special spot on this list.


In jazz big bands, popular during the 1930s and 1940s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four strums to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent of this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.
Most players will immediately think of the Jazz guitarist Charlie Christian, who brought the Gibson ES-150 to fame with the Benny Goodman Quartet.  Many top notch players realized that the tone these instruments could offer was unparalleled, and began to use them in their own illustrious careers, such as George Benson and Pat Metheny, alongside the other countless masters that wield these masterfully crafted instruments.
Guitar pedals and other effects, including an early version of the wah-wah pedal used by Jimi Hendrix and the Tone Bender fuzzbox pedal, a Vox variation on the famous original Gary Hurst Tone Bender (used by Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin and Jeff Beck of the Yardbirds as well as The Beatles, Spencer Davis and others), were also marketed by Vox and later on manufactured in Italy.
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.

We think the reason this book is so good is because of its readability. That is, it starts very slowly in theory, and Tom does an excellent job of explaining the constructs of music theory in simple and understandable terms. From there, the concepts are set up in such a way that is easy to follow and very thorough. Mr. Kolb did a great job of laying out the sequence of the topics to make them understandable to someone picking up a guide to music theory for the first time.


Another LTD model that is easily on the same level as the standard ESP stuff is the MH-100QMNT. The guitar comes from the very top of LTD’s entry level lineup, and brings a great price to performance ratio. I’ve had a lot of time to play with this guitar, and at first it didn’t sit right with me. As I played it more, I got used to the contour of the neck and the way its body ‘moves’. From that point on, ESP LTD MH-100QMNT grew on me rather quickly.
12-string acoustic guitars have six string courses, each with two strings that are tuned to produce a chiming, chorus effect. Usually, the string pairs in the bass courses are tuned an octave apart while all treble strings are tuned in unison. Some guitarists prefer tuning the second string in the third course (G) in unison while others opt to tune it an octave higher for bell-like ringing tones.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  1 Meg Ohm, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.

Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown
Finally, vintage gear tends to display more variation from unit to unit relative to modern gear. Fifty years ago the technician winding pickups might have been distracted and left the pickup on the winding machine a little longer then normal, resulting in a coil with extra windings of wire and a hotter output. Modern standardization is usually a good thing-you’re less likely to encounter unwanted surprises. On the other hand, the relatively casual standards of the past sometimes resulted in happy accidents.

You can think of these pedals like modulation effects that change nothing but the timing. They split up the signal in the same way, but time-based effects don’t usually make any major changes to the copied signal. Instead, they hold it back by a certain length of time before mixing it back in. This makes a few different varieties of pedal possible:


With an entire industry surviving off musicians’ insatiable desire for the ultimate guitar tone, it seems obvious that some company would have cracked the code for the greatness. After all, corporate chain restaurants can quantify that if they use X of fat, Y of salt, and Z of sweet in their latest enormo-burger, then consumers across the country will salivate. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple with music.
At one point, Fender switched to producing guitars with the bridge pickup located farthest from the highest-amplitude portion of the vibrating strings, slightly “over-wound”, thus increasing the signal output from that pickup. Even more overwound pickups (“hot-wired” designs) became popular, either for all three pickups (a “hot” configuration), or for the bridge position only (so-called “Texas Hot” due to its popularity among Southern Rock guitarists).
Vacuum tubes were the dominant active electronic components in bass amplifiers manufactured from the 1950s until the early 1970s, and tubes continue to be used in the 2010s for expensive bass combo amplifiers, amp heads, and preamplifiers (as well, tube amps continue to be used by audiophiles for some expensive home hifi stereo systems). Tube amplifiers for bass almost always use class AB1 topology for efficiency reasons.

Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
Thanks for your opinion Sheils. While your advice is appreciated, certainly no two guitarists would come up with the same guitars for any given list, or present an article like this in the same way. However, you did mention a few points hopefully readers might find useful. Constructive feedback, and the expression of different opinions, is always welcome.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Ash - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 42.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Medium - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome - Pickups: CAP Double Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Black
Comfort is at the top of the SUB Silo3’s priorities. Its curvy body has contours in all the right places, its asymmetrical neck profile—it’s slightly slimmer towards the treble strings—feels natural in your hand, and even the vintage-style tremolo bridge has a flat surface to rest your palm on. Add a light basswood body, and you’re ready to rock for hours on end.
Based on the popular Les Paul Jr, the Saga LJ-10 DIY electric guitar kit follows after its streamlined aesthetics and electronics. It comes with the popular LP style body, crafted from basswood and pre-drilled for complete assembly. It has a bolt-on neck that you have to screw into the body, and a headstock that you can carve into your preferred shape.
I played a hollowbody Ibanez almost exactly like this Artcore back when I was studying Jazz guitar in college. For the aspiring Jazz beginners out there, this is the guitar to start with if you’re wanting to stick closer to the “traditional” Jazz-type guitar without spending a fortune. However, make no mistake, this isn’t just a Jazz guitar. With 2 humbuckers you’ve got plenty of muscle for Blues, Rock, Rockabilly, etc.
Because of this, the VI opens the door for critique at the smallest degree, but I couldn’t even get that far before finding problems. The strumming is so terribly robotic out of the box, and the sounds divided among the four guitars (Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, and “bright” and “normal” versions of a Duesenberg StarPlayer) aren’t screaming authenticism either.  

Besides insulting Taylor Swift in a way even Katy Perry would bristle at (“Nobody would confuse the pop star’s chops with Bonnie Raitt’s. But she does play a guitar.”), Edgers manages to make it through an entire history of the electric-guitar industry as it stands without quoting more than one female guitar player — the Runaways’s guitarist Lita Ford. Any person who has actually interrogated the music landscape deeper than, say, an Eric Clapton record would recognize that the electric guitar isn’t dying. The throngs of women who play electric guitar just don’t get exalted or celebrated in the same way as aging men. But there are legions of women playing guitar — maybe Edgers just hasn’t been paying attention.
ESP LTDs are a ripoff. All the money goes into the finish and nothing else. Cheap hardware and poor electronics. All of the LTDs I've ever owned couldn't stay in tune worth a damn, have noisy, pop-y switches and crappy pots. I have the Viper 400, and it's an overrated turd. Luckily I got it for a steal. Thing can't stay in tune AT ALL. I will be replacing the alleged Grover tuners with real Grover lockers. That still doesn't solve the issues with the soft finish and ultra-noisy electronics. Plus it has a humpy neck, a cracking neck joint (like all of my LTD set-necks) and the frets were likely leveled by a monkey considering the quality.
Received it right on time. It was a gift for my best friend and it turned out to be a lot more beautiful than expected. The shade of blue looks real classy and different in different lighting ! Yamaha is known for its magical sound and they maintain their name with this piece too! The guitar comes tuned , and sounds absolutely amazing ! Other website reviews say that it's not as loud, I didn't think so. It has a complete resounding sound that is pleasing to the ears ! My friend went in shock at the surprise and I went in shock with the unexpected high quality ! Definitely recommend, as a beginner or a pro, it's an easy to handle guitar that cradles comfortably between your arms and sounds perfect.
I bought a Palmer acoustic-electric about 10 years ago, for 185.00, used, it's white, with black trim, and still plays very well. I also can't find out where it's made, the neck is still straight, and the tone is good. It says hand crafted inside, and model p-38-12 and a letter I don't recognise, or is a misprint. the pick-ups are near the last frets, small screws, almost hidden. The neck is kinda wide, but you get used to it. Thats all for now, I'll bet all their guitars are pretty good.
This multi effects pedals brings all that shine of the studio in a single compact device. Now you have state of the art processors like flanger (click here for flange pedals), chorus, a phaser pedal, delay, a vocal effects processing device, and tremolo and pitch shifter in your bare hands. Apart from such features, you also get a mind-blowing back up of 24-bit/40 kHz resolution that turns your jamming into a soulful experience.

There are just a few minor differences. For example it has a bolt-on mahogany neck instead of a set neck, and the fretboard is made of rosewood rather than expensive ebony. We don’t really care about that, since rosewood actually is really good for fretboard since it’s naturally oily. You don’t want a super dry fretboard. It’s good for the sound too, since it captures some extra overtones that make your tone fuller, nothing goes to waste!


SOLD ; Fresh releas from the JVG Vintage Vault collection.....Here she is a wonderful sounding Exotic tone woods LawSuit model Takamine from the PeaK and end of this so called Lawsuit copies. What can I say this beauty has it all the Exotic Tone Woods the beautiful TONE the superior workmanship this example exhibits the care from its one owner. Its condition is better than average it has no cracks, no checking, no warping nothing to report, it does have a very few minor chips or dinks overall way better than average not exactly new or mint like its overall gorgeous and is easily a solid 9.5/10 used vintage excellent, its neck is arrow straight proper relief is set and action is beautifully low and it makes playing this beauty a dream like pleasure. She's been professionally set up with a new set of Martin strings. Intonation is dead on and she rings like a bell. Very rare to see this model up for sale and available to buy this guitar is Amazing and is a keeper.... SWEET! Contact Joe to buy it at: JVGuitars@gmail.com Thank you for looking.

Welcome to the gallery of Silvertone guitars from the VintageSilvertones.com collection! The instruments are listed in chronological order from left (oldest) to right (more recent). The gallery will continue to grow as we get more Silvertones. The purpose of this gallery is to help identify all the Vintage Silvertone guitars from the 1950's through the early 1970's. We're major fan of Silvertones and have discovered that there's a lot of misinformation out there.
If you do have logic of GarageBand they come with a vast sample library including lots of different guitar sounds, now combine that with melodyne and you can get some pretty convincing custom guitar parts. It's a slow process but it will sound a lot better than most straight VI's, I've done the same with brass section stuff in the past to good effect.
The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
JHS distributes them and they get really over the top cheesy reviews in the free magazine "gear" which is really just a JHS catalogue. Their endorsers include lists of "has beens" and "up and coming next big things". Trev Wilkinson no doubt has some good designs but gets more credit than he deserves for some of these copies. I've seen a few in the shops, and they range from not bad looking to absoloubtly terrible. I think they're very inconsistant, some I've picked up had very sharp fret ends. 

Wah pedals make exactly the noise they’re named after – yep a “Wah” noise! If you say to yourself “Wah, Wah, Wah” slowly, that’s the same sound the pedal makes. Imagine a baby crying in slow motion and you kind of get the idea. The Wah sound was probably best captured on “Foxy Lady” by Jimi Hendrix and is widely used in funk and rock solos thanks to its really cool sounding effect.

Well, we are not part of the study! The study has been conducted, and he’s just giving you the results, it was written nowhere that you had to guess which wood was which or anything of the sort. This doesn’t imply that his little kid (cause this is his son’s science project, remember) performed any form of double-blind test, but still your remark is completely inapplicable and actually turns back on you, that make a big fuss about this article’s sloppyiness, only to attack it with wrong logical reasoning.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-
Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.
Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavlly, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation with single-coil pickups, and sometimes with a Bigsby tremolo, has long been popular in country and rockabilly; it has a distinctly more twangy, biting tone than the classic jazzbox. The term archtop refers to a method of construction subtly different from the typical acoustic (or "folk" or "western" or "steel-string" guitar): the top is formed from a moderately thick (1 inch (2.5 cm)) piece of wood, which is then carved into a thin (0.1 inches (0.25 cm)) domed shape, whereas conventional acoustic guitars have a thin, flat top.
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