Then, as the most popular version goes, a young, jack of all trades guitarist named Les Paul got tired of all that. So, he set out to create a guitar that could be heard just as much as the louder instruments. He fiddled with a lot of electronic means to boost his sound. Some worked better than others. His piece de resistance at the time would come to be known as "The Log". It looked like what you see up there on the left:
It’s as simple as it gets: On/Off, Tone and a “clean-to-drive” Volume switch that becomes dirtier at higher volumes. Anything else you will need stomp-boxes, which this amp pairs well with thanks to its no-frills concept. Just do yourself the favour and invest in high-end pedals – otherwise you will ruin the amp’s exquisite tone with unsuitable digital effects.
Depending on your choice of guitar kit you may be required to perform a small amount (or a large amount) of work wiring the guitar. This typically involves a soldering iron and a basic understanding of guitar electronics. You will also need to be able to follow schematic diagrams of pickup configurations. It’s not a one size fits all job either, wiring up a Telecaster is different to wiring a Stratocaster and a Les Paul or hollow body is different again.
Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.
The CD-60CE is a Factory Special Run acoustic-electric guitar made by Fender. This inexpensive model comes with a Honeyburst gloss finish and a solid construction that gives a warm and rich sound. This guitar is made of laminated mahogany all-around. The top features scalloped X-bracing patterns for a wider range of frequencies and a distinctive sound.

• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 


Many guitarists with instruments that have more than one pickup spend most of their time on the bridge unit. Using a variety of pickup positions when recording will thin or fatten the sound as required, but also help free up space when it comes to the mixing stage. Think of a recorded mix as a layer cake; too much density in one frequency range will cause a headache for the mixing engineer.
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One glance at this bad boy reveals just how accurate it is to the 1959 version. We are talking exact same tubeless truss rod assembly, aniline dye, exact same finish... everything. In terms of hardware, they went with a set of Klauson Deluxe tuners and period specific Tune-o-Matic bridge. The custom humbuckers were coiled and voiced to perfectly match the original PAF design from the late '50s which was done using Alnico III magnets and 42 AWG wire. The performance of this guitar is an experience that is rarely found out there.

While a high school degree is not necessarily required, it does provide an edge for graduates who wish to become guitar technicians. Students should concentrate on classes such as music, band, English, shop class and mathematics. A major part of any education should include guitar lessons. Techs often need to be able to play by ear and must be able to pick up on any nuances in an instrument's sound and tuning.


Just start out small, when i first started playing guitar I wanted to learn every metallica song there is, and sure enough I did, it took me about 5 years to get there and a bunch of different gauges eventually with time you start to develop the feel for what gauge satisfies you the best. Now I mostly use hybrids ranging from 10-13's, but just like everyone I started out with softest strings that are out there in existence but I used to break them alot so there were many beers out there that I didn't get to drink because the will to play guitar was stronger hahaha. But in the end it was worth it cause now I get to have all the fun on the guitar, and all the chicks are digging it hahaha, no they're not. And one more thing never obey the rules it's just something that stuck up guitarist make up because they don't want to be outdone find out what pleases you the most and keep on doin that.
The downside is you do pay a considerable sum for the pleasure! Still, the playability, comfort and tone on offer from is exceptional – as we highlight in the complete Taylor A12e review. It sports a Grand Concert body made from solid Sitka spruce on the top, with laminate sapele back and sides, along with a mahogany armrest for optimal ergonomics.
• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.

The Electro-Spanish Ken Roberts was additionally, the first instrument to feature a hand operated vibrato, as a standard appointment found on every model.[12] The vibrato device was called the "Vibrola" and was invented by Doc Kauffman.[12] [13] It is estimated that fewer than 50 Electro-Spanish Ken Roberts were constructed between 1933 and 1937; fewer than 10 are known to survive today.[7][8][9][10]
There are a few ways to save some money on your electric guitar (click for modal analysis). One way is to order online, for example from Amazon, which is usually cheaper than buying from a physical shop. Make sure that you know what the usual price for the guitar you want is, so that you can compare different sites, and in the best of worlds, use a discount code or wait until there’s a sale.

It usually has 8 terminals – two poles with 4 terminals each. Each pole has one common terminal and 3 switched. The first thing you want to figure out is which terminal is common. Note that terminal on the left is connected to the lever all the time – that’s our common terminal. The other three terminals are connected to the lever only in certain switch positions. Represented as a schematic, each pole would look like this.

THE CONTROL CAVITY Routing the control cavity is just as important as the neck pocket but with a couple more steps. The best thing to do is to cut out the plastic cover. Trace the pattern that you came up with for it on the plastic then cut it out with a jig saw. Use a fine tooth blade to prevent the plastic from chipping and will also yeild a smoother cut. Once this is done, take your template and reverse it, trace the patern on the back side of the body. Next set your router to a depth that is the same as the thickness of the plastic plate and rout the cavity working out to the line you drew. I do this free hand since the first cut is too shallow for a template. Be careful when you do this and test fit the plate you cut to make sure you get a goo fit. Then you will draw another line about 1/4" along the inside of the cavity you routed out, leaving extra room in areas for the screws you will use later on to secure the control plate. Rout this area out in the same way, working out to the line you drew. When you start to get close to the half way point in the wood start to think about how much wood you need to leave at the bottom. Usualy 1/4" is good but make sure you are careful! I miscalculated once and ended up going all the way through the body. Bad experience.
Solid-state amplifiers incorporating transistors and/or op amps can be made to produce hard clipping. When symmetrical, this adds additional high-amplitude odd harmonics, creating a "dirty" or "gritty" tone.[37] When asymmetrical, it produces both even and odd harmonics. Electronically, this is usually achieved by either amplifying the signal to a point where it is clipped by the DC voltage limitation of the power supply rail, or by clipping the signal with diodes.[citation needed] Many solid-state distortion devices attempt to emulate the sound of overdriven vacuum valves using additional solid-state circuitry. Some amplifiers (notably the Marshall JCM 900) utilize hybrid designs that employ both valve and solid-state components.[citation needed]
The first step is to determine what’s in your pickup already. The most common magnets for humbuckers are (roughly in order of strength): alnico 2, alnico 4, alnico 5, and then various types of ceramic magnets. In simple terms, the stronger the magnet, the greater the potential output. But you can’t just look at magnetic strength alone, because stronger magnets also affect the string’s ability to sustain.
The Omen-6 is a stripped down take on the Hellraiser, with the same sleek double cutaway design and HH (dual humbucker) configuration, but at a more affordable price point. But what's good about it is how Schecter is able to maintain the premium look and attention to detail at this lower price point, including the carved top design. While the name again implies something evil, this guitar is quite good for the price.
And on that (low) note, I’ll wrap up. While many bass parts nowadays are probably laid down with samples and synths, by keyboard players and guitarists, what you’ll get from a real bassist is more than just his sound, it’s the magic in his fingers, and his bass-players’ sense of just what to play to perfectly complement the song—it’s certainly worth a little extra effect to take advantage of what the true masters of the low-end have to offer.
Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.
Lastly, we have the bread and butter of Schecter’s mid-range selection. Schecter Omen Extreme-6 is one of their oldest and most popular models to hit the market. This guitar brings a decent balance of price, performance and build quality. While it’s not as fancy as the previous models we have mentioned, as soon as you pick it up you know it’s made for serious business.
Gibson seems to have the features that diminish the drawbacks in the Fenders series. The USA Company comes with the humbucker pickups that reduces the noise and humming concerns and produces a warm sound. This makes Gibson mainly fit for the rock players. Unlike Fender, Gibson guitars have a shorter scale length of approximately 24.75 inches. It decreases the string tension. Thus, the easy bending produces a warmer and smooth sound, which is characteristic for the brand. You can certainly go for a Gibson guitar to enjoy a Fender guitar quality on short strings. Additionally, the use of mahogany further jazzes up its performance.

Paul Reed Smith’s offering to pro musicians with exacting standards, the PRS McCarty 594 takes its name from two things. The first is its scale length of 24.594 inches and the second is that it’s a 1959-spec guitar with four knobs. According to Paul Reed Smith, this vintage-inspired instrument aims to recreate the most desired classic Gibson tone, that of a ‘59 Sunburst.
My first electric was a Decca, and a friend had one too. Mine was the one pickup style and his had two pickups. This was back in 1972. These were cheap but played very well and I wish I still had mine. There's one on Ebay right now that's just like the one I had, only ten bucks so far. I remember the great sustain and feedback I could get through it playing Hendrix songs!
As the author of the article, I don’t use an Axe-Fx, but a $250 Fly Rig. But if I want to talk to an expert on modeling, I wanted to ask the company that knows it best. Sure, you have to take in to consideration a PA, but you have to do that if you own an amp too, since proper sound sends keeps the volume lower on stage to send everything through the PA.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.

Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
The first type of distortion pedals were fuzz boxes. They produced a distorted tone that allowed guitar players to play singing leads. Like the name says, the tone was more "fuzz" than tube distortion, sounding like a damaged speaker cone. Still, fuzz pedals can be heard on countless recordings from the 60's (think of the opening guitar riff in the Rolling Stone's I Can't Get No Satisfaction or just about any of Jimi Hendrix's riffs.) Fuzz pedals remain popular today. 

As with so very many elements in the great world of guitar, however, once the novelty wore off and we were less awestruck by the new technology—and, in many cases, came to realize that we had little use for 2 seconds, or even 500 milliseconds of delay time—many of us came to miss the warm, pliable sound of the analog pedals. Today, as with all such things, the jury is still out; plenty of great players use each type of pedal, and the music you make with the technology remains more important than the type of technology you choose to use to make music. Used in isolation, at the same delay settings, each would probably sound just a little different to a guitarist with good ears. At the back end of a pedalboard with eight or ten other effects on it and three or four running at a time, the differences are likely to be negligible—but different players have different preferences, depending on what makes them feel good about their tone.


Opening the case, the AE doesn't disappoint. There are the classic lines of the AE body, with just the right amount of bling, you instantly feel that you are looking at a quality instrument. As you'd expect from Ibanez, the neck, quite frankly is a dream. Featuring its advanced comfort profile to be found on all the AE range, it is slim and relatively shallow and combined with the silky satin finish makes it a joy to play. Tonally, the combination of Sitka spruce and the bracing result in a guitar that is seriously bright while still being well balanced and that definitely projects. It also sustains forever and, while uncomplicated, will sit exceptionally well in a band situation. At this price, the AE500 is a serious contender and gives the Martins and Gibsons in this price range a run for their money.
Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo
The rest seems like a bit of an odd ball selection. It's the age old argument of technique over substance. BB King puts more into a small handful of notes than Malmsteen does in several hundred. One of the most musical guitar players to have graced the earth. In fact I think it was BB who stated that it's not the notes you put in but the notes you choose to leave out that count. Now that's music.
Ring modulator: A ring modulator produces a resonant, metallic sound by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave generated by the device's internal oscillator. The original sound wave is suppressed and replaced by a "ring" of inharmonic higher and lower pitches or "sidebands".[70][78] A notable use of ring modulation is the guitar in the Black Sabbath song "Paranoid".[79]
I wish I knew what goes on in there. I'm told it is a simple cut of the laminated neck and then the tone block is glued to the back. I hope it is that simple as I am about to perform some major surgery on my 9 ply neck to acomidate this construction technique . If any body out there can lend some advise on this , please do so I don't turn my bass into a clock!
Austin-based John Grammatico is building some of the best amps available, and with his current range of products he’s managed to capture the spirit of legendary vintage amps while utilizing modern reliable components. The LaGrange is a small 15 watt amp that will sound great with either single coils or humbuckers. Expect a warm, woody sound with throaty mids and bell-like highs. The sound is transparent, harmonically rich and well worth the investment.
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The primary starting point for information about Martin guitars is, of course, Martin Guitars: A History by Mike Longworth, one-time pearl inlaying ace and former company historian (4 Maples Press, Minisink Hills, PA). Longworth’s book chronicles the company’s history in very personal terms and provides wonderfully rich detail about Martin’s many guitars through the ages. It should be an essential part of any Martin lover’s library.

While anything with decent gain could be used for metal, a dedicated metal amp is the only thing a dedicated metalhead would want to use. These amps are actually very similar to other styles of amp, with one big difference – they are loaded with massive gain, which is essential for metal. A perfect example of what makes a great metal amp is the EVH 5150III. Designed with Eddie Van Halen, this all-tube amp head is an absolute beast in term of power and gain, with face-melting distortion and 50 watts of power.

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Mike Longworth’s book shows at least three guitar amplifiers carrying the Martin name from the early ’60s. Who made them is unknown… most certainly it wasn’t Martin. In 1961 Martin marketed a pair of combos, the Model 110T and Model 112T. Both had top rear-mounted controls and a very groovy geometrical grillcloths in a sort of M.C. Escher pattern. Presumably the 110 featured a 10″ speaker, while the 112 had a 12″. The “T” suggests a tremolo circuit. In 1962 Martin offered a very cool #700 portable amplifier, a unit ensconced in a leather carrying case, presumably battery-powered.
The company’s craftsmanship and innovation remain unmatched. Aside from their traditional ranges, Gibson also offers seriously high-tech instruments. This Mashable review of one of the brand's most revered models lauded not only its full-bodied tone but also Gibson’s penchant for taking risks. Its modern-take-on-an-old-icon kind of thinking allows it to constantly raise the bar—and the prices too, unfortunately.
the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….

The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product


How it sounds: Ex. 1a demonstrates the treble-cut control—nothing surprising here. Ex. 1b features the bass-cut. With a clean tone like this, it’s a bit subtle, though you can hear the difference if you focus on the low notes. But Ex. 1c adds a vintage-style germanium Fuzz Face with the gain and volume maxed. With the guitar’s tone control wide-open, the signal easily overpowers my vintage Fender brownface—your typical Fuzz Face fart. As I gradually trim bass via the guitar, the tone acquires greater punch and clarity. I remain on the neck pickup throughout—the only thing changing is the guitar’s bass pot setting. The extreme-cut settings near the end of the clip may sound harsh in isolation, but they can be perfect in a band context. At the end of the clip I max the bass pot again to underscore how much the tone has changed. It ain’t subtle.
What’s more, musicians will (or at least modern musicians have the opportunity to) learn about their niche area through metadata analysis and find out what makes the fans tick, so that they can pick up on this connection between music maker and listener. As such, how can you really be sure that the person playing the drums, strumming on the guitar or singing the song on your favourite album is actually feeling the music in the magical way we’d like to think they are?
ESP is another huge brand in the realm of electric guitar, with huge bands like Metallica, The Rolling Stones, Deftones, Lamb of God, and Slayer endorsements in full swing. Any fan of this kind of acts will be very interested in starting with an ESP of their own. Like Fender and Gibson, ESP has a more affordable range known as LTD. This kit includes an electric blue H-51 guitar with 24 frets and dual humbuckers, as well as a 12 pick sampler set, gig bag, guitar stand, strap, 10-foot instrument cable, and a tuner.
There is no way to indicate strumming patterns or the duration of notes. Take our examples above. If you know these two songs, you can quickly figure out how to play these passages. But imagine that you don't know them. How long do you hold the C chord at the beginning of Silent Night? How long do you play the notes for Day Tripper? The only indication in Silent Night is the inclusion of lyrics. For Day Tripper, the distance between the numbers gives you minimal information about note duration, but you could never reproduce the riff if you didn't hear someone else play it.
Mr. Bojangles,Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver, City of New Orleans,Steve Goodman, Alice’s Restaurant & Motorcycle song, Arlo Guthrie, Bobby McGee, Janis Joplin, Taxi, Harry Chapin, Please Come To Boston, Dave Loggins, Lady, Little River Band, Sailing, Christopher Cross, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Credence Clear Water Revival.

So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
The MS-50G lets you use up to six of effects simultaneously, from its large pool of digitally modeled effects (47) and amps (8). And all of the settings and parameters are adjusted via its intuitive interface, albeit with just a single footswitch. You can save each preset you create or edit, just store them into the pedal's 50 memory banks. This flexibility gives you an unprecedented tone options. Other noteworthy features include its built-in chromatic tuner and its versatile power options, which include 2 x AA batteries or via a USB power source.
Most often, you will see effect pedals housed in small metal boxes on the floor at a guitarist’s feet. They are often called stompboxes because stepping on a metal button turns them on and off. Many effects boxes also include a foot pedal allowing the player to modulate the effect’s intensity or volume. Sometimes you will see a larger floor unit with multiple buttons and pedals. These are called multi-effects pedals or processors. They usually have a wide variety of different effects that can be engaged simultaneously. Multi-effects processors have grown enormously in popularity as their sounds and functionality have improved.
But for all its light weight, this classical guitar shows off a stunning cedar top and rosewood fretboard. The inlay is just as elegant, and to keep the guitar’s profile looking good, the neck has a 3-ply construction style to prevent warping. The guitar has a matte finish, which gives it an “old-school” appearance, and the matte finish is great for photo sessions: no glare.
Other ways to reduce feedback include: playing with the bass amp's speaker cabinets in front of, rather than behind, the instrument; reducing the onstage volume; moving the bass away from other loud instruments, such as the drum kit (low toms can trigger feedback on some basses) or the rhythm guitar player's amp); signal phase reversing; using a parametric equalizer or "notch filter" EQ to turn down the frequency that is feeding back; or using "feedback eliminators", which are basically automatic notch filters that find and turn down the frequency that is "howling". Some other ways to reduce feedback are to use a plywood laminate bass rather than a carved wood bass, use a solid - body electric upright bass and/or use magnetic or optical pickups. Many of the methods used to reduce feedback (notch filters, filling the f-holes with foam) have effects on the tone of the instrument. However, these drawbacks need to be considered against the significant problems for the audience's experience caused by unwanted feedback.
In the years since, Novak has built the instruments of choice for the likes of musicians like Charlie Hunter, Phillip De Gruy, Joe Louis Walker, and Henry Kaiser, to name a few. As time passed, he experimented with a variety of design ideas involving the use of non-traditional woods. At times, he was viewed as downright crazy from many a purist's standpoint. But he turned the other cheek, seeking the solutions that would satisfy his own personal playing requirements.

*The expensive Fender USA hardware (supposedly genuine, purchased at Guitar Center San Marcos CA), which includes the 2-point delux strat tremolo, big-apple scratch plate, Sperzal USA tuners, Graphtech nut, and pickup selector. These items should all combine to sound awesome, and coming from a reputable supplier and for the price I paid I would expect to be identical to what is found on a USA standard or delux Fender.


• Heavy is as Heavy Does: For low hanging alternate tunings like open D or dropped D, consider a heavy string gauge – at least .11s, although Stevie Ray Vaughan, who kept his instrument turned down just a half-step, employed a set gauged .13 to .58. Thicker strings will maintain their tension better when they’re low-tuned, which makes for less fret noise and other undesirable distortion. Many players feel thicker strings make for better slide playing, too, since the strings resist going slack under the pressure of the slide. But that’s really a matter of feel and learning to control a slide more than a string thing.

I'm pleased more and more people are realising this. It really is blindingly obvious when you think about it. Anyone who talks about "resonance" when talking about a solid electric guitar body is completely missing the point, and the point is to remove, as far as is possible (and that's pretty far), any influence the body has on the amplified sound. So the primary quality you're looking for in a solid electric guitar body is not resonance, but density.
As this site was founded by one of the circuit board designers from GuitarPCB.com, you can be assured that all of the homework has been done for you in selecting the appropriate parts for each circuit. Many of the kits we sell are not available from any other US supplier. Currently, we only ship to the USA, however, we plan to expand to the rest of North America in the future.
The Epiphone Dove Pro continues to work its old school magic into the hearts of guitarists, new and experienced alike. Its classic styling seems to be a major part of its appeal, as most reviewers attest to. Value for money comes in as close second, with many satisfied that they are getting a great looking solid guitar at a very justifiable price point. It is used in many different musical styles, including country, folk and even rock.

Because any acoustic guitar can be made into an acoustic-electric, from what I’ve seen — and this is simply an observation, not a blanket statement — most of these sacrifice both quality of guitar and quality of pickup to sell affordable instruments in the name of convenience. So for the introductory acoustic player, here is my advice: Skip the acoustic-electric section and find a plain ol’ acoustic guitar that you like. When the time is right, plenty of companies make a variety of pickups designed for acoustic guitars, which will give you more options when selecting a method of amplifying your acoustic.
The simplest close-miking technique using a single mic is one that’s familiar to anyone who has gigged in a venue large enough to have a full sound-support system. Stick a Shure SM57 or similar dynamic mic within an inch of the grille, and away you go. This technique frequently delivers a direct, punchy, in-your-face guitar tone that feels muscular in rock-oriented tracks. If you have a Royer R-121 ribbon mic or some other good ribbon or condenser option that can handle the sound-pressure levels involved in close-miking a guitar cab, these will offer variations on the traditional mids-forward SM57 flavor. In many circumstances this simple technique proves entirely adequate, or at least makes a good foundation to build upon, but you still need to consider exactly where to position that mic, and subtle variations of approach will reveal nuanced differences in the tones you can achieve. Also, if you’re playing a combo or extension cab with more than one speaker, listen carefully to determine which is the best-sounding speaker – or the one that’s right for the track – and mic that one (if you’re not sure, and have two appropriate mics, record two speakers to separate tracks to select from later, more of which below).
Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.
The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
Being a grand auditorium body shape guitar, it’s a little smaller than the typical dreadnought size that we’ve covered several times on our list. That’s no bad thing, and allows this guitar to be nice and flexible, especially when combined with the ‘Expression’ electronics system that allows for some good tonal customisation. Match up with an effective wireless instrument system.
A list that's bound to be disagreed with, and I do. Although I love Hendrix, Clapton, etc. I'm still most impressed with Mississippi Fred McDowell. Bass line, rhythm, lead slide, and singing simultaneously and effortlessly. Several video performance on DVD are available, in case you listen to just an audio recording and wondered "who are the other guitarists playing, they're really good together?" nope, just Fred.

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Among the most common rookie amp buyer mistakes is buying a big amp that's too heavy to gig with, or going the opposite and buying one that's too small. If you're gigging at different places and you don't have a roadie, then consider going with a smaller amp that has DI output so you can go straight to PA with your tone intact. In big venues where big amps are a must, some opt for amp heads because the separated head and speaker cabinet are lighter on their own, although you'll have to move more pieces.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
You will be able to chord the guitar with comfort and has bend strings. You will be able to play with ease as it has c shaped neck with satin finished. Its three single-coil pickups can allow you to play the rock and jazz sounds, two-tone sound controls, 5-way switches to pick up. ITS Synchronized Tremolo chrome allows you to create a flat pitch and sharp sound. This is just the right guitar in your certain budget to get the best quality assurance and peace of mind. 

I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring


I'm only 3 months into this journey to become a musician, so a beginner, but absolutely love everything about this guitar. I messed around in the early 90's on old electric while in college, but never learned chords or any songs. When my wife acquired her old Sears-quality kids guitar from her Mom, I put new strings for something to mess around with on the weekends. Several weeks later, I got a cheap First Act electric for $25. Several weeks later a nice Takamine acoustic as the ears "learned" the notes and chords better. While switching from this quality acoustic guitar to the First Act, it was clearly apparent the First Act was a piece of junk. Notes and chords were just not clear and just not enjoyable to play. Well, this Epiphone is an awesome step forward combined with the Marshall amp. While I want to progress to blues scales in time, I've purposely focused on the major and minor chords and seamless transition between them. This guitar expresses the notes of chords so clearly. What I love most is the ability to slightly modify major chords like from Dmaj to Dsus4 and have it translate so clear as an example. Prior I never used the effects on my Marshall because it just sounded like a mess, but this guitar solves that issue. After a whole weekend of use, it felt like a big leap forward just because of quality. The fretboard layout helped refine the chords I've learned so far, so all strings were clear. Really helped practicing bending, hammer-ons and pull offs too. At any rate, for the money, it's hard to beat. I suspect that if this journey continues a more expensive guitar may be warranted in a few years, but as others have said, this will always be a quality practice instrument. Especially considering we spend every other weekend at our beach bungalow and it is nice not having to transport every time.
Now, the body size isn’t the only thing to think about. There’s also whether or not there’s a cutaway, and how this is implemented. A cutaway makes it easier for you to access the higher frets, because you can place your hand right next to them. Naturally this will reduce some of the resonance because there’s less body beside the neck, but it’s a tradeoff that a great many guitarists are happy to make if they want to be able to play those higher frets well.
If you do record the bass both via a DI and a miked-up cab, and combine them later, as suggested above, you’ll want to pay attention to the relative phase of the two tracks. Even if the mic is placed very close (an inch or so) to the amp’s speaker, that track will still be slightly delayed (on the order of milliseconds), due to that small distance, relative to the DI track. Small delays like this can cause comb-filtering when the tracks are combined (at close to equal levels), which produces cancellations and reinforcements in the frequency spectrum that can impart a nasal, hollow, or slightly “flangey” sound, weakening the tone. You can see the time difference if you line up the waves in the DAW and zoom way in. You can either advance the amp track (via editing) or delay the DI track (via editing or a plug-in) until the two line up—the resulting tone should be fuller, and ultimately sit better, with a more solid low end, in the mix.

Recently I was in the market for a low watt 1x12 amp. My local music store had a good selection. I grouped an old Vox AC15, Fender Deluxe, Orange, and a PV around me. I used a PRS Custom 22 to try them out. After about an hour I decided on the Fender. The sales guy suggested I try one more amp. It was an Egater Rebel 20 head with an Egnater 1x12 cab. My reaction was instant! If you have not played one of these you owe it to yourself to check them out! I bought it and also a Rebel 30 1x12 Combo a few weeks later! They SING!

SSO Strings (Sonatina Symphonic Orchestra) is a creative commons licensed library. For violin, chamber strings and flute I have taken several of the instrument samples and layered them together to allow for expressive playing over the velocity range. Flute SSO for example contains soft, hard and overblown samples from SSO. To create chamber strings I have used bass strings, cello, expressive violin and viola over certain ranges of the keyboard.


But there are two things in which latency matter. Latency is time. Every digital thing ever adds latency. If you’re a well trained musician or studio rat, you can hear about a millisecond of latency if you’re listening closely. You won’t likely be bothered by 1ms latency, but 10ms might be a bit of an issue, and 100ms makes some things completely unworkable.
But a lot of bands also go in to a pro studio for the shared experience… add to that the expertise offered by a producer and engineer. In this scenario, you might have a hard sell but I’ve had a lot of producers and engineers call me to order an Axe-Fx after hearing one in this context. Nick Raskulinecz, Richard Chycki, Jack Douglas to name a few. In some case  guitar tones are prepared in advance on the Axe-Fx and then the “team” works together to decide what the album is going to sound like. I’ve also done consulting where the Axe-Fx was used to Tone Match the sound of stems from “the last album” or an old masterpiece. I also just saw a video where a band kept fooling this superstar producer by switching to the Axe-Fx and telling him it was the real amp he had set up in the live room. In all of these cases, you’re basically also dealing with many of the same things from the “top ten” list above. I also think it can save time and money. Just think about how easy it makes re-amping and how important that can be to notching things up a level… re-crafting guitar tones around a new mix idea. By the way, these things are all equally true for established artists as well; doing your first album is not really all that different in this regard.
Electro-acoustic guitars are commonly referred to as semi-acoustic guitars. Electro-acoustic guitars have pickups that are specifically designed to reproduce the subtle nuances of the acoustic guitar timbre. Electro-acoustic pickups are designed to sound neutral with little alteration to the acoustic tone. The Ovation range of Electro-acoustic guitars have under-the-saddle piezo pickups and a synthetic bowl-back design. The synthetic bowl-back ensures a tough construction that stands up to the rigours of the road while offering less feedback at high volumes. Ovation were the first company to provide on-board Equalization and this is now a standard feature. The Taylor Electro-acoustic range uses the traditional all-wood construction and the necks of these guitars have a reputation for superb action and playability. Yamaha, Maton and many other companies manufacture Electro-acoustic guitars and the buyer is advised to test as many models and makes as they can while taking note of the unplugged and amplified sound.
A nice twist on this Squier is the use of a humbucking pickup in the bridge position, which is the reason for the HSS moniker (Humbucker-Single-Single). Humbuckers—two single-coil pickups sandwiched together and wired out-of-phase so they cancel out noise—are much quieter than single-coil pickups. However, they don’t have the trebly twang of single-coil pickups. Most rock guitarists use the bridge pickup most of the time because it has a brighter, more cutting sound than the neck pickup, so in most situations the HSS Bullet Strat will deliver a robust and hum-free sound.
Fender-type switches are, obviously, found in Fender guitars but are easily available so could find their way into any guitar, most likely Strat-type guitars. Import-type switches are often found in other makes like Ibanez and on replacement pickguard assemblies. If you have a look at my HSH wiring page and scroll down you’ll see I have an import switch in my Godin SD.
Six slot-headed Classics were offered. The 133/8″-wide GN50 Standard ($65) had a yellow spruce top and mahogany neck and body. The 141/4″ GN60 Concert ($79.50) featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian Imulawood body. The 143/4″ GN70 Grand Concert ($99.50) sported yellow spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood. The 15″ GN80 Auditorium (4109.50) was the same as the GN70 but with 4″ X 403/8″ dimensions. The 141/4″ GN90 Concert featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian rosewood body, with extra binding. The 14 1/2″ GN100 Grand Concert ($169.50) came in yellow spruce, Brazilian rosewood and ornate inlays. Cases were extra.
Well, we are not part of the study! The study has been conducted, and he’s just giving you the results, it was written nowhere that you had to guess which wood was which or anything of the sort. This doesn’t imply that his little kid (cause this is his son’s science project, remember) performed any form of double-blind test, but still your remark is completely inapplicable and actually turns back on you, that make a big fuss about this article’s sloppyiness, only to attack it with wrong logical reasoning.
So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.
Joe is a musician, engineer, and producer in NYC. Over the years, as a small studio operator and freelance engineer, he's made recordings of all types from music & album production to v/o & post. He's also taught all aspects of recording and music technology at several NY audio schools, and has been writing articles for Recording magaz... Read More
WIRING Lay your beautifully finished guitar on a soft towel so you don't scratch it and cover the back with a cloth as wel so you don't splatter solder on it. How you wire you guitar up depends on the layout you have chosen. Mine was a simple one tone, one volume and three way switch set up. I have gone with the Les Paul set up on other guitars which is a two tone and two volume before as well. What ever set up you go with just follow the schematic that either came with you pickups or get one from Seymour Duncan. They also have instructional videos that are done by Seymore Duncan himself on Strats and Les Pauls. I recomend watching these if its your first time wiring a guitar.
The first thing that you’ll notice is that the PR5-E is a florentine style guitar, which means that it has that fantastic looking cutaway with a really dramatic horn. This gives you nice access to the upper frets while retaining some resonance. The result is some really nice tone for such an affordable guitar. What’s more is that it’s a slimline design. It is an incredible sounding instrument.

These two articles show us how me can manipulate coil winding direction, electrical phase, and magnetic polarity to achieve hum-cancellation between two coils. Having this knowledge allows us to create hum-cancelling combinations of coils over and above than just using humbuckers. A good example is using a RWRP pickup in the middle position of a Strat.

Electric guitars are capable of producing a multitude of different sounds, ranging from the purest cleans right through to saturated distortion and feedback. Many factors influence the final recorded sound; the type of guitar and amp, and any stompbox or rack-mounted effects used will shape the initial tone. The choice of microphone(s) and mic’ing techniques, too, along with any studio processing, will also contribute to the end result. Your playing style is also crucial; experiment by playing with fingers or a variety of plectrum gauges until you get the right attack. While most guitarists play with a pick, coins can also be used to produce interesting harmonic overtones – just ask Brian May or Billy Gibbons.

Note: as of November 2004, the serial number represents not necessarily the year the instrument was produced but rather the model year to which the instrument belongs. It has long been Ibanez's practice to begin production for the subsequent model year in November (or even late October), but the serial numbering change that was implemented in November 2004 acknowledged and formalized this practice.
My sound is pretty clean with no overdrives or distortion. Besides a tuner and a volume pedal, I use a delay and a reverb pedal (TC Electronics) and I have a freeze pedal as well (EH Superego). I’m never sure if the freeze pedal should come before or after the delay and reverb. By trying both options I can’t really hear a difference in the overall sound which I guess is fine. Any thoughts or recommendations are welcome.
The electric guitar was born out of necessity. Going back to the big band era, acoustic guitar players needed an instrument that could be heard over all the brass and woodwind instruments. They also need to be heard over the banjos and mandolins on the front porch. In the 1930s, companies such as Rickenbacker and Gibson started to add guitar pickups to their instruments, which allowed musicians to plug them into an amplifier for added volume. Rickenbacker added a pickup to their Hawaiian guitar (also known as a lap steel guitar) “Frying Pan” model, and similarly, Gibson added a pickup to their electric Hawaiian EH-150 model. Soon after that, Gibson introduced the iconic ES-150, which gave players the very best of both worlds. It gave guitarists a world-class Gibson hollow body guitar with a built-in pickup, which made it the perfect fit for guitarists who played large ensembles. In 1951, Fender revolutionized the electric guitar market even further by unveiling the first ever mass-produced solid body electric guitar, now known as the Telecaster, which was introduced in order to combat the feedback that hollow body electric guitars produced. Then in 1952, Gibson worked closely with one of the most widely respected guitarists of the era to create the first Gibson solid body electric guitar, now known as the Les Paul and named after its co-inventor.
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