SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor allows you to monitor your hybrid IT applications and systems. Monitor Microsoft® Office 365 Exchange side by side on your on-premises Exchange server and other applications. Check, track, and report on O365 user/shared mailbox growth, users over quota, archived mailboxes, inactive mailboxes, mobile device, mailbox groups, and more. You can also monitor Microsoft portal access to help ensure you're meeting your SLAs.
{ "thumbImageID": "JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Natural-Oil/H97609000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Jackson JS22 Dinky DKA Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Natural Oil", "sku": "sku:site51500000033288", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "266.65", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Jackson/JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Natural-Oil-1500000033288.gc", "skuImageId": "JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Natural-Oil/H97609000003000", "brandName": "Jackson", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Natural-Oil/H97609000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Metallic Blue", "sku": "sku:site51366901765023", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "266.65", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Jackson/JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Metallic-Blue-1366901765023.gc", "skuImageId": "JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H97609000002000", "brandName": "Jackson", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H97609000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Satin Black", "sku": "sku:site51366901764897", "price": "199.99", "regularPrice": "199.99", "msrpPrice": "266.65", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Jackson/JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Black-1366901764897.gc", "skuImageId": "JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Black/H97609000001000", "brandName": "Jackson", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/JS22-Dinky-DKA-Electric-Guitar-Satin-Black/H97609000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

The Limited Edition Slash Firebird Premium Outfit also features Epiphone's rock solid nickel hardware including a classic Epiphone LockTone ABR Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece, Kluson Reissue Firebird Banjo-style machine heads with a 12:1 ratio, a Switchcraft 1/4" output jack, and Epiphone Straplocks. A standard Epiphone hard case is also available.


Entire contents Copyright © Musician's Friend Inc. Musician's Friend is a registered trademark of Musician's Friend Inc. All Rights Reserved. Publisher does not accept liability for incorrect spelling, printing errors (including prices), incorrect manufacturer's specifications or changes, or grammatical inaccuracies in any product included in the Musician's Friend catalog or website. Prices subject to change without notice.

I agree with play with effects if you want to, they're a lot of fun. I do think playing with distortion and practicing with it on is a good idea. I don't think it's a good idea to practice with distortion all the time. It will mask a lot of mistakes and imperfections in your technique. If you can play something in a clean tone perfectly, it will sound that much better when you add effects. – Tony May 3 '13 at 20:09


The amplifier you choose to use will have a huge impact on the sound. Valve amps are still king for most players, but they can often be impractical in home recording scenarios. Though we’d all love to mic up a cranked Marshall Plexi every time a classic-rock sound is required, these days software and hardware modelling is so good that the results are almost indistinguishable from the ‘real thing’ in a finished mix. Though pricey, the Kemper Profiling Amp and Fractal Audio Axe-Fx produce seriously realistic results, while almost as impressive are software solutions such as IK Multimedia’s AmpliTube and Guitar Rig from Native Instruments. If you are recording on a Mac or iPad using GarageBand, don’t discount the built-in amp and pedal simulations either.
For acoustic players, the Rogue Beginner Acoustic Dreadnought guitar with Accessory Pack comes highly rated. Included within this pack is Rogue's exceptionally crafted beginner acoustic dreadnought, along with a Musician's Gear Tubular Guitar Stand and premium Pearloid Celluloid pick, an Ernie Ball polish cloth, and 12 80/10 Bronze acoustic guitar strings. Overall, it's a worthy yet affordable pack for any budding guitarist.

With the correct strings on the guitar, and the strings tensioned to the tuning you intend to use, place a capo at the first fret, or depress the low "E" string at the first fret. While doing this, depress the same string at the 12th fret. Site along the bottom of the string and note its relationship to the top of the frets up and down the fretboard between the fretted positions. The string in this situation, since it is under tension, is essentially a straight edge, and the curve, or profile, of the fretboard can now be seen. Generally, a gap of 1/64 - 1/32 " between the bottom of any string and the tops of the 6-7th frets (when fretting the string at the 1st and 12th frets or higher) is considered acceptable. You could go a hair flatter, or even a bit more curved depending on the needs of a given player, but start here.


He assumed the stage name Muddy Waters and released a series of historic recordings on the legendary Chess Records label. These discs established the quintessential Muddy Waters persona—the jive-talkin’, sharp-dressed, tough-as-nails, mojo-workin’ Hoochie Coochie Man. Waters’ confident, cocky vocal delivery was augmented by the knife-edge drama of his bottleneck guitar leads. This steely, highly electrified sound galvanized a new rising generation of British rock musicians when Muddy first visited those shores in 1958.
This guitar is based on Loar's U. S. Pat. 2,020,557 (filed 1934, awarded 1935), in which electric amplification is combined with an acoustic guitar body. The design offered a player the option of switching between electric and acoustic amplification, or combining both, with metal posts through the bridge that transfers vibrations from the strings to the bar-armature. With the posts raised, the bridge comes in contact with the soundboard for exclusively acoustic amplification; with the posts lowered to contact the metal bar-armature, both acoustic and electric amplification is engaged, and with the posts lowered completely, the bridge is lifted off of the soundboard and supported only by the bar-armature for exclusively electric amplification. The back of the guitar, made from arched spruce, with two f-shaped soundholes, incorporates another of Loar's ideas, covered more extensively in U. S. Pat. 2,046,331 (filed in 1934 but awarded in 1936), to use the back of the instrument as a second soundboard by transferring bridge pressure from the top.

The Effect: Wah pedals are primarily based on inductors, and later on Fasel inductors – serving as integral parts which play a big role in the outcome of the sound itself. They work on a basic principle, by adjusting a wah pedal’s footswitch your sound frequency’s behavior is modified, resulting in a “wah wah” tone – for further clarification take a listen to “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, effects may vary slightly or greatly depending on the model in question. Some of the most popular modern wah pedals are Dunlop’s numerous Cry Baby iterations and Vox’ marvelous classic enhanced remakes. The thing that sets wah pedals apart from other types in a unique way, is the fact that they rarely feature any controls, it’s just the footswitch and a dynamic range of impressive funky tones at your disposal.
1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson’s mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world’s greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom’s 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that’s just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic ’59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original!
Made of mahogany, the Destroyer's iconic body style has been attracting artists for years. It features a mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offers ultra-smooth playablity. Electronics include DiMarzio Air Norton and The Tone Zone pickups for a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars: kay vintage reissue guitars","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"kay vintage reissue guitars","prop5":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","prop6":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] sub category2"}

Wah-Wah: For swishy, rounded sounds that sort of sound like the guitar is wailing, a wah-wah pedal employs a sweeping filter controlled by a spring-loaded treadle, creating quirky frequency boosts as you work the pedal up and down. A famous version of this pedal is marketed by one manufacturer as the “Crybaby,” in an attempt to describe its tone in one word. The late Jimi Hendrix used one of these pedals to great advantage.
 Great, low priced, vintage Japanese project guitar. May be Decca, Teisco or similar. Has "P90" style, Japanese pickup installed which is not original to the guitar. Solid Mahogany body and neck with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard. Body is perfectly flat and is a thin 1.25" thick. Back of neck profile is very "flat". Top of original bridge is missing and has a wooden one laying in it's place. The pickup is wired directly to the output jack as there are no pots. 3 of the original tuning machines have had their gears changed. All work fine. The headstock logo is missing. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
This particular Duo-Jet belonged to a right-handed gentleman who had owned and played it upside down from 1971 to 2008. The Duo-Jet was Gretsch’s answer to the Gibson Les Paul Custom, and the overwhelming majority of these were black, with a sprinkling of Cadillac Green from 1956-1958. In addition, the single-cut Silver Jet 6129 was offered with some custom sparkle colors from 1954-1960. This guitar was refinished in Orange a long time ago, before the second to most previous owner acquired it in 1971.
Nearly all Martin instruments come in different styles. The higher the style number, the more fancy (and collectible) the instrument. Again starting in October 1930, Martin stamped all flat top guitars with the style number, directly after the body size (and above the serial number). Style numbers can range from 15 to 45. A letter can follow the style number too, giving some additional info about the instrument. For example, a "T" after the style number indicates a Tenor guitar. See the general specs section for a full list of these suffixes.

Although the electric bass was invented in the 1930s by Paul Tutmarc, his new instrument did not sell well. It was not until Leo Fender developed the Fender Precision electric bass in 1950 that this new instrument took off in the marketplace. Unlike the upright bass, a solid-body electric bass does not produce acoustic sound from a hollow body; while an upright bass player often benefits from using a bass amp, a bass amp is a necessity for an electric bass player.
Beginners want to hear the changes in their sound and get the blues, funk, and rock genres on their guitar. The DigiTech Element XP comprises essential features that enable a beginner guitarist to get more out of their guitar while still maintaining quality. These units also have durable metal foot-switches and an inclusive power supply. Other features include:

Got myself a Palmer today 050627, it´s a doubleneck 12/6 and seems to be of rather good quality. Needs some neck adjustment but so did my brand new Gibson LP to :-). Mine was imported from Germany to Sweden from a firm called JJ Music (JoJo) but i also have trouble finding out were they are built, what kind of wood and so on is used. Would be nice if someone knew something about these guitars or were to find something about them on the net. I really don't want to disassemble the guitar to check what kind of mics and stuff are used.
Tags: Adrian Belew, All Time, Arto Lindsay, bert jansch, bob mould, built to spill, Carcass, Carrie Brownstein, chic, dave navarro, David Bowie, death, dillinger escape plan, earth, Eugene Chadbourne, Fred, Fred Frith, fugazi, james blackshaw, Janes Addiction, Jerry Harrison, John McLaughlin, Johnny Thunders, Josh Homme, Joy Division, Keiji Haino, King Sunny Ade, living colour, Lydia Lunch, Marc Ribot, marnie stern, Mayhem, MC5, Meat Puppets, Mick Ronson, Morbid Angel, morrissey, Napalm Death, Nels Cline, New Order, nile rodgers, Orthrelm/Krallice, Pantera, Patti Smith Group, pavement, pearl jam, PS I Love You, rage against the machine, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Rhys Chatham, Robbie Basho, Rufus, screaming females, Shuggie Otis, Sightings, Skrillex, sleater-kinney, Slint, Smashing Pumpkins, Soundgarden, st vincent, stephen malkmus, Syd Barrett, The Birthday Party, The Breeders, the Jesus Lizard, The Magic Band, the slits, Throwing Muses, Tinariwen, Wayne Kramer, wild flag, Wino, Wipers, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Yo La Tengo
National Dobro’s involvement with electrics began, indirectly, with experiments conducted by George Beauchamp, who designed his first “electro” guitar in 1931, while actually still with the National company (not yet merged with Dobro). This was a wood-bodied “frying pan” with a pickup probably designed in conjunction with Paul Barth and Harry Watson, another National employee.
Since 1946, the P-90 has been pleasing guitarists with its vintage-soaked tone, that shares qualities of both single-coil pickups and humbuckers. P-90s are primarily single-coil in their construction (although larger and flatter), and come in a range of different housings. Although they feature a relatively low output, they provide a meatier tone than a single-coil, but with a bit more sparkle than a humbucker, and are therefore very versatile. They have been put to great use in rock, blues and jazz music, with Pete Townshend, Tony Iommi, and Carlos Santana all taking advantage of the sweet P-90 tone. On our chart above, the Seymour Duncan Antiquity is a great example, but check out more P-90 highlights on the dedicated page.
The top of the archtop line featured two very nifty new models called the Vegas 40 and Vegas 66. The Vegas 40 (Teisco Del Rey EP-11T) double-cutaway thinline was promoted both in Japan and the U.S. It was a full size ES-335-style with two pickups (the large rectangular type with chrome sides and black insert, square poles), bound f-holes, volume and tone controls on the lower bout (no plastic plate) and a fancy new angular archtop Bigsby and roller bridge. The pickup selector was a rotary switch on the lower horn with a new round knob with a lever (versus the old chicken beak). The bolt-on neck had a new three-and-three head with a flared “check mark” indentation in the top, with wide wings on either side, a shape that would characterize a number of other models later in the decade. The fingerboard was bound, with dots. On the Japanese version, the headstock carried a zippy new typeface proclaiming “Vegas 40,” while the pickguard used a similar angular script for the Teisco logo. The Teisco Del Rey carried its regular sticker.

But there are more questions – are you a beginner, or do you have 20 years playing experience under your belt? Are you on a tight budget, or is money no object? Do you prefer funk, or are you a full-on metalhead? Somewhere the perfect guitar is waiting for you, and – with hundreds of reviews on this site – chances are we have featured it on these pages!


Do you know what does custom shop means? Like custom shop cars and motorcycle, furniture. With Top Guitars it pertains to woodworking, most of us would define a custom shop as one dealing with made-to-order goods with certain specifications. Someone comes into my realm with a certain vision. That vision may be on a set of architectural prints or still locked in their brain waiting for extraction. In either case, it’s a vision or plan that they have, not me.
The Best Reality TV Shows Ever The Best Organic Coffee Brands The Best Electric Guitar Brands for Beginners The Best HBO Dramas of All Time The Best TBS Original Shows 10 Weird Things That Can Mess Up Your Sex Life The Best Game of Thrones Characters The Best Michael B. Jordan Movies The Funniest TV Shows of All Time The Greatest Game Shows of All Time 33 Famous People Who Were Teachers Celebrities Who Weren't Born Where You Think The Best TV Shows Streaming On Hulu Shows That May Be Just Too Scary For TV Easy Songs to Play on Guitar The Very Best Business Magazines, Ranked The Very Best of the Scumbag Alcohol Meme The Best Electric Guitar Brands The Best Toothpaste Brands The Best Probiotics Brands The Top Country Artists of All Time The Best Washing Machine Brands The Best Global Brands The Best Cheap Laptop Brands

It wasn't long before Southland went to hell in a hand basket. I would like to acknowledge the professionalism of people like the late Lee Ingber who was quality minded enough to know that junk will ruin any business. It's too bad that the last owners of Southland never learned that, even as their company faded into the sunset of the graveyard of greed.

Hughes & Kettner is another new comer that's making really good progress in the market, thanks to the surge in popularity of their TubeMeister line of low-wattage tube amps. For a company that just started in the mid '80s, this is an incredible feat, and it seems like they are not letting up because they continue to get good market feedback from users and experts alike. This is mostly due to their commitment to building quality tube driven musical equipment, the same commitment which inspires their latest guitar amp models. Nuno Bettencourt, Alex Lifeson, Tony Macalpine, Allan Holdsworth are just a small sample of big name guitarists who help further expand the company's reach.
Distortion is an important part of an electric guitar's sound in many genres, particularly for rock, hard rock, and metal. A distortion pedal takes a normal electric guitar signal and combine harmonic multiplication and clipping through the use of analog circuitry to create any number of sounds ranging from a fuzz sound to the sound of an overdriven tube amp and beyond! Distortion is essential to Heavy Metal Music.
There’s another wrinkle: vintage-style pickup magnets can weaken over time, resulting in a softer, smoother tone. Some pickups are designed to mimic this ageing process. Say you were looking for a vintage P.A.F.-style humbucker: You could choose between one of our models that that sounds like a pickup straight off the late-’50s production line (the Seth Lover humbucker), and another that mimics a similar pickup as it would sound and look today after decades of wear and tear (the Antiquity humbucker).
The exciting thing about the Kemper is that you can use it to capture the sound of your JTM45, right where it hits that sweet spot, with the microphone you prefer and that mic preamp that just adds a certain something. Then you can refine the 'profile' you've made while A/B-ing the digital signal with the original using the Kemper's onboard EQ, and save the sound alongside the library of 200 or so profiles that comes pre-loaded, with access to hundreds more via the Rig Exchange section of the Kemper website. If you fancy a little more spice you can clean up or crank the KPA's onboard gain control to go way beyond the level of drive available on your original amp, adjust sag, tweak the audible effects of pick attack and even, thanks to what Kemper claims is "digital alchemy", alter the size of your virtual cabinet from a huge stack right down to a cigarette packet, while there's also a fully loaded set of effects. We've heard various approaches to digital modelling sound good in the studio before but this is as close to a 'real' mic'd valve amp sound as to be indistinguishable. If you're the type of guitarist who records regularly, or a producer who wants 24/7 access to a personal library of refined and tested guitar sounds wherever you happen to be on the planet at any given time, the Kemper Profiling Amp is the product of the decade so far.
A far cry from just another mass produced vintage looking guitar, the Kay Vintage Reissue Series successfully duplicates the original 50's models, within feel, playability and the legendary Kay sound. Complete with the company's gold chevron, flagship headstock design, displaying 3-D raised "Kel-von-a-tor" style emblem, to this day, the Kay Thin Twin Electric Guitar is probably one of the coolest looking guitars ever made.
In the Guitar Setup course, the third DVD is devoted to acoustic guitar setup. Acoustics are very, very different than electric guitars, when you get right down into the mechanics of them, and as such they truly do need a section of their own in any guitar setup guide. You’ll learn how to setup the action and intonation properly on your acoustic, as well as many other tips and tricks that will help you keep it in top working order.
If you’re paying attention, you probably noticed that I forgot to mention EQ and volume pedals. Actually I didn’t. Placement of these particular pedals depends more on what you want to achieve with them than any hard and fast rules. For example, you may want to place a volume pedal at the very front of the signal chain to perform dramatic fade in and fade out effects or to better regulate the guitar’s level before it hits any effects (or you could just do what I do and use the guitar’s own volume control). Placing the volume pedal near the end of the signal chain just before the delay and reverb effects allows you to perform professional-sounding fades or mute the guitar’s signal without cutting delay or reverb tails short. If you use a loop switcher, a volume pedal can be paired with a single effect, and you can use the volume pedal to blend or mix that effect independently.
There is competition for Guitar Tricks and this is a good thing, as this makes sure that they have to keep improving. Prior to starting with Guitar Tricks I bought some lessons from True Fire. While the lessons were good and very well presented they needed to be downloaded onto a PC and could only be played in a special player program. TrueFire also offer an online service that includes group and one-on-one lessons.  Another alternative worth checking out is JamPlay. JamPlay has been continually gaining ground on Guitar Tricks and is worth while checking out. They do not have a free trial period, but you can get started with a very low amount for the first month and they also have some free lessons. Another option is a fairly new program called Infinite Guitar. They seem to be doing a rather good job too and also offer some free lessons.

The Wire. You'll see a lot of vintage spec wordings bounced around here and that pretty much boils down to the aesthetics. Those early Fenders and Gibsons we all know were wired at the original factories with a cloth covered 'push back' wire, whereas as some modern factories, far east predominantly use standard plastic coated wire today. But the important detail is the 'AWG', or American Wire Gauge. Widely used in the guitar world for optimal results, is 22AWG wire. I would go into detail on this, but THIS site has some superb facts about AWG, which if you'd like to find out more I'd recommend a read of! So back to the cloth/plastic thing. Personally, the 'push back' cloth wire is much easier and tidier to work with and I fully hold my hands up to saying it looks much better too. I always use this for any guitar wiring, the results are always great and it's a pleasure to wire up with. I personally use 22AWG copper, solid core wire, great to work with and consistent. 
What is an Essex? Also who compiled this list? It definitely wasn't guitar professionals. Every guitar maker has top line and then entry level guitars. Top line for those that can play and entry for the beginner who 9 out of 10 stop playing and they don't care that a $60 to $200 mistake lays in the closet for years. Yamaha makes 100's of styles and a lot are great guitars and some stink. It goes with the territory in a very competitive market. This should have been better defined and broken down by cost levels. Because this could have even been titled "The 10 Best Guitar List"
A typical digital multi-effects pedal is programmed, with several memory locations available to save custom user settings. Many lack the front-panel knobs of analog devices, using buttons instead to program various effect parameters. Multi-effects devices continue to evolve, some gaining MIDI or USB interfaces to aid in programming. Examples include:

The Line 6 Spider IV is the most fully featured beginner amps out there, yet is surprisingly inexpensive, only edging out the Orange Crush PiX CR12L a little bit on cost. The Line 6 Spider IV 15 offers four amp models, six built in effects, a built in tuner, a headphone jack, and a CD/MP3 player input. Everything a beginner needs to practice in one compact package. These features aren’t completely necessary for beginners to have, but they do serve as a nice convenience and the Spider IV does not cost that much more in the process to add them. On top of that, the Spider IV still manages to be straight forward and easy to use, despite all the built in options.
Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]
Fender "Squire / Bullet" Strat. Great, low priced project guitar. Black, laminated body, maple neck with Indian Rosewood fingerboard. 4-bolt neck plate. Original, "covered" tuning machines and nut installed. Frets in NEW condition. Neck adjusted well with slight "back-bow" under no tension and does have adjustable truss rod. Body and neck finish in excellent shape. Headstock finish has wear to the word "Bullet" see photos. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Ready for your custom hardware parts. Would make a great project / player or second "don't care if it gets stolen off the stage" guitar.
Copyright © 2018 HubPages Inc. and respective owners. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. HubPages® is a registered Service Mark of HubPages, Inc. HubPages and Hubbers (authors) may earn revenue on this page based on affiliate relationships and advertisements with partners including Amazon, Google, and others.
Pitch Bend/Shifting: From a simple octave above the note you’re playing or at intervals in between, a pitch shifter effects pedal will change the pitch of your note or chord. More sophisticated pitch shifters create two or more harmony notes so you can accompany your root note for a fuller sound. Some simulate a chorus effect by providing minute shifts in pitch.
Their innovation continued by developing a bowl shape guitar body - the result, at least to my ears and that of many other guitarists, is that the resulting tone of their acoustic-electric guitars is similar to those using traditional tonewoods in their construction. Unlike more radical brands like RainSong, they still use traditional woods for the tops of their guitars.
The RP360 XP lets you combine different effects to craft your preferred sound by choosing from its wide variety of options including 74 effects, 32 amp models and 18 cabinet models. Each setup can be saved into one of its 99 user presets, that allow for incredible flexibility. The interface has a bit of a learning curve, but allows for deep editing.
I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.
Martin's OM, or "Orchestra Model", available from 1929 to 1933, has a rare combination of features. The joining of a long-scale (25.4") neck with a small body makes it an extremely responsive and playable guitar. In many ways the OM models were the first truly modern flattop guitars. They were the first Martins to have necks with 14 frets clear of the body. The OM has a wide neck (1 3/4" as opposed to the dreadnought's 1 11/16") which appeals to fingerstyle players. The string spacing is slightly greater at the bridge than on other models too, although not as wide as a classical guitars. The neck shape of old OMs is a bit unique too, although this is variable since each neck was handmade. OMs have a wide but thin backshaped V-shape which is very comfortable. Finally, the OM's smaller body size makes the guitar easy to hold, especially in the seated position. Compared this to the D dreadnought which is larger both in body depth and width (dreadnought players seem to use straps and stand up so the guitar's size is less of a factor).
“A magnet doesn’t have a tone, per se – you can’t put it to your ear and hear anything. It’s really the engine that drives the coils in a pickup. In a humbucker you’ve got a bar magnet located under the coils; if it’s a Stratocaster or a Telecaster you’ve got magnetic rods that are in the centre. But essentially they’re all doing the same thing: throwing up a magnetic field that the guitar strings vibrate in when they’re plucked.
Leo Fender didn’t know how to play guitar. The inventor of the famous guitar brand, which includes the Telecaster and Stratocaster models (favored by Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix), never learned how to play his own instrument. Fender began as an accountant with a knack for repairing radios, later turning that hobby into a full-time electronics operation. The highly versatile Telecaster, which he developed in 1950, became the first mass-produced solid-body electric guitar.
As can be seen from our reviews above, it clear that the best guitars are those that meet the needs of the player—whether beginner or intermediate player—the best electric guitar should be able to provide quality sound, last for a considerable time, easy to play and always reliable when needed. Although every single guitar listed here are of top quality, there are different guitar for every budget, style and genre of play.
While Taylor Guitars is most famous for our acoustic guitars, we are also proud of our line of unique electric guitars. We have the T5, our original hollowbody hybrid that bridges both worlds like no other guitar. Check out our T5z, the smaller hybrid with a compact body that electric players will love. And be sure to try the T3, our inspired take on the semi-hollowbody guitar with a sound that comes alive with amazing pickup flavors, plus coil-splitting and tone-shaping versatility.
In this modern world of in-ear monitors and digital consoles, both guitarists’ amps face the back wall of the stage rather than forward toward the audience. This allows them to crank their amps as loud as they need to achieve their signature Skynyrd-like drive without blowing out the Front of House engineer or the first three rows of the arena they’re performing in.

I believe that the best electric guitar amp for beginners is a straightforward combo amp, represented by the amps on this list. Avoid the bells and whistles of the fancier, feature-rich combo amps until you’re confident you have a solid set of playing chops. Then you can either move up to a modeling amp, or start adding effects pedals to your rig. The great thing about all the amps profiled above is that they provide a solid base for what ever effects you want to add to the mix later on down the road.


The positions (that is where on the fretboard the first finger of the left hand is placed) are also not systematically indicated, but when they are (mostly in the case of the execution of barrés) these are indicated with Roman numerals from the first position I (index finger of the left hand placed on the 1st fret: F-B flat-E flat-A flat-C-F) to the twelfth position XII (the index finger of the left hand placed on the 12th fret: E-A-D-G-B-E; the 12th fret is placed where the body begins) or even higher up to position XIX (the classical guitar most often having 19 frets, with the 19th fret being most often split and not being usable to fret the 3rd and 4th strings).
This tonewood isn’t a very common wood used. But, when it is used on a solid-body guitar, you’re definitely going to have access to deeper, richer, and woodier tones. However, pair it with a Cedar top and you can have bright and warm overtones. Paired with a Spruce top, you can play to get an aggressive bite on the trebles with a definite presence on the low end.
Sometimes called an auto-volume, these pedals work the same as the wah-wah pedal.  The effect functions based on your picking dynamics, but instead of a change in tone, you get a change in volume.  The effect will have no volume when you pick, but will then swell up to audible levels.  It masks your pick attack and simulates the sound of a bowed instrument.

Depending on the type of music you're playing, you may actually want your compressor pedal at the end of your chain. For example, if you're playing country music, a compressor pedal at the end of the chain squashes everything, regardless of the effects you're using. With rock music, on the other hand, it typically works better right after the filter pedals.
Orville Gibson patented a single-piece mandolin design in 1898 that was more durable than other mandolins and could be manufactured in volume.[10] Orville Gibson began to sell his instruments in 1894 out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1902, the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd. was incorporated to market the instruments. Initially, the company produced only Orville Gibson's original designs.[11] Orville died in 1918 of endocarditis (inflammation of the inside lining of the heart chambers and valves).[10]
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"performance level","prop11":"beginner","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
It has a wide dynamic range and a 20dB attenuator, which alongside a bass-cut filter should clear out any noise that’s not supposed to get over your guitar track. Add to this an integrated suspension to reduce any vibrations when playing on stage and you get a highly functional condenser microphone that won’t capture anything else than what’s supposed to.
If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.
Among the favorite brands of Gretsch lie the signature variants Brian Setzer and Chet Atkins models. Whereas, its Jet and Duo Jet are equally worthy. All these models are aimed explicitly at Jazz. In fact, you can think of them for Jazz as what you call Jackson for metal. For intermediate and pro players looking for affordability, its Electromatic Series is the desired option.

"We are extremely excited about this next phase of growth that we believe will benefit both our employees, and the Memphis community. I remember when our property had abandoned buildings, and Beale Street was in decline. It is with great pride that I can see the development of this area with a basketball arena, hotels, and a resurgent pride in the musical heritage of the great city of Memphis. We continue to love the Memphis community and hope to be a key contributor to its future when we move nearby to a more appropriate location for our manufacturing based business, allowing the world the benefit of our great American craftsmen."[36]

A chorus effect alters the duplicated waveform in a more subtle, nuanced way. The altered waveform will sound much like the original, but just different enough to sound like multiple voices playing the same note or notes. As it is usually applied, chorus sounds like the same signal running through two amps with a very slight delay between them. In fact, Pat Metheny's famous chorus sound is produced in exactly this manner, using no actual chorus effect at all.

You have 16 different modulation effects including chorus and flange, 12 overdrive/distortion effects including high gain monsters and smooth creamy overdrives, 14 mono and stereo delays and reverbs and 22 amp models including tube and solid state amps from Fender, Marshall, Orange, Diezel, and mesa Boogie. It’s safe to say, you’ll find it hard to get bored of this thing!
For a long time Yamaha were regarded as one of the best producers of student guitars but their reputation didn't go far beyond that. And it's true that they make excellent guitars for beginners, I am one of the many who originally learned to play on their student nylon string C40. BTW I'm one of those guitarists who thoroughly recommend initially learning to play on a nylon string guitar.
In his early days, Jimmy James, as he was then known, played in rhythm sections, backing artists like Little Richard, B.B. King and Ike and Tina Turner. It isn’t until 1966, when he moved to London and formed the Experience, that Jimi Hendrix was able to cut loose and start getting the attention he deserved for his magnificent guitar work. Alarmingly, Hendrix was virtually unknown in the U.S. until he played at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—the legendary performance in which he doused his Fender Stratocaster with lighter fluid and set it on fire.
Native Instruments Guitar Rig VST plugin offers a free collection of various rack stacks that lets us try out typical effects setups of recent years. It can run in a DAW host or as a standalone. Do a Web search for "best amp synth" and you'll find more about what's happening with amp emulators -- along with maybe a link back to the excellent recommendations found in this thread.
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.
In the entry-level market, brand-name guitar companies are usually forced to make their guitars with cheaper materials. There is a simple reason for this. Most major brand-name companies have a brand owner (sometimes an American company). That company buys from a factory in China, and in Australia they will have a distributor who will sell to a retailer (your local music store). It’s pretty easy to see why they can be forced to use cheaper materials. There is a lot of price pressure to get a guitar manufactured at a low enough price for everybody to take their cut of the profit down the chain.

Excellent explanation! One thing that no one has touched on, yet is the physics of the high frequency components (mentioned above). When you clamp a string at both ends and pluck it it will have a fundamental frequency of waving back and forth based on a) it's length b) it's thickness and c) how tightly it's stretched. All wavering strings, though will have additional waverings. These are referred to as overtones. The first overtone will be a doubling of the frequency and the next a trippleing and so forth. Each of these overtone frequencies contribute to the rich, complex sound of the instrument. Here's a good explanation with pictures. Note the location of the frequency nodes in relation to the placement of the pickups.


All tube class A single end design Factory modded with premium components selected for optimum tone. This is Vox taking on the boutique guys and beating them at their own game. Lush rich 3D tone and with a classic Vox chime. Paired with an Alnico 2x12 and a reverb pedal you’ve got beautiful shimmering natural tone to die for. Boxed in excellent condition.
Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.

The MG-100 has so many features, its hard to name them all. But, here we can list: 13 classic amp models via NUX's TS/AC technology, vintage 3-band passive EQ modeling for every amp model, 6-band graphic EQ designed specifically for electric guitar (120hz,250hz,750hz,1.6khz,3.2khz,6.4khz), 11 cabinet models, seamless and quick preset switching , loop sounds can be played with drum machine, rhythm beat synchronously. The aux in jack makes it easy to practice along with MP3, CDs and other inputs. Large color TFT LCD panel (160 x128), graphic interface making the overall operation easy and intuitive. A total of 72 presets, 36 factory + 36 user presets.
Bassists pairing an amplifier "head" of a certain wattage and a speaker cabinet (or speaker cabinets) with a certain wattage power-handling capacity may require advice from music store amplifier expert or an audio engineer. One of the reasons that many beginning bassists choose combo amps when they are starting is because with a combo amp, the manufacturer has ensured that the speaker and power amp are compatible from a power handling and impedance perspective. While there is a widespread belief that an amplifier with a rated wattage that is higher than the rated wattage on a speaker cabinet will harm the speaker, in fact, a clean, un-clipped power amplifier signal can be above the rated wattage of a speaker without damaging the speaker, as long as the power amp is sending out a clean, unclipped signal. There is a much higher risk of damaging a speaker when a clipped (unintentionally distorted) power amplifier signal is sent through it, even if the wattage is far below the rated wattage of a speaker. For example, a bassist could use a 700 watt power amp which is running with zero power amp clipping through a speaker cabinet rated at 500 watts without damaging the speaker; however, if a 100 watt power amp that is heavily clipping is plugged into the speaker cab, this could blow the speaker.
I recently bought my first tube amp, the Marshall DSL40C, which has amazing sound for the money, but the reverb that came on it is virtually non-existent. So I started looking at reverb pedals.....who in their right mind would pay over $100 for an effects pedal that does one thing like a (Fender reverb or Hall of Fame or Holy Grail)? Then I cam across the Zoom Chorus/Delay/Reverb and almost bought it for $119 but then this popped up. With the nearly 5 star average review, I thought I would spend the extra $80 and try it out. WOW am I glad I did. Not only do I now have a great sounding reverb, but I have every other effect you can ever imagine (phaser, tremolo, chorus, delay, overdrive, distortion, filters, etc....the list goes on and on and on.
Electric basses tend to use a medium jumbo fret as most Fenders have thru the years.  There are some folks who like the medium or even the very narrow/small mandolin fretwire for basses – this is more of a vintage feel, like the earliest Fender basses (Fender created the Precision Bass in 1951).  Since string height for bass strings is higher due to gauge and tuning, they are easy to grip and many bassists do not seem as concerned about fret height as guitarists.

A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Chord inversion is especially simple in M3 tuning. Chords are inverted simply by raising one or two notes by three strings; each raised note is played with the same finger as the original note. Inverted major and minor chords can be played on two frets in M3 tuning.[56][74] In standard tuning, the shape of inversions depends on the involvement of the irregular major-third, and can involve four frets.[75]
The Marshall MG series are also strong contenders, a lot of players use them and they’re ideal for the kind of music you like. You see them in a lot of studios. Not a tube amp and all that, but perfectly serviceable and they have some onboard effects, which can be fun. I used a mic’d MG50 when I played in Kenny’s Castaways for a year or so in the house band, and people said I sounded great. Amp cost me $280 on sale I think. I found the sound of the MG superior to the Line6, but not so much that I’d pay a lot more money for it. If I had a gig where I needed options and didn’t already own the effects I needed, I’d have no problem using the Line6.

There are many similarities between the two designs, such as the exquisite detail of the visual appointments, from the bound necks and headstocks to their trapezoid and block inlays.  They both include separate volume and tone knobs for each of the two humbuckers, which can be switched between or used in conjunction with the 3-Way Toggle switch.  Once you get your hands on one, the differences become apparent quickly though.
Volume pots don’t attenuate all frequencies consistently. Treble gets attenuated faster which results in treble loss when volume is rolled down. Treble bleed circuits (or bright caps) are there to compensate for treble loss and make guitar sound at lower volume as close as possible to sound with volume maxed. There are several different treble bleed circuits used or recommended by guitar/pickup manufacturers. What’s common between them is that they are installed across guitar volume pot (input and output lug).
I have a beautiful 2003 Ltd and my friend who has played for many years has the Taylor and he ended up borrowing my tak for five months he didn't want to give it back you know the guy has played with some well known folk's so I trust his judgment played with Keith Green and America and I have played over thirty years so I haven't let to many go by without some trial and ownership this tak is as good or better than the best Martin can offer. Ovation can't touch it and of course Gibson is too soft for me I own a fender and a Yamaha 6 and 12 for the money you can't beat a yam and I have played hummingbird to dove guild gretch Washburn breedlove which is a favorite not many I haven't played so with all this my top ten is Takemine Martin Gibson Breedlove Hagstrom Taylor Guild Gretch Washburn and Yamaha. If you can find a Hag it will blow your bag I have a 1971 Hagstrom acoustic I believe it was a demo for Golden Earing it was a gift from an old friend from Deutschland any way I will say ...more
This is the main component that separates acoustic guitars from electric guitars. A pickup senses the vibration from a string, transfers it to the guitar amplifier which then transfers it to the loudspeaker. There are many pickups but we’ll cover the four basic ones. The single coil pickup has a single coil of wire with two horseshoe-shaped magnets. They produce a bright, cutting sound and are quite noisy. The P90 pickup is a single coil pickup with one wide coil that increases the surface area of the strings, producing a bigger yet less bright sound. Humbucker pickups were designed with twin coils. They produce richer, warmer, more powerful sounds but roll back some higher frequency sound. Active-passive pickups use a battery-powered circuit to produce a powerful yet balanced tone across a range of frequencies. It outputs a balanced, clean tone.

Even when using noise-cancelling pickups, guitars tend to be relatively noisy sound sources, especially when used in conjunction with high levels of overdrive, either from a pedal or an amplifier. High levels of gain are needed to produce overdrive sounds, so any source noise will be increased accordingly. If an attempt is going to be made to remove some of the noise by electronic means (such as a gate, expander or single-ended noise-reduction unit), it may be best to leave this until the mixing stage, so that an incorrectly set gate or noise filter doesn't ruin a good take. However, gates should be used before delay or reverb effects to prevent the tail end of the sound being shut off abruptly when it falls below the gate threshold. If you simply have to record with delay effects, a dedicated guitar gate pedal placed before the delay unit will probably work best. If you are also using an overdrive pedal, then the gate should come after this so that it can deal with circuit hiss as well as hum from the guitar pickups. Note that all-in-one floor units tend to include gates at an appropriate point in the signal path, between the overdrive/amp section and the effects.


At the beginning of the Teisco saga, Teisco instruments were primarily built for domestic consumption in Japan. The early guitars were fairly high quality by contemporary Japanese standards. As the ’60s dawned, Teisco increasingly got caught up in the export market, and by the mid-’60s were major players in the low-end or beginner arena, with instruments sold primarily by mass merchandisers such as Sears and at discount department stores which were rapidly developing at the time. It was mainly in this latter niche that Teisco guitars are known in the U.S. In order to give this narrative some structure, I’ve divided the Teisco history into four basic periods: I-Gibsonia; II-Frumpy Fender-ama; III-A New Spectrum of Originality; and IV-Copydelia.
I think singing with confidence without too much doubt was a satisfying thing. It was, artistically, very satisfying to be covering subject matter that means something to me. I think a little bit of that was getting to know yourself. And just the simple fact that I was ready to do it now. Everything else I'd done since going out on my own in '87 has been absolutely amazing to me, and I feel like the luckiest guitar player alive, and I am very grateful.
Fender’s open-back combo tube amps have been used on countless hit records in practically every genre of music in the past half-century. They can deliver both warm bell-like clean tones and gritty overdriven snarls. The Blue Junior III is a relatively inexpensive way to get into Fender tube amps, and it’s the perfect size for studio and small venues.

An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.
Tremolo bars - Many lower-end guitars are designed to look cool and are equipped with floating bridges for super tremolo bends and flutter. They look cool , but a sad fact is many of these lower end models have low quality hardware. There is nothing more frustrating than being a newbie, buying a hot looking guitar, and have to fine-tune it every 2 minutes. Avoid this, or buy a decent bridge for around $100.00 extra and install it.
Everybody doubles their rhythm parts, but I always thought, 'Why don't they double their lead solos, too?'. It's really hard to do, especially with any bends and faster sections, and it does take a very long time, but I've been doing it a different way to make things a little easier. For instance, as soon as I've just finished a song, I'll double the lead part right away, while it's still completely fresh in my mind.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.
There are many, many variations of the electric guitar. Science has told us that in order for sound to be naturally amplified, there needs to be a chamber in which sound can resonate. Just look at the construction of the ancient amphitheaters, or the way that the human body has natural resonating chambers that allow us to use our voices, or a stand up bass, with its large, chambered body designed to amplify the resonating strings.

Launch price: $599 / £500 | Body: Basswood | Neck: Hard maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Manson Design bridge humbucker, Manson Design neck single coil | Controls: Volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Two-piece bridge and tailpiece, staggered height locking machineheads | Left-handed: Yes: MBC-1LH | Finish: Matt Black

I was a guitarist for almost 18 years now I am a session musician. For me choosing the best string gauge is one of the most important things a guitarist should know. During those early years our band tends to play on Heavy metal music and if you are using those lighter string gauge its ineffective for those kind of genres. So at that point I have been using .011 or .013 string gauges to gain fat tones and huge sustain. But however as years goes by we tend to play lighter music so I am using .09 and .010 string gauges. For me using those heavier strings for a long time will cause damage in your wrist, after acquiring a carpal tunnel syndrome I have used lighter strings in my guitar.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Curly - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: Natural - Frets: 24, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Waverly Tuners - Pickups: Fralin P-90 - String Instrument Finish: Golden Natural, Winter Solstice, Hickory Burst, Aged Scotch, Faded Onyx - Made In: America
James Williamson was the man who facilitated Iggy Pop’s transition from self-lacerating Stooges frontman to solo artist, icon and all-around elder statesman of punk. In a way, Williamson was the only man for the job. He shared Iggy and the Stooges’ Detroit garage rock roots and was a friend of Stooges founding guitarist Ron Asheton during the mid Sixties.
Perhaps the most famous of these sounds—or, at least, the most formative—is that of Dave Davies, the lead guitarist for The Kinks, who got bored of his Elpico amplifier in 1964 and decided to pierce its speaker cone with a razor blade. This effect, known as “clipping,” cuts off the audible waveform at the height of the amplifier’s limits (voltage, current, and thermal), thereby distorting the signal. Although Link Wray had been doing this since the late 1950s, Davies popularized guitar distortion in the first few moments of “You Really Got Me,” changing guitar music.
CostHelper Electric Guitar Guide - [New Window] - Find out how much an electric guitar should cost. Get price guidelines and shopping tips for an electric guitar. A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200 to $400 for a beginner's outfit; a better quality kit can run $500 to $2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000 to $5,000 or more for the instrument alone. 

Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.

I disagree, not saying that you can hear tonewoods but saying that it isnt just the string and pickups that make a difference. There is a huge difference in how a string vibrates and pickups do pickup resonances, otherwise a semi hollow would sound exactly like a solidbody and would never feedback. Get some humbuckers put them in a telecaster and then put them in a 335 and tell me they sound exactly the same. What is important is scale length (string tension), weight and various things like bridge design. Get a hardtail strat with strat pickups and then route it for a trem bridge ... it will sound different, maybe minor or major depending on what but it will change the tone.
Nice-Keys-Extreme-2.0  Still a big SoundFont set at 1gb or 1000mb (645mb dedicated to 3 pianos with 6 velocity layers). Similar to the top set but the main piano is a little less detailed so it leaves room for an extra piano (Steinways).  PC users should not have any problems or if running on iOS this set runs perfectly well on iPhone 6s or iPad Air 2. It is still possible to load this set within the bs-16i app and run Sweet Midi Player app using GM set one at the same time for midi backing if required. This set has everything described below plus the addition of guitars.
A marvelous 6 string acoustic guitar for the right handed. It has a beautiful natural satin finish, giving it awesome looks for stage performance. It is developed by cort guitars, with over 50 years of experience in musical instruments manufacture. The body back and sides are made from mahogany, whereas the top is spruce laminated. Prices range from around INR 7,600 depending on offers available, which is relatively affordable. You can get more product details by clicking on:
20 pages, black and white with color front cover. In the middle of 1981, Rosetti took over distribution of the Gibson line in the UK. Rosetti were a very big name in Britain, having distributed Epiphone since at least 1963, as well as Hagstrom and others. This catalogue was produced at the tail end of 1981, and introduces a number of models to the UK, such as the MV-II, MV-X guitars and the Victory basses, the GGC-700 and the Flying V bass. Some of these models were so short-lived that they were actually never included in US brochures. The cover image (reproduced in part here) showed some of the earliest demonstration models, including a Victory with a highly unusual white scratchplate.
At the beginning of the 1920s, Andrés Segovia popularized the guitar with tours and early phonograph recordings. Segovia collaborated with the composers Federico Moreno Torroba and Joaquin Turina with the aim of extending the guitar repertoire with new music.[14] Segovia's tour of South America revitalized public interest in the guitar and helped the guitar music of Manuel Ponce and Heitor Villa-Lobos reach a wider audience.[15] The composers Alexandre Tansman and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco were commissioned by Segovia to write new pieces for the guitar.[16] Luiz Bonfá popularized Brazilian musical styles such as the newly created Bossa Nova, which was well received by audiences in the USA.
Giannini guitars were (and are) made by the Tranquilo Giannini S.A. factory, Carlos Weber 124, Sao Paolo, Brazil. They are generally known for being well-made instruments featuring very fancy Brazilian hardwood veneers, as well as for the strange-shaped asymmetrical CraViola models. Probably the most famous, indeed, perhaps only famous, endorser of Giannini guitars was José Feliciano. No reference materials were available on the early Giannini guitars. A catalog from 1971 is available, with a snapshot of the line that probably goes back at least a decade, and certainly forward.
The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.
bought at a tiny store in holland, back then they said to me the guiter was already 20 years old. he was looking a new, and bought it for 1000,- dutch guildens. thats maybe...445,- euro now. thats nothing compared to the prices they ask for a vox guitar they make TODAY! thay are building guitars again and ask pricies beginning by: 2000,- euro's. I wanna know when my guitar was bild, he has a chrome plate at the back with made by japan on it too.
: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
In terms of precedent, one of the best known users of a parlour acoustic is Ian Anderson, frontman of eccentric British prog-rockers Jethro Tull. Here the smaller sized guitar enabled Mr Anderson to sling it off his shoulders, often mid song, to embark on a flute solo or child-scaring facial contortion marathon.  So, if that’s your goal, a parlour is the guitar for you.
    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.
The LGXT comes with 2 Seymour Duncan custom humbucker pickups that give it a classic electric guitar sound. The piezo pickup with custom preamp EQ makes it sound very much like an acoustic guitar. With the built-in synth pickup you can get just about any sound you want via a Roland GR series synth. It has a silver leaf maple solid body with a figured maple top and a mahogany neck with a richlite fingerboard on top which Godin says makes the action even better when using a synth. It has a full 25.5" scale length and 1.6875" nut width.
Fred’s wife Lynn Shipley Sokolow served as our student tester. She plays double bass and banjo in the Americana quartet Sugar in the Gourd but is just starting to learn her way around the electric guitar. I also got Wirecutter’s John Higgins to give me his opinions of the amps; he is a Los Angeles session musician and frequent Wirecutter contributor who has a master’s degree in music from the University of Southern California and more than 10 years’ experience teaching music at private schools.
If your volume and tone knobs start to make crackling or popping noises through your speaker whenever you’re plugged in, or if the signal is weak, inconsistent, or cuts out altogether in certain positions on your controls, some foreign matter (however minute) has probably lodged itself in your controls. Dust and rust pose the greatest potential threat to any electronic connection.

Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.


We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
As these same makers ramped up for digital production, digital choruses naturally joined the team. The effect as produced digitally might sound broadly similar, but it is done differently than in the analog circuits. Digital chorus pedals double a signal and add delay and pitch modulation to one path, the latter wobbling below and above the pitch of the unadulterated signal, which produces an audible out-of-tuneness when the paths are blended back together. It’s hard to fault the power and range of control that digital technology affords, and this version of the effect has been hugely successful, but many guitarists still prefer the subtle, watery shimmer of the analog version. Conversely, the same ears often find the digital variety makes them a little queasy.
Dick Dale: Nicknamed “The Beast” by Dale himself, the guitar comes in “chartreuse sparkle” (a greenish-gold color) with a white pickguard and rosewood fretboard, with vintage 50s features and a number of custom modifications. Notably, the guitar comes with a reverse headstock and a reverse angled bridge pickup to achieve the sound of playing a Stratocaster upside-down, which was how Dale learned to play.
The EG-6N had a similar profile but tuners were mounted on a square-topped head with the buttons facing up. This had a dark square-ended fingerboard with dots and a single chrome-covered pickup with black center insert and exposed poles (same as on the SD-2L/4L), volume and tone control. The EG-8N was similar except for having a light fingerboard with black dots, and two of the chrome/black insert pickups, volume, tone and threeway select. A folding stand to hold the steels was available (this was a standard Teisco product from the mid-’50s on).
Guitar effects pedals offer a huge range of possibilities for guitar-sound manipulation―there are literally hundreds of pedals from scores of manufacturers. If you or someone you know is not completely satisfied with the clean, unprocessed sound coming from their guitar and they want to experiment with and modify or color that sound, a great way to tweak it is with effects pedals, also called “stompboxes.” An effects pedal, depending upon its configuration, modifies the sound of a guitar through electrical circuitry or digital modeling via computer chips, either giving it subtle color or dramatic shift. All pedals include knobs on the enclosures that allow the player to adjust the intensity, speed, depth, and shape of the effect in increments, from nuanced color to ear-splitting crunch.
We will use the remaining pole to switch tone pots. Typical strat wiring has two tone controls – one for middle and one for neck pickup. We want to switch neck/middle tone control on when neck/middle pickup is on. To do this, common terminal of the second pole is connected to the common terminal on the first pole (pickup output) and neck and middle terminals of the second pole are connected to their respective pots. When neck pickup is on, the second pole will switch the output to the neck tone control as intended. What happens in position 4 (both neck and middle pickups on)? Both pots will be switched on and will be in parallel. Moving any tone pot would change the overall resistance to the tone cap and change the tone. The result is below:

Yamaha’s Pacifica Series spans many ability levels and price ranges, with notable models such as the entry-level PAC112 proving one of the most popular beginner’s guitars on the market. Then there is the RevStar Series, which launched in 2015 – another beautiful collection, inspired by the street-racing motorbikes of London and Tokyo in the sixties.
Fusion players such as John McLaughlin adopted the fluid, powerful sound of rock guitarists such as Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. McLaughlin was a master innovator, incorporating hard jazz with the new sounds of Clapton, Hendrix, Beck and others. McLaughlin later formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra, an historically important fusion band that played to sold out venues in the early 1970s and as a result, produced an endless progeny of fusion guitarist. Guitarists such as Pat Martino, Al Di Meola, Larry Coryell, John Abercrombie, John Scofield and Mike Stern (the latter two both alumni of the Miles Davis band) fashioned a new language for the guitar which introduced jazz to a new generation of fans. Like the rock-blues icons that preceded them, fusion guitarists usually played their solid body instruments through stadium rock-style amplification, and signal processing "effects" such as simulated distortion, wah-wah, octave splitters, compression, and flange pedals. They also simply turned up to full volume in order to create natural overdrive such as the blues rock players.
Very large cabinets, such as 8x10" cabinets, may have both wheels and a long "towel bar"-style handle to facilitate moving the equipment. Some 8x10" cabinets have handles on the top and bottom to facilitate two-person carrying of the cab. Some combo amplifiers have wheels and a retractable carry handle, to enable bassists to walk while pulling their bass amp; this can enable bassists to walk onstage with their bass and amp or walk to a venue with their gear.
Of course you can use a pair of headphones and any number of other devices to listen to your playing - many of them will produce pleasing tones from your instrument, and even let it sound similar to what you heard playing through the amp - but without the physical interaction between the guitar and the amp, that constant feedback tone that you heard and felt will not be possible. If, instead of playing through headphones you play through a PA system, or studio monitors, or even the stereo speakers on a computer, you can regain some of that real, physical feedback, but it will be different. And every amp brings in different tones, different kinds of feedback and fuzz and distortion.

pedal bass fender stratocaster electric amp left handed guitar fender telecaster gibson les paul telecaster ibanez epiphone martin guitar fuzz prs taylor guitar gretsch electro acoustic guitar les paul gibson sg marshall stratocaster fender precision bass tokai rickenbacker free fender bass fender jazz bass resonator guitar 12 string guitar fender amp fender jaguar
In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.
{ "thumbImageID": "American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural/J32625000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender American Elite Precision Bass Maple Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Tobacco Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000006153", "price": "1,999.99", "regularPrice": "1,999.99", "msrpPrice": "2,000.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Tobacco-Sunburst-1500000006153.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Tobacco-Sunburst/J32625000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Tobacco-Sunburst/J32625000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000006152", "price": "1,999.99", "regularPrice": "1,999.99", "msrpPrice": "2,000.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural-1500000006152.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural/J32625000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Elite-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Natural/J32625000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
This is not a complete list of former or current American guitar companies. Among the omissions are Steinberger electric guitars and basses, now part of Gibson and Carvin, who is still independently owned and sells only direct, not through distributors or stores. I have not included the past great archtop luthiers such as D’Angelico, D’Aquisto or current archtop makers such as Bennedetto. Nor have I included the many smaller USA luthiers who are currently building excellent guitars such as Huss & Dalton, Foggy Bottom or Collings.

I HAVE A P38-12E I BELIEVE MINE WAS MADE IN SPAIN ALSO. LATER THEY WERE MADE IN MIAMI AND LATER IN CHINA KEEP IT IN GOOD SHAPE I HAVE MANY GUITARS ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICS. EXCELLENT ACTION AND SOUNDING GUITARS FOR THE PRICE I HAVE GIBSON,EPIPHONE,IBENEZ, THE BEST SOUNDING 12 STRING I EVER OWNED WAS A TAKIMINE. WHICH WAS STOLEN IN LAS VEGAS. EVEN HAVE A 12 STRING ACOUSTIC I MADE. I ADDED A FISHMAN AND MADE IT ELECTRIC I ALSO PUT A TUNEMATIC BRIDGE ON IT. THEY ALL HAD DIFFERENT SOUNDS BUT THE ACTION ON THE PALMER IS THE BEST. I EVEN HAD A VICTORIA VIOLIN BASS WAY BEYOND A HOFNER. JUST BECAUSE YOU DIDN'T PAY BIG BUCKS DOESN'T MEAN ITS NOT BETTER THAN A MARTIN. I PLAYED MY UNCLES MARTIN HE MADE AT THE FACTORY WHEN HE WORKED THERE. AND IT CAME NOWHERE CLOSE TO MY PALMER OR TAKAMINE. PALMER CAME CLOSE TO MY 1960s GIBSON DOVE. DOVE HAD A BETTER SOUND PALMER HAD BETTER ACTION. HOLLYWOOD PHIL. GUITARIST AND SINGER FOR THE GWB BAND. I'M ALSO HEAD SOUND AND LIGHTING TECH FOR THE METAL BAND BLACKFATE.


THE VOTERS: Trey Anastasio, Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys), Brian Bell (Weezer), Ritchie Blackmore (Deep Purple), Carl Broemel (My Morning Jacket), James Burton, Jerry Cantrell (Alice in Chains), Gary Clark Jr., Billy Corgan, Steve Cropper, Dave Davies (The Kinks), Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing editor, Rolling Stone), Tom DeLonge (Blink-182), Rick Derringer, Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), Elliot Easton (The Cars), Melissa Etheridge, Don Felder (The Eagles), David Fricke (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), Peter Guralnick (Author), Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Albert Hammond Jr. (The Strokes), Warren Haynes (The Allman Brothers Band), Brian Hiatt (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Lenny Kravitz, Robby Krieger (The Doors), Jon Landau (Manager), Alex Lifeson (Rush), Nils Lofgren (The E Street Band), Mick Mars (Mötley Crüe), Doug Martsch (Built to Spill), J Mascis (Dinosaur Jr.), Brian May, Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Scotty Moore, Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Tom Morello, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), Brendan O’Brien (Producer), Joe Perry, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Robbie Robertson, Rich Robinson (The Black Crowes), Carlos Santana, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Marnie Stern, Stephen Stills, Andy Summers, Mick Taylor, Susan Tedeschi, Vieux Farka Touré, Derek Trucks, Eddie Van Halen, Joe Walsh, Nancy Wilson (Heart)
The offset body style includes three main instruments: the Jaguar, the Mustang, and the Jazzmaster. While there are definite differences between them, offset guitars all generally have a “jangly” sound. When we say jangly, we mean bright and clear with a subtle mid and low-end response. These guitars are also well suited to rhythm work depending on their tone knobs are adjusted.
I thank Roger Evans “How to play guitar” for his easy & intuitive written method, a good reason why he is a bestseller & outselling your hard-pushed videos. I can assure you, you will be a better teacher if you buy his book, and you will a top teacher if you read his other books such as “How to Read Music”, “How to play piano”, & ” How to play keyboards”. You will thank me for this advise and you will be a better asset to your potential students.

Major-chord progressions are constructed in the harmonization of major scales in triads.[21] For example, stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression, which is traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio; its sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is used in popular music,[22] as already discussed. Further chords are constructed by stacking additional thirds. Stacking the dominant major-triad with a minor third creates the dominant seventh chord, which shall be discussed after minor chords.


Imagine someone telling you about an old-time music store that had a huge stash of unsold guitars from the 1960s, plus some guitar effects from the ‘70s lying around in its upper floors in Newark, NJ. Well, you can bet it didn’t take long for me to beat a path to the door of Newark Music City (calm down; this was a long time ago and, while the company still exists, it’s long gone from Newark). Even though I was late in the game, there were still unmined treasures to be had. A real Temple of Doom!
Welcome to Lefty Vintage Guitars, a site specializing in buying, selling, trading, and consigning high-end lefty guitars. I have been collecting vintage guitars for over 20 years, including Fender and Gibson electrics and acoustics primarily from the 1950s, and 1960s. I also collect high-end modern era lefty guitars, including Gibson Historics and Fender Custom Shop guitars. The rarer, the better! Please browse the Sold Gallery and Showcase Instruments to get an idea of the wonderful guitars I have acquired and sold to happy clients!
In the vintage setup, the pickup is wired to the pot lug alone, with the tone control capacitor being attached to the output side. This tends to allow the volume to be rolled off without losing too much high end. This is great for those who play clean rhythm by just lowering their guitar volume as opposed to switching amp channels or turning off a boost pedal. It’s old-school, and it works. The downside is that the tone control sometimes has to be rotated a bit more before its effects are heard.
A Delay or Echo pedal creates a copy of an incoming sound and slightly time-delays it, creating either a "slap" (single repetition) or an echo (multiple repetitions) effect. Delay pedals may use either analog or digital technology. Analog delays often are less flexible and not as "perfect" sounding as digital delays, but some guitarists argue that analog effects produce "warmer" tones. Early delay devices actually used magnetic tape to produce the time delay effect. U2's guitarist, The Edge, is known for his extensive use of delay effects. Some common Delay pedals are:
Marr, once a member of Electronic with Bernard Sumner of New Order and Neil Tennant of Pet Shop Boys, has played on a number of records and contributed to numerous other high-profile projects, including his recent stint in Modest Mouse. This weekend, Marr returns to Denver in support of his debut solo album, The Messenger, and in advance of the show, we spoke with the charming and intelligent guitarist about how he got the sound for "How Soon Is Now?" and his signature model of the Fender Jaguar.

{"reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","pageName":"[gc] services:repairs","prop2":"[gc] services:repairs","prop1":"[gc] services","prop5":"[gc] services:repairs","prop6":"[gc] services:repairs","prop3":"[gc] services:repairs","evar51":"default: united states","prop4":"[gc] services:repairs","channel":"[gc] services","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] services"}


Although the hollow bodies of these guitars create a mellow, naturally voiced tone perfect for jazz, vintage country and other styles that require warmth and clarity, they can also snarl. For proof of the latter, check out Lennon’s performances on “Revolution” and “Cold Turkey.” Too much volume or proximity to the amplifier, however, and hollow bodies can howl with feedback unintentionally. And that’s why the semi-hollow body guitar was invented.
TC Electronics implemented their TonePrint technology into this stompbox. TonePring allows you to import your own presets, which you previously design using a piece or proprietary software. Such a configuration of features and controls ensures borderline endless possibilities. None of that matters much if the quality of tone itself isn’t on par. In this case, you definitely don’t have to worry about that.
Ear Wring is a ring modulator controlled by three phase distortion oscillators and one LFO. Depending on the pitch, this can go from a gently oscillating tremelos to fuzzy, synth-like freak-outs. An optional harsh fuzz can be added to the signal before modulation. Mixed with the dry input signal and fed into an amp simulator, Ear Wring can add some meat to your guitar tone.
A hard-tail guitar bridge anchors the strings at or directly behind the bridge and is fastened securely to the top of the instrument.[20] These are common on carved-top guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Paul Reed Smith models, and on slab-body guitars, such as the Music Man Albert Lee and Fender guitars that are not equipped with a vibrato arm.
×