Squier Affinity Stratocaster has all the same features of the Fender Stratocaster guitar at a highly affordable price. It has a maple neck and an alder body which gives it a snappy Strat tone. It also has three single-coil pickups that can be manipulated by a 5-way switch. A vintage style tremolo system makes it a great choice for those who like that system.
Plugged into a Fender blue deluxe, this instrument immediately proved to be a love at first riff. The humbuckers sounds so amazingly, and coupled with great and rich percussive and natural full tone, that overall sound that emanates from this instrument is far beyond what is normally expected for a beginner’s piece. The fact that it is made in China has nothing to do with its quality. This might just be your favourite new ax.

It also has an overwhelming amount of sheet music in it. These music sheets allow you to practice what is being taught in the given chapter, which is nice, but going through the books, I felt there was a lot left unexplained. This was probably a result of them trying to simplify things as much as possible, but this actually leaves holes in the padawan guitarist's knowledge.


One and a half steps down. Famously used by Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi in the 1970s, as well as Carrie Brownstein, Dimebag Darrell of Pantera, Eyehategod, Architects, Dying Fetus, Anata, Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney, Between the Buried and Me, Machine Head (tuned 40 cents sharp), Down, All That Remains, Bolt Thrower, Pete Loeffler of Chevelle (on Wonder What's Next), Billy Howerdel of A Perfect Circle and Ashes Divide, Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit, Guns N' Roses (on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and "I Don't Care About You"), Slayer (on "Gemini" from Undisputed Attitude, Diabolus In Musica, the majority of God Hates Us All as well as "Cult" and "Black Serenade" from Christ Illusion), and Stone Sour, as well as former guitarist Jim Root's other band Slipknot on the song "Snuff". Also used by Kyuss on the Sons of Kyuss EP and on the songs "Isolation", "Big Bikes" and "Stage III" from Wretch. Used by Metallica on the song "Bad Seed" from the album Reload, by blink-182 in "Obvious". Also used on Considered Dead and The Erosion of Sanity by Canadian technical death metal band Gorguts.
The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[when?] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color.
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
This depends on a number of things. Are you looking for placement in a series of pedals? If so, it should go towards the end of your chain. Are you looking at it as a functional point? If so, using an octave lower can give some hugeness to heavy guitar or might pull a fatter sound out of some higher solos, whereas an octave up is almost always great for a layering effect.

Description: 1997 Non Left Handed Model. Body: Laminated Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Ebony, Natural, Vintage Sunburst
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of...  Click To Read More About This Product
What about Esteban?….lol. There’s no way to make a top ten list, as there are so many extremely talented players. Glenn Campbell is an outstanding guitar player. Lee Roy Parnell is second only to Duane Allman as far as that style of slide playing. Although Willie Nelson doesn’t shred, he is an incredible talent. Duke Robillard, Danny Gatton, Robbie Robertson, Steven Stills, Alvin Lee, Tony Rice, Bryon Sutton, Brian Setzer… there are so many wonderful incredibly talented musicains….thank God! It would suck if everyone played the same. Variety is the key…learn to truly love the art of music. Just like blonds, brunettes and redheads they are all wonderful! If you even try to list the top ten of anything, you are only shortchanging yourself.
This is a guitar that we’ve featured before as our top pick for those who are looking for an electric acoustic for less than $500, so there’s no surprise that it’s back as one of the very best prospects at any price at all. Epiphone might be Gibson’s more affordable brand, but that certainly doesn’t mean you aren’t getting very high quality when you choose the Dove Pro.
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Neck Construction – The neck part of the guitar includes the fretboard and headstock. The tuners are mounted on this part of the guitar. The width and profile of the neck affects the playability of the guitar. Most necks are either “C” or “U” shaped. In most cases, the fretboard is made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, but some guitars have maple necks. Fretboard have position dots and other inlaid markers that assist the player. There are generally 3 types of necks – bolt on, set neck and neck through.
I have a vox valvtronics amp I bought a while ago it has a real preamp tube and loads of very accurate effects great reverb 3 kinds good modulation effects awesome distortion and tube overdrive and very important it is easy to adjust effect level and a power knob that lets you adjust output 1 to 60 watts like a pr attenuator its great so you don't loose that sound of a cranked up amp when you don't want it to loud it also has a easy to use tuner this amp is very user friendly unlike some modeling and effects carrying amps and you can easily adjust effects levels with separate knobs no confusion also a pedal to control effects is available for about 50 dollars is a great studio or small gig still amp and saves a lot because all of the effects it offers its like having a vox tone labe on top of a amp exactly you can sound like van halen led Zeppelin pink floyd lady gaga or the beatles and more and the price is very competitive to all others in its category
Not nearly as popular as single-coils and humbuckers, piezo pickups can be found on electric guitars as well. These crystalline sensors are usually embedded in the saddle of an electric guitar. Piezo sensors operate on mechanical vibration as opposed to magnets to convert sound from vibrating strings into an electric current. Piezo pickups can be used to trigger synthesizer or digital sounds much like an electronic keyboard. Most often, piezo pickups on an electric guitar are used to simulate an acoustic guitar tone. Piezo-equipped guitars often also include magnetic pickups to expand their tonal versatility.
No matter whether you used method A or B, you can now go about measuring the neck bow. This is done by measuring the string height (the gap between the ruler/string and the top of the fret) at about the 8th fret. There is a lot of debate over how straight a neck should be, and in fact it really is personal choice, but a height roughly the same as the thickness of a B string is a good starting point. Personally, I use a 0.012” feeler gauge to do this, but you could use a B string. Simply slide the feeler gauge/B string into the gap to see if it is too big/small.
The use of "full range, flat response" (FRFR) amplification systems by electric guitarists has received an extra impetus from modeling amplifiers. Before widespread availability of modeling, guitarists did not commonly plug electric guitars straight into PA systems or powered speakers, because most genres relied on the tonal coloration of a regular guitar amplifier setup—from the preamplifier, equalization filters, power amp, guitar speakers, and cabinet design. The FRFR approach assumes the tone is shaped by sound processors in the signal chain before the amplifier and speaker stage, so it strives to not add further coloration[20] or dedicated combo-style amplifiers with a broad frequency range.[21] Such processors can be traditional guitar effects, a modeling amplifier (without power amplifier), or a computer running tone-shaping software.[20] Using a modeling amp or a multi effects pedal used with line level output, a guitarist can plug in the guitar into a flat response mic input or into a keyboard amplifier.

An electric guitar can last many lifetimes; however, they have a variety of electrical parts and connections that, over time, can wear out. When that happens, you need to know how to fix or replace those electronics. The following are the parts that are most likely to wear out or break and need replacing. You can perform any of these fixes yourself without doing damage to the electric guitar — even if you screw up.

Because in most cases it is desirable to isolate coil-wound pickups from the unintended sound of internal vibration of loose coil windings, a guitar's magnetic pickups are normally embedded or "potted" in wax, lacquer, or epoxy to prevent the pickup from producing a microphonic effect. Because of their natural inductive qualities, all magnetic pickups tend to pick up ambient, usually unwanted electromagnetic interference or EMI.[23] The resulting hum is particularly strong with single-coil pickups, and it is aggravated by the fact that many vintage guitars are insufficiently shielded against electromagnetic interference. The most common source is 50- or 60-Hz hum from power transmission systems (house wiring, etc.). Since nearly all amplifiers and audio equipment associated with electric guitars must be plugged in, it is a continuing technical challenge to reduce or eliminate unwanted hum.[24]

Most Fender guitars are equipped with single-coil pickups. They have a lower output level than dual-coil pickups but sound brighter and sharper, which is perfect for clean and crunch sound. Both the Telecaster and the Stratocaster generally have an ash or alder body, a maple bolt-on neck and a rosewood or maple fretboard. Some other Fender models were also moderately successful (the Jazzmaster, the Jaguar or the Mustang). Squier, a brand that originally manufactured strings, was bought by Fender to become a sub-brand and sell guitars manufactured in Japan from 1982 onwards.


The Japanese copy juggernaut got off to a fast start, and the second major Univox guitar was the Lucy, a lucite copy of the Ampeg Dan Armstrong, again produced by Arai, introduced in 1970. This guitar had a surprisingly thin bolt-on neck (especially compared to the Ampeg original) and a slightly smaller body. The fingerboard was rosewood with 24 frets and dot inlays. This had a fake rosewood masonite pickguard with volume, tone and three-way select. Like the Ampeg, the Lucy had a Danelectro-style bridge/tailpiece with little rosewood saddle. Unlike the Ampeg – which had Armstrong’s groovy slide-in epoxy-potted pickups – this version had a pair of the chrome/black insert pickups jammed together at the bridge. Other Japanese manufacturers also made copies of the Ampeg lucite guitar, notably carrying the Electra (St. Louis Music) and Ibanez (Elger/Hoshino) brand names, with versions of the slide-in pickups. In ’71, the Univox Lucy (UHS-1) was $275 including case. Just how long the Lucy remained available is unknown, but it probably did not outlive the original and was gone by ’73 or ’74.


this is a norma guitar. i think from the late 1960's to maybe 1970estate find. has scratches in some placeshas two on and off button in white they push in real easy. theres a rhythm, and solo button theres two knobs bellow.theres only 3 strings on it. theres three missing part off the r is missing on the norma. i have no equipment to test it to see how it sounds it seems ok when i play with what strings i have on it.please check out all the pictures for better detail selling as is no returns... more
Large speaker cabinets such as 8x10" enclosures may have wheels and a "towel bar" and dolly wheels to facilitate transportation. Speaker cabinets with 1/4 input jacks typically have two parallel jacks, so that the amp head may be plugged into one cabinet, and then a second cabinet can be "daisy chained" by connecting it to the first cabinet. Cabinets with horn-loaded tweeters often have an attenuator knob for controlling the tweeter. Some 2000s-era speaker cabinets may have Speakon jacks; these jacks are often used with high-wattage amps, because they are safer, as the cable connections are hidden inside the connector and thus it is impossible for the user to touch the metal contacts when plugging in the amp cable.
The world of audio effects is one that can be confusing even for experienced engineers. Especially in modern computer-based recording systems, there's a bewildering array of options, and to add to the confusion, some effects are widely referred to by more than one name. In this article, I'll take you through the most common effects, explaining how they work and where you might want to use them in your music. Meanwhile, SOS 's team of writers has contributed a wealth of expert tips and tricks, which you can find in the boxes scattered through this article.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
The new generation of ‘boomers’ as they were known, thrived with the growing push on consumerism.  This of course included buying records and with the pin ups of Rock and Roll like Elvis and Chuck Berry – they felt part of a new movement which understood them and related to their struggles, such as growing pains, responsibilities and fitting in with society.

With the PAC112V there is no harm going with the crowds. The Pacifica is a crowd-pleaser precisely because of its versatility – and so whilst it might have a very recognisable look, this electric gives you the opportunity to craft a sound that is entirely your own. The only drawback is its weight, which is not much of a drawback at all – particularly for this price.
At the higher end of the market, you will definitely want to consider theGibson Memphis ES Les Paul Studio. A stunning marriage of the ES hollowbody and Les Paul solidbody shapes, this is a model that combines playability, power, sustain and tonal warmth to perfection. Equipped with ’57 Classic and Super ’57 Classic pickups and boasting solid construction throughout, the ES-Les Paul Studio is perfect for anything and everything you could imagine. Each model is supplied with a Gibson Memphis hardshell case to get you out and about in style.
If you had to write a soundtrack for the 20th century, electric guitars would almost certainly be playing the tune. No other instrument defines the angry rebelliousness of the modern age quite like it. Who could forget Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, or Nirvana—some of the greatest exponents of guitar-driven rock? But if you think playing an electric guitar is all about attitude and dexterity, think again: it's actually about the science of electromagnetism. Let's take a closer look a how these amazing instruments turn electricity into sound.

Anyone who wants a guitar that can handle both the expected twang and bluesy yield of a traditional Tele, along with the hard rock and punch of humbucking pickups will find a rather ideal companion in this guitar. I like it for studio guitarists in particular since it gets you a professional brand along with a wide range of tone capability that can help you be more accommodating to clients.
If you're in a small, unsigned band, it's very important to choose an amp that's loud enough - as not every venue will mic your amp. Ironically, bigger artists don't need to worry about this, since they are safe in the knowledge they'll always have a good sound and their amps will always be mic'ed. That's why Seasick Steve plays a small Roland Cube amp, but it's not necessarily a great choice if you're in a band who plays live.
Signature Guitar was a Canadian Guitar company, which providing good quality guitars for more than 30 years. They produce high quality electric guitars, beautifully crafted and basses. Their guitars are especially made for Indian weather. The company is situated in Aurora, Ontario, Canada. They are regarded as one of the reputed Indian Guitar brand. The price range starts from 4,999/- onwards (approx).

The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.

I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
The enormous world of electric guitars can seem daunting to navigate. While there is no best or worst guitar, there are guitars that have been ingrained into our collective headspace. There are also guitars that have pushed boundaries and become staples of the modern musical landscape. Putting aside the latest in guitar tech or rare vintage gems, let’s take a look at models that have time and time again satisfied and inspired players of all tastes and from all walks of life. Here are five of the most popular electric guitars in the world.
The difference extends far past just the look and feel.  Roundwound strings have a shorter life, create more string noise, and wear on your frets more, but feature a brighter tone, longer sustain, and lower tension.  You'll also hear more harmonics and be able to grip them better for bending and finger picking.  Flatwounds last longer and have a warmer sound... pretty much the opposite of what we listed for roundwound's.
But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
Maton earned international renown for their superb acoustic and electric guitars and basses, which have been played by scores of famous performers from The Easybeats to The Wiggles.[1] George Harrison owned one of their MS500 models, which were introduced in 1957 and famed British session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan owned and used a Maton ‘Cello’ guitar for many years during the peak of his career, playing it on recordings with Sarah Vaughan, Sammy Davis, Jr., Johnny Keating and his Big Band and Neil Finn from Crowded House.
Learning guitar chords is often one of the first things beginner guitarists do. You only need to know a few popular chords in order to be able to play a huge amount of songs. This beginner’s guitar chords article will provide you with the necessary chords you’ll want to learn for both beginner and intermediate players. Before jumping into learning the chords provided in the guitar chords chart below, I wanted to first explain what a guitar chord actually is. What Is a Guitar Chord? As wikipedia defines it, “a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar”. Although a
There have been a series of the Boss RV pedals, some of which have included delay as part of the package. The RV-6 doesn't brand as a reverb/delay pedal, but it does have a "+Delay" mode that incorporates it into the reverb's decay trail. While it doesn't quite meet the same decorated feature list as the HOF (no true bypass, no analog signal, less modes) the RV-6 does add an expression pedal option, which gives you some added flexibility that might be more helpful in performance situations.
Schecter Keith Merrow KM7 MKIII Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$1,699.00In Stockor 12 payments of $141.59 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Limited Edition Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom-7 Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$949.00In Stockor 12 payments of $79.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING ESP LTD SCT-607B Stephen Carpenter Baritone Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$1,099.00In Stockor 12 payments of $91.59 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Ibanez FRIX7FEAH Iron Label Electric Guitar   New from$899.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $75 Free Ground Shipping See All Electric Guitars: 7-String
Ok I know Hondo? .... But this is a good one folks its got a lot going for it really have a closer look, its actually built well it is a beautiful vintage guitar in its own right its condition and patina good looks good sound and easy playability make it an excellent entry or back up choice into vintage guitars, The Top appears to be solid 2 piece center seam spruce top you see grain going from top to bottom with really beautiful straight grain with flame type figuring that is surprising on a Hondo it's unique in that feature and it has that patina I love it caught my eye big time as I got close I couldn't believe it was a Hondo, it's logo has that same font as old Martin & Takamine used this one has the look and feel, but it's action was a little off spec , so I fixed all that it has great action now it's neck set and angle was excellent and I ended up changing its nut & saddle out for Martin born nut & saddle set and a new set of 80/20 strings, this guitar has good volume and sweet tone it rings clear and true with good intonation. It's in very good to excellent vintage condition, it's body & neck has no cracks , no finish checking and still shines like glass it's beautiful just have a look, it's not new or mint it has a couple drinks on its top and a couple on its back too but besides those it's exceptional vintage and plays easy with good low action with plenty of saddle left to lower more down the line of ever needed it's set up to meet or exceed Martin specs for playability. This is a lot of vintage guitar for this kind of price WOW! .
I'm also retarded. And my father used to beat me with my decca.... Im also the ex-ceo for decca inc. Your guitars are worth mere pennies.... litterally, Deccas were originated in the late 60s for young children to pretend to be their idols.. Deccas were packaged in cereal boxes as ready-to-go kits.. you assembled them yourself... they are made from old left over popsicle sticks.. So Im glad to put your high hopes and sleepless nights of wondering whos going to come up to you and tell you your old guitar is rare and worth thousands... Because frankly it will just never happen..
TASTING NOTES: When you add a second speaker, tones acquire texture and detail due to the phase cancellations between speakers. Tones also get more diffuse, with rounder highs and softer focus. Note how the 4x12 Marshall configuration has a muscular low-mid thump that the Fender configurations lack. That’s due in part to the closed back of the Marshall cab.

Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.


Marr, once a member of Electronic with Bernard Sumner of New Order and Neil Tennant of Pet Shop Boys, has played on a number of records and contributed to numerous other high-profile projects, including his recent stint in Modest Mouse. This weekend, Marr returns to Denver in support of his debut solo album, The Messenger, and in advance of the show, we spoke with the charming and intelligent guitarist about how he got the sound for "How Soon Is Now?" and his signature model of the Fender Jaguar.

A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.
Some bass amps may have additional controls for onboard effects such as bass chorus or a knob for controlling a multi-effects unit (which might include a suboctave generator, chorus, reverb, fuzz bass etc.). Some 2000s-era amps may have a knob to control digital amp or speaker emulation settings (e.g., emulating the tone of a huge 8x10" speaker stack or a vintage tube amp by famous makers, such as the Ampeg SVT).
More theory: tone knobs are basically adjustable resistors with certain values. The higher the value of your potentionmeter (hence “pots”), the more treble you allow to pass. This is why Fender guitars with their bright single coil pickups have 250K pots, while Gibsons with humbuckers have 300K to 500K pots. Some guitarists emply 1000K pots for maximum treble, and some make pots that when maxed out, make it seem to the circuit that it is not present, allowing all frequencies to pass through.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
The people at VOX know a thing or two about creating great sounding amps, after all the AC30 is probably one of the most famous amps of all time. The VOX Valvetronix VT40X modelling guitar amp actually recreates the sound of these great amplifiers and so many more. In fact, you have 11 famous amps to choose from which can expand to 20 when using the included Tone Room Editor as well as 13 effects built in. The hybrid digital/analog power amp provides you with all the warmth of a tube amp but with digital stability! If you want more power, you have the VOX VT100x or the smaller version – the VOX VT20X.
Several years later, Gibson issued its third Jimmy Page Signature guitar, this one based closely on Jimmy Page’s #2. Issued in a production run of 325 guitars, the guitar more accurately reproduced Page’s heavily modified No. 2 than the original Signature model of the 1990s, and featured the 4 push-pull pots, the two mini-switches under the pick guard, accurate tuners and sound-accurate pickups (the same pickups that were used in the 2005 Jimmy Page No. 1 Signature), as well as an accurate neck profile. As in the original Signature model of the 1990s, pulling up the neck or bridge volume pots switched the respective pickups’ coils from series to parallel, and pulling up the tone pots switched the respective pickups from humbucking to single coil. The two push-button DPDT switches mounted beneath the pickguard provide universal switching functions, regardless of the positions of the push-pull pots. With the switch mounted toward the bridge-end of the pickguard in the out position, the bridge pickup’s phase is reversed. With the switch mounted toward the neck-end of the pickguard in the out position, both pickups are wired in series and out of phase. With both switches out, both pickups are in series and in phase. The Jimmy Page “Number Two” Les Paul is finished with a sunburst finish to replicate the appearance of the original guitar. 325 of these guitars were made, with the initial 25 being autographed by Jimmy Page and priced at US$25,000 when new.
One detail is the rating, honestly there is no right or wrong here really, it's down to personal preferences. A .022uF capacitor will roll off less treble frequencies than a .047uF, so you'd perhaps notice a more prominent drop in treble when rolling a tone pot down which has a .047uF cap wired to it than you would if it was a .022uF. This to me is an important detail to consider when choosing the right cap for you, but if you're still not sure, the general rule is .022uF for humbuckers and perhaps P90s, and a .047uF is used primarily for single coils. This isn't set in stone though, so perhaps consult your pickup manufacturers recommendations first. If you want any help in choosing the right rating for your harness though, I'm very much here to help, so by all means drop me a message!
IK Multimedia are good friends of ours and we’ve watched them grow from a small plugin company to a world-beating manufacturer of amazing widgets for getting sound in and out of your iPhone or iPad. Amplitube Custom Shop is the software you need to buy their premium plugins. However, it comes with a load of amazing stuff out-of-the-box, including 9 stomp box emulations, 4 amps, 5 cabs and more.
Morris D-41 copy vintage 1980s Japanese high end hi class Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood tone woods body it has detailed fancy inlay perfling and in in amazing condition. Here we are proud to present to you a Classic dreadnought high quality Guitar made of vintage aged tone woods with impeccable workmanship and top quality materials fit and finish rivals the best of the best. This guitar was made by the premier custom shop builders of Japan in the Terada factory and are well known for making Ibanez's top of the line series guitars like the Artists - musician- the George Benson line as well as many others Some of the great Aria's top of line guitars and a few other makers they have the great woods and skills to make some of the finest instruments made period and this Morris is one of them. Just have a good look and you'll see for yourself. One of the finest D-41 type guitars made She's approaching 40 years old and in superb vintage condition I'm looking for dings still and don't see them it's really in sweet condition WOW it's rare to find such fine examples like this all round nice I suspect this beauty will not last long. She is currently in our JVGuitars shop for a full set up and will receive a JVG-Martin upgrade which consists of new fit Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set a full fret dressing and polishing and a beautiful resonant set of solid ebony bridge pins with brass ring and inlaid Abalone detail as well as a new set of Martin 80/20 phosphorus bronze strings and a full body polish. Just in pics soon to come. To enquirer contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com .

Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown

Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.

Any experienced professional guitarist will tell you there’s usually a big difference between what works on the live stage and what works in the studio. Most discovered early on that the carefully honed live tone they were so proud of just didn’t work on the recorded track, for any of several reasons, or not without a lot of tweaking and readjustment, at least. The first thing you’re likely to discover is that it’s a lot harder to record satisfactory overdriven and distorted guitar sounds than it is to record clean or mildly crunchy sounds, a revelation that often goes hand-in-hand with the fact that big amps tend to be more difficult to record satisfactorily in general.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
Many guitarists with instruments that have more than one pickup spend most of their time on the bridge unit. Using a variety of pickup positions when recording will thin or fatten the sound as required, but also help free up space when it comes to the mixing stage. Think of a recorded mix as a layer cake; too much density in one frequency range will cause a headache for the mixing engineer.
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Seller: bennick2013 (4) 100%, Location: Marietta, Georgia, Ships to: US, Item: 302905274242 Beautiful red body and maple neck looks great despite minor dings and scratches. Neck is straight and intonates well, action just fine with no divots or dead spots. Get it now before they become scarce and PLAY Condition: Used, Condition: Very Good, Brand: Lotus, MPN: Does Not Apply, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Type: Solid, Body Color: Red, Model: Strat, Model Year: ? See More
Compared with many of the guitar models on this list that have been around for half a century, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is still a baby. Ibanez introduced its Artcore line of semi and full hollow body electric guitars only in 2002. Nevertheless, the Artcore guitars have amassed a massive fan base because of their tuning stability, rich tone, impressive sustain and overall quality. Plus, they’re also extremely affordable considering their features.
It's pretty common that your fingers hurting at first. We all went through it. It does not matter what kind of strings you use. You will pay the price…. Think of it as a Right-Of Passage, or an initiation of sorts. If you think about it, everything in life that is pleasurable comes with a certain amount of pain that must be endured, whether it is financial, such as buying something you really want, emotional, as in love, or physical, such as building your muscles and playing sports.
The one major drawback of Guitar Tricks is the almost overwhelming amount of material that is available. There is a chance that you get distracted into trying out many different styles and techniques. You may find yourself jumping around from song to song and lesson to lesson wanting to see whether you are up to it. As a result you may not be able to follow your curriculum as initially planned. On the other hand, I strongly believe that this will broaden your horizon and make you a better and more versatile guitar player.
[author image=”https://www.producerspot.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/alan-steward-avatar.jpg” ]Alan Steward is a Producer, Engineer and Musician with over 30 years experience in the music business. He worked with Grammy winning artists from the Temptations to the Baha Men. His music has been used in TV shows and feature films. He is also well-known as a producer of loops for music production and owns a recording studio in Germany.[/author]

At least one company, Audiovox, built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as 1932. Audiovox electric guitars were built by Paul Tutmarc[1] who is also credited as the co-inventor of the magnetic pickup along with Art Stimpson, and the fretted electric bass guitar. Bob Wisner worked for Paul converting tube radio amplifiers into guitar amplifiers and eventually developing his own amplifier circuits so Paul's instruments could be sold along with their own amplifiers. Paul was unsuccessful at obtaining a patent for his magnetic pickup as it was too similar to the telephone microphone coil sensor device. Audiovox production was handed over to Paul's son, Bud Tutmarc, who continued building these instruments under the brand, "Bud-Electro" until the early 1950s. Bud Tutmarc had been delegated by the senior Tutmarc the task of winding the pickup coils used on his father's and he continued producing them for his own guitars. He used horseshoe magnets in a single-coil and later a hum cancelling dual coil configuration. Bob Wisner was hired by Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker and may have passed on Tutmarc's magnetic pickup technology and helped them develop the more familiar bar magnet and pole-piece pickup construction still widely used today for their cast aluminum electric guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1933.


“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
In this lesson we will study Tennessee Stud as performed by Doc Watson. The tune has a great bluegrass type intro that repeats throughout the song. It applies many of the basic bluegrass principles we have discussed in the Bluegrass Genre section. The chords used are not difficult, however the timing and arrangement are a little tricky. Best to learn a section at a time.
However, Class D amplifiers (also called "switching amplifiers" or confusingly, "digital amplifiers") are more efficient than conventional Class-AB amplifiers, and so are lighter in weight and smaller. The Acoustic Image Focus head, for example, produces 800 watts of power and weighs 2.2 kilograms (about 4 pounds). Class-D amplifiers use MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) rather than 'ordinary' (bipolar) transistors, and generate a pulse-width modulated signal that is filtered before it reaches the speaker.[15] In the 2010s, the availability of Class D amplifiers has enabled amp manufacturers to produce very lightweight and small, yet very powerful amp heads and small, lightweight combo amps.
The music that Jimmy Page made was able to transport you so that you got lost in what he was playing. His solos were show-stopping and so innovative when it came to guitar-playing technique at the time. He set himself the challenge of breaking the preconceptions of what a guitar can do, so his style evolved over time. But he was always one of the greats, even when experimenting!
Shimming a neck: The best shims are one piece and the full size of the neck pocket. For this veneer from the hardware store works well. However, it is very hard to get an even taper on these. The next best option is to use masking tape. Masking tape is paper which is wood fiber so it's almost as good as a solid shim, and much better than the smaller shims which leave large gaps which impedes the transfer of vibration, and could cause problems later on. To make a tape shim, lay strips of tape side by side perpendicular to neck, and add layers to provide the taper. i.e. stripe 1- 1 layer, stripe 2- 2 layers, stripe 3- 3 layers. Place the neck in the pocket, mark outline of pocket, and trim just inside outline.
My purpose for the visits were neither to buy, nor to have repaired, an instrument. It was to have the proprietor take a look at the bass that I had build. To give me his opinion and estimation on how I did. He walked through the process I'd used, for defretting, paint stripping, and then staining and poly sealing. Demonstrated how to adjust the truss rod, and complimented me on the work I'd done.

The “quacky” tone of the middle and bridge pickups, popularized by players such as David Gilmour, Rory Gallagher, Mark Knopfler, Bob Dylan, Scott Thurston, Ronnie Wood, Ed King, Eric Clapton and Robert Cray, can be obtained by using the pickup selector in positions 2 and 4. The neck and middle pickups are each wired to a tone control that incorporates a single, shared tone capacitor, whereas the bridge pickup, which is slanted towards the high strings for a more trebly sound, has no tone control for maximum brightness. On many modern Stratocasters, the first tone affects the neck pickup; the second tone affects the middle and bridge pickups; on some Artist Series models (Eric Clapton and Buddy Guy signature guitars), the first tone is a presence circuit that cuts or boosts treble and bass frequencies, affecting all the pickups; the second tone is an active midrange booster that boosts the midrange frequencies up to 25dB (12dB on certain models) to produce a fatter humbucker-like sound.

"The development of the modern tuning can be traced in stages. One of the tunings from the 16th century is C-F-A-D. This is equivalent to the top four strings of the modern guitar tuned a tone lower. However, the absolute pitch for these notes is not equivalent to modern "concert pitch". The tuning of the four-course guitar was moved up by a tone and toward the end of the 16th century, five-course instruments were in use with an added lower string tuned to A. This produced A-D-G-B-E, one of a wide number of variant tunings of the period. The low E string was added during the 18th century."[48]


Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of
Playability and tone are two of its most commended traits. Many describe its neck as very easy on the hands, while others describe the overall playing experience to be better than their other acoustic guitars. The TK-40D preamp gets a lot of nod from users who want to fine tune their amplified sound, while there are also many who are satisfied with its acoustic sound.
So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
Seller: bennick2013 (4) 100%, Location: Marietta, Georgia, Ships to: US, Item: 302905274242 Beautiful red body and maple neck looks great despite minor dings and scratches. Neck is straight and intonates well, action just fine with no divots or dead spots. Get it now before they become scarce and PLAY Condition: Used, Condition: Very Good, Brand: Lotus, MPN: Does Not Apply, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Type: Solid, Body Color: Red, Model: Strat, Model Year: ? See More
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I Have a '70 lyle hummingbird and its a solid spruce top and mohagony neck back and sides. My guitar luthier fully inspected it. Mine is in near mint condition and sounds identical to the '64 Gibson Hummingbird my luthier has. He was trully freaked out by this.. ha ha He keeps trying to buy it from me but im affraid im hanging on to mine. It seems there is alot of contradictory information on these guitars. It is super hard to get more than a small paragraph of info on these things. One site out there has several catalogs from lyle guitars but they require a payment or paid membership to view them. If you are interested google lyle guitar catalogs. There is one that sold for 600.00 at joes vintage guitars.com Its Identical to mine. If I find any more info Ill post as discovered.
Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the autumn of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as March 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. The Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another since its first incarnation.[1] The Fender Telecaster has been mostly used in music genres such as country and rock, but is also sometimes used in blues and jazz.
That day, I learned about the array of amazing things you could do with effects pedals. Sure, guitar is about your hands, but you also have to play with your feet. You have to know when a song needs more distortion, and when a song needs a jangly chorus with reverb. Without effects pedals, you’re painting with only primary colors, you’re singing in only a major key, movie-acting with one emotion. Guitar pedals open up a world for you in music. Of course wonderful music has been made in the time before such magical machines existed, and great music will continue to be made without them as well. They’re just tools after all. But what glorious tools they can be.
Good results are usually achieved using a dynamic instrument microphone placed 6-8" from the speaker, off-center. If more low-end is needed, move the microphone closer in (2-5") for increased cardioid proximity effect. Use your ears or a set of headphones to find the "sweet spot" of the speaker. Consider miking the guitar itself with a small-diaphragm condenser in the area of the picking hand aimed toward the bridge, for extra string texture in the track.

I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.
There were marked differences between the other Les Paul models and the Les Paul Junior. For instance, although the Junior’s body outline was clearly reminiscent of the original upmarket Les Paul guitar, the Junior issue was characterized by its flat-top “slab” mahogany body, finished in traditional Gibson Sunburst. The Junior was touted as an inexpensive option for Gibson electric guitar buyers[citation needed]: it had a single P-90 pickup, simple volume and tone controls, and the unbound rosewood fingerboard bore plain dot-shape position markers. However, as a concession to the aspirations of the beginning guitarist buyer, the Junior did feature the stud bridge/tailpiece similar to the second incarnation of the upscale Gold-Top.
Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
Three and one half steps down from Drop D. Used by Darkest Hour on the song "Wasteland", Attack Attack!, Baroness (on their first two EPs), The Acacia Strain (on some songs), Dead by April (on some songs) and In Flames (on the song "Transparent" from Reroute to Remain). Chelsea Grin also used this tuning on their album Ashes to Ashes. Also Pantera and Whitechapel recorded Sandblasted Skin in G-g-C-F-A-D, Drop G variation with D standard.
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Some areas of the top’s lacquer finish have been peeled away from the long-ago removal of a few stickers and black electrical tape (the previous owner admitted to decorating the guitar with the black stripes in a tiger-theme). The guitar plays well, with a good neck angle and decent original frets. The guitar was just set up this past month by the pros at the renowned Guitar Factory in Orlando(http://www.guitarfactory.us/). It now plays great and needs nothing – they do great work! Pickups read 4.12 (neck) and 4.20 (bridge), and pots and switches work well. And, very important to note on vintage Gretsch guitars, there is NO binding rot. Also includes the Original Hard Shell Case.

My rule of thumb, whenever possible, is drive the input and route the modulation. I.E. - I put compression, over drive, distortion, fuzz, and wah/filter effect on the input; and then I route flange, phase, chorus, and delay through an effects loop. I do this for a couple of reasons - 1.) I don't have 15 effects ganged together hitting my input which can effect tone, clarity, and volume; and 2.) I can shape the tone and dynamics of my guitar going the amp's input while maintaining definition, tone, and volume to my modulated effects through the buffering provided by an effects loop.
Pots generally come in two types: 500k or 250k. K refers to 1000 ohms and is a measure of resistance, which is the amount of resistance the signal from your pickup receives before being passed to your output. As a result, increasing or decreasing the amount of resistance your output receives via your volume pot affects the overall volume of your guitar.
I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
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The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.

Includes 9+ hours of in-depth training on all aspects of guitar. There are many variables that can impact the tone and quality of a guitar recording — from setup, string gauge, amps and pickups, to processing, effects and miking. Mark breaks it all down so you can confidently create awesome guitar tone and take your mixes, productions, performances and recordings to the next level.
A little lighter than the On-stage but equally sturdy is the Gator GFW, at only 8 lb of weight. This doesn’t mean it won’t be able to offer proper support to the heftiest amplifiers, however, since it is rated to hold as much as 176 lb before showing any signs of stress. At this capacity, most people would be able to use it as a chair without any worries.

Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.
Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.
With $500 in your pocket, buying a good amp becomes a lot easier. In fact, it’s probably as expensive as most casual guitarists would ever need to go. This category includes a big choice of both amp heads and combos, solid-state and tube amps. While they make great practice amps, they are all worthy of small to medium-sized gigs and studio recording. For example, you can find the excellent Peavey ValveKing II. This little amp head offers the same beastly tone as the iconic full-size 6505, with 20 watts of power and solid controls.
Bass amps come with a range of different input and output jacks, depending on the cost of the amplifier and its intended purpose. The least expensive practice amps may only have a single 1/4" input jack and no output jacks. Some practice amps and small combo amps have RCA or 1/8" inputs for plugging an MP3 player or CD player into the bass amp, to facilitate practicing with a recording. Some amps have a high-gain input, for basses which have internal preamplifiers one the instrument. The high-gain input is routed through a pad (attenuator). An amp may also have a low-gain input, which is unattenuated, for regular basses. Some combo amps have a 1/4" auxiliary input, which could be used to plug in a keyboard, drum machine or second bass.
Next up is this beautiful standard Telecaster from Fender. All the words in the name are words that appeal to us. Fender is a well-renowned brand that most guitarists consider a safe option that delivers great guitars. The next word, ‘Deluxe’, suggests that this particular guitar is a little bit better than all the rest, and then we have Nashville, which makes all country enthusiasts curious.

Besides his restoration of vintage guitars, one of the most important contributions Paul has made to the guitar world is passing the torch to a new generation of guitar masters by offering Luthier classes that teaches how to build your own electric guitar at his shop. People from all walks of life have attended his seminars, including Mark Colombo, a former offensive tackle of the Dallas Cowboys. Paul is not only sharing his love of building great guitars but also teaching the science of how the magic works. "I have what's known as the 'no-fail policy,'" he says and laughs. "If you can't do the work, I'll do it for you."


For beginners looking to practice their first notes, chords and songs, nothing more than a couple of watts is needed – in fact, most dedicated practice amps won’t offer much more than 10 watts. If you are planning on jamming with a full band or starting to gig in small venues (think bars, clubs and small halls), then anything from 15 to 50 watts will suffice. Bigger gigs, including auditoriums and outdoor festivals, will demand upwards of 100 watts.

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And a heads up for anyone interested and if you're like me and somehow missed the fact that Line 6 is releasing a soft vst version of their Helix effects and amp sim package called Helix Native. I'm waiting on making a decision on updating my soft Amp/Fx packages until I see what it is like. If it's approaching anything like the hardware version(s) it should be great.
Next to the great sounds and looks, the most noticeable thing about Seagull guitars is the incredibly reasonable prices. With Seagull, you get a quality guitar made from superior woods and materials for a lot less than it seems like it ought to cost. The Performer CW Flame Maple is definitely one of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000 out there.
Hendrix, Van Halen and, uh, Mozart are the musicians to thank for most heavily influencing death-metal shredder Azagthoth, not that they really come through in the jagged riffs and cheetah-fast solos of Morbid Angel classics like “World of S—t” and “Where the Slime Live.” But that’s because he has blazed a tension-filled style all his own (when he solos, he enters a mystical mind state he calls the “Temple of Ostx”) that is finally getting more praise than early antics like cutting himself with a razor before hitting the stage and extolling Satanism.
WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
Our electric guitars deliver the same rewarding mix of playability, tone and craftsmanship that players love about our acoustics. Proprietary Taylor pickups fueled the design of our current electric family, featuring three series, each loaded with player-friendly features: the groundbreaking hollowbody hybrid T5, the electric-leaning T5z, and the semi-hollowbody T3.
Not nearly as popular as single-coils and humbuckers, piezo pickups can be found on electric guitars as well. These crystalline sensors are usually embedded in the saddle of an electric guitar. Piezo sensors operate on mechanical vibration as opposed to magnets to convert sound from vibrating strings into an electric current. Piezo pickups can be used to trigger synthesizer or digital sounds much like an electronic keyboard. Most often, piezo pickups on an electric guitar are used to simulate an acoustic guitar tone. Piezo-equipped guitars often also include magnetic pickups to expand their tonal versatility.

We have done hundreds of guitar 'set-ups' / repairs / restorations over the years and know how to do them to a degree that 95% of 'players' will be very satisfied. We're not just changing strings and polishing. We'll check and adjust the neck for correct string height at the 7th fret (should typically be about the thickness of a .010 gauge 'E' string when fretted at the first fret and the 12th fret). We also check for a 'body bump' in the neck as if that can't be addressed to a 'playable' degree, then the balance of the adjustments will be for naught. As we're in a very dry climate, we will check for 'fret overhang' due to neck shrinkage and 're-dress' the frets accordingly. If it's a 'bolt-on' neck, we'll check for neck joint / screw integrity and repair as necessary. We check and adjust for correct intonation using our 'Peterson' strobe tuner and our other 'analog' tuner. Electrics are typically intonated with 'fresh', .010 strings installed (if you want it intonated with a different gauge, just let us know). We inspect and test the electronics, especially looking for any 'aftermarket' re-wiring / mods / incorrect repairs. We inspect the integrity of the tuning machines and repair as necessary. Of course we do all the standard cleaning, adjusting and test playing once the 'basic integrity' of the instrument has been addressed.
It comes with a single coil pickup in the neck position and a humbucker at the bridge - switching between the two pickups gives you both a strat like sound and an LP like tone. The pickup selector is 3-way so you can play with both pickups at the same time. It sports a shorter 24.75" scale length and smaller 12" radius on the rosewood topped mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1.6875" nut width making it very playable and accessible to guitarists of all levels of experience. Many customer reviews suggest the Empire HG feels and plays like a more expensive guitar.
With 20 watts of rated power and an 8-inch speaker, the Champion 20’s sound output capability is a little above average for this class of amplifier. Those who like the features but need more power can check out the 40-watt version with a 12-inch speaker, the Champion 40, which costs twice as much but should be powerful enough for most jam sessions and gigs. The Champion 20 also includes a 3.5 mm line input for connecting a smartphone (good when you want to play along with recorded music or a music instruction app) and a 3.5 mm headphone output.
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
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The more pedals you collect, the more you should consider investing in a pedal board as well. Some pedal boards are simply that – boards – to which you can stick your stompboxes to keep them organized. But you can also get powered pedal boards, which have built-in DC power supplies. That means no need for batteries or individual adapters connected to each pedal: just tether them to the central source, and you can power them all up by plugging the pedal board into a single outlet.

Effects pedals, or stompboxes, are effects units designed to sit on the floor or a pedal board and be turned on and off with the user's feet. Typically, effects pedals house a single effect. The simplest stompbox pedals have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers (knobs) for controlling the effect, gain or tone, and a single LED display to indicate whether the effect is on or not. More complex stompbox pedals have multiple footswitches, numerous knobs, additional switches and an alphanumeric display screen that indicates the status of which effect is activated. An effects chain, or signal chain, may be formed by connecting two or more effects pedals together.
There’s a bolt-on thin U-shaped maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and 24 extra-jumbo frets, which makes fast playing and string bending a breeze. As we highlight in our full review, the EC-10 is voiced by two ESP-designed passive LH-100 humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions, which are loud enough to cope with rock and metal lead playing, although articulate and warm when playing without distortion.
While Laney brand might not sound as familiar to the “uninitiated”, this brand has been producing quality amps for very good prices. The  LG12 is a combo amp with 12-watts. While 12-watts isn’t much it seems to kick in a punch when needed (and plus, you want it for practice and more practice amps don’t have a lot of wattages). Apart from that this combo offers  LG12 12 single channel with switchable drive, CD input, headphone socket (a much for practice) as well as Bass, Middle and Treble control. The tone of this amp is pretty crisp and clean. That’s partly due to the 6.5″ custom-designed speaker. The speaker is not only functional but looks pretty nice. Looks wise this model has top mounted construction, rubber feet for sturdiness and leather handle for ease of transportation. Apart from being a great practice amp, it is also great if you travel around and want a model that can take a punch or two.
When jazz guitar players improvise, they use the scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chords in a tune's chord progression. The approach to improvising has changed since the earliest eras of jazz guitar. During the Swing era, many soloists improvised "by ear" by embellishing the melody with ornaments and passing notes. However, during the bebop era, the rapid tempo and complicated chord progressions made it increasingly harder to play "by ear." Along with other improvisers, such as saxes and piano players, bebop-era jazz guitarists began to improvise over the chord changes using scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) and arpeggios.[2] Jazz guitar players tend to improvise around chord/scale relationships, rather than reworking the melody, possibly due to their familiarity with chords resulting from their comping role. A source of melodic ideas for improvisation is transcribing improvised solos from recordings. This provides jazz guitarists with a source of "licks", melodic phrases and ideas they incorporate either intact or in variations, and is an established way of learning from the previous generations of players.
The guitar output jack typically provides a monaural signal. Many guitars with active electronics use a jack with an extra contact normally used for stereo. These guitars use the extra contact to break the ground connection to the on-board battery to preserve battery life when the guitar is unplugged. These guitars require a mono plug to close the internal switch and connect the battery to ground. Standard guitar cables use a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) mono plug. These have a tip and sleeve configuration referred to as a TS phone connector. The voltage is usually around 1 to 9 millivolts.
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