Particularly if you want to get into recording and production, this Blackstar model is ideal. With six distinct “voices” from Clean Warm to OD2, as well as 12 stereo effects, there is a huge range of tones and options to play with. Together with the patented ISF control it allows for a nuanced choice of timbres, allowing you to immerse into exactly the sound you are after in gloriously deep Super Wide Stereo.

Gibson ES-335 Figured Electric Guitar The Gibson ES-335 thinline archtop semi-acoustic electric guitar is a popular choice among blues, rock and jazz musicians because of its warm tone and near-zero feedback. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured model features a thermally engineered chambered maple center block, a hand-wired MTC Premiere control assembly, an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles and all-new MHS II humbucking pickups.
I have found, like others, that I'm very comfortable with a 9.5" radius Modern C neck. I prefer it if the neck is on the chunkier side of Modern C, but I'm OK with most of 'em. Wider string spacing is helpful too, but would probably be a detriment to someone with shorter fingers. I rarely play fast (OK, I can't really play fast) so a flatter thinner "shredder" neck holds no advantages for me.

Guitarists and bassists who want to extend what their instruments are capable of have a huge arsenal of effects pedals and processors they can turn to. From subtle to outrageous, guitar and bass effects pedals and multiprocessors help you capture inspiring sounds off recordings as well as spark your own creativity. Keep reading to get the details on the many types of guitar and bass effects you’ll find at Musician’s Friend. We’ll also get up close with some completely unique stompboxes.

When Electric Guitars first hit the music market way back in the early fifties, they weren’t easily accepted by the people. However, later electric guitars became an integral part of the music industry throughout the world. The following article describes this amazing music instrument, which unlike its conventional counter-part, works on the laws of electromagnetism.
The trust you place in a guitar master's steady hand, keen mind and eye for detail when you hand him your baby is almost too much to bear. It's more hope than faith. For you need someone who's knowledgeable, but not just book smart. A guitar master needs to know more than just how to solder the yellow and green wires together, glue a new bridge and replace a few strings. He must know its rhythm, that steady beat pulsing through the wood.
In this style, the guitarist aims to render an entire song — harmony, melody and bass — in something like the way a classical guitarist or pianist can. Chord roots cannot be left to the bassist in this style. Chords themselves can be used sparsely or more densely, depending on both the individual player and his or her arrangement of a particular piece. In the sparse style, a full chord is often played only at the beginning of a melodic phrase.[4] The denser chordal textures, in contrast, approach chord soloing (see below). A third approach is to maintain a steady, busy bass-line, like a New Orleans pianist. Here, no more than two or three notes are played at a time, and the full harmony is indicated by arpeggiation. Exponents of this style often come from a country, folk or ragtime background, such as Chet Atkins, although it is also sometimes employed by straight-ahead jazz practitioners, for instance Martin Taylor. Chord-melody is often played with a plectrum (see Tal Farlow, George Benson and others); whereas fingerstyle, as practised by Joe Pass, George van Eps, Ted Greene, Robert Conti, Lenny Breau or hybrid picking as practised by Ed Bickert, Laszlo Sirsom and others allows for a more complex, polyphonic approach to unaccompanied soloing.
To celebrate the new generation of shredders profiled in our May/June “Loud Issue,” the SPIN staff decided to find some wheedle in a haystack, taking on the impossible task of ranking our favorite guitar players of all time. Traditionally, the “greatest guitarist” timeline begins with Robert Johnson magically conjuring the blues, nears perfection with Eric Clapton mutating it beatifically, and then ultimately reaches a boomer-baiting Rock and Roll Hall of Fame apotheosis with the free-spirited Jimi Hendrix shooting it into space like feedback-laden fireworks. For this list, we veer toward the alternative canon that kicks in with the Velvet Underground trying to erase that form entirely, making guitar solos gauche and using instruments as sadomasochistic tools for hammering out sheets of white heat.
Ken Rosser picked the Spider Classic 15 as his favorite of the amps we tested, saying, “I think the effects on the Line 6 sounded the best. It gives you a nice range of tone options. The clean tones stay clean even at loud volume, which a lot of these can’t do. One caveat is that, when you switch the amp sound, it changes the way all the knobs work, so the sounds can really jump out at you.” Fred Sokolow liked the Line 6 in general, saying, “I could pretty much figure out what to do with it, but I could figure out the Fender more easily.”
Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.
Another exotic tonewood is making a name for itself in the guitar industry. It’s similar in appearance and sound performance as Mahogany. It has a distinctive punch for the mid-range tones, but it emphasizes the bright trebles that can be an asset in music when you achieve pitch-perfect intonation. The Martin Road Series DRS1 Guitar sports Sapele beauty perfectly!
Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.

Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.

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Another tone option for a guitarist is to put a pickup out of phase with another pickup, producing a thin "inside-out" squawky kind of sound. When 2 pickups are in phase, they work together and reinforce each other. When they are out of phase the 2 pickups are working against one another and the resulting sound is the "leftovers" from these cancelations. The closer the 2 pickups are, the greater the cancelations, the thinner the sound and the lesser the volume. Therefore, the neck and bridge pickups out of phase is the best choice for this type of sound.
The reverb driver amp consists of a phase inverting push-pull circuit made from dual sections of a 5532 high quality audio op-amp. This provides a voltage swing of approximate twice the supply voltage to the reverb impedance matching transformer, allowing higher power transfer. The 100 ohm resistor is critical for insuring a clean drive signal, without it, the op-amps can saturate when driving the transformer, producing unwanted distortion.
The third technique I would like to talk about today consists in, once again, doubling a distorted, or not, guitar sound with a...folk guitar. This will give you much more definition and sustain on arpeggios, while on rhythm guitars it will allow you to highlight the sound's percussive aspect, and on power chords it will make your sound more powerful. This production technique has been around for ages (Led Zeppelin was pretty fond of it, for instance). But this doesn't mean that it's an outdated trick and it can't be used on modern productions: lots of contemporary metal bands still use it nowadays.

We don’t have many cutaway styles or Jose Ramirez guitars in our review list, but this is one of them, and it just happens to be a “hybrid,” or a classical guitar with an electronic pickup. Handcrafted in Spain, the 4NCWE model is a cedar-top with Indian rosewood on the back and sides. Like the other Ramirez guitars we have listed, this comes with a hard-shell case, so you won’t have to worry about the guitar being broken in transit.
Hello everyone. Today we’re going to do a setup on a Les-Paul-style guitar. For this post, I’ll be setting up a “Burny Super Grade” guitar, but the set up is the same for most Les-Paul-style guitars. I already have a general electric guitar setup post over here: http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-set-up-electric-guitar.html, but there are a few Les Paul specific areas I’d like to go into here.
• Heavy is as Heavy Does: For low hanging alternate tunings like open D or dropped D, consider a heavy string gauge – at least .11s, although Stevie Ray Vaughan, who kept his instrument turned down just a half-step, employed a set gauged .13 to .58. Thicker strings will maintain their tension better when they’re low-tuned, which makes for less fret noise and other undesirable distortion. Many players feel thicker strings make for better slide playing, too, since the strings resist going slack under the pressure of the slide. But that’s really a matter of feel and learning to control a slide more than a string thing.
Packed with over 200 amps, cabs and effects, the Line 6 Spider V 120 is a perfect amp for those who want a wide variety of sounds to choose from. Especially handy for those in cover bands as you can actually dial in famous amp and pedal combinations. It’s also wireless ready via the Line 6 Relay G10 wireless guitar system. No more guitar leads tripping you over while you're rocking out on (or off) stage!

During the first three decades of the 20th century, with the rising popularity of Hawaiian and big band music in America, guitar makers built larger-bodied instruments, using steel instead of gut strings, and metal instead of wood for the guitar body. Around 1925, John Dopyera designed a guitar with metal resonating cones built into the top that amplified the instrument’s sound. That suited twangy Hawaiian and blues music but not other genres. Then, in the 1920s, innovations in microphones and speakers, radio broadcasting, and the infant recording industry made electronic amplification for guitars possible. The volume was suddenly able to go up: way up.


Almost criminally underappreciated, Irish blues rock guitar player Rory Gallagher was arguably the top guitar player of the 1970s. Capable of playing slide guitar as well as anyone that ever existed, he also excelled at blues improvisation. One of his best songs is “Tore Down,” a hard driving blues rock song with a truly tasty guitar riff and inspired soloing. Hopefully, with time, Gallagher will start to get a little more recognition.
Vintage styling, high quality speakers and that classic Fender cabinet warmth - there's a lot to love about the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab. Perfectly matched with the Fender Bassbreaker 15 & Fender Bassbreaker 45 guitar amp heads. There's 2 x 12 inch, 8 Ohm Celestion V-Type speakers inside and the semi-closed back ensure those rich, low end frequencies are captured. A great addition that can act as an extension cabinet to the Fender Bassbreaker 45 combo/head and the Bassbreaker 18/30 combo. if you want to add that signature fender warmth to your sound, this head is a perfect match to your own amplifier head with a total impedance of 16 Ohms.
Purchase a more suitable microphone, if necessary. If you have found that your mic really doesn't capture sound the way you need, you'll have to research to find the right mic for your situation. For example, you might use a large diaphragm condenser mic to capture crisp, pop rock tones.[32] However, you should be able to achieve consistently good recordings with the use of either a common:
The reason why we love this guitar so much is that the top is made from koa wood. What is koa? It’s a Hawaiian wood that has a very special look to it, with an unusual grain pattern. When you have a guitar top made from koa like this, it just looks very organic and natural, so if you don’t like the plastic-fantastic style, then this is the best way to go!
This is obviously the most important value when it comes to any musical instrument. If the guitar doesn’t sound right, none of the other values will be able to make up for that. Guitarists are notorious for their attention to tone, and many players will form a tight allegiance to the brand they feel provides the perfect sound. The Gibson is sought after for its full bodied overdriven sound in rock circles, while others swear by Fender’s classic offerings. It all comes down to a matter of preference, so you will want to be well acquainted with the sounds of each brand. Look up your favorite guitarists and see what they play. That will likely put you on the right track.
The Pacifica family of guitars was launched years ago to address this market in particular. They’re excellent guitars for the working man and student alike. After a break-in period, these machines should provide stable, frustration-free operation for many years, with enough tone and versatility to play any style. The video below even demonstrates how, with a solid amp, you might not even know it was inexpensive.
When Martin turned to jobbers rather than direct sales, more variation in cases took place. Depending on what part of the country you bought your Martin, the jobber would supply a similar range of cases - chipboard, hardshell, or deluxe hardshell, from the case manufacturer of their choice. So cases on old Martins can vary greatly. This changed in 1972 with the blue thermoplastic case which was included with the sale of all new Martins.

During final construction, a small section of the outside corners is carved or routed out and filled with binding material on the outside corners and decorative strips of material next to the binding, which are called purfling. This binding serves to seal off the endgrain of the top and back. Binding and purfling materials are generally made of either wood or high quality plastic materials.
Sorry Joe but I don’t really any value of this arrangement. It could work only in super bright guitars that would always need some treble bleed. It’s much better to change pot values for guitars like that, go from 500K to 250K etc. When changing pots doesn’t cut it it’s better to get rid of the pickups/guitar than to have a bleed circuit on all the time, some of the magic is always lost.
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.

I got this guitar just a couple months ago, not knowing much about guitars and not really knowing much about quality or anything I did a lot of research about what would be the best purchase for the right price for a beginner guitarist.. and I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG700, Fantastic reviews and ratings for beginners with great overall quality and overall sound, especially for the cost. I did a bit more research, comparing instruments and what not just to be sure I didn't purchase something that was made out of cardboard and shoe strings when I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG800, which was said to be the upgrade of the 700. I did some reading and though it didn't have as many reviews it was said to have improved sound and durability for the exact same price. Knowing that Yamaha has pretty much always been rather good quality
Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.
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I have a Martin, 3 Taylors and a heap of other good stuff inc. a Luna Vista Bear - I chose my particular one because of the beautifully matching selection of woods used. At first just OK sound (but I did get it for the visuals! ) but after a proper setup and a few tweaks plus a set of John Pearse strings it sounds and plays pretty darn good. I'm more than happy with it, and for the price a very nice guitar now. Not up to Taylor/Martin levels of course, but it has its own sound - and when plugged in it has a really great well balanced sound. Recommended!
Tablature, or Tab, is a very important tool that allows guitar players to easily learn how to play chords, melodies, and songs. Learning how to read guitar Tab can be a mystery for some newer guitar players. In this guitar lesson, we are going to learn how to read guitar Tabs and go over some of the more common elements you will see when you pull up a Tab for a song you want to learn. Try this lesson if you want to learn how to read guitar sheet music.
My first recommendation is Epiphone. It is not just one of the best but it is the best guitar brand for beginners who are looking to buy a guitar to learn the ropes. I have included a few recommendations from this brand in this post. If you don’t know which one to buy and you are a beginner then buy one from this brand and you won’t go wrong for sure.
Claimed to have been invented by guitarist Victor Griffin of Pentagram (who tunes it 1/2 step down).[37] Also used in the song "March of the Fire Ants" by Mastodon, "Rusty Cage" "Holy Water", and "Searching With My Good Eye Closed" by Soundgarden on their Badmotorfinger album, "Cowboy Hat" and some of "Silver Side Up" by Nickelback, "Gasoline", "Shadow on the Sun", "Bring Em Back Alive" and "The Worm" by Audioslave and "Prison Sex" by Tool. Today is the Day have used it on every album since Temple of the Morning Star, Shining use it on most of their album Blackjazz, and Black Label Society used this on much of their early material, often to emulate a 7-string guitar. Used also by Silverchair in the songs "One Way Mule" and "The Lever" from their album "Diorama".
Electric guitars were originally designed by acoustic guitar makers and instrument manufacturers. Some of the earliest electric guitars adapted hollow-bodied acoustic instruments and used tungsten pickups. The first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp, the general manager of the National Guitar Corporation, with Paul Barth, who was vice president.[3] The maple body prototype for the one-piece cast aluminium "frying pan" was built by Harry Watson, factory superintendent of the National Guitar Corporation.[3] Commercial production began in late summer of 1932 by the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (Electro-Patent-Instrument Company), in Los Angeles,[4][5] a partnership of Beauchamp, Adolph Rickenbacker (originally Rickenbacher), and Paul Barth.[6] In 1934, the company was renamed the Rickenbacker Electro Stringed Instrument Company. In that year Beauchamp applied for a United States patent for an Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument and the patent was later issued in 1937.[7][8][9][10]
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]
This is a rare bird. Its a early ibanez maxitone 994. It has a huge neck but plays pretty great! It has that classic MIJ tone. I can include a new Gator case for $50 extra! The neck and frets are good! The electronics are a little dirty. Ill clean them the best i can, but i thoughtit worth mentioning. It is functioning as it should be just a little dirty!
My first guitar was a fender knockoff. My first professional guitar was a Gibson LP custom. I like the richer tone of the Gibson for ballads, folk and country and the Fender gives you the edge you need for rock, garage and loud stuff. Foot pedals get the sounds you need for just about any style of music with either brand. The fender neck is a bit easier to move over because it is thin and fat-fingered guys like me need a bit of help that way. The Gibson reminds me more of my acoustic guitars. Strings are an important selection for any guitar to be comfortable and get the right sound.

Delay pedals are among the most popular effects around, and the reason is simple: A delay pedal not only gives your sound a professional sheen and adds a three-dimensional quality—even when set for a discreet, atmospheric effect—but it can also produce a wide variety of not-so-subtle sounds and textures, ranging from ear-twisting rhythmic repeats (à la Eddie Van Halen’s “Cathedral”) to faux twin-guitar harmonies and live looping.
While it was produced, Ovation’s super-shallow 1867 Legend was the recommended guitar in Robert Fripp‘s Guitar Craft.[22][23] Tamm (1990) wrote that the acoustic 1867 Legend has “a gently rounded super-shallow body design that may be about as close to the shape and depth of an electric guitar as is possible without an intolerable loss of tone quality. Fripp liked the way the Ovation 1867 fitted against his body, which made it possible for him to assume the right-arm picking position he had developed using electric guitars over the years; on deeper-bodied guitars, the Frippian arm position is impossible without uncomfortable contortions”.[22]

More recently, many boutique pedal manufacturers, such as the Z.Vex and Death by Audio series, have attempted to revive the analog strangeness of germanium transistors and diodes. Not bound by imitation, they continue to innovate with analog materials as if the technical innovations of the 70s and 80s had never happened. The mid-90s Z.Vex Fuzz Factory is notable for establishing internal feedback loops that are inadvertently tied to the logic of circuit bending. This means that the pedal self-oscillates, producing an absurd yet controllable noise, akin to an air-raid siren.

But what about the Les Paul devotees like Jimmy Page, Zakk Wylde and Bob Marley? Is it possible that the Les Paul is as enduring and adaptable as the Strat? Um… Yes! Each guitar style has its own rich history of players and possibilities, and with a powerful imagination, anything is possible. Solid body guitars are truly the dominant species of electric guitars for their overall versatility, ability to interact with pedals and amps, and general lack of fussiness.
A spring reverb unit is really a small amplifier in itself, that sends the guitar signal through a tube circuit to a small output transformer (or through a transistorized circuit) and from there to one end of the springs in a spring can rather than to a speaker. This signal vibrates the springs, is picked up by a transducer at their opposite end, and from there is blended back with the dry signal by degrees determined by a “depth” control, and sent on to the output (or the power tubes, if part of a guitar amp). As you can image, it’s a bulky effect when achieved in this way, requiring at least a couple of transformers, two or three tube sockets and a spring can, but the circuit itself is fairly simple.

The neck's profile and width affects the guitar's playability and the player's comfort when fretting. While most necks are either "C"- or "U"-shaped, the width and depth of the neck in relation to the player's hand is an important consideration. Players with smaller hands should seek out narrower, shallower necks while those with larger hands will most likely find beefier neck profiles more comfortable.
On amps, I think there are alot of affordable yet fantastic amps released in 2017. Try checking out the Boss Katana series, Orange Crush, Marshall Code series, Line 6 Spider V, Fender Mustang which are more in the budget range. Most of the amps I mentioned here are modelling amps, so I think you’ll have a fun time fiddling around with all the pokery jiggery. These amps will hopefully keep you occupied for awhile :)
With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.
Maybe the most well known amplifier released under the Peavey name, the 5150 is the result of a collaboration between Peavey and Eddie Van Halen. Debuting in 1992, the 120-watt, all-tube, two-channel head featured a searing lead channel that helped usher in a new wave of high-gain guitar ferocity in the early Nineties. Since Van Halen and Peavey parted ways in 2004, the model name was changed to the Peavey 6505 and has become an industry standard for modern metal bands such as Chimaira, August Burns Red, All That Remains and others.

Now that we mentioned some of the exotics, it’s time to go back to the roots. Epiphone Les Paul Standard is as old school as it gets. Legendary LP body style that brings a no-nonsense combo of hardware has always been the way to go. I actually have one of these, and after years of playing it keeps surprising me. I’d say it easily punches way above its price range.
Gibson Les Paul specifications during 1958–60 varied from year to year and also from guitar to guitar. Typical 1958 Les Paul Standard necks had a thicker “club-shaped” neck, thinner frets and lower fret height, which changed during the course of 1959 to develop into typical 1960 necks with a thinner cross-section and wider, higher frets. Les Paul Customs from the same period had totally different frets and were referred to as “The Fretless Wonder”, which were designed for jazz guitarists with thick flat-wound strings.[note 7][note 6]
Think "guitar god," and a particular image of Jimi Hendrix springs to mind: Hendrix kneeling, shamanlike, before his Fender Stratocaster, his hands seeming to coax flames from the instrument. Captured by photographer Jim Marshall at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, this image is burned into the collective consciousness of American rock culture in the same way that Hendrix's signature sound still echoes through the years. His defiant rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner" isn't quite a technical masterpiece -- one could almost play the melody with a single finger. What elevates the song is its sound. To get that dissonant wailing, Hendrix uses two effects: an Arbiter Fuzz Face and the Vox Wah-Wah [source: Trynka].
“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”
"It's a labor of love," says Youngman, a guitar master who's been handling guitars since the '50s and '60s when rock 'n' roll was still in its infancy. But he's not just a surgeon; he's a neck specialist. "If the neck doesn't feel right, you're not going to play." He's always been good at setting guitars up, and today he works mostly from home, although he also does repair work at Guitarasaur in Watuga. "It's always nice to make someone happy. It makes me feel like I'm doing something right."
With a growing popularity of the Les Paul guitars, hundreds of unendorsed imitations and copycat versions had appeared on the markets. However, due to the lack of U.S. legislation to address patent infringements and restrict the import sales, oversea imitations caused legal and financial problems to the Gibson Guitar Corporation. An also troublesome thing was the existence of high quality imitations of vintage Les Paul (and vintage Stratocaster) produced by oversea manufacturers.
Well technically, the floor and the ceiling do shape the tone, post amp. Room acoustics are a major factor in the quality of sound recordings. Also Dan isn't wrong. Each thing that vibrates that eventually moves the pickup (while a note is being played or sustained) will disrupt the magnetic field. In physics there is hardly ever an instance where things have absolutely zero effect on the things around them. It comes down to the significance of the effect. For example, if something moves the pickup .05 picometers six times a second, then it likely has a negligible effect on the sound (i.e. our ears are not capable of detecting any difference. There does come a point where other variables do begin to change the characteristics of the sound. Additionally, as a string is struck, due to the rigidity (or slight lack thereof) the neck and body will vibrate, changing the distance between bridge and nut. The shortening and lengthening of this distance will then change the vibration frequency of the string. This can result in the dampening of vibration or potentially slight amplification of frequencies or overtones. Overall, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty that something does not have an effect on something else in this case. The truth, however, is that the degree to which the change is noticeable may not be detectable by the human ear.

Guitar amplifiers generally incorporate at least a few effects, the most basic being tone controls for bass and treble. There may be some form of "overdrive" control, where the preamplifier's output is increased to the point where the amplitude overloads the input of the power amplifier stage, causing clipping. In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with tube amp distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators, such as Tom Scholz's Power Soak, as well as re-amplified dummy loads, such as Eddie Van Halen's use of dummy-load power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers.

Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro Electric Guitar Look at this snazzy thing. The Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO is one electric guitar you’d be proud to tote on stage with its sleek looks. Taking from the original Les Paul Custom - AKA the “Tuxedo” Les Paul - the Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO is now packed with modern upgrades including a more slender neck and a modified stopbar design.
In 1966 Vox introduced the revolutionary but problematic GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. The instrument's trigger mechanism required a specially-wired plectrum that completed circuit connections to each fret, resulting in a very wide and unwieldy neck. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, though this never panned out. According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative. The instrument never became popular, but it was a precursor to the modern guitar synthesizer.

Each brand has its own distinctions, benefits, drawbacks, and niche which it appeals to. Most guitar players are loyal to one particular brand for one reason or another. Even the style and image associated with the instrument comes into play heavily, here. For example, consider the image cultivated by Jimi Hendrix and his Fender Stratocaster. Not only did he expand the realm of tones that everyone thought the guitar was capable of, he made this particular model his own. It’s an iconic guitar that will always be associated with Hendrix and the blues.


TRUE. Tommy can be good but I find he has a lot of filler and some overly fluffy tunes sometimes. It makes it sound like he’s trying too hard to play it with as many different chords as possible before finally landing the first note. (which is usually late). and for clapton below me I could agree but I think Jimmy Page’s playing is just as good but he’s more reckless. he’s reckless for good reason though, it’s like he’s transfering his feeling to it like Jimi Hendrix would but Page’s guitar sounds like your heart wanting to rip out of your chest to claim your biggest desire once and for all. The kind of vibe when you finally realize your in love after a LONG time of dullness. Jimi is groovy, and Clapton likes to serenade seeming like an old gentle man from any age.
Hughes & Kettner is another new comer that's making really good progress in the market, thanks to the surge in popularity of their TubeMeister line of low-wattage tube amps. For a company that just started in the mid '80s, this is an incredible feat, and it seems like they are not letting up because they continue to get good market feedback from users and experts alike. This is mostly due to their commitment to building quality tube driven musical equipment, the same commitment which inspires their latest guitar amp models. Nuno Bettencourt, Alex Lifeson, Tony Macalpine, Allan Holdsworth are just a small sample of big name guitarists who help further expand the company's reach.

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There’s 12 footswitches for you to control all your sounds and effects as well as a smooth expression pedal that can control swells, wah and even make parameter changes. A looper with 20 mins of record time is ideal for songwriters, buskers and those who need to be able to write music anywhere. It especially shines when coupled with the HeadRush FRFR-112 2000 Watt Powered Speaker.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.

These days it’s hard to determine where Squier’s end and Fenders begin. Squier by Fender Classic Vibe 60’s SStratocaster is a perfect example of what we meant. It’s a well built guitar that brings admirable craftsmanship and a tone that is equally as good. To me, the difference between this model and a Mexican Strat was too small, which made me somewhat uncomfortable.
Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.
Launch price: $1,427 / £999 | Body: Mahogany with maple cap | Neck: 3-piece mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, Seymour Duncan Jazz humbucker (EMG 81/60 reviewed) | Controls: 2x volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: EverTune bridge, Grover tuners | Left-handed: Yes (without EverTune) | Finish: See Thru Black, Dark Brown Sunburst
Compressors also have the ability to increase the sustain of notes beyond sounds that are normally usable on the instrument; yet another reason the effect is a popular tool in the soloist’s arsenal. The tiniest signal can be normalized to the same amplitude of a fierce pick attack, and a trailing note will resonate at the exact same volume until the string stops inducing a signal on the pickup.
Like any other electronic products, the amp as well has already gone into notable changes and updates over the years. However even the changes in amp technology happened, many still prefer a tube powered amplifier over a solid state and modeling amps. This is mainly because the sound of a valve is considered the organic or natural on how an amplifier should sound. While the other two is engineered to sound like a tube amp especially the modeling amps.
The Epiphone ES-335 Dot was the world's first semi-hollowbody electric guitar, introduced in 1958. Today, it's made by Gibson, but it is still prized by jazz and blues musicians looking for a classic sound. Setting up the Dot involves adjusting the truss rod to correct for any underbowing or overbowing of the neck because of humidity changes. The bridge saddle on the Dot may also be adjusted to get the right distance between the string and the fretboard, called the “action.”
Lastly, we have the M-100FM. This guitar features a body that is similar that Super Strat style Ibanez is known for, packed with a great set of pickups. This is a mid range guitar, but one that is very capable compared to its immediate competition. If you need an axe that looks good and plays good as well, ESP LTD M Series M-100FM is the ESP for you.
The octave pedal raises or lowers your pitch an octave. This makes a huge sonic impact as soon as it is heard. This pedal will make your guitar sound huge, broad and bass-rich or fierce and piercing - even both. It's best to look for a pedal with a “mix” knob, so that your original tone is not completely lost. One step and you can change the direction of the riff or the entire song. This effect was used extensively by Jimi Hendrix in combination with a fuzz tone, while more modern users include Tom Morello and Jack White.
Gibson gave this guitar a comfortable V neck profile, which together with shorter 24.75" scale length and 1.725" nut width make this guitar one of the easiest instruments to play in this list. My only complaint with this guitar is its bank breaking price, but this steep price point and exclusivity play an important role in making this iconic instrument more appealing. Start saving now if you want to be one of the privileged few who can play this guitar.
The AC10 was one of the first amplifiers to bear the VOX name and has long been adored for its ability to achieve rich, articulate tube tone at very manageable volumes. For this reason, the AC10 has become a highly coveted piece of VOX history since its discontinuation in 1965. It was re-introduced in 2015 as model AC10C1 and has proven to be very popular as a quality option to the Fender Blues Jr. and Fender Princeton.

I think it's just a matter of how you prefer to restring your axe. Personally I use a peg winder and just thread all six through the body of the guitar (BC Rich Warbeast for practice, Ibanez for live play) at one time and then go through and wind them all up and tune accordingly. I think though that the main reason I do this is because restringing my Ibanez is not for the faint of heart, so it's way easier for me (I have one of those, I don't remember the model, that you have to lift the bridge up off the body and thread the strings underneath) doing it that way rather than going one at a time.
There were also four full-sized archtops; the Model EP-14, Model EP-15, Model EP-17 and Model EP-18. These were basically all variations on the same guitar, with glued-in necks, non-dipped heads, mini-strip plastic inlays, single rounded cutaway, f-holes, adjustable bridge, trapeze tail and translucent pickguard. Rocker switches were mounted on a small plate on the upper shoulder, while the volume, tone and jack were on a small plate on the lower treble bout. The EP-14 (shaded mahogany) and EP-15 (natural) had two pickups. The EP-17 (shaded mahogany) and EP-18 (natural) had three pickups, some two-tone, some flat rectangular metal-covered.
Kamico guitars were lower-priced versions of Kay's original guitars. They were among the first guitars to use a humbucker type pickup, predating Gibson by some few years.[citation needed] Produced along with Kay brand name guitars from 1931–1951, according to most sources. The most recognizable model is the Jumbo Jazz. Kay also made banjo's under the kamico name.

In jazz big bands, popular during the 1930s and 1940s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four strums to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent of this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.
On May 1, 2018, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. As part of its debt restructuring, the company will close down and liquidate its unprofitable Gibson Innovations division, which sells audio equipment outside of the U.S. and has been the source of much of the company's financial troubles. The restructuring will allow Gibson to focus on its most profitable ventures, such as musical instruments. No changes will be made to its guitar manufacturing business, and all Gibson and Epiphone branded guitars are expected to continue in production uninterrupted. Additionally, $135 million was provided by existing creditors to provide liquidity to maintain existing operations.[57][58]
Another LTD model that is easily on the same level as the standard ESP stuff is the MH-100QMNT. The guitar comes from the very top of LTD’s entry level lineup, and brings a great price to performance ratio. I’ve had a lot of time to play with this guitar, and at first it didn’t sit right with me. As I played it more, I got used to the contour of the neck and the way its body ‘moves’. From that point on, ESP LTD MH-100QMNT grew on me rather quickly.
It’s little wonder that Fretboard SE is such a popular guitar book. It focuses on the practical application of learning guitar and relies less on intellectual theory. That is not to say that a guitarist attempting to improve their skills from this book won’t be challenged and introduced to a unique system. It is just to say that the system it introduces is different than you may be used to if you’ve read other books or tried learning guitar from another method. This book teaches around the "CAGED" method. That is, the book will attempt to explain the fretboard layout to you and how to navigate it by focusing on the five basic chord shapes and the root notes in those chords. As you might have guessed, the chords the method teaches are C, A, G, E, and D, thus the name. For a more detailed explanation check out this article from Premier Guitar.
A thermally engineered centre block and bracing make this 335 acoustically louder, open and with more clarity. The 'burst top and back also look more modern than vintage, while the translucent dark brown/ almost-black sides and neck-back finish add contrast that creates a classy appearance, along with the nickel hardware. We also get a lightweight aluminium stop tailpiece with locking studs, but this is all-very-classic ES-335 fare, such as the small block inlays and the small fleur head logo. Again, Gibson's build specs tell us we have MHS 'buckers and here the 'Memphis Tone Circuit' includes matched pots with a tight five per cent tolerance, with the same 'orange drop' tone caps as the ES-275.  Plugged in, it's like all our Christmases have come at once. There's a more solidbody response here, as you'd expect, and it really pushes out the sound. It's expensive, but as an investment, this is one of the best electric guitars on the market.
The Orange Crush is all about style and portability. It’s distictive look is due to the Orange basket weave Tolex, woven speaker grille, beading and legendary hieroglyphs (PiX) and of course the Orange signature ‘picture frame’ edging. It’s not as feature rich as other models, but that’s the point. It’s simple, portable and just a good basic combo amp. It’s also available in black (why?) and retails for around $99.
For electric guitar amplifiers, there is often[vague] a distinction between "practice" or "recording studio" guitar amps, with output power ratings of less than one watt to 20 watts, and "performance" or "stage" amps of 30 watts or higher.[citation needed] Traditionally,[according to whom?] these have been fixed-power amplifiers,[jargon] with some models having a half-power switch to slightly reduce the listening volume while preserving power-tube distortion.
Also worth an honourable mention is the iconic Gibson Hummingbird, a square-shoulder dreadnought named after the bird which Gibson best felt described its unique qualities. The Hummingbird is one of those unique things in that it’s an acoustic guitar which eschewed the industry-standard natural wood finish of around 98% of its peers in favour of a cheery sunburst finish more commonly seen on Gibson’s now famous electric guitars like the Les Paul and ES-335.
Ibanez is the pioneer to launch the first 7-stringed guitar. They are the creators of the 7-stringed instrument in 1990 with the collaboration universe. Most Ibanez guitars come with a full-size frigate shape having a top of laminated select dapper. Ibanez guitars have mahogany neck, back, and sides, along with 20 frets on a rosewood fretboard. The Ibanez-branded headstock came with attractive quality and closed chrome die-cast tuners. These all features make the Ibanez guitars suitable for every kind of style and genre of music. However, heavy music is mainly the field where metal crowd flock and let the Ibanez guitars unbeatable.
The main reason this exists is because some players prefer to drive their amplifier's preamp with high gain to achieve distortion instead of using an emulation through a pedal. This means that you can't push modulation and time-based effects into the preamp since distortion will come after them. Again, you can do this but it will sound horrible because it breaks our four main rules above. Nobody wants a muddy, smeared, and washed out tone, and thus the effects loop exists.
• Why size matters: Fret width and height affect playability considerably. Fret wire measures at .078 to .110 at the crown, or top, and runs between .035 and .055 high. Taller frets, at .45 and up, tend to make for easier string bending and produce clear notes without much pressure. The latter makes them ideal for high speed playing. The furthest point of that concept is the scalloped fretboard, employed most notably by Yngwie Malmsteen and John McLaughlin, who played a specially designed Gibson J-200 with scalloped frets and drone strings with the group Shakti.
Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!
That hand-built prototype, an anonymous white guitar, had most of the features of what would become the Telecaster. It was designed in the spirit of the solid-body Hawaiian guitars manufactured by Rickenbacker – small, simple units made of Bakelite and aluminum with the parts bolted together—but with wooden construction. (Rickenbacker, then spelled ‘Rickenbacher,’ also offered a solid Bakelite-bodied electric Spanish guitar in 1935 that seemed to presage details of Fender’s design.)
So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!

Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.


I disagree, not saying that you can hear tonewoods but saying that it isnt just the string and pickups that make a difference. There is a huge difference in how a string vibrates and pickups do pickup resonances, otherwise a semi hollow would sound exactly like a solidbody and would never feedback. Get some humbuckers put them in a telecaster and then put them in a 335 and tell me they sound exactly the same. What is important is scale length (string tension), weight and various things like bridge design. Get a hardtail strat with strat pickups and then route it for a trem bridge ... it will sound different, maybe minor or major depending on what but it will change the tone.
Get a custom drawn guitar or bass wiring diagram designed to your specifications for any type of pickups, switching and controls and options. Just complete the guitar wiring diagram order form with your custom specifications and our designers will do the rest. Our custom diagrams are easy to read, affordable and delivered by email for FREE! To order a custom diagram, select the number of pickups on your instrument below and complete the diagram order form.
Chrome trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
The primary means of identifying the model number of Kent guitars is via a label on the back of the headstock. Through the years many of those labels have fallen off or been peeled off. They do not add anything to the appearance of the guitar. The 700 and 800 guitars had a round foil sticker with the model number and sometimes serial number pressed into it, kind of like Dymo tape labels. The look a lot nicer than the white paper one used on earlier models, but they still can fall off over the years, and they are harder to read.
There are a lot of different kinds of guitars (acoustic, semi-acoustic, electric, steel etc.) but some companies make a wide variety. Here's a list. . Fender (Mine) . Ibanez (Mine too) . Epiphone (Also Gibson plus the kids version is Maestro) . Dean . Some good acoustic companies are . Alvarez (Also mine) . Crescent . You can visit the websites for these companies. Hope I could help!

If you’re used to using a pick to play your guitar, it might be time to get a handle on fingerpicking. This style of playing is incredibly diverse, and consists of various techniques that you can employ to gently pluck the strings of your instrument. It also has the potential to eliminate the plasticky strumming sound that can drive your unintended audience batty. It isn’t a good fit for every genre, but it’s important for all you metalheads to remember that two-hand tapping is technically a form of fingerpicking.
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.
Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).

High-end solid-state amplifiers are less common, since many professional guitarists favor vacuum tubes.[citation needed] Some[who?] jazz guitarists favor the "cleaner" sound of solid-state amplifiers. Only a few solid-state amps have enduring attraction, such as the Roland Jazz Chorus.[15][16][17] Solid-state amplifiers vary in output power, functionality, size, price, and sound quality in a wide range, from practice amplifiers to combos suitable for gigging to professional models intended for session musicians who do studio recording work.
A real hall-of-famer from Ibanez, which displays true rock style and lightning-fast playability in an affordable beginner-friendly package. With the classic Superstrat body in a range of colors, this RG is made of solid basswood and features a slick, thin Wizard III maple neck, with rosewood fretboard and 24 jumbo frets, making it superb for chugging powerchords and fast soloing.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a pickup and amplifier set for musicians to use with existing guitars.
Chorus – This is the subtlest type of modulation effect. It does exactly what its name suggests, making it sound as though multiple instruments are all playing in unison. The effect could be compared to running a signal through two amps at once and setting one on a slight delay; in fact, that’s how many artists created chorus effects before these pedals were commonplace.

Australian singer Frank Ifield also owned and used a Maton guitar, which he later had fitted with a custom-made scratch plate, made in the shape of a map of Australia. Frank gave this instrument to his guitarist Ray Brett when he returned to Australia, and it has been featured on an episode of the BBC programmeAntiques Roadshow. Although these guitars are now normally worth around UK£2,000, expert Bunny Campione valued Ifield’s guitar at between UK£10,000 and UK£15,000, because Ifield had used it in songs featured in a compilation album alongside The Beatles‘ first two singles.[2]

Here we have something quite beautiful and very sweet sounding that I picked up directly from the very talented luthier himself while in Hawaii ...I liked this one because it has some very beautiful intricate inlay hand work see the gorgeous inlaied rosette and fingerboard not overstated just classicly tasteful WoW.. this is a Gorgeous all SOLID WOOD Hawaiian figured Koa Tenor Ukelele. I love the tone of this beauty and so will you its classic Uke tone is rich and full and plays like butta... Top wood : Solid Koa Back & Sides Material Solid Koa Neck Material : Solid AAA flamed grade Mahogany, Headplate wood: Solid Koa Strings : Italian Aquila Strings Fingerboard wood : Solid Rosewood Bridge wood : Solid Rosewood Nut Material : Real Buffalo Bone Finish : Polished Satin nitrocellulose instrument lacquer Scale Length : 17" Overall Length : 26 1/2 "( 673 mm ) Fingerboard Width At Nut : 35 mm Fingerboard Width At 12th Fret: 43.8 mm # Of Frets Total : 20 Hand picked for its great solid construction and impecable workmanship fit & finish are top notch, excellent volume & tone -playability and beauty. You will be hard pressed for find one this sweet for twice the price... Just $329. Direct comes with a top shelf hard shell case / included .

Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.

At this point you should have the pots, switch, and jack out of the guitar with the pickup wires still connected. You can either de-solder the pickup wires or use wire cutters to clip them off. If you’re replacing the pickups as part of your re-wiring, you can do this now (I did not in the example photographed here). Just feed the leads of the new pickups back through the holes in the pickup cavities.


Jackson is another great American guitar manufacturer that has been at the peak of popularity a couple of decades ago. These days they are still considered to be an authority in the industry. Current Jackson lineup includes some of their legendary models revamped in a new edition, as well as brand new guitars. People are usually divided when it comes to Jackson, but no one can claim that their guitars are not among the best.
I am a fan of inexpensive guitars. Why but something so valuable you can’t take it out or afraid it will get damaged. Get an inexpensive guitar that is closest to the expensive ones you desire. Basically the construction and woods are the same just made inexpensively to sell to the masses. Watch who plays the secondary brands and get full cred. I have a squire cabronita, squire telecaster with upgraded coil tapped humbucker/single coil pickups, gretch electromatic single cutaway soildbody, and 2 Harley Benton les pau l type guitars with p90s and coil tapped tumblers for less than 175.00 each. Every guitar is a beauty and a joy to own.

I figured it was a bad choice of pickups and eventually, with great anticipation, purchased a set of P-Rails after hearing the great demos of them on youtube. I am a pragmatic engineer and used to believe that the tone of an electric guitar MOSTLY came from the pickups. How WRONG was I. The P-Rails sound just as muddy as the JB and M22V (in fact, the M22V should be really bright because it's a lower winding count an lower DC resistance p'up).


Distortion and overdrive: In the early days of electronic music, vacuum tube amplifiers were used for processing the output electrical signals. Like any amplifier, these tube amplifiers had a maximum amplification above which they began to clip the peaks of the waveforms. While the resulting distortion may have disturbed the electrical engineers, a substantial fraction of the musicians liked the distorted sound and it became part of the musical medium.

For beginning electric guitarists—or experienced players who want something inexpensive and portable—we think the Fender Champion 20 is the ideal amplifier. We researched 24 models, then put the 10 most popular to the test for 20 hours with two professional instructors, a guitar student, and our Wirecutter West Coast musical instrument testing team. With a colossal variety of sounds, plus built-in effects and intuitive controls, the Fender Champion 20 was a nearly unanimous top pick.
Regarding the PDF download, I have not done so yet, but all of this info is available on the web, in color, ad nauseum. I bought the book to have at my bench so I could refer to it while wiring guitars. I do not have a color printer. I find the thought that, in order to experience what the book OUGHT to look like, you have to download a file, presumptuous, at best. Annoying, at the least.
Hi Carlos. Referring to your first statement, yeah you are dead right. But surely anyone wishing to know the "tech" involved with series/parallel switching with have at least a basic knowledge of Ohms law, which is all we are talking about regarding pickups and cable lengths. If you aint aware of what is being conversed about you need to swot up a little afore attempting anything physical with ones Strat, Tele, or whatever! I aint having a pop at you mate. Useful to the individuals lacking the knowledge and just wishing to know why the click of a micro switch, or other device makes such a hell of a difference to the overall tone. so fair play in that situation. I suppose you could say its like switching from a true single coil to a humbucker, tonality wise. Thanks for your time and patience, lol.

Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker
But opposites not only attract—sometimes they also make groundbreaking music together. This is certainly true of Zoom’s collaboration with Doe and Cervenka. Since that band broke up, Zoom has gone on to do session work with everyone from the late John Denver to the Raconteurs. He’s also become semi-legendary as a guitar amp hotrod guru, having tweaked circuitry for Jackson Browne, the Black Crowes, Los Lobos, L7 and Social Distortion, among many others.
There are few companies in the music industry that understand guitarists as well as Suhr. What other company can you think of makes excellent guitars, amplifiers and pedals? Whether you need the warm, vintage voice of a Badger or the paint-peeling roar of a PT-100... Suhr has a connoisseur level amplifier to scratch any guitarists itch. Stop in and a play a Suhr amplifier at Eddie's Guitars today. 
If you're looking for a one-stop music shop with an amazing selection of guitars, drums, keyboards, recording, live sound, DJ equipment and more, Guitar Center Twin Cities is it. Whether you're a beginner or a gigging pro, our team members have the expertise and musical talent to get on your level and help you make great choices. Located adjacent to the Rosedale Shopping Center by the Best Buy in Roseville.First and foremost at Guitar Center Kansas City, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales and repairs to lessons and rentals, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Midwest music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.

Of course, the big news was the introduction of the Spectrum 5. This had a slim, highly contoured body with a pointed upper horn pointing up and a hooked lower horn. The body featured a German carve relief along the edge. The head was the new hooked kind from ’64-65, while inlays were triangular “picks,” sort of like Kays of the time. Pickguards were two-part plastic covering the entire area under the strings, with volume and tone controls and stereo and mono jacks. The “vegematic” push-buttons came in five groovy colors.


The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
Maintaining these items does help though, perhaps every year or so remove the cover plate or pickguard and clean out any dust building up on the switch and contacts, it'll make them last for years to come so it's worth the minimal effort. You'd perhaps clean the fretboard and frets, so it's worth thinking about the other, hidden, functional parts too. 
Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.

While most beginner electric guitarists focus on the actual guitar when purchasing equipment, the amp actually plays a far larger role in the overall sound. The best made guitar in the world is not going to sound good through a cheap, poor quality amp. However, any decently made guitar can sound quite good when played through a good amp. So, a guitar amp should not be an afterthought purchase for a beginner.


SOLD OUT: Here we had a 40+ year old 1972 Alvarez 5080 Acoustic guitar that was built by the master guitar builder Kuzio Yairi. He used 30 year old vintage aged tone woods when they built this guitar over 40 years ago.. that would make this wood arround 70 years old... Thats right...you can say that about a new Martin can we... not going to get tone like this from a new Martin either. This is one high class example replica of the Martin 000-28 this model is quiet rare and beautifully adorned with exotic tone woods plese refer to the pics. Just have a look at the beautiful exotic old growth Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back, sides, fingerboard...headstock overlay .., ebony pins with MOP and brass ring all high end classic detailed appointments... notice the real patina this guitar plays real well and has been played and it shows... in a good way to my eyes.. I love it. So will you just have a look... no visable issues, no cracks to be found, inlays, bindings, pickguard, tuners,frets.....all good..and sound is rich and has a nice sustain and is a pleasure to play... fresh from the JVG shop with a fresh bone saddle & nut & new Martin Marquis strings sweet! A must HAVE 40 YEAR OLD VINTAGE YAIRI 000-28 STYLE, Claptons favorite for good reason... SORRY THIS GUITAR HAS SOLD gr8bids@comcast.net Thank you for your interest.
The Epiphone Dove Pro continues to work its old school magic into the hearts of guitarists, new and experienced alike. Its classic styling seems to be a major part of its appeal, as most reviewers attest to. Value for money comes in as close second, with many satisfied that they are getting a great looking solid guitar at a very justifiable price point. It is used in many different musical styles, including country, folk and even rock.
In 1977, Gibson sued Hoshino Gakki/Elger Guitars for copying the Les Paul.[21] In 2000, Gibson sued Fernandes Guitars in a Tokyo court for allegedly copying Gibson designs. Gibson did not prevail.[22] Gibson also sued PRS Guitars in 2005, to stop them from making their Singlecut model. The lawsuit against PRS was initially successful.[23] However, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the lower court decision and ordered the dismissal of Gibson's suit against PRS.[24]

Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, unforgettable journey, slideshow, TV, radio. Featuring muted electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
Tremolo is a regular and repetitive variation in gain for the duration of a single note, which works like an auto-volume knob; this results in a swelling or fluttering sound. This effect is very popular in psychedelic and trip-hop music. The speed and depth of the flutter are usually user-controlled.This is a volume-related effects pedal. This effect is based on one of the earliest effects that were built into guitar amplifiers. Examples include:

We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks


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Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.
The core of this guitar is its twin horn double cutaway mahogany body, which follows after the original SG. But as expected in this entry-level price range, they exchanged what's supposed to be a mahogany neck for maple with 12" radius rosewood fingerboard. Specifications remain faithful to the original, with a scale length of 24.75" and 1.68" nut width. The generic pickups installed sound surprisingly good for the price, but like many have done, the pickups can be easily swapped out for more hard hitting humbuckers to get more out of the guitar.

Since the Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor was announced at NAMM 2018, guitarists and bass players alike have been enjoying the functionality and unrivalled sound quality of the unit. We actually created a blog called 3 Reasons Why The BOSS GT-1000 Is Really Special, discussing 3 of the key features that make this stand out so much, but trust me when I say that there’s so many more reasons that this is easily one of the best multi-effects pedals ever made.

These probably were not made very long, due to the intensity of the war effort. In 1942, production of resonator guitars ceased for good (except for their brief revival on the fiberglass models of the mid ’60s). The acoustic Hawaiian craze had peaked and was already being replaced by electric Hawaiian music, as reflected in the growing line of lap steels. By the end of World War II, resonators were obsolete, and music would be dominated by big-bodied dreadnought and jumbo acoustics, or electricity.
An utterly odd topic would be a discussion of woods for a certain tone. Wood does no magic to the tone. It has properties which might change the resonant behavior of a guitar body. But, that it does by some very course parameters, say stiffness and specific weight. Of very same importance is the shape of the plank which is referred to as “the body”. Stiffness, weight and shape work all together.
Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]

Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.


There aren’t that many entry-level to mid-priced electric guitars that can meet the demands of heavy use and/or meet the standards of professional musicians, which makes the PRS SE Standard 24 pretty special. Its tag price is friendly enough for beginners and intermediate players yet it’s packed with features that make it a favorite among pro-level guitarists.
Flanging: This effect involves mixing two copies of the same signal with one of them slightly phase shifted. Historically, it had its origin with studio engineers using reeel-to-reel tape recorders. They would make a copy of a tape and then feed the original and copy together to a recorder, having placed a pencil on the flange of one tape to slightly alter its speed. The slight speed change would not be enough to cause notable delay, but would be enough to cause the two waves to be "out of phase" with each other. The effect is described as a king of "swirling" sound, with notable pitch oscillations if it became more extreme.
We’ve talked about four electric guitars by now. Let us talk about the “Mini” Strat from Squier by Fender. It is a “mini” guitar because it is has a small Strat and therefore, it is literally the best choice electric guitar if you want to buy one for your child. But that does not mean adults cannot use it. If you are a beginner who just wants to practice then this is a great model for practicing your skills.

Late 1934: "T" frets (aka tang frets) replace Bar frets on flat tops. (Most other guitar makers had stopped using bar frets much earlier.) Martins Hawaiian style guitars retain bar frets until at least 1938. The first Martin model to use T frets was the 00-17, introduced on a lot of 00-17 guitars #57305-57329 in 1934. Initially the first T-frets were special ordered by Martin to contain 30% nickel ("normal" fret wire is 18% nickel, 65% copper and 17% zinc). The higher percent of nickel, the harder the fret wire. This special 30% nickel fret wire was ordered from the Horton-Angell Company (the inventor and patent holder for barbed alternating "fish hook" T frets) on 8-31-1934 in an 100 pound lot, along with 100 pounds of "normal" 18% nickel fret wire. It's unclear if Martin ever used 30% nickel fret wire after this, because it was more expensive and not the norm. The same instruments also introduced the "T" neck reinforcement bar. Shortly thereafter T frets were standard. (Like with steel strings in 1922, Martin tried these innovations first on inexpensive low-end models to minimize financial damage in case the experiment was a failure.)
I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.

He has a way about him that makes you stop and listen, but he isn’t in your face. His sound is very melodic, which is why his tone was so perfectly matched to answering the needs of the vocals, yet he still holds his own in every tune. Bright, confident and edgy, he is a serious guitar-player and he has no intentions of holding back! People often say that he carries humour in his music, which is quite a clever characteristic to portray with this piece of equipment.

I purchased my Dove in 1989 in a mom and pop kind of music store in North GA , actually Cumming GA. I have played it ever since and I have owned many other guitars in my 52 Years in the music business but it has always been my come back acoustic for the sound and playability of the neck slim D stile ,but the sound quality is very much as good as any lots more expensive guitars,the way it holds the overtone of the note long after you play the note in the body is just unbelievable ,my hat's off to which either company wants to claim they built it I am just glad they did!! Damn fine Guitar.Thanks,Victor

The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
The hollow body — the original electric guitar design — is completely hollow on the inside, like an acoustic guitar. Hollow-bodied guitars like the Gibson ES-150 saw use in jazz ensembles by players such as Eddie Durham and Charlie Christian, but were also adopted for country, folk and, eventually, rock and roll. If you’re looking for warm, mellow tones, the hollow body is your best bet. That isn’t to say it can’t give you some sweet, raunchy distortion. A proper hollow-body setup can pull off a great classic blues or rock sound, but they are more prone to feedback than solid body guitars.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)
Technically the knobs are just the parts you turn when adjusting your volume or sound. When you remove the knobs however you are left with the pots (potentiometers) which are used for both volume and tone control. They look identical and almost are but there are differences in the way a volume pot and a tone pot is wired, which will make more sense by the end of this article.
Original Stratocasters were shipped with five springs anchoring the bridge flat against the body. Some players removed the backplate covering the bridge to remove two of the springs and adjust the claw screws to allow the bridge to ‘float,’ with the pull of the strings in one direction countering the pull of the springs in the opposite direction. In this floating position, players could move the bridge-mounted tremolo arm up or down to modulate the pitch of the notes being played. Jeff Beck and Ike Turner used the Strat’s floating tremolo extensively in their playing. However, other players, such as Eric Clapton and Ronnie Wood, disliked the floating bridge’s propensity to detune guitars and inhibited the bridge’s movement with a chunk of wood wedged between the bridge block and the inside cutout of the tremolo cavity and by increasing the tension on the tremolo springs. These procedures lock the bridge in a fixed position. Some Strats have a fixed bridge in place of the tremolo assembly; these are colloquially called “hard-tails.” Luthier Galeazzo Frudua has said the floating tremolos can have stable tuning through techniques specific to a floating bridge.[8] The Stratocaster features three single coil pickups, with the output originally selected by a 3-way switch. Guitarists soon discovered that by jamming the switch in between the 1st and 2nd position, both the bridge and middle pickups could be selected, and similarly, the middle and neck pickups could be selected between the 2nd and 3rd position.[9] This trick became widespread and Fender responded with the 5-way pickup selector (a standard feature since 1977), which allowed these tonal combinations and provided better switching stability.

The fact is, the qualities of different strings can have an effect on your guitar’s resonance and tone, on the quality and responsiveness of your attack as a plectrist or finger picker, and impact your speed and other important factors. And think about your budget. Some coated strings list at nearly $20, while a good basic set of electric guitar strings can be scored for $3 to $4 on sale.
The United States Department of Justice found emails from 2008 and 2009 in which Gibson employees discussed the "gray market" nature of the ebony wood available from a German wood dealer—who obtained it from a supplier in Madagascar—as well as plans to obtain the wood. It filed a civil proceeding in June 2011,[40][43][44] the first such case under the amended Lacey Act, which requires importing companies to purchase legally harvested wood and follow the environmental laws of the producing countries regardless of corruption or lack of enforcement.[44] Gibson argued in a statement the following day that authorities were "bullying Gibson without filing charges" and denied any wrongdoing.[39][45] Arguing against the federal regulations and claiming that the move threatened jobs, Republicans and Tea Party members spoke out against the raids and supported Juszkiewicz.[46]
Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
You may find a flood of several guitar brands in the Indian market. All of them claim to deliver the best products. Hence, it is a bit difficult for a newbie to choose the right one. That is why having prior background knowledge about all the brands is of utmost importance before you spend money on a guitar. Such know-how will help you to escape from the trap of words of mouth.
Amps and effects don't have to be just for guitars and basses, either - nor do they have to play out loud. While the vast majority of amplifiers fit into the categories we've just been through, some exceptions would be amps made for keyboards and electronic drums, which can generally be used to amplify just about any instrument as long as you can attach a pickup or microphone. And if you want to practice the guitar or bass without waking up the neighbors, be sure to look into headphone amps as well: they'll push all the sound you love, but to your ears instead of a loudspeaker, so you can keep the sweetness to yourself... until you're ready to share, that is!
At least one other Teisco guitar was available from around this time in the ’50s, probably slightly later on � another mini Les Paul that was the ’50s piece de resistance, the J-5. The J-5 was a single-cutaway solidbody that went beyond the other more derivative LPs. This had a slightly elongated body shape, with less pronounced waist than a traditional Les Paul. The upper bass bout headed toward the neck with a more angular, almost pointed corner rather than the typical rounded shoulder. The cutaway horn was also more angular, heading out at almost a right angle to the neck. It’s impossible to tell from the photograph, but this looks to be a glued-in neck. The fingerboard was bound, and featured the typical large white dots with two small dots at the octave. The headstock was a white-faced asymmetrical affair, with a curved peak extending on the bass side, with a concave dip across the top. Tuners had white rectangular buttons. These would be interesting enough, but the body had a bound flamed maple top � flat, not carved. The pickguard followed the body profile, with an extension down the lower side for the volume and tone controls. On the black pickguard were two black-covered pickups, looking sort of like P-90s. Pickup selection was with a chicken-beak rotary three-way switch. Knobs were white knurled with silver top rings. The bridge was a typical adjustable wooden type. Again, a large tailpiece assembly allowed the strings to pass through the body. This is a very beautiful guitar.
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.
NOTE: In these diagrams, the volume and tone controls are viewed from the rear. The volume and tone controls are variable resistors, also known as potentiometers (or "pots" for short). In electric guitars, the values for either of these usually is about 250K to 1 megohm. The capacitor in the circuit is for the tone control and these values usually are from .02 to .047 mfd (short for microfarad).
ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
I inherited a guitar and am looking for any information I can about it. It is a Kent model 533 Videocaster. I have no idea when they were made or what this one might be worth. It is a solid body, but I know next to nothing about guitars so I am not sure what other info might be needed. It needs to be tuned/serviced and possibly needs a little restoration, but otherwise it works and is not in horrible shape. Any info would be appreciated.
"We strive to offer our clients the highest level of service in guitar sales, repair and consulting. We will, as keys to attaining this objective, conduct our business according to a high standard of excellence. We are dedicated to earning our clients' trust through our professional conduct, our many years of experience, and our extensive preparation for their needs."
SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.

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One of the earliest tremolo devices goes back several hundred years and can be found on 16th century Italian and German pipe organs. Like modern day samplers, these early organs had several auxiliary stops including drums, birdcalls, drones, bells, and a tremulant — a mechanism that opens and closes a diaphragm to vary the air pressure of the pipes. As the pressure varied, so did the amplitude, allowing for both vibrato and tremolo.

Portland, OR was probably the place of import, but all the Lyles were 'licensed' copies of Gibson, they weren't seconds. The acoustic guitars were built in Japan, with laminated tops and sides. Over all construction on the guitars was very good for the materials used. I gave my Humminbird copy to my son after playing it for 25 years, and he still plays it today. Unfortunated during that 25 years, I had to have the bridge reset 3 times due to the weakness of the laminated top. My luthier asked me why I didn't just buy a Gibson or a Martin for as much money as I put into repairing that Lyle...I told him the tone was worth the extra expense.
Great guitar at this price point. Want to make it better? For so little money you can add lighter strings, a bone saddle, bone nut and pins. It's not necessary but they may help some. A bunch of small improvements put together make a big difference. What really does make a difference is having the action set up properly. Lowering it made it much easier to play for me. The finish and craftsmanship on this guitar is excellent.
I kind of think what I do is like producing with my feet because I do a lot of that in my own shows. Particularly when I'm playing guitar with other bands, I'm always changing reverb [settings] and modulation types and the very sorts of things that [maybe no one else realizes what's going on], but it keeps me interested. I think because I come from a time before that was possible, it's a magical thing for me.
As of 2012 Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees. The company maintains two factories: One in El Cajon, California and the other, 40 miles away in Tecate, Mexico where the entry-level guitars of the Taylor line (the Baby, Big Baby, GS mini, and 100-200 series) are made along with the Taylor guitar cases. In early 2011, the company opened a distribution warehouse in the Netherlands. Also that same year, the company, along with Madinter Trade, S.L., partnered to purchase the Crelicam ebony mill in Cameroon. [6]
I had a similar problem and went with a similar solution - the Vox Tonelab amp modeler and multi-effects unit. Has a headphone out that works fine for practice. Plus it is working well for gigging as well. I can practice tunes with the exact amp and effects that I'm going to use. When I get in front of the guitar amp, I just need to get a clean sound and give it a little color in the tone. It isn't perfect for gigs, but it is SO easy to practice with and can sound like a Fender, Marshall, Hiwatt, Mesa - whatever. This is starting to sound like an ad, so I'll stop. :-) – Anonymous Jan 18 '11 at 10:47
At the beginning of the Teisco saga, Teisco instruments were primarily built for domestic consumption in Japan. The early guitars were fairly high quality by contemporary Japanese standards. As the ’60s dawned, Teisco increasingly got caught up in the export market, and by the mid-’60s were major players in the low-end or beginner arena, with instruments sold primarily by mass merchandisers such as Sears and at discount department stores which were rapidly developing at the time. It was mainly in this latter niche that Teisco guitars are known in the U.S. In order to give this narrative some structure, I’ve divided the Teisco history into four basic periods: I-Gibsonia; II-Frumpy Fender-ama; III-A New Spectrum of Originality; and IV-Copydelia.
A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.


Get used to people staring when you bust out this guitar. Its thinner mahogany body with satin finish delivers killer sounds while also being ridiculously pleasing to the eye. When it comes to tonal diversity, this guitar hits it out of the park. With Super Rock II pickups, you’ll be able to shred crunchy riffs while also being able to switch the pickup to single-coil mode to get those beautiful, clear, resonant tones. To spare you some technical mumbo jumbo, Schecters have hardware that promises to keep your guitar in tune longer, which is always a plus! Grab a Schecter Stealth for just under $500. 


While jazz can be played on any type of guitar, from an acoustic instrument to a solid-bodied electric guitar such as a Fender Stratocaster, the full-depth archtop guitar has become known as the prototypical "jazz guitar." Archtop guitars are steel-string acoustic guitars with a big soundbox, arched top, violin-style f-holes, a "floating bridge" and magnetic or piezoelectric pickups. Early makers of jazz guitars included Gibson, Epiphone, D'Angelico and Stromberg. The electric guitar is plugged into a guitar amplifier to make it sound loud enough for performance. Guitar amplifiers have equalizer controls that allow the guitarist to change the tone of the instrument, by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequency bands. The use of reverb effects, which are often included in guitar amplifiers, has long been part of the jazz guitar sound. Particularly since the 1970s jazz fusion era, some jazz guitarists have also used effects pedals such as overdrive pedals, chorus pedals and wah pedals.
Most users and experts agree that the Zoom MultiStomp MS-50G is a high quality and high value pedal. But it's not just about bang per buck, because many are satisfied with the quality of its effect and amp emulations. Even Music Radar is convinced of its performance saying, "While not all of the sounds are going to appeal to all players, there are enough usable tones here to make this a very practical item for just about anybody who uses effects."
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1]
Five string guitars are common in Brazil, where they are known as guitarra baiana and are typically tuned in 5ths. Schecter Guitar Research produced a production model 5 string guitar called the Celloblaster in 1998.[43] A five-string tuning may be necessary in a pinch when a string breaks on a standard six-string (usually the high E) and no replacement is immediately available.
Here, in this mini guide to acoustic guitar body types, we’ll aim to show you some of the key differences in size, shape, sound and suitability between the major variations of guitar. We’ll look at the history of some of the better known body types, and make recommendations according to the sound you’re going for and the style in which you play. So whether you’re a wispy finger-picker or a hearty strummer, we’ll explain some of the more intricate details of acoustic guitar body shapes.
From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.
This electric guitar style has experienced surges and lulls in its popularity, but has never fallen off the scene, due to the number of great players who have chosen to use the Flying V, such as Jimi Hendrix, Dave Mustaine, Kirk Hammett and Michael Schenker.  The Flying V offered many of the same benefits as the SG with a much more distinctive body shape.  It is now a very common guitar among heavy rock and metal guitarists and will achieve its destiny of being a guitar of the future!
During the late 1930s and through the 1940s—the heyday of big band jazz and swing music—the guitar was an important rhythm section instrument. Some guitarists, such as Freddie Green of Count Basie’s band, developed a guitar-specific style of accompaniment. Few of the big bands, however, featured amplified guitar solos, which were done instead in the small combo context. The most important jazz guitar soloists of this period included the Manouche virtuoso Django Reinhardt, Oscar Moore who was featured with Nat “King” Cole’s trio, and Charlie Christian of Benny Goodman's band and sextet, who was a major influence despite his early death at 25.

(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.

AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
This guitar could have rocked around the clock. Bill Haley and many other early rockers used guitars just like this baby. They have a sound of their own, and just breath taking, to say the least. This Harmony H38 dates to about 1957-59. She's completely original except for the button input jack that someone installed. This guitar puts a chill in cool. There's just something about playing a Vintage Harmony. $799.99
That is not always the case with acoustic electric ones, especially with piezoelectric pickups since they pump out a relatively high amplitude signal. All you really need is a small DI box that will attenuate the signal a little, and you plug the guitar straight into a mixer. Naturally, how good this is going to sound will depend on your guitar's preamp.
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.

The material in the neck and fretboard also matters. Some guitars have both neck and fretboard in maple, and they will typically have a bright and open sound. Rosewood has traditionally been used for fretboards, usually combined with a maple neck, because it is a hardy and oily wood that can stand up to extensive human contact. Rosewood will give a darker tone than maple alone.
The first trick is the most obvious one: to double a crunch or heavily distorted guitar with a clean one. By sub-mixing a clean sound, you will be able to retain some precision, which is no minor detail considering that distortion has the annoying tendency of blurring sound. For this trick to be as transparent as possible, the crunch and clean performances must be as similar as can be. That being said, if you have a hard time getting that perfection, you can always "cheat": be it by editing the clean sound to make it match the original performance or simply doing some reamping with the first take, as discussed previously. In both cases the trick ought to work wonders because the clean take is only meant to be "felt" but not distinctively heard by the listener.
Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.
Guitar straps may be small, but they play a big role in your performance and comfort level during gigs or practice sessions. A top quality strap keeps your axe securely in place while you're shredding on stage, and reduces stress on the arm and shoulder. More than simply functional, guitar straps add a decorative look to your stage presence to complement your own personal vibe. To that end, El Dorado offers a variety of stylish, durable guitar straps to add to your accessory collection, allowing you to spend less time wrangling straps and more time focusing on the more important task of making awesome music.

Wow! I don't even know where to begin... I am using this processor with my new Cecilio electric violin. I learned and trained on classical violin, acoustic, reading sheet music, etc, so I'm pretty new at now playing an electric one hooked up to an amplifier, and even newer at using a pedal/processor. Upon first assembly, I found that many of these effects will probably not be used in the music that I play (worship & praise - old school & contemporary), but others will be very useful to bring a new sound to old songs. Also, some of the effects sound very similar to one another. I haven't yet figured out and tried to edit and save any effects to my liking, so I can't really say how well the MG-100 does in that area. But I must say that I am absolutely in love with the drum machine ... full review

Replace or upgrade your guitars pickup selector and other switches with the highest quality switches available from Switchcraft, CRL, Fender, Oak Grigsby Gotoh, Philmore and other top brands. Lever/blade style switches, toggle switches, mini switches, rotary switches, slide switches and other styles. For pickup selector and mini switch technical data, visit our Pickup Selector & Mini Switch Connections page to view drawings with the internal switch connections of each switch position. And if you are upgrading or replacing your pickup selector switch with a different type or style, check out the Pickup Switch Terminal Cross Reference page to view the corresponding terminals of the most common pickup selectors and switches.
Forget Risky Business (remember the famous scene of Tom Cruise rockin' out in his boxers?); this technique, which I consider real air guitar, is serious business. It entails capturing the airy, percussive sound of the plectrum strumming or picking the electric guitar's strings-either in acoustic isolation or combined with the ambient sound from the amp-and then mixing this sound with the recorded amplifier sound. The addition of just a little percussive plucking can enhance the presence wonderfully for any style of guitar playing. In my opinion, it's the greatest studio-recording innovation since John Bonham's distinctive drum sound.

To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain; modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle; and time-based units (delay/echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the sound. Some performers use a noise gate pedal at the end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum introduced by overdrive units or vintage gear.[12]

The one-man band has been elevated to new heights lately, but behind the loopers and pads, there usually lies an unremarkable musician. Australian songwriter Tash Sultana brings a widescreen pizazz to the format. Her sprawling, expertly weighted amalgamations of hip hop beats, soothing synth pads and foil-wrapped shimmering tones, give way to surprising bursts of scuzzy, shred-y solos, creating an exhilarating contrast to her breathy vocals. A talent that doesn’t decay with the delay pedal.
Anytime a single coil-sized humbucker is split, a tiny coil is the one seeing the strings, so the volume is going to drop. You can split to the other coil, or set the switch to wire the pickup in parallel, which will keep it hum cancelling. However, splitting to the other coil in a neck position Cool Rails probably won’t be a big difference in sound since the coils are pretty close together and pretty small.
Hughes & Kettner is another new comer that's making really good progress in the market, thanks to the surge in popularity of their TubeMeister line of low-wattage tube amps. For a company that just started in the mid '80s, this is an incredible feat, and it seems like they are not letting up because they continue to get good market feedback from users and experts alike. This is mostly due to their commitment to building quality tube driven musical equipment, the same commitment which inspires their latest guitar amp models. Nuno Bettencourt, Alex Lifeson, Tony Macalpine, Allan Holdsworth are just a small sample of big name guitarists who help further expand the company's reach.
A detailed study on MIT physics students has proven that online classes really do work. Guitar Tricks results show that online lessons not only work for physics but also for learning the guitar. A GuitarTricks member survey in 2010 found that 98% would recommend Guitar Tricks. 80% reported that they were learning faster than with any other method that they had tried before. Most members found that their skills increased from 3 to 5 (on a scale of 1 to 10) within a short period of starting the online lessons with Guitar Tricks.
The Effect: The octave effect does exactly what its name says. It takes the raw signal from your guitar and adds one or more of its copies which are pitch shifted for an octave up, or down. Some models come with both upper and lower octave available, while others allow you to use as many as three octaves. One of the best examples of this type of pedal is the Electro-Harmonix Pitch Fork.
• Lighten Up: Typically, heavier strings project more natural sound when struck, but for most live performers it’s practical to have an acoustic guitar with a pick-up for plug-and-play situations. Having a pickup in an acoustic guitar allows for the use of lighter gauge strings. Some acoustic guitars even respond well to slinky electric sets, like .10s, providing electric-guitar-like playability without sacrificing the chime of acoustic tones.
Chuck Berry is the true founding forefather of rock and roll. His guitar playing in the mid Fifties defined the true personality and vocabulary of rock and roll guitar so comprehensively and conclusively that it’s impossible to find any rock player who doesn’t still steal his licks, riffs and tricks today. In fact, Berry doesn’t even tour with his own band; instead, he hires local musicians to back him up, because almost everyone all over the world knows how to play his songs.
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