In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.

Ibanez Artcore AF75 Electric Guitar Another hollow body guitar to whet your appetite! The Ibanez Artcore AF75 isn’t as “old” as the other models here but it has earned a huge following because of its affordability, quality workmanship and versatile sound. Suitable for a variety of music styles, the Ibanez AF75 Artcore is also perfect for beginners eager to get started on a moderate budget.
So you want to shred without all the lettuce. You want to strum without losing all your Benjamins. You want an electric guitar without spending loads of money…is what these metaphors mean. Probably over-explaining it now. If you’re looking for an affordable electric guitar that doesn’t sacrifice quality, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s take a look at ten notable electric guitars for under $500.
So where do you start in a section as massive as this one? From acoustic to electric, nylon to steel stringed, hollow body to solid body, all styles are represented here, so having a good idea of what you're looking for will definitely help. The best place to start is usually with the brand, as each one has a reputation for something different, allowing you to narrow things down from there. For example, you'll instantly recognize names like Fender, Gibson and Ibanez as trailblazers of the electric guitar, while others like Martin, Taylor, and Breedlove are more famous for the unparalleled quality of their acoustic instruments. After that, you'll want to look at things like body type, tonewood, strings, size, orientation and performance level. Once you have a general idea about each of these, your decision gets that much easier. Just remember, it all comes down to personal preference, so as long as you're happy with the guitar you choose you can't go wrong. The guitar is a special instrument, with a different meaning to every player. Whether you're taking your first steps into the world of music or you're a professional rocking out in front of sold out stadiums all over the planet, strumming, plucking and picking on a guitar is a way to express yourself that can't be duplicated with anything else. So pick up a guitar here and start playing... you'll be glad you did.
Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.
Effects are electronic devices and circuits that process the electronic signal input from an instrument or mic. Also referred to as FX, they run the gamut from limiter or expander settings so subtle you can barely detect them to sci-fi modulation effects so extreme that the original sound is virtually undetectable. Think of your guitar or bass as your artist’s palette of primary colors. Effects are the equivalent of your brushes, tools, and color-mixing skills that add near-limitless creativity to your artistic vision.
"Vintage" fretwire is most usually known as "medium" fretwire and that size in today's measurements is usually .080-.040"; what you would see commonly on a Fender RI or Martin acoustic.  I mention this as fretwire does vary and some "vintage" wire back in the day on the guitars was as narrow as .070".  It is commonly referred to in Dunlop numbers as 6230.

My first recommendation is Epiphone. It is not just one of the best but it is the best guitar brand for beginners who are looking to buy a guitar to learn the ropes. I have included a few recommendations from this brand in this post. If you don’t know which one to buy and you are a beginner then buy one from this brand and you won’t go wrong for sure.


Compressor sometimes sounds good after distortion too, it helps with noise (compressors can be noisy and if put before overdrive then the distortion pedal makes the noise louder). Placing the compressor after distortion also increases your sustain (depending on the type and amount of distortion used!). It can sound darker if placed after as well - so it really is down to your ears and what you think sounds best! But I have mine first in the chain, before Fuzz as I don't often (ever?) use them together
The tone controls compensate for and complement the somewhat lifeless and mostly midrange-y character of the average guitar pickup. The gain control, often designed with a pull-boost, basically excites and heats the preamp tubes, which along with judicious use of both the amp and the guitar’s tone controls will begin to produce much of the sonic seasoning and flavor that guitarists and their fans crave as it flows from the speakers.

Now, to answer your question I would have to point out a series of popular brands and what they are popular for. After that, you make a decision on which one is best for you. You might see where I’m going with this. There is no single best guitar brand the same way there is no single best car brand. But we do have the Ferraris and Lamborghinis, as well as the Toyotas and Nissans of the guitar world!
The 10.5mm string spacing allows for easy picking across strings, such as string skipping and hybrid picking. The snap and hold tremolo arm socket can makes it easy to load a tremolo arm, and the arm torque adjuster enables fine torque adjustment without any tools. The stud lock screws lock the stud bolts in place, for better tuning stability and resonance. The 2-point floating tremolo system allows for super smooth tremolo motion when either raising or lowering the pitch.
When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970s. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970s. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.
Speaking of versatility, pedals aren't the only type of multi effects units that you'll find here. There are also rack-mounted models like the Rocktron VooDu Valve Online Guitar Multi Effects Processor and the Line 6 POD HD PRO X Guitar Multi Effects. Looking for a case to store your multi effects pedal when it's time to pack up after the show? Check out the Gator G-MULTIFX - Medium Guitar Effects Pedal Bag and the Boss BOSS Bag L2 for starters. There's lots to see here, and it's worth taking the time to have a close look!

The Sex Pistols, Steve Jones' brutish power chords and flamboyant gutter-glam solos were a perfect mirror for the taunting bile of Johnny Rotten – and a yardstick for every punk-rock noise-maker that followed. His legacy was set with indelible riffs on one record – 1977's Never Mind the Bollocks… – that inspired guitarists from Slash to Billie Joe Armstrong. It was an attitude as much as a sound. As Jones told a journalist during his days with the Sex Pistols, "Actually, we're not into music. We're into chaos."
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.
SOLD OUT: Super condition its been kept in the case over 25 years WoW!... JVG just set-up and plays wonderfully no buzz no drag its EASY to play now and it has NO WEAR almost like owning NEW Vintage! Sounds good ! its loud and robust TONE this is a great deal on an absolutely wonderful guitar. This was well crafted in Korea in the late 1980's same as Japan spec incredible. Lots of vintage guitar for a great price Its woods are as follows... Top is Spruce nice straight grained and may be solid cant see a seam it is what it is as made, the back and sides are all a fine instrument grade mahogany as is the neck a medium slim profile neck feels great , the headstock has the rosewood overlay with Fender logo in mother of pearl with gloss finish to front headstock as the body is gloss front - sides and back and the back of neck smartly in satin finish to not show finger prints easily.. Fit and finish is rated JVG at very good - excellent vintage easily Near Mint rating I'm still looking for a dink and cant find one yet, but thats not to say there may be something minute somewhere but I looked it over good and she qualifies for near mint rating vintage and is WAY BETTER than average. The fingerboard I believe is ebonized rosewood and shows no divots at all... same with frets I polished them pre set up and I can attest they are excellent too... Neck angle and action is very good straight and as a result the action is set to within Martin spec and plays excellently with no buzzing. Original tuners on board and are good quality and do the job well, intonation on this guitar is good so it sounds sweet up or down the fingerboard... surprisingly great tone for a guitar anywhere near this price point, You will be very pleased. Comes with its original semi hard chipboard case black good all latches and handle are good, Here is a great sounding and playing Vintage Korean guitar that will be sure to please. Questions ? asl Joe jvguitars@gmail.com .
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
No, you’re right. The more I think about it, the more I see the attraction. Plus, I was wrong in my previous comment when I said the sides would sound the same up to the limit of the smaller cap. Because I think they’re be audible resonance differences between the two values. It’s the same reason why the scheme I’m discussing differs from a standard tone control. And I sound vague, it’s ’cause I am! One reason I’m eager to explore this …
Our guide to guitar strings, the hope and savior of beginners across the world. We're going to cover the types of guitar strings, how they're made, the best brands, the standard gauges, how to pick the right ones for your instrument and style, what to expect in terms of cost, and much more. Take a ride with me through Ledger Note's guitar string guide...
A volume pedal does the same thing a volume knob on a guitar, but it allows you to control the volume with your foot. It is not a boost, it just allows you to sweep between zero output and the full output capacity of your instrument. Many guitarists use a volume pedal, also sometimes referred to as an expression pedal, to create pedal steel-like swells, where a note or chord is played, then the volume is slowly and smoothly raised. Volume pedals can also be used as a boost effect, by simply playing at less than full volume, then stepping on the pedal to go to full volume momentarily when you need the extra boost. Volume pedals can make a standard electric guitar sound like a pedal steel when used with a well-practiced foot technique.They can also be an important pedal to have in your toolbox when playing in a band with multiple guitars.
BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!

A wah-wah pedal is a moving bandpass filter whose frequency center is controlled by the musician via a rocker pedal. This filter boosts the frequencies in the instrument signal around the moving frequency center, allowing the musician to emphasize different areas of the frequency spectrum while playing. Rocked to the bass end of the spectrum, a wah-wah pedal makes a guitar signal sound hollow, without upper harmonics. On the other end of the sweep, the filter emphasizes higher-end harmonics and omits some of the low-end "growl" of the natural instrument sound. Rocking the pedal while holding a note creates a sound that goes from growl to shriek, and sounds like a crying baby, which is how the effect got its name and also the reason behind the Crybaby line of wah-wah pedals. The wah-wah pedal, used with guitar, is most associated with 1960s psychedelic rock and 1970s funk. During this period wah-wah pedals often incorporated a fuzzbox to process the sound before the wah-wah circuit, the combination producing a dramatic effect known as fuzz-wah.


A towering figure in the Japanese underground beginning in the early ’70s, Keiji Haino plays guitar — often distorted to the point of pure sound — with such a wild diversity that it’s misleading to call him merely a “noise guitarist.” But he is very, very, very noisy. With personas that include blues-sludge hero, noise-blast deployer, and big-eared post-psychedelic improviser, Haino’s renown (and collaborations) spread far beyond Japan, most notably with albums recorded by Fushitusha, his all-improv/nominally rock outfit.
Sennheiser's cardioid MD421 crops up almost as frequently in interviews, and has a wider frequency response, none of the low mid-range suckout, and an even heftier sensitivity boost upwards of 1kHz. This microphone also has a larger diaphragm than the SM57, and the off-axis response anomalies of the larger diaphragm, in particular, give a different character to the sound. Although obviously very popular, this mic seems more often to be used in combination with other mics than on its own.
Believe it or not, Eddie Van Halen hadn’t even heard rock music until he and his family moved from the Netherlands to Pasadena California in 1967. After hearing Cream, he quickly abandoned piano and drums for the guitar, learning the instrument by picking licks off records by Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and Jeff Beck. These influences were merely a springboard, though. Eddie was quickly able to put his own mark on everything he played.
Sure, Marshall and Vox contributed to the sound of British rock in the Sixties and Seventies—but let us not forget the mighty Hiwatt DR103. Although it's often associated with the Who's Pete Townshend (who would test their durability night after night), it was a favorite of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, not to mention the Moody Blues, the Stones and beyond. Although the DR103 looks a bit like a Marshall, it certainly doesn't sound like one. This was the result of a vastly different design.
Half a step down from standard, used by bands such as Emmure, TesseracT and Meshuggah in their earlier days, Jeff Loomis (now formerly of Nevermore), Cannibal Corpse mid-career, ERRA, Hypocrisy on End of Disclosure, Adema, American Head Charge, Sonata Arctica in their album Unia, Mushroomhead, Korn in Neidermeyer's Mind demo album, Revocation, Dir En Grey since "Dum Spiro Spero," After The Burial on Forging a Future Self album, Chad Kroeger of Nickelback on the song "This Means War" (Ryan Peake used a six-string), Slayer (on War Zone and Here Comes the Pain from God Hates Us All), and Trivium on Silence in the Snow, The Sin and the Sentence, and all live performances of songs previously written on standard tuned seven string guitars.

Adjusting saddle height couldn’t be easier on a Les Paul. Since the bridge can only be adjusted at each end, there is no need to adjust each saddle individually. Firstly check and, if necessary, adjust the low (thick) E string height. Do this by adjusting the height of the bridge at the thick E string end. This is done by rotating the thumbwheel anti-clockwise (counter-clockwise) to raise the bridge or clockwise to lower it. You might be able to do this with just your fingers, but chances are you will need to use pliers. Be careful if you use a tool as it is easy to slip and damage the finish on your guitar. Alternatively you can slacken all of the strings and use your fingers, although this is a very time-consuming process. Finger method
Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.
I don't understand why everyone is so "Gibson is the best". They have been going downhill for years. Unless it's a custom shop job, it is hit or miss. the same with Fender. Everyone likes them because of the mystique of the players that played them over the last decades. It's a "lifestyle cult" with name recognition. If you want a guitar that plays and sounds like a Gibson of Fender is supposed to but want to be guaranteed of the quality you are receiving and spend for a fraction of the money, then get a used USA Custom Shop made Washburn. You will never look back. I say used because the Chicago custom shop has apparently closed. Anything made there from about 1993 - 2008 that looks like a competitors guitar will outmatch the competitors version every time. You will notice that it is hard to find a used custom shop Washburn around. That's because they are the guitar worlds best kept secret. The people in the know get them - at a massively reduced price - and keep them. People hang onto their USA Washurns for the most part and there i a reason for that. They are that good.
Many modern players use the first joint of the thumb against the back of the neck, and almost on the upper binding, sort of like gripping a baseball bat, so they can reach over the neck with their thumb tip to play bass notes on the E and A strings while picking melodies out with the other fingers. Tommy Emmanuel, and Andy McKee are particularly adept at this. You’ll need to experiment some to find what works best for you.
I put the pots into a wiring jig I made for Les Pauls: a piece of pickguard plastic with holes to match the LP control arrangement (cardboard works just as well). This lets me do my wiring outside the body, and everything fits back in neatly.The guitar’s controls were on a metal mounting plate. We decided to ditch the plate, sticking with the ’50s theme.

The MD400 has one Alnico V humbucker at the bridge and one Alnico V mini-humbucker at the neck. Both are ‘rail’-style pickups, which are quieter, and provide more consistent tone and sustain across the strings. Both pickups have been coil-split, too—so push or pull the master “Tone” knob to disable one coil of each humbucker, effectively turning them into single-coil pickups.
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