I bought mine used in 1989 in a mom and pop music store in the North GA mountains in Cumming GA and have loved it everysence I Know very little about it except that I would not trade it for a new one. The sustain in the body of the overtone note is fantastic and rare to find.I use d'Addario phosphorus bronze strings 11 - 52 and would not change anything about this guitar,fantastic!!! Thanks Victor
no. first of all a bass guitar has 4 strings and a guitar has 6 strings second, u couldn't tune the guitar open notes a whole octave down to create the bass notes as the strings would be too loose. although you can play bass songs on a guitar but it wouldn't be as deep a bass. Actually you can. depending on the kind of way your guitar is built you can remove your guitar strings and replace them with bass strings and finally adjust the setting on your amp so you can have a rich full tone. I have a Fender Squier and made it into a bass by replacing the strings and adjusting the settings on my amp. WARNING: you NEED to know if your bridge or the place where you put the bass strings through can hold the pressure the bass string apply.

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Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.
Ibanez started off as a Japanese music company particularly focused towards producing copies of favorite guitars in America. Today, they have surpassed most firms by offering best quality products on their own. Being specifically directed towards the hard rock and metal players, Ibanez ensures to have something for players belonging to every genre.

The two new Fender-style solidbody basses were the Precisely and Naked. The double-cutaway Precisely U1971 had a single pickup under a chrome cover, covered bridge/tailpiece assembly, Fender-style four-in-line head, dot-inlaid rosewood fingerboard, black-white-black pickguard with fingerrest, volume and tone. The Precisely had an outlined logo decal and a sunburst finish. The Naked U1971N was the same thing, natural-finished. Both cost $250.


Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.
In this range, you will find many premium options. Many guitars in this range will offer some of the best features available. Again, you will find many upgrades from less-expensive models. Often, these are considered the standard models. Of course, you certainly don’t have to spend $1000 to get a great guitar. However, most guitars of this caliber will satisfy even the most discerning player. Musician’s Friend’s Private Reserve collection includes instruments that cater to the most demanding professional guitarists’ requirements.
Also worth an honourable mention is the iconic Gibson Hummingbird, a square-shoulder dreadnought named after the bird which Gibson best felt described its unique qualities. The Hummingbird is one of those unique things in that it’s an acoustic guitar which eschewed the industry-standard natural wood finish of around 98% of its peers in favour of a cheery sunburst finish more commonly seen on Gibson’s now famous electric guitars like the Les Paul and ES-335.

Also, a quick note on the topic of high pass filters: use them. They can be your best friend, but be careful as they're a double-edged sword. HP filters can quickly clean mud from your mix and open things up, but too much can lead to a thin, weak-sounding mix equally as quick. When applying them, I like to come from the top down, as I find that easier to dial in properly. By that, I mean instead of rolling up an HP filter and listening until I think it's removed what I'm looking for, I start way above with "too much" HP filtering and roll it down until I feel that I have all the information on the bottom I need. I find it easier to hear the effect this way, which therefore allows me to more accurately and effectively control my low end.

The Epiphone brand scores another spot in this list with the Hummingbird Pro, a stylized take on the popular dreadnought shape. This guitar is the affordable version of the original Gibson Hummingbird, as seen in the hands of big name artists like Keith Richards, Noel Gallagher, Sheryl Crow and many more. It is a modern and more cost effective take on the guitar that Keith used on many of The Rolling Stones' popular tracks, including "Play with Fire" and "Satisfaction".


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That's what I was thinking. Have you seen what those things go for when one does pop up for sale? It's nothing for those to go for close to $10k. That's insane for something non-vintage, but that's just my opinion. It's a bit excessive for what's essentially a two humbucker shredder, even if it is handmade over the course of nine years and the body is a piece of a 12th century Viking ship that's been soaked in mead for six centuries and aged to exquisiteness or whatever the fuck. I blame Misha Mansoor. He's got a bunch of guitar nerds all fucked up in the head now.
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.
Electric guitars are capable of producing a multitude of different sounds, ranging from the purest cleans right through to saturated distortion and feedback. Many factors influence the final recorded sound; the type of guitar and amp, and any stompbox or rack-mounted effects used will shape the initial tone. The choice of microphone(s) and mic’ing techniques, too, along with any studio processing, will also contribute to the end result. Your playing style is also crucial; experiment by playing with fingers or a variety of plectrum gauges until you get the right attack. While most guitarists play with a pick, coins can also be used to produce interesting harmonic overtones – just ask Brian May or Billy Gibbons.

Eric Clapton: select alder body with a special soft V-shaped maple neck/fretboard, 22 vintage-style frets, three Vintage Noiseless pickups, 25dB active mid-boost circuit and a “blocked” original vintage synchronized tremolo. Available in olympic white, pewter, candy green, torino red (Artist Series), Antigua burst, gold leaf, EC grey, daphne blue, graffiti canvas, mercedes blue, black and midnight blue (Custom Artist), as well in olympic white, torino red and pewter with a “Thinskin” nitrocellulose lacquer finish (Custom Thinskin Nitro).
Considering that the setup on a factory-fresh guitar might be good or bad (and few music stores bother to do setup on inexpensive guitars), we strongly recommend that you have a new guitar professionally set up, which will likely cost about $50. You can also learn to do it yourself; there are plenty of online tutorials, and even at age 15 I managed to figure out how to set up my first electric guitar with a little guidance from my guitar teacher. It’s a good idea for every electric guitarist to at least learn how to set action (string) height because you will want to adjust this to suit your style and skills as they evolve.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
Description: Flamed 10-Top, Gold Hardware Model. Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch, Locking Tuners - Pickups: Dragon II - String Instrument Finish: Blue Mateo, Ruby, Gold Metallic, Whale Blue, Dark Cherry Sunburst, Violin Amber Sunburst, Emerald Green, Vintage Yellow, Black Sunburst, Gray Black, Natural, Black, Amber, Tobacco Sunburst, Orange, Black Cherry, Vintage Natural
Pickup(s) 3 or 2 single-coils, with the latter having a hot humbucker in the bridge position,[1] with the exception of the Acoustasonic Strat and Stratacoustic models, the only acoustic Stratocasters.[1]Most Stratocasters generally came with a pickguard; on certain high-end versions, the pickguard is absent. There are also select models that come with active electronics and HSH, HHH, HH or Hpickup configurations.Humbucker-equipped Strats are often referred to as “Fat Strats”, in reference to the fact that humbucking pickups usually tend to have more bass in the output signal than single coils, thus making the sound “fatter”.

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Michael Bloomfield is credited with Eric Clapton for helping seed the renewed interest which compelled Gibson to return the original Les Paul to full production; both musicians began using Les Pauls at about the same time. Bloomfield first played a 1954 Les Paul goldtop (with the strings wrapped around the tailpiece rather than suspended and intonated over a bridge) while with the Butterfield Blues Band in 1966, but he swapped the guitar (plus $100) to guitar technician Dan Erlewine in exchange for a 1959 Les Paul Standard. This guitar was characterised by mismatched volume and tone control knobs (a reflector-topped “tone” knob for the bridge pickup volume, two top-hatted knobs for neck pickup volume and bridge pickup tone, and a cylindrical “speed knob” for the neck pickup tone), a missing cover on the rhythm/treble toggle switch, a truss rod cover with “Les Paul” engraved in script (this feature had originated with the early Les Paul SG models, not the original Les Paul single cutaways), and a crack in the wood behind the tailpiece. Because the guitar was lost in the 1970s (Bloomfield biographers Jan Mark Wolkin and Bill Keenom, in Michael Bloomfield: If You Love These Blues, disclosed that a Canadian venue owner claimed it as compensation after Bloomfield missed a scheduled performance and never reclaimed the instrument), Gibson used hundreds of photographs of the late blues guitarist’s instrument (and consulted with Bloomfield’s family) to produce the limited-edition Bloomfield signature. The company produced one hundred Bloomfield models with custom-aged finishes and two hundred more with the company’s Vintage Original Specifications finishing in 2009. They reproduced the tailpiece crack on the aged version, plus the mismatched volume and tone control knobs and the “Les Paul”-engraved truss rod cover on both versions, while including a toggle switch cover. The headstock was characterised by the kidney-shaped Grover tuning keys installed on the guitar before Bloomfield traded for it, and the pickups were Gibson Burstbucker 1 (at the neck) and Burstbucker 2 (at the bridge).
All I can say is quit wasting $ on new. A new guitar is like a new car it’s gonna lose 20% of its value once you take it out the first time. Unless you are buying a Gibson or fender custom shop etc Just go for what plays and sounds great. Perfect example is the Esp ltd ec401vf or 400. Used $300-400 has stock seymour duncan 59 neck jb bridge or the newer 401 has the dimarzio’s in it. Grovers tuners earvana nut mahogany body. Just an excellent setup for half the price of an epi les paul. Don’t get me wrong I have an Epi les paul traditional pro and it’s a nice guitar but for $750 nah. Since I picked up the 401 I hardly play my jag mustang or either of my epi l.p. or sg. Its just that nice of a guitar. If you are in the market for a les paul style or a new guitar in general take a look at the 400 series it’s a whole lot of guitar for the $
What every great guitarist does, with respect to sound, is achieve a very high level of nuanced control over the sound, not by having a computer play his guitar for him. As a keyboard player, I would recommend you first concentrate on playing your synth with lots of use of pedals, velocity-sensitive changes in timbre, and left hand controllers. Then you can experiment with all sorts of synth sounds. This way, you can play as expressively as a gutarist, but without sounding like a bad copy. Instead, you can sound like something different, new, and this is really where synth lead work can shine (and actually add to our musical lexicon).
The list is leaving off some HUGE names. You absolutely cannot leave out Clapton and Van Halen. However, you apparent uninformed people saying that John Mayer shouldn't be on the list should wake up and get in your music. He is on track to waxing this whole list by the end of his career. Clapton is practically handing him the torch. But then again, I guess that Tiger Woods will never be as good as Jack to some.

Gibson guitars do tend to run on the high end of the price spectrum, but for an experienced player it’s not hard to understand why. Their guitars offer top notch craftsmanship and tone that is favored by a large segment of players. However, this does make their line of guitars less practical for beginners, who will likely want to improve in skill before making that level of investment.
Today we are going to show you some of the best effects pedals from this category, which you can get right now. We have chosen a variety of flavors as well as price ranges, thus making sure that anyone can have access to a good reverb no matter what. More importantly, we want to use this opportunity to familiarize you with reverb as a guitar effect.
The Fender Super-Champ X2 HD is a true champion when it comes to versatility and quality, combining old school tube technology with modern amp voicing and digital effects, all in a compact and portable 15W amplifier head. With a single 12AX7 preamp tube and two 6V6 power amp tubes, you can't lump this amp with conventional amp modelers, but you also can't group it with traditional tube amps because it does let you choose from 16 amp voicings that cover everything from clean Tweed tones to high-gain metal. In addition, the amp comes with 15 effects that include variations of reverb, tremolo, modulation and delay. With its low watt rating, the Super-Champ X2 HD is ideal for practice and recording, while being loud and portable enough for small venue gigs. Finally all these features are made available in a compact and more importantly - affordable package.
How it sounds: Ex. 1a demonstrates the treble-cut control—nothing surprising here. Ex. 1b features the bass-cut. With a clean tone like this, it’s a bit subtle, though you can hear the difference if you focus on the low notes. But Ex. 1c adds a vintage-style germanium Fuzz Face with the gain and volume maxed. With the guitar’s tone control wide-open, the signal easily overpowers my vintage Fender brownface—your typical Fuzz Face fart. As I gradually trim bass via the guitar, the tone acquires greater punch and clarity. I remain on the neck pickup throughout—the only thing changing is the guitar’s bass pot setting. The extreme-cut settings near the end of the clip may sound harsh in isolation, but they can be perfect in a band context. At the end of the clip I max the bass pot again to underscore how much the tone has changed. It ain’t subtle.
The cool thing about this setup is the EQ bypass feature. In other words, you can completely nullify any effects of the EQ and tap into the raw tone of the guitar. That works great for those who want that authentic tone or to let the mix engineer handle the rest. Overall, this Takamine is rock solid in all aspects. It is a great alternative for anyone who's looking to extract the most out of their money who wants to try something other than a Martin.

Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
And that’s about that. After ’93 Martin Stingers, like their previous Martin-brand cousins, started drifting off into solidbody byways of guitar history. The Stinger ST-2, basic fulcrum-vibrato Strats with pickguards and three single-coils, in black, red, and white, and the now ubiquitous droopy pointy headstock, was still listed in the 1996 Martin catalog, but these were pale reflections of the peak years.
I am sorry to hear this, Andrew. Rear shifted bracing should help protect against the kind of top bulges normally seen behind the bridge. Unfortunately, when it comes to guitars made by hand out of organic materials like thin, solid wood, some pieces of wood will misbehave. The old saying is a guitar takes about two years before the wood stops trying to turn back into a tree.
Choose a pedal kit or two from one of the kit suppliers. If you are new to this, start with one of the simpler kits such as a boost pedal. You can move on to more complex circuits such as delays and reverbs later. You can order multiple kits at once if you want, but learn your skills on the easy ones first. Good kits come with comprehensive documentation. They normally list the tools that you will need, so read the docs online first and make sure you have the tools available. If not, order them at the same time as your kits so you’ll have everything ready. It’s very irritating when you are keen to get started on a pedal project and are missing that one small tool or part.
My guitar is in excellent condition and is all mostly original. The tuners are replicas of the original Klusons, and it came with non-original wooden legs. The legs were originally `sold separately, so it’s possible that the original owner opted for cheaper off-brand legs instead. I prefer to use a table-type keyboard stand anyway, mainly because it frees up more space for my feet underneath. This is my primary gigging steel; it’s reliable and versatile, and it usually turns a few heads as well due to its unique appearance. Aside from a broken name badge, it’s in excellent condition; it came with the cleanest original Valco case I’ve ever seen. There is some slight deterioration of the chrome plating, but otherwise there is little wear to be found. I previously owned a Supro Console Eight, and liked it so much that I traded it for the double-neck version. The Console Sixteen is a rare bird because it was produced only briefly; it first appeared in the 1958 Supro catalog and last appeared in 1959.
The rest seems like a bit of an odd ball selection. It's the age old argument of technique over substance. BB King puts more into a small handful of notes than Malmsteen does in several hundred. One of the most musical guitar players to have graced the earth. In fact I think it was BB who stated that it's not the notes you put in but the notes you choose to leave out that count. Now that's music.
While Line 6 is probably the best known high-volume preset modeling amp brand, Peavey isn’t far behind – and truly rivals the offerings of Line 6, both in quality and quantity. What’s especially intriguing about this particular amp is that it allows you to choose not just the amp models and a wealth of applicable effects, but that it gives you the power to choose the type of instrument you’re plugging into it – thusly shaping the rest of the options accordingly. Whether you play guitar, acoustic guitar, or bass, this amp can change it sound to suit the instrument. And that’s a lot more than other competitors’ amps have to offer. It also features a tap tempo, USB connectivity, a headphone jack, and more.
Guitar techs specialize in stringed instrument technology, providing support for all issues relating to electric and acoustic guitars. They might work in music shops repairing, tuning and finishing guitars for customers. Techs may also be hired by bands to maintain and prepare instruments before, during and after shows, including the set-up, stringing and tuning of guitars, bass guitars, pedals, cables and amplifiers. Additional responsibilities include instrument shipment between shows and maintenance during recording sessions. Securing employment with a band may be a competitive endeavor, and travel is often required for those positions.
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I like some of the less known models and smaller brands. Deans are very nice, Cort has some very nice models (and cheap crap too..), Fenix LP copies (depending on the model/age) are great and I've got a Morgan strat that seems to just get better every year. Korean Yamahas are pretty nice and so are the ones from Taiwan. Korean/Chinese Epiphones vary quite a bit so try before you buy. Don't care for most Korean Ibanez and ESP/LTD models.


Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
Re-amplified Distortion: This re-amplified distortion is audible by comparison, when switching between a solid-state and valve amplifier in real time. By paying close attention, it is heard as a fine spurious inter-cluttering within the music. This is clearly noticeable with efficient speakers but not with inefficient speakers. Valve amplifiers are inherently linear. Their natural gain is small and therefore require minimal or no negative feedback.

If you want to invest in a guitar that replicates the famous ’70 guitars, look no further than the model offered by Fender Vintage. This product was designed to feature a basswood body that is a replica of the famous workhorse Fender guitars. Moreover, the device has a “C” shape neck that was constructed from maple, and that is said to be quite resistant.
1960's Kay, Model K-1 "SG-Style" Electric Guitar. 1 single coil Pickup. Great, original "see-thru" Mahogany-color finish. Bound fingerboard. Laminated maple neck and laminated Mahogany body. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Stop Tailpiece. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with no visible wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .011 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings.  No case included.
By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".
In 1974 Martin Sigma electrics included two SGs, a Tele and a Fender bass. The SBG2-6 was pretty much a straightforward SG copy with a bolt-on neck, center-peaked three-and-three head, block inlays, large pickguard, twin humbuckers, finetune bridge, and stop tailpiece, in cherry. The SBG2-9 was pretty cool, with a natural-finished plywood body, white pickguard, rosewood fingerboard with white block inlays, gold hardware and Bigsby. The SBF2-6 was a Tele with rosewood fingerboard, three-and-three head, block inlays, neck humbucker and bridge single-coil. The SBB2-8 was the bass, with natural finished body, three-and-three head, rosewood ‘board, block inlays, white ‘guard, and two humbucking pickups.
You aren’t likely to really know what works best until you get the song a little further along in the mix, when you can hear how the guitar sound sits with the vocals and other instrument tracks. Sometimes, what sounds like the best guitar tone in the room isn’t always the most effective guitar tone in the track, but as ever, at this point you can only take a stab at what you think will work. Through experience, you’ll build a tool kit of go-to mic positions that achieve what you are seeking.
A towering figure in the Japanese underground beginning in the early ’70s, Keiji Haino plays guitar — often distorted to the point of pure sound — with such a wild diversity that it’s misleading to call him merely a “noise guitarist.” But he is very, very, very noisy. With personas that include blues-sludge hero, noise-blast deployer, and big-eared post-psychedelic improviser, Haino’s renown (and collaborations) spread far beyond Japan, most notably with albums recorded by Fushitusha, his all-improv/nominally rock outfit.
There’s so many multi effects pedals out there to choose from, that finding the right one that suits your musical style and your budget can be a little difficult. depending on what your style or genre is, you’re could be wondering which multi effects pedal is best for metal, or curious if your multi-effects pedal will work with your tube amp or even which option is right for your acoustic guitar, but fear not as we aim to answer all those questions and more.
Polytone Mega Brute, Jazz guitar amplifier fully functional. Has loads of clean head room but also has 3 settings: Warm, Edge and drive.  I think they’re rated and 65watts, into 8ohm 8” speaker. Super light and portable, approx. 22lbs. Probably from the mid ‘80s production. Hi and low gain inputs, bright switch, effects loop. Spring reverb. Mint condition and everything works like brand new. Shipped to the lower 48 for $50.00. Local pick up would be great. Return if unhappy but ship in same packing and also pay return shipping. Thanks  
To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.

• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 
Chorus – a frequency-based effect that makes your guitar sound like more than one guitar is playing. The effect is created by doubling your guitar tone one or more times (using a short delay) and then varying the pitch of the double slightly up and down against the dry guitar tone. Chorus pedals have at least two controls: Depth and Rate. The Depth controls the lowest and highest pitches that the doubled tone varies between. The Rate controls the speed that the doubled tone moves up and down in pitch.
We've already heard the story of Muddy's rise from a Mississippi planation to a Chicago blues legend but that only took his career so far, at least in his chosen style of music. Eventually, bands that were influenced by Muddy like the Rolling Stones (named after one of his songs), Animals, Yardbirds, Cream and Hendrix became big, raising Muddy's profile but not getting him the same level of success his descendants were having. Marshall Chess, son of the president of the label who worked at the company had the idea to try something different by putting Muddy's music into a psychedelic setting to appeal to a younger audience. After discussing the project with Muddy, he went for it. He wasn't forced into it as some have been led to believe.
This is worse than the Rolling Stones magazine’s list. Paco De Lucia, Django Reinhardt, Andres Segovia, Sabicas, Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Jeff Beck, David Gilmour, Jimi Hendrix, John Williams (no, not the movie score composer) IMO the top ten. It’s much harder to play jazz, flamenco, and sometimes classical, than it is to play blues or rock. These guitarists are all infinitely greater than Jack White, John Frusciante, Tom Morello, or John Mayor.

Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]

In 1977, Gibson introduced the serial numbering system in use until 2006.[71] An eight-digit number on the back shows the date when the instrument was produced, where it was produced, and its order of production that day (e.g., first instrument stamped that day, second, etc.).[72] As of 2006, the company used seven serial number systems,[71] making it difficult to identify guitars by their serial number alone.[71][72] and as of 1999 the company has used six distinct serial numbering systems.[72] An exception is the year 1994, Gibson's centennial year; many 1994 serial numbers start with "94", followed by a six-digit production number[citation needed]. The Gibson website provides a book to help with serial number deciphering.[72]
I have been a musician for many years now. I have played in everything from metal bands to acoustic coffee house sets to worship/praise bands. I feel that with these many years of playing I have earned a sharp ear, no pun intended. By that I mean that I have developed an ear not only to hear pitches, tones, and notes, but I can also hear good and bad timbre. I feel that Taylor guitars simply produce the best timbre of any acoustic guitar I have played. Naturally, all of my acoustics are Taylor! With that, thanks to Bob Taylor for doing it best and doing it right the first time!
Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.

Since they present a finer break point at the neck end of the strings’ speaking length, narrower vintage-gauge frets are generally more precise in their noting accuracy. From this, you tend to get a sharper tone, possibly with increased intonation accuracy, plus enhanced overtone clarity in some cases, which could be heard as a little more “shimmer.” If you’re thinking these are all characteristics of the classic Fender sound, you’d be right—or they are, at least, until you change those vintage frets to jumbo.
Orion Blue Book Online (at UsedPrice.com): The Orion Blue Book Online will help you determine how much nearly anything that you own is worth, including guitars. This includes electric and acoustic guitars, as well as bass guitars, amplifiers, and other guitar peripherals. The company behind Used Price works in conjunction with Orion Bluebook, which makes this the largest website dedicated to pricing used musical instruments. The website is browsable by the first letter of your instrument's manufacturer or make. It has every major guitar manufacturer and most obscure ones.

They say the formula for how many guitars to own is n + 1, where n equals the current number of guitars you already own. Now that we know that you’ll be buying another guitar, I’ve put together a list of the top 15 acoustic guitars for under $500. A top 10 list just wasn’t going to cut it here, as there are so many great choices under $500. If $500 is too much to spend, check out my guide on the best beginner guitars that come in under $300.
Buying a new guitar amp is easy. But, as you will have seen, ending up with the right amplifier for you isn’t as straightforward. Amps are not something you buy every day, so take your time, read our guide, use our categories and charts as inspiration, and ultimately you will find something that will suit you and your playing perfectly. Good luck in your hunt for the perfect amp!
1966 Yamaha FG180 Nippon Gakki Japan crafted over 50 years ago early RARE light GREEN LABEL in top vintage condition WoW Now at JVGuitars we are very proud to present such a SWEET and RARE FIND folks... This is an excellent example of the Japanese Vintage Yamaha FG180 is from 1966 Folks that right an oldie but a real goodie for for sure she is about 51 years old and as you can clearly see from our high resolution pictures it has been very nicely taken care of for over 5 decades just for you today thats AMAZING!!! WoW She's one of the very first of the highly sought after original first FG180 run with its light green label FG180 prototype to the later 1970's FG180 Red Label, She's HERE NOW at JVGuitars its been Pro set up and polishing and is all round vintage excellent condition no cracks no issues no warps no pulling no funny business from what I see and thats a lot of guitars this guitar is far above average for such a vintage piece. she's in top playing condition and the cosmetics are very good as well with natural play wear and patina of such a well loved guitar. Here are the General Specifications Scale Length 650mm (25 9/16") Body Length 505mm (19 7/8") Total Length 1038mm (40 7/8") Body Width 412mm (16 3/16") Body Depth 100 - 118mm (3 15/16" - 4 5/8") Nut Width 44mm (1 3/4") Top Material Sitka Spruce Back Material Mahogany Side Material Mahogany Neck Material Mahogany Fingerboard Material Rosewood Fingerboard Radius R400mm (15 3/4") Bridge Material Rosewood Nut Material Urea Saddle Material Urea Bridge Pins Black ABS Tuners Open Gear (Chrome) Body Binding Rosewood + Cream + Black Soundhole Inlay White + Cream + Black Pickguard Black Body Finish Gloss Neck Finish Gloss Color Natural Case FREE Original Marigold lined Semi hard Chipboard case. This Rare FG180 has been treated with care and respect and love for 5 decades and someone is going to be very pleased in deed. To purchase this rare beauty. contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com quality .

Bell's journey to become a guitar master began with a car running over him as a child. He was an aspiring baseball player just shy of his 13 birthday and left with a fractured skull that ended his future career. So he picked up the guitar and fell in love. He's been building and repairing guitars since 1975. Today, he's running Bell's Custom Guitars on the side and repairing guitars at Murphy's Music in Irving.
High-end solid-state amplifiers are less common, since many professional guitarists favor vacuum tubes.[citation needed] Some[who?] jazz guitarists favor the "cleaner" sound of solid-state amplifiers. Only a few solid-state amps have enduring attraction, such as the Roland Jazz Chorus.[15][16][17] Solid-state amplifiers vary in output power, functionality, size, price, and sound quality in a wide range, from practice amplifiers to combos suitable for gigging to professional models intended for session musicians who do studio recording work.
A combo amp contains the amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet. In a "head and speaker cabinet" configuration, the amplifier and speaker each have their own cabinet. The amplifier (head) may drive one or more speaker cabinets. In the 1920s, guitarists played through public address amplifiers, but by the 1940s, this was uncommon. A rare exception in the 1990s was grunge guitarist Kurt Cobain, who used four 800 watt PA amplifiers in his early guitar set-up.
Ultimately, if you’re mostly playing rock, heavier blues, or any shred or metal styles, you might prefer jumbo or medium-jumbo frets. However, for country, rockabilly, surf, or old-school ’50s rock and roll, narrow frets could be the way to go. In any case, though, if your frets are in good condition and your guitar is set up right, the size of that wire in and of itself shouldn’t stop you from sounding great on whatever you play.

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On my guitar, the bridge plate is held on by five screws. Three on the back of the plate, two towards the neck on the front. You may need to remove the intonation block things.One or all. If you decide to take any off, use your calipers and measure from the front of them to the back of the bridge plate, so that you don't lose your intonation. Mark each saddle like in the picture.

Thought you'd like to know. Before Christmas, I stopped by a local music shop to buy my 12 year old granddaughter a new guitar to replace an old Beaver Creek she'd been banging on for a few years. Since I'm an old folky from the 1960s, I thought a low end Gibson or Martin would give her both good sound and some bragging rights at her school's guitar club. The shop owner was in the acoustic guitar room strumming something I had never seen before and quickly told me I should forget Martin or Gibson and get what he was playing. It was a Seagull. An equal sound for half the price, he said, so I looked it over, strummed the few chords I could remember, and bought it on the spot. Later, I was still pondering how a little Canadian guitar could be called better than a Martin or Gibson when I found your ratings post. I do believe I kept repeating "Oh my God, it's true!" over and over. And she loves the guitar, especially the smaller neck and fuller sound. Thanks for helping this old folky who always thought Martin and Gibson were names to be spoken in hushed reverence believe in something new.
I have no idea what the set measurement is for the Authentics, and if it is any different than other guitars. Probably not. But guitars settle during their initial acclimation period and the exact bow of the neck and arch of the top can change. Actually it is almost certain to change some. There have been reports of all sorts of Martins with action reaching up near or over the maximum height within spec. But the same holds rue from brand of guitar that uses organic materials like solid wood.

Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...


The Effect: Boost pedals are essentially an extension of your guitar’s volume knob. Their main purpose is to give you additional gain to work with. This extra gain can be used to accentuate your solo sections, give you more girth in your clean channel, or even push your tubes into a slight overdrive. A great example of a booster pedal is the legendary Electro-Harmonix LPB-1.

Play a classic 6120 or Duo Jet and it can seem a bit, well, old-fashioned. A growing number of players desire the brand’s looks, sound and unmatched vibe, but also want something a tad more versatile and user-friendly. Enter this latest Players Edition model with its neck set lower into the body for improved access, higher-output Filter’Tron-style humbucking pickup (Full’Trons) and a modernised Bigsby vibrato where through-stringing replaces the notorious ‘hooking the ball-end over a peg’ system that scuppered any chance of a quick change. Mate these modern tweaks with another recent innovation (for Gretsch, at any rate), the Centre Block range, and you have a guitar ready to compete with anything out there - in virtually any style.
Likewise, six Folk/Country Western guitars were offered, with flat, corner-notched heads, belly pin bridges and tortoise pickguards. The 14″ GS240 Concert ($79.50) was a Spanish shape with natural spruce top, mahogany body, and dot inlays, presumably on a rosewood fingerboard. The 15″ GS350 Grand Concert ($99.50) was another Spanish with natural spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood body, with diamond inlays and wood rope binding. The GS380 Grand Concert ($109.50) was the same as the GS350 except for a Brazilian rosewood body. The GS460 Country Western ($129.50) was a 16″ dreadnought with a spruce top in red sunburst, cherry-finished mahogany body, a black pickguard, sort of mustache bridge, diamond inlays and white binding. The 16″ GS570 Auditorium ($149.50) was another dreadnought with yellow spruce and full grained Brazilian rosewood body, diamond inlays and fancier rosette. The GS680 12-String Auditorium ($185) was another 16″ dreadnought 12-string otherwise the same as the GS570.
Reverb pedals come with all kinds of different layouts. Even so, some of the controls are virtually universal. The first one we would like to mention is the dry/wet knob. This control is what you use to mix your original signal and the effect itself. When the knob is turned all the way to dry, there will be zero reverb present in the signal. As you move towards wet, the amount of reverb increases.
This page contains information, pictures, videos, user generated reviews, automatically generated review and videos about Washburn XM DLX2 but we do not warrant the quality, accuracy or completeness of any information on our web site. If you have more information about Washburn XM DLX2 please write a review. Some reviews are automatically generated generated by using verbal representation of publicly available numeric rating information musicians entered while writing review of Washburn XM DLX2. User generated reviews of Washburn XM DLX2 represent opinions of credited authors alone, and do not represent Chorder's opinion.
Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.
wonderful feel of a small town, with caring people and the owner is amazing. He'll of a player too! Just got a gorgeous ESPN strat copy from him, he graciously showed me just how well of a strat it is... by playing it through a fender tweed tube amp. He even sang a little for me as he made my strat sing right along with him. Price was excellent, as are all his prices. See More
Another important factor to consider is speaker size, which impacts overall loudness and tonality. Bigger speakers can push more air and have more low end, while smaller speakers have limited pushing power, while emphasizing the mids. In addition to size, different speaker models and cabinet types also introduce subtle differences to the overall sound.
This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar.  I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best.  You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment.  You get treated like a valued customer.  Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars.  They have a great variety of quality instruments.  Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars.  A place like this is so rare nowadays.
Typically, players tend to place their delay and reverb effects within the effects loops of their amplifiers.  This placement is especially helpful if you get your overdrive and distortion from your amplifier instead of pedals. Otherwise you would be feeding your delay repeats and reverb ambiance into the overdrive and distortion of your amplifier, which can sound muddy and washed out.  You can also place your modulation pedals within the effects loop of your amplifier as well for a different sound.
Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno
My 10 year old was getting bored with his previous instructor's teaching methods and had been begging us to drop guitar lessons. We thought we would try a different instructor. We've had only one meeting, but I saw a light reappear in my son's eyes and he is excited to start lessons with Jon. The video lessons and use of newer computer technology and has my son excited and motivated to keep learning to play.
The next most important review criteria for any electric guitar, is its sound. Please allow me to be very clear here that this guitar is mostly suited for heavy rock tones, aggressive higher leads and chugging, crazy distortions. If you are more interested in a crisp, jazzy tone, maybe you should opt for a beginner’s Stratocaster electric guitar like Squier by Fender, instead. Having said that, this instrument sounds great in its genre, and also remains in tune for long periods, so you don’t have to worry about manually tuning it. Yes, the string tension is higher as compared to a 24.75” Stratocaster or XX Les Paul, but in a way this challenges electric guitar novices to acquire greater mastery over their notes!
There are any number of different variations which can give a guitarist his or her tone. The combinations and possibilities are mind-blowing. You can take your pick from the type of guitar used, the hardware and technology used in the guitar, the amplifier you’re plugged into, the room in which you’re playing, the level of technique within your fingers. The list goes on. Typically any one of these factors could make the exact same rig sound completely different in the hands of another player. Yet technical mastery and high-end or vintage equipment are usually a by-product of having played the instrument for A Very Long Time. What about when you’re at the start of your playing career, and you’re looking for a quick shot in the tonal arm? Or you’re more accomplished and looking to experiment with different sounds and textures. It’s here that guitar effect pedals start becoming more and more attractive. But what are they?
Read Full Review If you’re looking for a lightweight guitar aside from a Stratocaster. You prefer the quality of tone produced using humbuckers than a single-coil can deliver. This SG model from Epiphone meets that requirements on the overall sound, playabilty and price that fits the under two hundred dollar budget of a beginner. As well as for seasoned players looking at the market for an affordable studio or back-up guitar to bring on stage.
This full-sized, 22-fret, single cutaway electric guitar features two single-coil pickups and is capable of producing a wide range of tones. With the bridge pickup, you can get that bright, rich, cutting tone known as the country "twang" made famous by artists such as Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings. With the neck pickup you get a warmer, mellow, bluesy tone, such as that of Albert Collins or Muddy Waters. Additionally, rock musicians as diverse as Syd Barrett, Chrissy Hynde, and Keith Richards have found a way to make their own distinctive sound using this style of guitar.
Mr Swike appears to know what he is talking about, and has undertaken a body of work that is unfortunately for sale while only being 70% complete. Some of the instructions are incomplete (like showing what North polarity looks like on Stew-Macs polarity tester, but not South), and at least one (the Varistor mod) wildly inadvisable. Why not get the book done, checked out by objective professional parties, and then released as a complete reference book?
“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.
But we can't forget that Rocksmith 2014 is designed like any other game, and as satisfying as it is to be able to pick up a guitar and play, all I wanted to do was try and level up on some of my favorite songs. I quickly found that Foo Fighters' "Everlong" was beyond my grasp, and Oasis's "Don't Look Back in Anger" would never become my jam, but I quickly got my fix trying to nail down The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop."
G & L Guitars - Leo Fender founded this US Based guitar company with then-partner George Fullerton (hence the name G & L. They offer guitars similar to classic Fenders, but with some modern innovations. It is said that if Leo Fender stayed with Fender, their instruments will be upgraded to the G&L designs, which he considers as an upgrade to his classic guitar creations.
Woodwinds, brass, and similar instruments can only play one note at a time. To make a chord, they have to have a minimum of 3 players playing a single note in the chord at the same time. As you can imagine, this requires excellent timing and coordination between the players to make a clean chord. This is why orchestras have to have a Conductor to direct the music. With a guitar, you are the Conductor, and can make any kind of music you want, all by yourself.

The Marshall MG series are also strong contenders, a lot of players use them and they’re ideal for the kind of music you like. You see them in a lot of studios. Not a tube amp and all that, but perfectly serviceable and they have some onboard effects, which can be fun. I used a mic’d MG50 when I played in Kenny’s Castaways for a year or so in the house band, and people said I sounded great. Amp cost me $280 on sale I think. I found the sound of the MG superior to the Line6, but not so much that I’d pay a lot more money for it. If I had a gig where I needed options and didn’t already own the effects I needed, I’d have no problem using the Line6.
this is a really cool product. at first i thought i was disappointed in the drum loop sounds becsuse i thought they sounded too cheesy and not real but when i recorded some music using them along with the songs ive been working on, it turned out sounding pretty good and im happy with it. Also, my bass that sounds to cheap and not so great recording in through my irig2 without any effects module , is drastically improved when i plug it into this NUX-MG20
Alder used to be very popular in the 1950s and 1960s, and many Fender guitars from that era are made from Alder. Today it is a bit more expensive of a wood, relatively, and isn’t as common. It is lightweight, has beautiful grain patterns, and gives a warm sound with plenty of highs. An instrument made from Alder is likely to have less midrange and bass than instruments made from other types of wood.
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
Re-amping is another increasingly common production technique, often used at the mixdown stage. This process involves a dedicated re-amping device, which takes a line-level feed from a mixing console or DAW interface and converts that signal's level and impedance to one that a guitar amplifier is able to accept. That signal is usually a separate "dry" (unamplified and unprocessed) guitar track recorded using an active 500kOhm direct box placed between the guitar and the amp.
Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.

Anyway, here’s how you adjust the truss rod. This must be done with the strings tuned to whatever pitch you usually use. If your neck is too bowed (the gap you just measured is too big), you tighten the truss rod by turning the socket clockwise. It is recommended that you only turn the tool a quarter turn at a time (or even one eighth) and then give the neck some time to settle. You will also need to make sure the strings are still properly tuned after each adjustment.
Fender instruments like the Stratocaster and Telecaster feature bolt-on necks and brighter tonewoods such as alder for the body and maple for the neck. They are easy to work on, and an owner with even a small degree of technical knowledge can fit replacement parts without professional assistance. Fender guitars are built to a 25.5-inch scale length, which lends to their brighter, more percussive tone. You’re more likely to see tremolo systems on this type of guitar, and hot-rodded guitars known as superstrats fall into this category.
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I Have a '70 lyle hummingbird and its a solid spruce top and mohagony neck back and sides. My guitar luthier fully inspected it. Mine is in near mint condition and sounds identical to the '64 Gibson Hummingbird my luthier has. He was trully freaked out by this.. ha ha He keeps trying to buy it from me but im affraid im hanging on to mine. It seems there is alot of contradictory information on these guitars. It is super hard to get more than a small paragraph of info on these things. One site out there has several catalogs from lyle guitars but they require a payment or paid membership to view them. If you are interested google lyle guitar catalogs. There is one that sold for 600.00 at joes vintage guitars.com Its Identical to mine. If I find any more info Ill post as discovered.
I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.
Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.
In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."
Hi Torch, appreciate the work gone into this , fantastically informative piece. Good to see such a following as well , too many Gibson / Fender fanatics out there that dismiss Jap / Asian guitars as inferior. Having played god knows how many guitars over 50 years I've had good and bad in both top and lesser known brands. Started off at 15 years old with a Tiesco ( cost me £15 S/H at the time. lol ). Admittedly it was a piece of junk, but hey it got me started. Just picked up a Strat copy made in China for £10 ( as new condition) Branded Excell , out plays my Aria by a country mile. I have an old acoustic here about 40 years old, cost £62.50 at the time. No place of origin , serial No or anything. Imported by Rose Morris with the brand Avon on the head stock. This baby out plays any acoustic I've ever played, including a couple of Martins, As any guitarist should know a guitar is how it feels and plays not it's name. Nothing wrong with Jap / Asian guitars , could be made in Iceland for all I care it's the guitar that counts. Keep up the good work. Regards and thanks.
First, remove the knobs of the pots that you want to replace. Some knobs are held in by setscrews. Look around the shaft of the knob to see if there is a screw head then unscrew the screw and remove the knob. Most knob are mounted on split shaft pots. There are no setscrews on a split shaft pot. Friction and pressure hold the knobs on the shafts in this case. You can pull the knob directly off the shaft of the pot since there is no screw. If the knob is stuck on the shaft, I usually use heavy gauges guitar picks to try to pry up the knob. You may also wrap a thin rag around the bottom of the knob and pull the knob off the shaft. Regardless how you get the knob off, be careful not to dent or ruin the finish on the top of the guitar. It is easy to rip the knob off of the pot and accidentally drop it on the guitar. Once the knob is removed, you can unscrew and remove the nut on the top of the shaft.

This was my first attempt on building pedal. Now I'm hooked. It was such a joy putting it all together and quite a learning experience. I cannot emphasize on reading/studying the instructions thoroughly. I would rate the included instructions a 10, a 5 STAR. Very clear and easy for a novice pedal builder to understand and walk through. Very well illustrated as well. Take your time as you can easily overlook soldering connections. The main problem I encountered was a shorting problem. The two soldering terminals along each side of the tube socket were located very close to the tube base socket and volume/gain pots. Follow the instructions by running a wire between the volume and gain pots, as well as the tube socket. Once, I've addressed this problem, it was clear sailing from there.


An octave pedal listens to what note you’re playing and adds the next octave up or down (depending on your settings) making it sound like someone is playing the octave note with you. If you’re familiar with guitar or just learning, you’ll know that an octave is the distance between one musical note and it’s corresponding note at a higher or lower pitch. For example, if you play an open E string and then play the E string on the 12th fret, it will sound the same, just an octave higher.
as an old school country picker i prefer the fender tele for the crisp twangy sound and also the feel of the fingerboard. I find a strat to be poorly designed with the volume control badly in the way to say nothing about the clumsy tremelo arm. I have modified some strats and made them playable for my slyle.A humbucker in the neck position on a tele is rite sharp for the blues.As for gibson they make a fine instrument,just not my style.
Since joining Charley's team, Russell has worked on hundreds of guitars. Music shops across Dallas and Fort Worth call him with questions. He's even corrected other guitar masters' mistakes, and he's also repaired some of the music industry's finest guitarslingers, including the guitarist from Cold Play and countless prominent local musicians. "It's part of the joy is knowing that I'm helping put players in a position where they can get on stage and feel confident knowing their guitar is working at its peak." He's also probably the only guitar master on this list asked to restore a broken guitar back to its original broken state. But it wasn't just any broken guitar. It was Elvis Presley's Martin D-28. "Elvis had broken it." This guy is truly more than a guitar master; he's a magician performing musical magic at Charley's five days a week.
There is enough acoustic guitars in the world to rock it to sleep, with a peaceful feeling of spanish legends to it. On the other hand there are enough electric guitars in the world to guarantee that it will never go to sleep, because there is always an electric guitar playing somewhere in the world. Which is exciting and which also causes the prices for electric guitar amps to be lower than for the amps of acoustic guitars, while retaining the same level of quality. The Roland Micro Cube Guitar Amplifier is a tiny little angel in the form of metal and plastic combined. It is small enough to be easy to carry around and store wherever, but it is also powerful enough to attract the attention of anyone passing you in the street, sitting in the bar, or otherwise hanging out in your vicinity. With a punkish style and a punk attitude, it is the perfect little helper for any musician, beginner or otherwise.
Modifying this guitar is also quite easy and you can add things to it to make it a lot better. Overall, it is just the right value for your money item to have. Again, if you are an intermediate or expert level player then avoid this guitar. If you are a beginner & looking for the lowest price electric guitar for beginners clicks the button on this one. With the price you pay, I am pretty sure you will be impressed by the performance of this guitar. Here is the link to buy this product or know more about it –
Buying an electric guitar will also require less force to play, but obviously the sound and styles you will be playing will be very different. I am a guitar teacher and I often recommend people start on an electric guitar,because it doesnt require as much hand strength. As for type of electric guitar, anything with a low action (strings close to the neck) will work well, try some out and you will feel the difference. But getting overly technical with guitar specifications is unnecessary, its like shopping for a mountain bike by comparing the tires...silly, eh.

I would like to start off the list of the best small guitar amps by talking about one of the best small guitar amps out there, which unfortunately dedicated the entirety of its existence to being used for the purposes of laying acoustic guitars. Unfortunately, because I would love to have one of these to work with my electric guitars. On the other hand, the fact that the amp works with acoustic guitars best, means that those of you looking for a mini amp for your acoustic guitar are in luck. The amp does a great job of amplifying the sound of an acoustic guitar, keeping it clean and clear of any kind of electric distortion, so that if there was no increase in volume, nobody would understand the point of the pick up. While small, the pick up is still on the larger side as compared to the rest on the list. The design is vintage and cool, so that the guitar is enjoyable to look at for everyone.
Preamp, or gain, controls (sometimes called “volume” on master volume–equipped amps) let you dial in impressive-sounding distortion at low volumes, but excessive preamp distortion can sound too compressed and sizzling at high volumes. Turn down the gain and crank up the master volume until the amp is set at the output level you’d normally play at. Now, slowly increase the gain until the sound becomes as distorted as you want it to be. If the tone is buzzy and lacks dynamics, the amp will have all the onstage presence of an American Idol reject.
This is such a trite discussion. There are many more choices than Fender and Gibson, and to boil it down to those two players is detrimental to the industry and by extension musicians of all skill levels. Those companies made great innovations and came out with classic models, and the industry owes them a whole lot. But to me, you get more points for continued innovation, not making a few great models then resting on laurels for the next 100 years.
On September 6, 2018, the company announced that a global settlement has been reached with respect to the company’s reorganization plan upon emergence from Chapter 11. Under the plan, the company will be focused on its core musical instruments business with "essentially no debt." Current Chairman and CEO Henry Juszkiewicz will step down as CEO and assume the role of consultant. With immediate effect, Brian J. Fox, the company’s CRO, will oversee daily operations until a new CEO is appointed.[59]
The double cutaway body and its higher fret access made the SG become the perfect axe for the slide guitarist.  Duane Allman of the Allman Brother’s Band is one of the most highly revered slide guitarists of all time, and he chose the SG as his weapon of choice.  Allman was even known to pass the fret board entirely and create notes in a high range that were not previously capable of being played with normal slide technique.
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Plate reverb and spring reverb were the first attempts to simulate reverb in a portable device. The plate and the spring, respectively, are made of metal and attached to a transducer. The signal is fed to the transducer, which causes the plate or spring to vibrate. Reverberations bounce around the plate or spring. A pickup at the other end, converts the spring or plate's vibrations back into an electrical signal.

While the number of effects may not be as many compared to recent releases, others don't have the same deep control and sound quality that the GT-100 provides. Speaking of control, instead of merely choosing your preferred amp, this processor lets you custom build your virtual amp and cabinet, an interesting feature that allows for even more freedom in crafting your own tones. Another feature that users are fond of is the ability to assign effects into its many footswitches, making the unit behave much like a regular pedalboard. Other notable features include polyphonic tuning and USB recording.


Curiously, Les Paul also contributed to recording... along with building his own recording studio at his home, he built his own disc cutting system, and did multitrack recording on acetate discs... recording on a disc, then overdubbing himself and that original disc playing onto another disc, and so on. He later worked with Ampex on multitrack tape machines, and released the first multitrack electric guitar recording on Capitol records in 1949... however, Sydney Bechet had released a multi-track recording using Paul's techniques back in 1941. 


When Rolling Stone founder Jann S. Wenner asked John Lennon how he rated himself as a guitarist, Lennon replied, "I'm not technically good, but I can make it fucking howl and move. I was rhythm guitarist. It's an important job. I can make a band drive." It is, and he did: Lennon was the Beatles' spark plug and bloodletter, often adding rawness to pristine pop songs. Listen to the airborne strums that power "Help!," the circular riffage of "Day Tripper" or the deceptively sloppy "The Ballad of John and Yoko" – where, with George Harrison away on holiday, Lennon turned rudimentary lead and rhythm lines into sharptoothed magic. He was also capable of generating a truly ferocious tone: In the live promo clip for "Revolution," Lennon makes his hollow-body Epiphone Casino screech like a very angry lawn mower. Still, he didn't get his due as a guitarist in the Beatles' heyday. "They call George the invisible singer," Lennon said. "I am the invisible guitar player."

Why is Mesa Boogie so low?! Have Mesa Boogie ever made a bad amp? Look how many guys endorse their gear. Have you ever tried a Dual Rectifier or Mark V? It will tear you to shreds. They are AMAZING amps. Best part, they're all tube. Line 6, why the hell are they fifth. Why are they in the top 15? They are nothing but crap digital rubbish. Play a real amp like a Mesa Boogie, line 6, pft. Mesa Boogie is the best amp brand by far.
Buddy Holly turned a generation of future heroes – George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck – onto the guitar, with an elemental style: an antsy mix of country and blues that merged rhythm and lead; check the push-and-tease phrasing on "It's So Easy," which echoes Holly's growl-and-hiccup vocals. Playing his Stratocaster and fronting a double-guitar-bass-and-drum quartet, Holly essentially invented the rock band. "Listen to the songs on the first three Beatles albums," says John Mellencamp. "Take their voices off and it's Buddy Holly."

The person who made up the Top Ten list of best guitars has it all wrong! Of all the guitar companies he lists, Carvin is the only company that still uses ebony as standard material for the fretboard. This is because most other companies refuse to take the time and expense of this type of production. The others all use rosewood because it is cheap, relatively soft and can be "slammed" together quickly by machine; an indication of how they make their guitars in general! No other company who makes guitars even comes close to using the hand selected grade of wood (start to finish) that Carvin does. Take a hint from someone who knows how great guitars made step by step; if you want a guitar made from the best materials you can get, with critical operations still done by hand, order one one from Carvin, try it for ten days, if you really don't like it just return it... No questions and no hassles... Really. If you are not the type of person who cares, or are not willing to do ...more
There are many excellent pedals out there, I especially like the ones that contain multiple reverbs like, plate, spring, hall, church, etc. Reverb can be a great subtle effect adding a slight bit of ambience to your guitar sound. This is especially nice when playing in small or dry rooms. Usually the larger the room, the less reverb you may want as the room produces its own reverb, which is exactly what we are trying to create with the effect! One of my favorite reverb tones is the old surf guitar sounds made famous by Dick Dale and the Ventures.
Amplesound's AGM Lite is a freebie guitar VST that can run as a plugin or as a standalone. (Standalone == no digital audio workstation required, just open the program, turn on your speakers and play). In either version, one can write strum patterns with the point-and-click cursor, and use the on-screen keyboard to make things happen without ever touching a keyboard.
The Telecaster was important in the evolution of country, electric blues, funk, rock and roll, and other forms of popular music. Its solid construction let guitarists play loudly as a lead instrument, with long sustain if desired. It produced less of the uncontrolled, whistling, ‘hard’ feedback (‘microphonic feedback’) that hollowbodied instruments tend to produce at volume (different from the controllable feedback later explored by Pete Townshend and countless other players). Even though the Telecaster is more than half a century old, and more sophisticated designs have appeared since the early 1950s (including Fender’s own Stratocaster), the Telecaster remains in production. There have been numerous variations and modifications, but a model with something close to the original features has always been available.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
While they may be on the dry side, these books are convenient because they’re always available for reference. In an online class or an app, you might have to go digging through files or lessons to find that one scrap of information that was helpful. You also have to be on your phone or at your computer. For some people, the old way is still the best way.
David Gilmour: Two models of Gilmour’s famous “The Black Strat” are available from the Fender Custom Shop: One is an American ’69 Strat body with an ’83 remake C-shaped ’57 RI maple neck (labeled as New old stock) with electronic and cosmetic modifications. The other is a”relic” style guitar that replicates the “The Black Strat” down to every scratch and dent. The relic version has two completely different coats of paint, just like the original.[16]
In a market filled with increasingly good Japanese copies of Les Pauls, the Ovation offerings fell, well, flat, despite obvious high quality. In ’75 both the Breadwinner and Deacon switched to Ovation humbucking pickups, metal covered with twin rows of six pole pieces. A very short-run Deacon 12-string debuted as well in ’75. In ’76 the blue finish on the Breadwinner was ditched and the Deacon acquired red, black and natural finish options. As synthesizer technology caught on in the late ’70s, some of these guitars became popular for adapting to synth playing, primarily because of their “high-tech” image.

I have many acoustic guitars in the collection including Gibson, Taylor, Fender and Washburn. That said none of these guitars come close to the richness in sound of a Maton. I'm assuming this is due to the quality of the Australian timbers and workmanship. Although a little expensive I highly recommend you at least play one in a shop as a treat and hope a dead relative leaves you some money to give you an opportunity of taking one home.
The Ibanez Artcore AF75, PRS SE Standard 24 and Schecter PT, for example, are priced below $600 and have been highly rated. They’re not exactly cheap money-wise, but they’re definitely worth a lot more. Getting one of those from the get-go will make playing guitar a lifetime passion. “Cheap” guitars may seem more affordable at first, but many of these are poorly made and can be more costly in the long run because of constant repairs and replacements.

The first step is to determine what’s in your pickup already. The most common magnets for humbuckers are (roughly in order of strength): alnico 2, alnico 4, alnico 5, and then various types of ceramic magnets. In simple terms, the stronger the magnet, the greater the potential output. But you can’t just look at magnetic strength alone, because stronger magnets also affect the string’s ability to sustain.
Proceed to the next two chords. The next chord you would play would be a power chord on the fifth fret of A three times. So you would play with your index finger on the fifth fret of A, your middle finger on the seventh fret of D, and your ring finger on the seventh fret of G. Then, simply shift this finger shape down one string so that your index finger is on the fifth fret of the E string with your other fingers on the seventh frets of the A and D strings. Play the chords in the sequence that they're highlighted with parentheses below:
1950s: occasional Adirondack red spruce. In 1952 or 1953, rumor has it Martin bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce from government surplus. Though Martin preferred Adirondack Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-1940s because all of the large trees had been decimated. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Adi Red Spruce than Sitka was. He could not however find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka.
Pickguards were white pearloid, or sometimes tortoiseshell, the neck used a string tree, and the all-around makeup of the guitar was bigger than later iterations — thicker necks, bigger and heavier bodies, larger fret markers. One obvious differentiator is the logo on the headstock; the earlier models, and even a few released as they moved into Phase Two, had a raised plastic “Univox” logo on the headstock.
You don’t have to go for the ones that cost thousands of dollars; there are some pretty decent ones that cost less than $300. What a multi-effects unit will allow you to do is to experiment with different effects and this will give you an idea of what kind of effects you will need to get a certain sound. Once you have a good idea of what kind of effects you’d like to use, then I certainly do recommend trying out individual pedals and building a pedal board. Either that, or you can definitely upgrade your multi-effects to one that has more authentic sounding effects and modelers.
Lol I agree I'm a nirvana freak, not a kurt freak.... but dam fender all you can make is the same butt ugly designs that you have made for years come up with a compleatly new body design and I mean COMPLETELY NEW and just use the same components or better for a new guitar called, idk caster lol or DOUCHECASTER lol don't matter to me just hive us something new
When sliding or rolling your amplifier into the boot of your transporting vehicle, ensure that the controls are not damaged. When transporting your combo amp or cabinet, make sure that the face is downward so that the controls are not put under stress. If you cannot transport these face down, it is better to place the combo on its side and not on the castors. If you are a frequent traveler, you might want to invest in a flight case for better protection.
Ah yes, the 808. It's often used and referred to as a kick, but it tends to act more as a very low tom, as it has a pitch. This thing is the Loch Ness Monster – there tends to be more under the water. The best way to deal with a true, clean 808 sample is to work around it. It's usually best to let the 808 do its thing and to get the bottom end around it the hell out of the way. If it's a fuzzy sample or has been driven and squashed, you may need to play with things above 250 Hz, but usually live and let live is the best approach.

Two and a half steps down from standard tuning. Used in Swedish death metal by bands such as At The Gates, Dismember, Edge of Sanity, Entombed, Amon Amarth, and Arch Enemy (during the Johan Liiva era), as well as Fear Factory, Carcass, Type O Negative, Cathedral, Seventh Void, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Sepultura, Five Finger Death Punch, Soulfly, Within Temptation, Triptykon and guitarist Kirk Windstein of Crowbar and Kingdom of Sorrow.


Reading the comments, looks like people dont like Ibanez, in my 15 years of guitar playing I have own three, all mid-lowend models in the RG series, those things are of amazing value they can take a lot of abuse and still sound great. I dare to compare them whit my SL3 jackson a guitar that costed me three times more than any Ibanez I had own, the only big difference are the pickups because other than that the built quallity is much the same and I dare to say Ibanez uses better compenets (frets, pots, switch) than Jackson...
I've gone into a fair bit of detail here, which may be baffling to some, or may be old news to others, but I hope it cleared some of the common misconceptions about certain parts transforming tone that I have discovered in my time doing this! Truth is, upgrading your wiring is a really worthwhile modification to carry out. Replacing parts with quality components, of reliable build quality and accurate tolerances and ratings will simply be the best for your guitar. You may well see a tonal improvement afterwards which each customer of mine has reported back after fitting one of our harnesses, which is lovely to hear. But approach with the right facts, approach without the mystique of 'this vintage style pot will transform my tone' and you'll be pleasantly surprised I'm sure! There's no magic to a responsive, great guitar tone. 
My brother had the single-pickup (neck) version of this exact guitar c. 1969, badged as a Tempo. I wound up with it but in the ’80s I butchered it into a four-string “piccolo bass” with a sawed-down Badass II bridge, a Bigsby, a Seymour Duncan stacked-coil J-bass pickup, and a set of phase/split switches. I sent it back to him in the mid-’90s and he tossed it. Now that I’ve gotten into guitar over the past few years, I’m sorry I don’t still have it in its original condition. I don’t believe it was ever plugged into a proper tube guitar amp.
Dexter Holland (b. 1965) is the rhythm guitarist of punk rock band The Offspring and has played Ibanez guitars for most of the band's existence. He currently uses a custom diamond plate RG with a custom Jägermeister logo on the twelfth fret, as well as DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups, though he used to use a brown and green custom RG and has been seen with a custom Purple RG.
As the crowds at Beatles shows got louder, they needed louder amps. Jennings provided Lennon and Harrison with the first AC50 piggyback units, and McCartney's AC30/T60 rig was replaced with an AC100 head and an AC100 2×15" cabinet. Lennon and Harrison eventually got their own AC100 rigs, with 4×12"/2-horn configurations. In 1966 and 1967, The Beatles had several prototype or specially-built Vox amplifiers, including hybrid tube/solid-state units from the short-lived 4- and 7-series. Harrison in particular became fond of the 730 amp and 2×12 cabinet, using them to create many the guitar sounds found on Revolver and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Lennon favoured the larger 7120 amplifier, while Harrison preferred the 730 and McCartney had its sister 430 bass amplifier.
In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.

The first trick is the most obvious one: to double a crunch or heavily distorted guitar with a clean one. By sub-mixing a clean sound, you will be able to retain some precision, which is no minor detail considering that distortion has the annoying tendency of blurring sound. For this trick to be as transparent as possible, the crunch and clean performances must be as similar as can be. That being said, if you have a hard time getting that perfection, you can always "cheat": be it by editing the clean sound to make it match the original performance or simply doing some reamping with the first take, as discussed previously. In both cases the trick ought to work wonders because the clean take is only meant to be "felt" but not distinctively heard by the listener.
The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.
In recent years, convolution reverbs have become both affordable and commonplace. These differ from synthetic reverbs insomuch as they work from impulse responses (or IRs), recorded in real spaces to faithfully recreate the ambience at the microphone's position when the IR was made. Sometimes these are referred to as sampling reverbs but there's no sampling involved as such, even though the process seems akin to sampling the sonic signature of a room, hall or other space.
On September 6, 2018, the company announced that a global settlement has been reached with respect to the company’s reorganization plan upon emergence from Chapter 11. Under the plan, the company will be focused on its core musical instruments business with "essentially no debt." Current Chairman and CEO Henry Juszkiewicz will step down as CEO and assume the role of consultant. With immediate effect, Brian J. Fox, the company’s CRO, will oversee daily operations until a new CEO is appointed.[59]

Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).

You should have been making all the above adjustments with the preferred gauge of strings, but since you have probably loosened and tightened the strings a number of times over the course of this process, you should now put on a fresh set and do a final check of all the settings Neck adjustments in particular can tend to settle in over the a couple hours after they have been done, so I find it best to then let the guitar sit overnight and do a final check the next day. The bottom line in ending up with a quality set-up is making each of the important adjustments in the correct order: Neck- then Nut- then Bridge saddles.
This said, the gig bag itself looks like it is top quality, with properly cushioned straps so you can wear it on your back if you need to, making it a great option for carrying it across town or campus. The only thing is, the listing says the guitar is lightweight, but at 16 lbs, some people would not say this is “light.” At least not compared with some of the more inexpensive models in this review list. After all, the back and sides of this instrument are made of mahogany, which is a hard wood. This makes the guitar more durable, but not easy for some to lift.

Luthier Steve Lamb has been providing quality instrument repair in Fort Worth for over 30 years. Steve’s years of experience has provided musicians, collectors, students and friends the information and service necessary to keep their instruments in shape. Lamb’s Music is an authorized service/warranty center for most guitar manufacturers including – Fender, Gibson, Martin, Taylor and more.


Predating many of the newer brands on this list is another Californian company – B.C. Rich, who has been producing heavy rock guitars since arriving on the scene in 1969. Since the seventies, B.C. Rich has been a name synonymous with high-quality electric guitars featuring weird and wonderful shapes, including the Warlock, the KKV and the Mockingbird.

Editorial comment – I advise folks when considering fretwork to consider not choosing a size or leveling operation resulting in less than .040” height if they want to play a style with frequent fret hand slurring, i.e. rock, blues, shred etc.  Low fret height is less capable of sustaining a reasonable fret leveling in the future, making it that much closer to refret time.  You don’t have to choose a very tall size if that is uncomfortable for you, but only choose a low height if that is really what you want and are accustomed to.
There were precedents for the palm-muted, ultra-percussive chug James Hetfield gave Metallica (Judas Priest, Motörhead), but he made it the gold standard of Eighties metal. He's never been a monochromatic headbanger, though, delving early on into the delicate picking of "Fade to Black" and later embracing the more nuanced hard rock of the Black Album. "I wonder if James Hetfield knows how to play the drums," Dave Grohl once said. "Because basically he's taking care of the percussion and melody of Metallica's songs with his guitar. And it's great."
Since we only want to check how straight the neck is, we need to isolate this aspect of the guitar. In other words we don’t want the height of the nut or the placement of the saddles to confuse us, so we take them out of the equation. Don’t worry; we’re not going to remove any of these components, just circumvent them. I use a ruler to do this, but you can do it using only strings. I’ll describe both methods below.

This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
At least one company, Audiovox, built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as 1932. Audiovox electric guitars were built by Paul Tutmarc[1] who is also credited as the co-inventor of the magnetic pickup along with Art Stimpson, and the fretted electric bass guitar. Bob Wisner worked for Paul converting tube radio amplifiers into guitar amplifiers and eventually developing his own amplifier circuits so Paul's instruments could be sold along with their own amplifiers. Paul was unsuccessful at obtaining a patent for his magnetic pickup as it was too similar to the telephone microphone coil sensor device. Audiovox production was handed over to Paul's son, Bud Tutmarc, who continued building these instruments under the brand, "Bud-Electro" until the early 1950s. Bud Tutmarc had been delegated by the senior Tutmarc the task of winding the pickup coils used on his father's and he continued producing them for his own guitars. He used horseshoe magnets in a single-coil and later a hum cancelling dual coil configuration. Bob Wisner was hired by Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker and may have passed on Tutmarc's magnetic pickup technology and helped them develop the more familiar bar magnet and pole-piece pickup construction still widely used today for their cast aluminum electric guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1933.
This string overview is useful for understanding what choice to make that suits your play style the best.  As players, we are always searching for the highest possible functionality, while balancing tone and playability for the genre we play.  Check out what brand and gauge your guitar heroes use to help you zero in on your perfect string set and keep on rocking!
Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt are generally held to have initiated the use of the guitar to play melodies and improvisations over other instruments, the former using an early form of amplification, the latter playing forcefully on an acoustic guitar. Over the years, jazz guitarists have been able to solo in standard jazz idioms, such as bebop, cool jazz and so on, while in also absorbing influences from rock guitarists, such as the use of electronic effects.
The 5968 written on the label is a model number, not a serial number. It seems that the labels were void of serial numbers rather than model numbers (the opposite of what I had originally suspected). The Dorado I'm working on is constructed of rosewood while the Model 5969 is Mahogany. The 5969 is identicle in size to the 5968 but had nickel plated tuners and a satin finish. From my quick look around the auction business, it appears that the Mahogany back and sides model brings about $150 less than the Rosewood model.
THe 3 way switches is normally placed on the guitar with 2 pick up. For easy reference the Gibson Lespaul, that has 2 humbucker or soapbar type pickups. 1 near the bridge and one near to the neck. As it has 3 way switches it has 3 types of selection. 1st toggle normally for the bridge pickup, 2nd toggle is for the neck and bridge pickup. the 3rd toggle is for the neck pickup
Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
I have a problem visualizing a pickup wiring diagram that I am trying to set up. I just purchased a set of the new Fluence Strat pickups and I can’t figure out how to connect one of the wires coming from the bridge pickup (yellow wire – preamp input). I am using 3 mini toggle switches instead of the 5 way switch so I am having trouble transferring the different wiring scheme. Basically, the Preamp input and the preamp output from the bridge pickup connect to the 2 connections that normally have a jumper on the 5 way switch, so I can’t figure out how to change the wiring. I can upload the diagram if that would help. Thanks.
Bass guitar tabs are basically meant to be plucked with fingers. One should try to pluck with all the four figures and if not possible then first two. One should also try to understand the rhythm of the drum and the tempo of the song, while reading the bass beginner guitar tabs mentioned below. The technique used to play these tabs is that the alphabets mentioned to the left of each string, is the string name, and have to be used. And the number represents the fret number. Try jamm'n with the bass guitar and the bass guitar tabs for beginners, that are mentioned below.

@Christos – As mentioned in the article above, wherever they sound good to you is the best place to put them! However, traditionally people tend to put filter pedals near the beginning of the chain (like wah pedals), and volume pedals as well. An EQ can go first if you just want to EQ your guitar signal before running into your effects, or last if you want the EQ applied to your entire signal chain, or somewhere in between. It really depends on what you personally are going for.
What makes the THR100HD special is its clever digital power amp, which faithfully mimics the operation of real valves. Then there's the fact that you get two of everything: two preamps, both with a built-in booster function that behaves as a stompbox; two effects loops; two power amps; two XLR line outs. What you see is very much what you get, with a five-position amp voice selector, which packs three overdrives - crunch, lead and modern - and two cleans: solid, and er, clean. There's also a channel volume control, because the master volume control works inside Yamaha's Virtual Circuit Modelling environment, adding more drive to the THR's digital power amp simulation, which in turn has five different valve choices, as well as Class A or Class A/B operation. Lurking on the rear panel are two speaker-simulated balanced XLR line-outs, with a ground lift switch that uses the latest Impulse Response cabinet simulation. There are superb Fender-influenced cleans, bluesy touch-sensitive crunches and a choice of classic or modern lead tones, all footswitchable for your convenience. The tones are so convincing it's really hard to believe there are no valves. The interaction of the clever digital power stage with the loudspeaker is just like that of a good valve amp, and the virtual valve choices are uncannily authentic.
The Ibanez Gio GRGM21 Mikro in Black Night proves that guitars don’t have to be super expensive to sound great. This is a fantastic cheap electric guitar that doesn’t suck, often picked up by beginner guitarists who are into metal and hard rock and those who like a shorter scale guitar. Featuring an iconic shape, a specially designed GRG neck made of maple, rosewood fretboard and 2 x Infinity R humbucker pickups that can be used separately or in unison via the 3-way pickup selector, you have a comfortable and great sounding powerhouse of a guitar at your disposal. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars that sounds amazing when you throw some distortion at it! Available in different finishes here.
I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!
I've been playing music my whole life, guitar since 16 (>30 years!!!). I'm used to distortion, delay, and some sort of phase for my unique sound. With this little devil, I make my guitar scream and whine like I'm playng straight from hell! Makes me sound almost as evil as I am in real life. For this DIYer, I have some good noise until I can build all my own pedals. Many presets, I only needed to modify two of the for my sound. Now i can sound like the true 80's hardcore punk and thrash metal songs and sounds that I grue up with.
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.

Ibanez LGB30 George Benson Electric Guitar   New from$1,099.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $91.67 Free Ground Shipping Gibson 2017 Les Paul Studio Worn T Electric Guitar (with Gig Bag)   New from$799.00In Stockor 12 payments of $66.59 Free Ground Shipping Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Electric Guitar   New from$599.00In Stockor 12 payments of $49.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2018 Les Paul Tribute Electric Guitar (with Gig Bag)   New from$1,149.00In Stockor 12 payments of $95.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 6-String
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