Another strong point of this guitar is its African mahogany neck that has a close to standard scale length of 25.3", making this instrument very easy to transition to when coming from regular sized guitars. Also noteworthy is its innovative split bone saddle, which allows for better intonation. Finally, the CT4B preamp gives you 3-band EQ, a volume control and a nifty built-in tuner Artists that play Takamine guitars include John Scofield, Bruce Springsteen and Bruno Mars! This is a great buy if you are looking for a premium couch & travel friendly acoustic guitar that does not cost an arm and a leg.
Flanging: This effect involves mixing two copies of the same signal with one of them slightly phase shifted. Historically, it had its origin with studio engineers using reeel-to-reel tape recorders. They would make a copy of a tape and then feed the original and copy together to a recorder, having placed a pencil on the flange of one tape to slightly alter its speed. The slight speed change would not be enough to cause notable delay, but would be enough to cause the two waves to be "out of phase" with each other. The effect is described as a king of "swirling" sound, with notable pitch oscillations if it became more extreme.
This guitar master knows wood. He understands its rhythm. He's a master woodworker and began building acoustic guitars when he was a child. "I couldn't afford the ones I wanted," he says, "so I built them." Perretta Guitars is the result of his experiments. But it wasn't until he toured with the guitars that he'd receive some of the best advice of his life from George Gruhan, a guitar master in Music City, whose customers included Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Johnny Cash and George Harrison: "If you want to work in this business, do repair work."
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
I have a sunset hellraiser fr. I have been playing for 8yrs and it is by far the best guitar I have ever owned or even played. Next to the ltd models that I was considering the schecter had better quality, feel, and sound at almost HALF the price of the high end lts. The quality of the abalone inlays, the finish (black cherry), the original floyd, grover tuners, 24 fret rosewood board, incredible set neck (you would think its a neckthrough without checking the specs), and the coil tapping emgs is unbelievable. I could go on forever about this guitar's action, sound, feel, quality, looks... I have spent over a 1000$ on a few dif. Guitars and I will never do it again. Ex- zack wylde epi, 2 usa fenders couple mex. 1's, a gibson Linkin Park standard, ltd kh-602, and a really nice jackson dinky style(not sure model) with 3 carvin humbuckers coiltaped just to name a few. Hellraiser is better than all of them. I recommend any of the hellraiser guitars especially with coil tapping emgs.
Unlike a piano or the voices of a choir, the guitar (in standard tuning) has difficulty playing the chords as stacks of thirds, which would require the left hand to span too many frets,[40] particularly for dominant seventh chords, as explained below. If in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in closed position, then they often can be played in open position; similarly, if in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in root position, they can often be played in inverted positions. A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Additional chords can be generated with drop-2 (or drop-3) voicing, which are discussed for standard tuning's implementation of dominant seventh chords (below).
Virtually all headphone amps offer a full menu of distortion, EQ, reverb, and a host of other digital effects, many of them simultaneously. So a headphone amp can usually double as a multi-effects processor, which is quite cool. Headphone amps also provide numerous presets — sounds preprogrammed by the manufacturer — plus full stereo sound (especially effective over headphones).
When consulting our buying guide, the first thing you need to think about is your budget. How much can you afford to spend? Generally speaking, musical instruments tend to get better the more expensive they get, although this is of course not always the case. And even if you would buy a really expensive guitar you might not be experienced enough to notice how good it is.
The U130 Bass Amplifier pumped out 130 watts with five inputs covering two channels (high and low each) and one input that bridged both channels. Channel 1 had volume with push/pull high boost, bass, middle and treble contour controls. Channel 2 had volume, bass and treble controls. Both channels had master volumes, plus two, four or eight-ohm output. Cabinet options included the UFO215 with two Univox Pro Mag speakers in a front-loaded horn cabinet, or the U215 with two 15″ Pro Mags in a “tuned duct” reflex cab.
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.
Cap in series with a resistor (shouldn’t matter which comes first). Kinman recommends this for single coils but it works rather well for humbuckers too. I installed 1nF cap in series with a 130K resistor and it works awesome. Resistor is there to limit the effect of the cap and having it in series with the cap means it shouldn’t affect pot taper as much. Larger cap means wider frequency range, so treble jump isn’t as sudden. So far, this is my favorite treble bleed circuit.
Their first flat-top acoustic guitar was produced some time shortly before 1910, but at that time their flat-tops were still a long way behind Martin in terms of popularity. It wasn't until 1923 that they began to seriously break into the flat-top acoustic guitar market with their signature Nick Lucas Special model and began to give Martin a run for their money.
The only guitars that I have been able to find pictures of that have the little curly thingie on the headstocks have been Kents, Kawais and some kind of no-name guitar that looks like the factory took a red Kent 820 and sprayed black around the edges to create a “redburst” finish. The example above appears to has started as a regular sunburst finish with more red and black added. The neck, headstock, pickups, and body are identical to the Kent 820 except the name ‘Kent’ doesn’t appear on the guitar anywhere. Note that the hardware on it is the same as on the 820 shown. That bridge and tailpiece configuration is a little unusual for Kent 820s. (the 820 there is mine) The bridge and tailpiece on the Kent 823 is the more common configuration.
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”
On regular occasion I have stuff come through to me after the instrument owner has already taken it to another shop that, for whatever reason, could not fix or solve the problem. This time, a supposedly professional and legitimate shop... and after the customer PAID FOR WORK THAT DID NOT YEILD THE DESIRED RESULTS. That just boggles my mind a bit. I would never charge a customer unless they are happy and satisfied with my work.
Gibson has produced three Jimmy Page signature models. The first was issued in the mid-1990s. It was based on a stock Les Paul Standard of the time (rather than the more prestigious and historically correct 1958/1959 re-issues issued by the Gibson Custom Shop). The modifications were based on Jimmy Page‘s “#2” 1959 Les Paul, which had been modified with push-pull potentiometers on all four control knobs, as well as mini push-pull switches under the pickguard. This first version of the Jimmy Page Signature did not have the mini-switches under the pickguard, nor did it replicate the custom-shaved neck profile of Jimmy Page’s guitar, but it did include the four push-pull pots. With all four pots pushed down, the guitar operated as normal. Pulling up the volume pot for the Bridge or Neck pickup turned the respective pickup into a single coil, rather than humbucking pickup. Pulling up the tone pot for the Neck pickup changed Bridge & Neck pickups wiring from series (stock) to parallel. Pulling up the tone pot for the Bridge pickup put Bridge & Neck pickups out of phase with each other. The first iteration of the Jimmy Page Signature utilized Gibson’s then-current high-output humbuckers: a 496R in the neck position and a 498T at the bridge.

Repetitive open-tunings are used for two non-Spanish classical-guitars. For the English guitar the open chord is C major (C-E-G-C-E-G);[67] for the Russian guitar which has seven strings, G major (G-B-D-G-B-D-G).[68] Mixing a perfect fourth and a minor third along with a major third, these tunings are on-average major-thirds regular-tunings. While on-average major-thirds tunings are conventional open tunings, properly major-thirds tunings are unconventional open-tunings, because they have augmented triads as their open chords.[69]


In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.
This company really does nothing for me. Hideous designs, cumbersome shaped guitars and the fact that they keep milking dime bags name just makes me feel like they don't have much else. There are definitely worse brands out there like first act and daisy rock (shudders) but I've always thought dean just always sucked as a metal guitar company and b.c. rich isn't to far behind them in my opinion.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 

The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.


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