Tone woods only effect acoustic or hollowbodys. The more dense wood harder tighter grained woods along with steep pitched saddle to stop string angle increases sustain.research labs experimented with marble body's and had tremendous sustain.also effecting sustain is type of neck.ie. bolt on set or thru. A bolt on May have equal sustain to a set if the thickness of body at bolt joint is made thicker but thru are best all have give and takes. Thru are less adjustable and limit repairs. Bolt on offer more adjustment. Set necks can be replaced or reset but cost more to do so. Thick heavy gibson let Pauls are known for the sustain.but endurance limited by heavy weight. It's all matter of choice. Buy usa or if not available japan. Stay away from Chinese or Korean they are bottom feeders
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Starting in January 1999, Taylor guitars are made with a patented bolt-on neck; the NT neck (new technology). It differs from other necks by using a continuous piece of wood all the way to the 19th fret to support the fretboard.[7] The standard practice is to support the fretboard up to the fourteenth fret with the unsupported portion being glued to the constantly moving soundboard. The NT neck fits into a pocket on the top of the guitar body with the desired angle being achieved by small, accurately milled neck spacers (shims). Over time, some guitars require the neck angle to be realigned (referred to as a neck reset). This process is greatly simplified by allowing the replacement of different sized neck spacers to return the neck to the required angle. Prior to 1999, Taylor Guitars had a simpler bolt-on neck. These guitar necks allow for simple adjustment later if needed. Traditional (Non-Taylor) guitars with a glued neck with a dovetail would need to be disassembled to be adjusted.[8][9]
The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.
I took the Gearank scores we have calculated for individual guitars for each brand and combined them using a weighted average to produce a rating for each brand. I can best explain this by saying if a hypothetical brand had 2 models and one of them had 99 rating sources and the other one only had a single rating source then the first model's ratings would contribute 99% of the final rating for the brand. An interesting statistic; we processed more than 17,000 sources for these calculations.
Every generation there's one guitar master whose touch can make a guitar purr; whose grasp of his skill is so complete that just by looking at the guitar, he knows her problem; and whose ears can pinpoint what your tone is lacking. They are legends. And the mystique that surrounds these guys is hard to penetrate. Swank is one of those guitar masters. "I think part of my mystique now is that I'm just flaky and don't return phone calls," he says. "It's not that I'm some kind of badass." Swank was first introduced to the business of guitar repairing when he saw another master's work. "I just thought it was a pretty noble pursuit."

Every time I guitar shop I come back to Gibson. Pricey, but the look, feel and tone are to my tastes. A lot of classic songs have been recorded over the years on these guitars. Are they superior to Martins or Taylors? It's a matter of preference. I own a hummingbird custom and the aesthetics, tone and feel are unsurpassed, but it doesn't "cut" like a Martin. For chording though, it's a better balance. I also own a J-45 which is the ultimate acoustic blues guitar.


Another piece of advice most experienced guitar players will give you is to keep your reverb pedals near the end of your signal chain. The reason for this is simple but requires a more colorful explanation. Imagine your signal chain as a conveyor belt for ice cream. As the signal leaves your guitar, it is just a plain vanilla mass that gets another layer of flavor as it hits different pedals. Distortion might add a nice chocolate glazing, then we have the modulation with its meticulous icing, and so forth. A reverb pedal in this context are sprinkles. You don’t want to add them at the beginning since they can completely change the way every other ingredient that comes afterward behaves. You add sprinkles at the end. In appropriate amounts only.

In addition to the alignment problem, there are other problems with using a simple text editor. For example, you'll have to align all the notes of a chord yourself... it's not easy to insert a new passage... if you make a mistake you can't just move the note... and to your system, it's just another text file. If you want to programmatic help to simplify your work, or if you want extra power (such as song playback, chord charts, and scale generation): use a TAB program.


Gruhn Guitars: If you're looking for a convenient appraisal that can be done online--something along the lines of what May Music Studio used to do--Gruhn Guitars offers an appraisal service. You must first send information and pictures of your guitar according to their guidelines. You must also include a payment for the appraisal fee, which varies depending on the instrument.
In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.
Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .
The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.
Solid-state amplifiers incorporating transistors and/or op amps can be made to produce hard clipping. When symmetrical, this adds additional high-amplitude odd harmonics, creating a "dirty" or "gritty" tone.[37] When asymmetrical, it produces both even and odd harmonics. Electronically, this is usually achieved by either amplifying the signal to a point where it is clipped by the DC voltage limitation of the power supply rail, or by clipping the signal with diodes.[citation needed] Many solid-state distortion devices attempt to emulate the sound of overdriven vacuum valves using additional solid-state circuitry. Some amplifiers (notably the Marshall JCM 900) utilize hybrid designs that employ both valve and solid-state components.[citation needed]
Home>Guitars, Amps, and Effects >Electric Guitars >Electric Guitars: 6-String PrintRefine your searchBy BrandCharvel (26)D'Angelico (28)Dean (32)Epiphone (65)Ernie Ball Music Man (30)ESP (67)EVH (7)Fender (141)Fret-King by Trev Wilkinson (3)Gibson (118)Godin (2)Gretsch (49)Guild (11)Hagstrom (9)Hamer (5)Ibanez (122)Jackson (54)Kramer Guitars (4)Line 6 (6)PRS Guitars: Paul Reed Smith (47)Reverend Guitars (9)Schecter (51)Squier (23)Steinberger (2)Sterling by Music Man (15)Supro (3)Taylor Guitars (6)Washburn (1)Wylde Audio (5)Yamaha (5)Play as you Pay® Eligible4-Payment Plan (542)6-Payment Plan (921)8-Payment Plan (885)12-Payment Plan (743)By Price$100 - $149 (5)$150 - $199 (19)$200 - $299 (24)$300 - $399 (60)$400 - $499 (73)$500 - $749 (183)$750 - $999 (233)$1000 - $1999 (245)$2000 - $2999 (93)$3000 - $3999 (65)$4000 - $4999 (34)$5000+ (13)Availability In Stock Items (860)Clearance Gear (229)By ConditionNew (914)Blemished (221)Scratch and Dent (18)Viewing products that ship to: Customer Kudos "zZounds is the best online company I've ever dealt with hands down." - Customer on October 21, 2017 1 MILLION+ Happy Customers learn more Guitar·Bass·Keyboard·Recording·Computer Audio·Live Sound·Drums·DJ·Accessories
Great playing and sounding bass. The Ibanez BTB series in a 'very playable' 4-string version. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. We believe the pickups are actually made by Bartolini. 'Locking' 1/4 jack. Solid wood, natural finish body. Rosewood fingerboard on maple neck. Tuning is accomplished via quality, 'sealed' tuning machines. Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up great! Currently has 'nylon wound' strings for a softer 'jazz' tone. Frets show virtually no wear. Body finish has VERY little wear. Includes gig bag.

There’s no disguising what the Jackson Pro Series DK2 Okoume is meant for: shredding. From the tonewoods to the construction to the feature set, everything on this guitar is designed to bring the best out of lightning-speed solos and other fretboard pyrotechnics. That it clocks in at under $900 off the rack makes the Pro Series DK2 a great value buy.
This is a really cool program. It let's you fiddle with a lot of cool effects, without having to spend a lot of money. The program works really well, after a bit of fiddling with the Jack server, and it far exceeds some of the commercial programs I have tried. I hope that this project gets some attention :) If I wasn't a "coding dyslexic", I'd be the first to sign up.
While the decision to choose between bridges can be an overwhelming one, to simplify things, it’s better to choose one that’s appropriate for your skill level and your personal taste in music.  One bridge for the heavy metal genre may be absolutely frustrating for a country player.  For those with numerous guitars, you might have a different bridge on each instrument to suit that situation or style of music.
The classic setup of three Standard Single-Coil Strat pickups and a five-way pickup selector provide the tonal versatility you’d expect from a Fender guitar, while a ’70s-style headstock and body design look the part. It’s true that the American series is the more “genuine” model, but you won’t be able to tell much difference when compared to the Standard.
Stop tailpieces are usually paired with two types of bridges. The most basic is simply a wooden or metal bar with grooves that strings pass through. Most Gibson guitars come with another of the company’s early electric era innovations, the tune-o-matic bridge. Tune-o-matics have adjustable individual saddles for each string and are therefore more desirable for most players looking to control their instrument’s action and intonation.
Discrete models describing the low frequency behavior of stringed instruments have appeared in the technical literature for more than 25 years. These models are very useful in understanding the nature of acoustic-structural interaction, but only when they are correctly tuned to match the measured response of a particular instrument. The tuning process is easiest when FRF measurements are made... [Show full abstract]
Pickguards were white pearloid, or sometimes tortoiseshell, the neck used a string tree, and the all-around makeup of the guitar was bigger than later iterations — thicker necks, bigger and heavier bodies, larger fret markers. One obvious differentiator is the logo on the headstock; the earlier models, and even a few released as they moved into Phase Two, had a raised plastic “Univox” logo on the headstock.
I borrowed the above quote from an article on effects pedals by Robert Keeley (a maker of seriously fine effects pedals) which can help you remember the order to place your pedals. I have a few slight modifications and additions to this that I use, but this is a great way to remember the rough order quickly, and it comes from one of the great pedal masters.
Eddie's Guitars specializes in the finest electric guitars available today. We have spent many years seeking out the best builders, brands and models available from yesterday and today. From classics like Fender Custom Shop and Gibson Custom Shop to boutique builders like Collings, PRS, Tom Anderson, Grosh and John Suhr we have every avenue of the sonic world of guitar covered.
Pitchshifters change the pitch of the note played via a user-specified amount. The range of pitch deviation depends on the equipment used, but many pedals are capable of raising and lowering the pitch two octaves above and below the fundamental pitch. The amount of pitch deviation can be set or controlled via a foot pedal (which typically offers smooth, continuous pitch control). Typically, such function will be used with the original signal, resulting in a Harmonizer: the pitch is altered and combined with the original pitch to create two or more note harmonies. These harmonies are typically programmed in discrete integer multiples of the fundamental tone. When used with an expression pedal, it provides a smooth, abeit slightly digital, bend-like effect. Pitch shifters can also be used to electronically "detune" the instrument. Some examples are:

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The extra-versatile twin-channel layout with independent controls delivers a wide variety of tones from clean to overdrive. The Sonzera 20—which we recently reviewed—packs a hell of a punch for players who need a versatile workhorse amp that pairs well with pedals and sounds incredible on its own for any style of music. While the Sonzera 50 Combo is well suited to the stage, the 20 is easy to haul to gigs, has a lower output that’s better suited for the studio—and its “American style” voicing thanks to its 6L6 power tubes (the Sonzera 50 features EL34 tubes).
Although much less common, the second trick I have in store for you shouldn't be taken lightly. The idea is to double a more or less distorted guitar part with an acoustic recording of the strings of your electric guitar recorded simultaneously as the distorted part. As preposterous as it sounds at first, considering that the sound of an electric guitar without an amp is certainly not the most pleasant one, the overall result can be truly amazing! Indeed, well managed, this screeching sound has the particularity of adding a bit more dynamic relief to "trashy" sounds, providing the performance a more "organic" aspect, especially due to the accents produced by the pick. But just like with the first trick, you need to sub-mix this take wisely so that the listener doesn't end up discovering the trick.
Cutting the RATE and DEPTH knobs too high will cause the effect to sound thick and chaotic. This is more so an attribute of the chorus effect in general and not a knock on the pedal itself. With that in mind, we would advise taking Roland's "formal" settings suggestions (pictured below) with a grain of salt, as long as you're using the CH-1 with an acoustic guitar. In most cases, we found that the pedal performed best on the lower settings, particularly with the RATE and E.LEVEL knobs cut before 12 o'clock.
When you’re just getting into the electric guitar, there are a lot of items you’ll need to get going. This includes the guitar itself, tuners, straps, an amp, a bag or protective case, a stand, etc. Buying it all piece by piece can be rather expensive. It’s much more practical in financial terms to opt into one of the many starter packs on the market. If you want to know which ones are worth your time, here are the 8 best guitar starter packs for beginners:
Beyond shaping and body design, there are a number of characteristics that distinguish the Gibson Les Paul line from other electric guitars. For example, in a fashion similar to Gibson’s hollow-body instruments, the strings of Les Paul guitars are always mounted on the top of the guitar body, rather than through the guitar body, as seen in competitor Fender’s designs. The Gibson also features a variety of colors, such as Wine Red, Ebony, Classic White, Fire Burst, and Alpine White. In addition, the Les Paul models offered a variety of finishes and decorative levels, a diversity of hardware options, and an innovative array of electric pick-up options, some of which significantly impacted the sound of electric music. For instance, in 1957, Gibson introduced the humbucker (PAF), which revolutionized the sound of the electric guitar, and eliminated the mains hum, which had previously plagued guitars with single coilmagnetic pickups.
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I think it's OK to find out what the knobs are supposed to do, so you know roughly what to expect, but I would thoroughly recommend just sitting for half an hour and playing around with all of them, just seeing what sounds you can get. You'd be amazed what tonal variety you can get from moving the volume knob before you go anywhere near the tone knobs.


After the dissolve of Kay/Valco in 1968, the Engelhardt-Link company bought the upright bass and cello lines[clarification needed] at the asset auction in 1969, and continue to produce the same instrument lines till today. Manufactured in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Engelhardt basses and cellos are sturdy instruments, widely used by students and touring professionals. The ES9 Swingmaster bass (formerly the Kay S9 Swingmaster), is highly thought-of by jazz, swing, and bluegrass musicians.

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In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega Electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet to rehearsals and shows. 1n 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp which added the feature of metal corner protectors, which keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?
Located in Kobe, Japan, this manufacturer made the famous Maya brand guitar. Maya guitars were in production from 1970-1980. It's been suggested that Maya may have been responsible for the Aztec badge. You'll notice that Maya has been attributed to a company known as Tahara. At this point I do not know if Maya assisted in production or if Tahara produced some Maya guitars as a subcontractor. Maya and El Maya badges have also been attributed to Chushin Gakki. More research is needed to clarify this point.
The earliest documented performance with an electric guitar was in 1932, by guitarist and bandleader Gage Brewer. The Kansas-based musician had obtained two instruments from George Beauchamp of Los Angeles, California, and he publicized his new instruments in an article in the Wichita Beacon, October 2, 1932 and through a performance later that month.

The K161 Kay Thin Twin electric guitar was originally introduced in 1952 and was known as the "Jimmy Reed" or "Howling' Wolf" model. "T-Bone" Burnett played a Thin Twin with Robert Plant and Alison Krauss at the 2009 Grammy Awards. The Thin Twin was the first guitar that was able to create that unique Blues sound. The special Kay interior bracing made the instrument a favorite among Blues players as well as rockers of the '50s and & '60s. The hand-wound pickups and separate center chamber allowed an extra biting natural distortion without feedback. The combination was a mellow clean gritty sound with natural sustain. The pickups are so hot that they needed to be contained in the center chamber, which is why the Twin Thin and Pro Bass made anyone who played it feel there was nothing else like it. The Pro Bass had a unique feature of a switch that cut off the high frequencies to reproduce an "upright Bass" sound but in the off position the Pro Bass gives a punchy Jazz sound. The Pro Bass comes with electric flatwound bass strings.
If your audio track suffers from a lot of spill, or includes chords, the pitch correction may not work correctly. Where spill is loud enough to be audible, you'll hear this being modulated in pitch alongside the wanted part of the audio as it is corrected. As a rule, chords are ignored, so guitar solos, bowed stringed instruments and bass parts (including fretless) can be processed, and only single notes will be corrected.
In terms of precedent, one of the best known users of a parlour acoustic is Ian Anderson, frontman of eccentric British prog-rockers Jethro Tull. Here the smaller sized guitar enabled Mr Anderson to sling it off his shoulders, often mid song, to embark on a flute solo or child-scaring facial contortion marathon.  So, if that’s your goal, a parlour is the guitar for you.
ESP LTDs are a ripoff. All the money goes into the finish and nothing else. Cheap hardware and poor electronics. All of the LTDs I've ever owned couldn't stay in tune worth a damn, have noisy, pop-y switches and crappy pots. I have the Viper 400, and it's an overrated turd. Luckily I got it for a steal. Thing can't stay in tune AT ALL. I will be replacing the alleged Grover tuners with real Grover lockers. That still doesn't solve the issues with the soft finish and ultra-noisy electronics. Plus it has a humpy neck, a cracking neck joint (like all of my LTD set-necks) and the frets were likely leveled by a monkey considering the quality.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy

For electric guitar amplifiers, there is often[vague] a distinction between "practice" or "recording studio" guitar amps, with output power ratings of less than one watt to 20 watts, and "performance" or "stage" amps of 30 watts or higher.[citation needed] Traditionally,[according to whom?] these have been fixed-power amplifiers,[jargon] with some models having a half-power switch to slightly reduce the listening volume while preserving power-tube distortion.
In addition to modern versions of tricones and single cone resonators, National Resophonic also produce Dobro-style guitars. This company made the Model D during the latter part of the 2000s. Production of the Model D guitar has now ceased, but a few dealers in the UK and USA have stock available. National Resophonic are now producing their Smith & Young `Spider Cone’ models and the Model 11 is built on traditional Dobro lines. Also, Goldtone, Paul Beard and a number of custom builders are producing good guitars.
This is a guitar tuning and style of playing on the Classical Guitar that has been developed by Ian Low. It was recently publicized in the form of a series of videos posted onto his YouTube channel on 14 July 2016. The 6 strings are tuned to F, G, C, E, C# and C using the standard guitar strings EADGBE strings to allow a different style of harmonic playing.
Martin opened its “Custom Shop” division in 1979.[7] Martin built its 500,000th guitar in 1990, and in 2004 they built their millionth guitar. This guitar is entirely hand-crafted and features more than 40 inlaid rubies and diamonds. It is worth an estimated $1,000,000.[8] As of 2007, Martin employs 600 people. Thirteen workers are devoted to quality assurance[citation needed]. In October, 2009, Martin purchased at auction a D-28 that was played by Elvis Presley in his last concert for $106,200.[9]
THE VOTERS: Trey Anastasio, Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys), Brian Bell (Weezer), Ritchie Blackmore (Deep Purple), Carl Broemel (My Morning Jacket), James Burton, Jerry Cantrell (Alice in Chains), Gary Clark Jr., Billy Corgan, Steve Cropper, Dave Davies (The Kinks), Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing editor, Rolling Stone), Tom DeLonge (Blink-182), Rick Derringer, Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), Elliot Easton (The Cars), Melissa Etheridge, Don Felder (The Eagles), David Fricke (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), Peter Guralnick (Author), Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Albert Hammond Jr. (The Strokes), Warren Haynes (The Allman Brothers Band), Brian Hiatt (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Lenny Kravitz, Robby Krieger (The Doors), Jon Landau (Manager), Alex Lifeson (Rush), Nils Lofgren (The E Street Band), Mick Mars (Mötley Crüe), Doug Martsch (Built to Spill), J Mascis (Dinosaur Jr.), Brian May, Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Scotty Moore, Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Tom Morello, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), Brendan O’Brien (Producer), Joe Perry, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Robbie Robertson, Rich Robinson (The Black Crowes), Carlos Santana, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Marnie Stern, Stephen Stills, Andy Summers, Mick Taylor, Susan Tedeschi, Vieux Farka Touré, Derek Trucks, Eddie Van Halen, Joe Walsh, Nancy Wilson (Heart)
This setup is the same as the first one above, however, the volume pedal has been placed near the end of the chain right before the delay and reverb effects.  This allows you to have full control of the volume of your signal right before the delay and reverb effects. This is useful for fading in a fully overdriven signal without cleaning up the signal at the lower range of the sweep.

Here we have a very nice example of the Yamaha Red Label fg230-12... This example is in very good - excellent original condition. The woods used on this guitar are of a very high grade ... spruce top, Honduran Mahogany back, sides and neck please see pics for the details but very nicely grained woods!... workmanship is impeccable... the guitar plays like a real with very good action and the intonation is set dead on... The neck is solid Mahogany and is slightly beefy..I love the feel of this guitar and when you hear is you will be in 12 string heaven... no cracks or repairs ... the condition is vintage used its about 40+ years old you know ...with several minimal scratches but still overall a very beautiful vintage guitar. The wood has aged and mellowed with time to yield a wonderful rich tone only a 30+ year old quality instrument can offer. This one has that quaity rich sound along with the playability with the right aging now and with its beauty ...its a no brainier... Also available is a cool $100 vintage hard shell case see pics Thanks for your interest!.
B.C. Rich has been scorching stages all around the world with their monstrous guitars for nearly 50 years. With bodies like a battle axe and tones that are just as brutal, B.C. Rich guitars have become staples in the heavy metal community. Inspired by the look of classic motorcycles, B.C. Rich guitars are as unmistakable as they are undeniable. If you're a fan of seriously heavy music, you've already seen these beautiful guitars around the necks of some of the biggest names around. Slayer's Kerry King, Matt Tuck of Bullet For My Valentine, Lita Ford, Ginger Wildheart of the Wildhearts, and Pat O'Brien of Cannibal Corpse are just some of the metal messiahs who crank out riff after riff on B.C. Rich guitars. If you're after a B.C. Rich of your own, you've come to the right place. You'll find guitars for all skill levels in the section, it's just a matter of taking a look around and finding the axe that's right for you. For example, if you're a beginner looking for their first killer electric guitar, you'll want to take a look at the Bronze Series Warlock. If there is one word to perfectly describe this guitar, it would be "wicked." It has a wicked look, a wicked sound, and is offered up at a wicked price. With BDSM humbucking pickups for a broad dynamic range and a beveled top, this is the kind of six string that any young rocker will want to learn on. Of course, if you're already a serious player who is looking for a truly intimidating beast of a guitar, you'll want to get your hands on the Rich Bich 10 Supreme Electric Guitar. This 10-string guitar has a look you'll have to see to believe, and a sound quality to match. With Seymour Duncan humbucker pickups and the ability to completely revolutionize your playing style, this versatile guitar is an absolute knockout. A B.C. Rich guitar is exactly what you need to get you through the rock and roll trenches. With bone shaking volume and bodies to match, B.C. Rich guitars are sure to get you noticed when you're on the stage.
Reverbs and delays can sound particularly unruly when run into an amp set dirty. If you use natural amp distortion but still like using pedals, you can run some effects into the front of your amp, and run time-based effects into an effects loop (most modern amps with channel switching will have an effects loop). Some modern programmable pedals, such as the TC Nova System or Eventide Time Factor delay, allow you to switch between -10 and +4 operation, so you can use them in front of your amp at the instrument level or at line level in an amp effects loop. This is really handy, allowing you to create and store presets tailored for using the pedal either in front of the amp or in the loop. Of course you can also use studio-type rack effects in amp effects loops. Units such as the Fractal Audio Axe FX and TC Electronic G-Major work great in this configuration, allowing you to store many presets and get pristine time-based effects, whether you are using clean sounds or dirty sounds.
Now, you have your first electric guitar and it’s set up nicely. The next thing you ask is “what is the best way to learn guitar?” And the answer is simple – get some lessons! Whether it’s from your local pro, guitar teacher, or from a range of excellent online courses, lessons will teach you the basics – allowing you to start playing songs within a couple of hours.
I have been a musician for many years now. I have played in everything from metal bands to acoustic coffee house sets to worship/praise bands. I feel that with these many years of playing I have earned a sharp ear, no pun intended. By that I mean that I have developed an ear not only to hear pitches, tones, and notes, but I can also hear good and bad timbre. I feel that Taylor guitars simply produce the best timbre of any acoustic guitar I have played. Naturally, all of my acoustics are Taylor! With that, thanks to Bob Taylor for doing it best and doing it right the first time!
This can all get a little tricky and can become overwhelming especially if you have never tackled this type of job before. If this is the case, I strongly suggest starting with one of the easier models in regards to wiring e.g. Telecasters are significantly easier to work on as the scratchplate will often be pre-loaded with pickups. However, if you purchase a kit guitar such as an LP or you want to upgrade your electrical components (which is often the case with an entry level kit) understanding some basics about guitar electronics is useful.

Festive music track with cheerful and happy mood, with “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” song melody. I’ve included in pack different logo and looped versions of this track, for your comfortable using. This celebratory track can be used for Winter Holyday projects, children arcade games, as New Year jingles, advertising and Youtube commercial video. Enjoy!

Replacing or repairing knobs. Knobs are covers for your pots so you can easily turn them, if any of your knobs are unable to be correctly placed on try due to broken or enlarge holes, place a good amount of tape around the pot's shaft that covers it and try to keep the the knob on the tape. If you cannot do so then you may need to replace your knobs.
Wah – This type of pedal was a Jimi Hendrix favorite, and you’ve probably heard the original “Cry Baby” in a lot of music. It was the first wah pedal to find success, and paved the way for others to follow. The Cry Baby is an example of manual wah, controlled by a rocker pedal that adjusts the level of treble response dynamically as you move it. Some modern wah pedals, by contrast, are “auto-wah effects,” which do the same thing but use presets for control instead of live input from your foot.
Wah pedals make exactly the noise they’re named after – yep a “Wah” noise! If you say to yourself “Wah, Wah, Wah” slowly, that’s the same sound the pedal makes. Imagine a baby crying in slow motion and you kind of get the idea. The Wah sound was probably best captured on “Foxy Lady” by Jimi Hendrix and is widely used in funk and rock solos thanks to its really cool sounding effect.
Unfortunately, there is no single unified format used for Ibanez serial numbers. Ibanez guitar production is outsourced to several companies and facilities through the world and the numbering schemes are different in each region and/or factory. The information on this page is culled from several sources both on-line and off-line and represents a distillation of the available information. It applies primarily to electric guitars, but some information may also be applicable to acoustics.
However, you don͛t need to fork out over $10k for this version, as it comes with a respectable sub-$1,000 price tag. Sporting a familiar Strat style basswood body, this model is available in three iconic EVH-approved colors. Playability – as you͛d expect – is top-notch, with a reinforced quatersawn maple neck and a compound radius rosewood fretboard.
I ordered this for my 6 year old nephew for Christmas. He wanted one because I had just recently bought my 3rd. I thought a smaller one would be nice for him to start learning. Just opened the box and the amp doesn’t work! At all! Light turns on but nothing else happens! Hooked guitar up to my own amp and it sounds nice so it’d definitely not the guitar or cords fault. Trying to get a replacement but no luck.
These bundles usually throw in a gig bag, so you don’t have to spend extra money to safely transport your gear, as well as spare picks, strings, and an instructable DVD that will help you learn some essential guitar techniques quite fast. You might also want a bundle that comes with a clip-on tuner so that you make sure you can keep your guitar well-tuned on the go.
 The type of guitar strings you choose, and how often you change them will not only dramatically affect your tone, but also impact the playability of your guitar. By learning about the different string options available for your guitar, you can find the strings which strike the best balance between great tone and playability. The key components affecting tone and playability come from string gauge, string winding method and the string construction material.
Guitar amplifiers can also modify the instrument's tone by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequencies, using equalizer controls, which function the same way as the bass and treble knobs on a home hi-fi stereo, and by adding electronic effects; distortion (also called "overdrive") and reverb are commonly available as built-in features. The input of modern guitar amplifiers is a 1/4" jack, which is fed a signal from an electro-magnetic pickup (from an electric guitar) or a piezoelectric pickup (usually from an acoustic guitar) using a patch cord, or a wireless transmitter. For electric guitar players, their choice of guitar amp and the settings they use on the amplifier are a key part of their signature tone or sound. Some guitar players are longtime users of a specific amp brand or model. Guitarists may also use external effects pedals to alter the sound of their tone before the signal reaches the amplifier.
This model offers the pretty standard budget Stratocaster experience, with the bright, open tone of alder as the body wood. It comes in two configurations, S-S-H and H-H, and given that the humbucker is the star, you might opt for the H-H version, especially because it comes with a coil tap. It’s a solid guitar and should give you everything you need for short money, minus the frustrations of a lot of cheap guitars out there. If you’re just starting out, you could also go cheaper with the PAC112J, but you have to give up the coil tap.
While it might look identical to the RevStar RS420, Yamaha Revstar RS320 is very different. The shape is the same, along with the most of the hardware. However, the tone is a whole different story. While RS420 comes with vintage humbuckers, the RS320 packs a set of extremely hot pups which are more modern. I personally liked this configuration more than the vintage one, simply because it offers extended versatility.
We've already heard the story of Muddy's rise from a Mississippi planation to a Chicago blues legend but that only took his career so far, at least in his chosen style of music. Eventually, bands that were influenced by Muddy like the Rolling Stones (named after one of his songs), Animals, Yardbirds, Cream and Hendrix became big, raising Muddy's profile but not getting him the same level of success his descendants were having. Marshall Chess, son of the president of the label who worked at the company had the idea to try something different by putting Muddy's music into a psychedelic setting to appeal to a younger audience. After discussing the project with Muddy, he went for it. He wasn't forced into it as some have been led to believe.

Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.


For many people, Yamaha isn’t a brand that immediately comes to mind when they hear “electric guitar.” Yamaha’s artist roster isn’t filled with many high profile endorsers nor is the Pacifica carried by the big online retailers. This is a shame and why (in my opinion) the Pacifica is one of the most underrated electric guitars available today. It’s a guitar I wish more people knew about: the PAC112V is very well made, sounds and feels great, and is suitable for a number of styles thanks to its H-S-S pickup configuration and 5-way pickup selector.
I've had my Dorado, model #5986, serial #41 since 1972 and have used it for classical guitar study off and on since getting it as a gift. For what it is, the sound quality and playability are quite good. I'm donating it to a church rummage sale tomorrow (6/3/07) and will remember it fondly. I have an Alvarez Regency, similar to the Dorado, which lacks the sound character.
hi-thanks joe -i have  installed a push pull pot to get middle and neck and all three pickups totegher-it works prefect but when not pulled it has seemed to change the sound on my normal five  selector sound and made all my normal five sounds very twangy-is this normal as when i pull the push pull pot up the extra sounds get clearer-is it becuase i have two tone caps on the push pull one on top half and one on the bottom but i thought that should not matter when the tone is at 10-thanks sean
We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Even if you are on a budget, it’s always worth looking in the higher price brackets and considering something a little more expensive, which will offer better sound quality (which is always encouraging), better build quality (usually more comfortable to hold and play), looks cooler (which will keep you motivated), and will last you longer – allowing you to grow with the guitar. It’s best to buy at the top end of what you can afford. For additional inspiration, make sure to check out this electric guitar list.

As a lover of fuzz pedals myself I have both kinds and find uses for them, they sound different and excellent. Other famous fuzz users are Eric Johnson, David Gilmour, Joe Bonamassa, and Stevie Ray Vaughan to name a few. When shopping for a fuzz, try to play as many as you can next to each other, even of the same model. Due to the transistor values the same model pedal can sound and feel very different from pedal to pedal.


While I have been able to find ways to get it to work for me most of the time, I have found that the controls for the video looping feature are not as precise as I would like them to be. There is definitely room for improvement. Another thing that I am missing is the option to control the speed of the video playback. Some competitors allow for the video playback to be slowed down or sped up while retaining the correct pitch. Guitar Tricks have been listening – Improvement have been made!This is a great help if you want to practice to play along at a slightly slower speed or if you want to review something in more detail. Luckily I have found a little helper too that allows me to control the speed of the video until Guitar Tricks are including this feature into their video player. I am using the MySpeed tool from Enounce. They advertise it to speed up videos to save time watching them. It also works a treat slowing videos down.
Get a ruler (or straightedge if you want to be all fancy) that is at least as long as the neck, but not so long that it reaches all the way from the nut to the saddles (and watch it doesn’t lean on the pickups or pickup surrounds either). If you can’t get one between these lengths, and are willing to sacrifice a ruler, get one that’s too long and cut it to length. Alternatively, you can just cut a little out of one edge so that you can still make full use of the other edge of the ruler. Now lay the edge of the ruler along the frets (don’t rest it on top of the nut, saddles, pickups or pickup surrounds).
In a very basic sense, your pickups create a magnetic field that is disturbed when guitar strings are vibrated above it. This, in turn, converts the vibration of the guitar strings into a current. The current is then sent through to your output jack where the signal then passes through your lead into your amplifier, where it is amplified. Different gauge strings vibrate at different rates e.g. an A string will typically vibrate at 440 cycles per second (440 hertz) which creates a current of 440 hertz in the pickup.
If you are a first time builder or an experienced professional you know the value of building your instrument on a solid foundation. The Custom Shop Jag body is beautiful, high quality and made to spec. The Allparts neck is manufactured under license by Fender. The materials and quality level meet the standards set by Fender. Using these high quality materials will give you the sweet tone and sustain you are looking for.
Want to visit our guitar shop? We electric and acoustic guitars in a comfortable laid back environment steps away from the Damen Brown Line, 81 and 50 CTA bus. The guitars we carry are more than just used guitars. Each guitar has a story - whether it’s where it was played, when it was built or how it was treated. Our guitar shop specializes in guitars for players and collectors. Vintage guitars and used guitars are inspected and set up by our Luthier before leaving our shop. Stop by our showroom often as our inventory changes frequently.
Taylor went with their own Expression electronics for the BT2. This system features volume and tone controls as well as a built-in tuner. You generally don't get too much maneuvering space in terms of tone shaping, however, the default setting of the Expression preamp is perfectly capable of reproducing this Taylor's native tone, and there's generally never any desire to leave that realm either.
A good starting point when recording is to place the mic close to the grille and positioned over the centre of the speaker. However, it's worth moving the mic a little off centre if you're after a less toppy sound.Guitar amps tend to use 10-inch or 12-inch speakers without tweeters or crossovers, so they have a very limited upper-frequency response. These speakers may be used singly or in multiples, in either sealed or open-backed cabinets. The familiar overdrive sound was almost certainly discovered by accident when early amplifiers were driven beyond their design limits in an attempt to obtain more volume, but because of the restricted top end of the speaker systems employed at the time, the distortion was stripped of its more abrasive upper harmonics and actually sounded quite musical. So, what started out as a side effect of limited technology soon became adopted by blues players and turned into a distinctive style, which later evolved into rock, and then into heavy metal with all its spin-off genres.

Firmly intended to compete with Gibson's ES-335, the Starfire IV, V and VI retain plenty of Guild style, not least the more spacious cutaways and the wooden foot tune-o-matic-style bridge. Placed side-by-side with an equally new Bigsby-equipped Gibson ES-335, the Starfire V somehow looks more 'retro', more 60s. The body here is made from mahogany laminates with a distinct striped figure under the Cherry Red finish, which was introduced with the first Starfire. Then, as now, it all creates a different aesthetic to the Gibson ES-335. A major difference is the control set-up, which here augments the Gibson layout with a smaller knobbed master volume control on the treble horn, just behind the three-way toggle pickup selector. The pickups here replicate the early-60s introduced 'Anti Hum Pickups' and are period correct, along with the black plastic, chrome-tipped control knobs. It's a fairly weighty guitar for a semi, thanks to the full-length maple centre-block, and has a classic strapped-on feel. It is, of course, thinline depth and feels every bit an ES-335. It has a 'clean' sound, with low-end definition, slightly bright on the treble pickup with decent sustain and, importantly, a very respectable feedback threshold. It likes volume, and while similarly evocative of virtually all those classic styles, it's the stage version and effortlessly takes you on to early The Who, The Jam or Britpop voices, while seemingly equally at home with rootsy, strummier Americana.
A distortion box produces what we call hard clipping, as opposed to an overdrive pedal that produces soft clipping. What does that mean? If we were to look at a note on an oscilloscope we would see a wave (hence the term sound wave) with a nice rounded top and bottom. When we overdrive or distort a note the top and bottom of the sound wave flattens out, or clips. The more clipping of the wave the more distorted the note. A fuzz pedal produces so much clipping it is seen as a square wave, completely flat on the top and bottom of the wave. There are many excellent distortion boxes on the market but some classic industry standards are the Rat distortion box, the Boss Super Overdrive (a bit more of a distortion box really), MXR Distortion +, Boss Distortion, and the Boss Heavy Metal Pedal.
Thinking out loud... what defines electronics then? I've always assumed that the pickups, caps, pots, etc. inside an electric guitar constituted an electronic system. The "guitar's electronics" facilitate a deliberate flow of electrons through a circuit with semi-conductors, etc. Heck, with coils and magnets (and sometimes battery packs), they also provide the electricity that's conducted through the system.

Now, you may be wondering if there are things to love about Guitarist and there certainly are. The GUI is incredible and simply one of my favorites around. And if you need funk or jazz rhythms fast, then this is your guy — the auto-wah feature saves this plugin. The more you put realism out of your head and strive for interesting tones, the more you’ll like Guitarist.
I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.

So, we’re just over £100 here with the Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo, but we had to include the new version of the world's best-selling amplifier series. At just over £100 you get 18 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets – which is a lot of features for such a small price tag, definitely making it one of the best cheap amps money can buy. With 20 watts of power at your disposal pumping out through an 8" Fender Special Design speaker, it won’t blow the windows out, but it will certainly stand up on its own on stage and when used in a rehearsal or practice situation.
While a little on the pricey side, their products are seen as particularly powerful and reliable overall. The H&K Trilogy is well appreciated for its versatility, allowed by the high level of German technology and engineering involved in its construction.  It has easy MIDI control and three channels, a clean, crutch, and lead, all with boost options that give a lot of freedom to musicians who are into experimenting.
Harmony almost wrote the book on guitars and responsible for so many rock stars. Youngsters all over the world ordered guitars from Sears, Montgomery Ward, and later by JC Penny. These affordable guitars are now very sort after and have become very expensive. Many of these models have been copied and reissued over the years. In their heyday, Harmony was the largest manufacture of guitars in the USA. In 1964-65 they sold over 350,000 instruments. The pickup used during and around those years were made by DeArmond Company. Today Vintage DeArmond Pups are still valued and sold. Look into years of bands, and you will find VIP's of the Rock World, with a Harmony in their hands.
This mod is a little different—and definitely not as affordable as the ones we’ve been talking about up to this point. When players think about modifications that involve tuning machines, the subject revolves around tuning stability. That’s all well and good, but I’ve rarely encountered a quality machine that slips—because the mechanical torque required to turn the tuner’s capstan is pretty stout. Problems of pitch are usually more related to capstan wobble or a bad nut-slotting job.
A nice twist on this Squier is the use of a humbucking pickup in the bridge position, which is the reason for the HSS moniker (Humbucker-Single-Single). Humbuckers—two single-coil pickups sandwiched together and wired out-of-phase so they cancel out noise—are much quieter than single-coil pickups. However, they don’t have the trebly twang of single-coil pickups. Most rock guitarists use the bridge pickup most of the time because it has a brighter, more cutting sound than the neck pickup, so in most situations the HSS Bullet Strat will deliver a robust and hum-free sound.
The wah-wah pedal is one of the most identifiable of all guitar effects, yet is one of the most simple as well.  An easy way to think of it is that you have a tone knob under your foot.  It is literally just that.  A rocker foot pedal allows you to accentuate high frequencies when your toes are down.  When you put your heel down, you accentuate the bass frequencies.
The exact effect of the smaller cap depends on the other components in the circuit, including the guitar cable but for a typical humbucker with the tone control at max treble, volume at max and 470pF of guitar cable you get a 6dB boost peak at 3K rolling off at 12dB thereafter without the small cap.With the small cap, the peak shifts down to 1KHz and you get 10dB boost. This is because the capacitance of the guitar cable forms a resonant circuit with the inductance of the pickup then you add a further cap in parallel which shifts the resonance down in frequency. if you then roll off the volume to about 7 the peak drops to about 9dB of boost and shifts up a little in frequency because the resistance of the volume control decouples the cable capacitance from the pickup inductance.
"Rocksmith" came out in 2011, following in the footsteps of "Guitar Hero" and "Rock Band" in look if not in game play. Developer Ubisoft claims that it can teach you to actually play the guitar. Unlike its predecessors, where you play along with any number of hit or classic rock songs, pushing the right button at the right time to earn points and unlock rewards, "Rocksmith" requires an actual guitar that you plug into your console. Thus, you're playing the actual notes to the songs, which increases the difficulty of the game.

Perhaps the most dramatic of ambient mic techniques, though, comes courtesy of Chris Tsangarides. His 'Vortex' involves using studio screens to build 30-foot-long walls along each side of the guitar cabinet, creating a flare shape (apparently inspired by the shape of a bass bin). Within this flare, he places a close condenser mic and typically another couple of condenser mics with different distant positionings, perhaps at 15 and 30 feet away. "I walk around while the guy's playing and find a sweet spot and put the mic there", says Chris.
The original guitar recording preamp was almost certainly the Scholtz Rockman, but within a few years we had several sophisticated competitors (from Sansamp, Groove Tubes and Mesa Boogie) using both solid-state analogue and tube circuitry. These all include speaker emulation of some kind, though usually offer few or no effects. On the whole they are easy to use and some produce excellent results, though they have less tonal flexibility than digital systems designed to model the characteristics of a range of specific commercial amplifier and speaker combinations.
Besides instrument inputs and speaker outputs (typically via 1/4" jacks), an amp may have other inputs and outputs. These can include an auxiliary input jack (sometimes with its own level control, for a drum machine), "send" and "return" jacks to create an effects loop, a “line out” jack and an extension speaker jack. Practice amps sometimes have a 1/4" headphone jack, or stereo RCA or mini jacks for connecting a CD player, portable media player or other sound source. Some guitar amps have an XLR input so that a microphone can be plugged in for singing. Guitar amps that include a mic input are in effect small, portable PA systems. Some amps, typically bass amps, have an XLR connector to provide a balanced output from the preamp section to go into a PA system or recording input.
Why We Liked It - Guitarists often have a love hate relationship with signature models, but we really think that the SE Angelus is a worthy addition to our rundown of the ten best electric acoustics you can buy right now. It’s a good price, offers some great design and hardware, and of course comes with the seal of approval from one of rock’s most accomplished guitarists.
This acoustic-electric parlor style guitar features a solid cedar top and solid sapele back and sides, premium appointments that other builders will require you to pay top dollars for. And it features old school parlor style body shape, which gives the instrument a vintage appeal, and blues box style tone with emphasis on the middle frequencies. This makes it ideal for blues, folk and old school comping, a good contrast to regular sized acoustics in a mix.
The movie is very hauntingly beautiful, and it's especially highlighted by an awesomely haunting score, and some breathtaking visuals. The story is interesting, but it's definitely slow-paced, and the climax is much more of an intellectual payoff than a spectacular action scene (which many viewers might be hoping for). So I can definitely see why some people would hate this film, but I loved it. It's one I definitely won't forget anytime soon too, and it's great to see Natalie Portman (my old favorite actress) back in top form! watch movies online pro
With the new Shreddage 2X update released in July 2014, S2 is better than ever. Enjoy a brand-new user interface and totally rewritten engine, with intelligent string / fret selection, new features and options, even more customizable mapping, and new samples like powerchord slides and staccatos. You can also use new built-in effects pedals and save/load your own custom presets to use across multiple projects.
Intonation is difficult since the bridge is a bar of metal with grooves cut into the top. The whammy bar works and provides a nice warble in a limited range. Action is a bit high at the moment, and adjustment is limited to bridge height unless I shim the neck (no truss-rod adjustment is obvious). Still, the short scale and light strings make it easy to play anyway.
Set-ups include diagnostics, redressing and buffing frets, cleaning fret board, tightening hardware, restring, adjusting nut slots, truss rod adjustment, balancing tremolo, adjusting action, setting intonation, checking electronics, adjusting pick ups, detail and cleaning. Electro/acoustics get balance of output, and archtops have bridge located and taped.

Compared to the guitar amp rankings, the bass amp list is largely dominated by heads rather than combos. Notably, many of the entries on this year's rankings come from the recent wave of ultra-portable, Class D bass amp—a topic we've covered before. Clearly, this subcategory of bass amp is dominating the market, and it's likely that there will be at least a few new entries under that heading at NAMM next month.

The Seagull Maritime Solid Wood Series of acoustic guitars are designed to offer the features and benefits of the brand’s higher-end Artist Series of guitars but at a more affordable price point. The Maritime SWS guitars are offered in a variety of shapes such as mini jumbo, folk and dreadnought, and come in two custom-polish finishes: high-gloss and semi-gloss.
OLD Morris looks to be equal in all respects to our Yairi CY116, exotic wood construction with very nice old woods and excellent workmanship - fit & f instance they make the fit & finish is amazingly nice on the Terada factory made Morris. If your not familiar with Terada they are responsible for some of the finest Japanese guitars on the planet for instance Ibanez George Benson GB10's and all that high end line, most of Ibanez's Artists, and several other top of the line Japanese legends and they know how to make exceptional guitars and this Morris Classical is no different it sounds beautiful and has the vibe that is if you love the looks and feel of a well seasoned fully broken in 40 year patina and your OK with the top finger drag wear your going to love this vintage beauty yes it has plenty of vibe bit it sounds deep and rich too. Nice meaty neck plays easily with great action and with absolutely no cracks oh it has minor doinks and scratches here & there but nothing horrible this guitar qualifies for a VERY GOOD JVG rating overall vintage excellent but with the wear as seen the neck is still pretty slick no major abrasions and the fingerboard is nice too. Yes this is a very nice Ole Classical that has another lifetime of wonderful service to its new owner. I think you will be very pleased. Any questions just drop me an email to JVGuitars@gmail.com . Thanks for looking Joe.
But opposites not only attract—sometimes they also make groundbreaking music together. This is certainly true of Zoom’s collaboration with Doe and Cervenka. Since that band broke up, Zoom has gone on to do session work with everyone from the late John Denver to the Raconteurs. He’s also become semi-legendary as a guitar amp hotrod guru, having tweaked circuitry for Jackson Browne, the Black Crowes, Los Lobos, L7 and Social Distortion, among many others.
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Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.
The early Silvertone electric guitars were made by Harmony and Danelectro, with a few exceptions. Danelectro had been making amplifiers since the 1940's for Sears, Epiphone and it's own brand. Their manufacturing facility was in Neptune New Jersey. The Dano's started mainly with the infamous "U" series which had the Lipstick pickups and "Coke-bottle" headstocks. Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and many other rock stars got started and continue to play the Dano's. Aside from the very first Danelectros for Sears they all had the Lipstick pickups. That's how you can tell a Dano from the other manufacturers. Danelectro also manufactured the infamous "amp-in-case" models of which I have two examples: a 1964 and a 1968. If you want more info on Dano's go here.
Boost is an effect which boosts the volume of an input signal, in order to assure that the amplifier is driven beyond its regular dynamic range and thus will produce clipping and thereby distortion. Boosts are very useful for tube amp players who wish to increase the gain on their amplifier without having to modify the tone the way a traditional overdrive or fuzz pedal would. A boost is often measured by how transparent it is--although there are some on the market (such as the Katana by Keeley and the EarthTone by NOC3) that employ JFET designs to produce additional "dirt" when engaged to add a subtle fattening effect to the boost.
Worked fine. The product is as advertised. The solder joints looked prfessional, the wiring was neat. I'd say you wouldn't want to put this in a boutique level guitar but if you have a cheaper guitar that needs new electronics, these'll do the job fine. you won't find a cheaper wiring harness but you need to keep in mind that you're getting what you pay for. If you want a top quality harness, you'll pay at least 3 times as much.
Also like Taylor, high-end Martin guitars can cost thousands of dollars and are out of the reach of many players. But the DRS2 Acoustic-Electric is an affordable guitar that will keep you under budget, and allow you to own a real Martin. It features a dreadnought body style for strong projection, and is constructed using a solid Sitka Spruce top, solid Sapele back and sides and a Stratabond neck. Stratabond is a strong laminate Martin has been using on some of their guitars in order to preserve some of those aforementioned tonewoods, and keep costs down. Richlite is another eco-friendly material, and here Martin uses it for the fingerboard and bridge.
The fit and finish are as amazing as one would expect, and the general aesthetics of the guitars are just awesome to look at. They aren't gaudy or try-hard, but refined and subtle in their expression. Strumming a single cord will tell you all you need to know about the tone quality of this guitar, which is what really matters. It has that Martin twang and a lot of it.
The movement to all-transistor amplifiers probably followed hot on the heels of the hybrid amps of 1968. The 1971 Univox catalog features a new, updated line of tube amps, but also has a little offset-printed flyer showing the Univox A Group of solidstate amps, which probably debuted a year or two before. These had black tolex-covered cabinets with vinyl handles, black grillcloths surrounded by white beading, and, on some, corner protectors. On amps with front-mounted controls, the logo had changed to wide, block, all-caps lettering printed on a metal strip running across the top of the grillcloth just under the panel. Combo amps with this logo treatment included the U-150R and U-65RN. The U-150R ($177.50) offered 20 watts of power running through two 10″ speakers, with reverb and tremolo, three inputs, and six control knobs. The U-65RN ($110) had 15 watts, one 15″ speaker, reverb and tremolo, with three inputs and five knobs. Joining these was the UB-250 ($150), a piggyback bass amp with 20 watts, 15″ speaker cabinet, two inputs, volume and tone. The U-4100 Minimax ($299.50) was a bass combo amp with 100 watts pushed through a 15″ speaker. Controls were on the back, with two channels for bass and normal. This had a rectangular logo plate on the upper left corner of the grille, with block letters and a round bullet or target design.
I knew what it is that I need to do. The friend who worked on it with me said when we were finished, "Oh right, it sounds like all your records all put together." I guess that got the job down. Without getting too technical about it or elitist, it kind of does the job of a Gretsch, sonically, and a Rickenbacker, sonically, but I play it like a Fender. It's kind of handy, really. I used to it pretty much exclusively during my time with Modest Mouse. And totally exclusively during my time with the Cribs. I've used it nearly entirely on the new solo record.
If you decide to use my link to Guitar Tricks when you sign up as a member, I will receive a compensation for my referral. I am not a professional reviewer and my views are biased because I only recommend stuff that I use and like. I appreciate if you follow my links to Guitar Tricks if you like I Really Like Guitars and my review of Guitar Tricks. Thank you!
EMG DG20 David Gilmour Wired Pickguard   New from$329.00In Stockor 8 payments of $41.13 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Seymour Duncan SH4 JB Humbucker Pickup   New from$79.00In Stockor 4 payments of $19.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson '57 Classic Humbucker Pickup   New from$164.99In Stockor 4 payments of $41.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING EMG JH Set Custom James Hetfield Signature Pickup Set   New from$249.00In Stockor 6 payments of $41.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Pickups

We think this is one of the best multi-effects pedals as it’s packed to the brim with a range of classic and modern Boss effects. In fact, there’s eight simultaneous effects categories that can work in unison, and each of those categories has multiple effects types within. This means you have access to a vast array of Boss effects as well as COSM amps derived from the Boss GT-100.

We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.
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I have had some truly “nightmare” scenarios with repair people in my time, and you must beware of these folks who love to take your money, but who can totally botch a repair job on a nice guitar! It’s happened often enough to me to make me be very careful whenever I am “trying out” a new repair shop for guitar-related problems. Due to this, I often like to start with bringing them some relatively un-complicated guitar repair problems such as fret jobs and wiring problems, but even these have sometimes turned into nightmares. Today for example, I brought of all things, 3 Lap Steels and one semi-hollow guitar for repairs, but unfortunately the store’s repair guy was not there. We had a good communication though, and they made sure I wrote down the repairs I felt were needed, with a separate sheet for each instrument, and said that he’d be calling me with any questions regarding the guitars and their repairs before tearing into them!
The Effect: Even though acoustic electric guitars are generally not associated with various guitar effects, using some can be very beneficial to your tone. Naturally, the types of effects you are going to use will differ from those used with electric guitars quite a bit. The most common accessory in an average acoustic electric signal chain is a preamp pedal. Something like LR Baggs Venue DI is a perfect example. This preamp allows you to boost the signal being fed into the amp or PA, but more importantly, shape it in a way that enhances your tone. Aside from preamps, many guitar players like to use various modulation effects, delays, reverbs and similar. General consensus is that overdrives and distortions are not something you would want to hook up to your signal chain. If you are frequently performing on stage, having even a simple effects chain can be a real game changer.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: LTD Tuners, Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: ESP LH-150N/LH-150B - String Instrument Finish: Silver Sunburst


One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.
Steve is the best! He does great work and loves talking about all kinds of guitars. I brought my Squier Affinity Stratocaster to him for a setup and a pickup replacement job, and I learned more about Stratocasters from him than I ever would have expected. I will definitely be a repeat customer! From what I've seen, he treats all of his customers' guitars, from my Squier to an Eric Clapton signature Strat, with the same level of respect and quality of work.
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
Guitar effects pedals offer a huge range of possibilities for guitar-sound manipulation―there are literally hundreds of pedals from scores of manufacturers. If you or someone you know is not completely satisfied with the clean, unprocessed sound coming from their guitar and they want to experiment with and modify or color that sound, a great way to tweak it is with effects pedals, also called “stompboxes.” An effects pedal, depending upon its configuration, modifies the sound of a guitar through electrical circuitry or digital modeling via computer chips, either giving it subtle color or dramatic shift. All pedals include knobs on the enclosures that allow the player to adjust the intensity, speed, depth, and shape of the effect in increments, from nuanced color to ear-splitting crunch.
This guitar is a good example of the late 1960s Matsumoku made imports that were flooding the Americas.  This model with these pickups were made for many years, starting around 1966 through the early 70s.  That’s a good run!  Based on my research this particular model probably dates from the late 60s.Most of the time I see these guitars with chrome or tortoiseshell pickguards, and this is the first one I’d seen with a white guard.  Has a cool shape too!  These pickups were exclusive to Matsumoku and generally have a good sound.  I’ve measured about 10 of these pickups, and the reading are often all over the place.  Some of these read out near 9k, and some read out under 5k, so obviously the specs changed over the years.  I think the hotter reading pickups came from the later 60s era.Now that Lyle name was owned by the L.D. Heater Music Company out of Beaverton, Oregon.  They had some cool electric models here and there and seemed to really focus on acoustic guitars back in the day.  Most, but not all of the electric models were made by Matsumoku.Most Matsumoku guitars were made rather well, especially the wood parts.  Bodies and necks were always top notch and their finishes hold up better than the average import guitar.  They did some great, burst finishes!  But one weak point on all these Matsumoku electric guitars were the pickup switches.  They just weren’t made to withstand constant use and almost always fail.  Dano at Happy Guitar Repair knows how to rebuild these switches, and it’s just about the only way to bring them back to life.The all-telling Matsumoku plate is back there and the neck pockets on all their guitars were really solid.  If you’re looking to get into these vintage Japanese guitars, Matsumoku models are always a good place to get your feet wet!Mike Dugan loved this particular model, even though the frets were vintage Japanese tiny, and the pickups read out a little weak, sometimes a guitar just has a little chime and zing, and this one had it.  Enjoy peeps!
Their designs do not require them to have comparator inputs as with solid-state amps. The small amount of negative feedback in valve amps is only required to provide damping to the speaker. Valve Amplifier Design From physics we know certain things must be a particular order and size to be efficient and this is acutely so with valve amps. 60Watts is the minimum power capacity for an amplifier to bring quality speakers to life with full fidelity.
The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.
Scott Knickelbine began writing professionally in 1977. He is the author of 34 books and his work has appeared in hundreds of publications, including "The New York Times," "The Milwaukee Sentinel," "Architecture" and "Video Times." He has written in the fields of education, health, electronics, architecture and construction. Knickelbine received a Bachelor of Arts cum laude in journalism from the University of Minnesota.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
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First up we have the most widely used and most useful pedal ever created – the Distortion pedal! If you’re wondering “What is a distortion pedal” the clue is in the name with how this pedal sounds. It basically takes your signal (the guitar) and distorts it, adding volume, crunch and sustain to your sound and is basically used as a contrast to the natural sound of your guitar. Often used in the chorus of some of your favourite songs.
"It's a labor of love," says Youngman, a guitar master who's been handling guitars since the '50s and '60s when rock 'n' roll was still in its infancy. But he's not just a surgeon; he's a neck specialist. "If the neck doesn't feel right, you're not going to play." He's always been good at setting guitars up, and today he works mostly from home, although he also does repair work at Guitarasaur in Watuga. "It's always nice to make someone happy. It makes me feel like I'm doing something right."

When buying any instrument don't buy cheap. I've been playing 5 string for 36 yrs. The most important thing in a 5 string is the tone ring with a resonator. many good brands on banjo's. I have a alverez denver belle flat top tone ring, white eagle arch top tone ring but my favorite is a honher Artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a Good acustic guitar my favorite is a martin D-35 ease of play and tone are awesome. The tone is what you are after.
The solid state amp isn’t really new either, but it only came into its own following William Shockley’s world-changing invention, the transistor. Its use for the audio circuitry allows the amp to be more adaptable and easier to tune, but despite innovations in recent years, the overdrive of solid state amps isn’t yet on par with what a tube can offer, and only a few manufacturers can boast of products that come close to sounding as clean as a tube amp.
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
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I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!

Hi Ri - Squier Affinity Stratocasters and Telecasters come in lefty designs. Unfortunately they are a bit more than $100. There are some guitars in that price range but unfortunately I don't have a lot of experience with them. I would tread carefully at that price point, as really cheap guitars often end up being more trouble that they're worth. Good luck, whatever you decide!

You didn’t think we would forget bass amps, did you? Due to their inherent differences in design, bass guitars require a dedicated amplifier – using your old Fender Champion isn’t going to cut it. Bass amps offer more power, with some outputs reaching 1000 watts or more. Like guitar amps, bass amplifiers come in many shapes and sizes – including heads and combos – although the mid-range Hartke HD500 offers a stage-worthy 500 watts of power in a portable combo unit, with great controls and an excellent balanced tone.
If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.
Loop pedals — or loop stations as they're often called — have exploded in popularity in recent years as more and more players have embraced the ability to build multiple parts and loops during gigs and practice sessions. With popular options like the TC Electronic Ditto Looper, guitarists can lay down a basic chord progression while soloing on top. Loop stations are also a popular option for vocalists who can use these devices to build harmonies or deploy creative vocal effects. Whether you're in need of a basic option like the Electro-Harmonix 360 Looper or a more elaborate solution like the Boss RC-505, there's never been a better time to get into the world of looping.
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