If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. Guitars may have a fixed bridge or a spring-loaded hinged bridge, which lets players "bend" the pitch of notes or chords up or down, or perform vibrato effects. The sound of an electric guitar can be modified by new playing techniques such as string bending, tapping, and hammering-on, using audio feedback, or slide guitar playing. There are several types of electric guitar, including: the solid-body guitar; various types of hollow-body guitars; the six-string guitar (the most common type), which is usually tuned E, A, D, G, B, E, from lowest to highest strings; the seven-string guitar, which typically adds a low B string below the low E; and the twelve-string guitar, which has six pairs of strings.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.
Smaller speaker cabinets with one, two, or four speakers, are more commonly used than the 8x10", because while the 8x10" cabinet is able to produce huge volume and powerful bass tone, the cabinets are very heavy and hard to transport. The 2x10" and 4x10" designs are popular for bassists who need less stage volume and an easier-to-transport cabinet to take to rehearsals and gigs. Some bassists own two or more smaller cabinets, such as two 4x10" cabinets. This way, a bassist playing a stadium concert on one day can bring both of her 4x10" cabs, but then if she is playing a nightclub show the next day, or going to rehearsal, she only needs to bring one 4x10" cab.
A Flanger simulates the sound effect originally created by momentarily slowing the tape during recording by holding something against the flange, or edge of the tape reel, and then allowing it to speed up again. This effect was used to simulate passing into "warp speed," in sci-fi films, and also in psychedelic rock music of the 1960s. Flanging has a sound similar to a phase-shifter, but different, yet is closely related to the production of chorus.
Hello all. I have a brand name guitar, which was very popular in the 1980s, and still is being manufactured under Gibson today. I didn't see it in your list though. It's a Kramer Stagemaster. It's a beautiful guitar, which I may never part with. Strat-Style with Neck-Thru-Body & Floyd Rose Trem. The headstock states Kramer American. These were passed off as American made models, however I understand that they were actually made in Japan. The style and appointments are strikingly similar to my Ibanez Proline 2550 from the same era, which has 'Crafted in Japan' written on the headstock. I know that Kramer made a lot of American made guitars out of Neptune, New Jersey, however these were all bolt-on neck guitars. Does anyone know where these Neck-Thru Kramers were made, or why they have American printed on the headstock if they are not tues American made guitars?
While you don’t have to mortgage your home to buy a good guitar, price will still be a key factor in deciding which guitar to purchase. When buying for a beginner—especially younger players—you may be hesitant to spend too much without knowing if the recipient will stick with the guitar. That’s perfectly reasonable. There are guitars to fit just about every budget. Just keep in mind that the better the guitar the new player starts with, the more likely they will be to continue learning and playing. An instrument that’s hard to play or won’t stay in tune will deter even the most enthusiastic beginner.
@Ricardo – I recommend placing tuners as close to your original signal as possible at the beginning of your signal chain. An EQ pedal can be placed where you would like to filter your signal to the settings of the EQ which is technically at any point in your signal chain. Try the EQ in different locations and use the setting that works best for your.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
Some amps have a bright cap on the volume pot. The purpose of this cap is to allow your amp to provide a bright, clear tone at lower settings on the volume pot. The more the pot is increased, the less effect the cap has. When the pot is turned all the way up, it should be completely out of the circuit. Like they do with a bright switch, drive pedals can interact with a bright cap and result in less-than-pleasant drive tones. If your amp has a bright cap and you don’t like the way it responds to some pedals, or you find it excessively edgy at low volumes, consider having a competent amp tech change the bright-cap value or remove it altogether. This can be a worthwhile and easily reversible mod.

You have a huge range of effects at your disposal, which can be applied to both vocals (thanks to the XLR inputs) and line level instruments such as your acoustic guitar. You have 2 compressors, a boost, 3 Chorus types, as well as 3 types of delay and reverb effects to suit a wide range of sonic palettes, all of which have been optimised specifically for acoustic guitar. However, it’s the Acoustic Resonance selectors, 80 second phrase looper and anti-feedback feature that the acoustic guitarists will really take advantage of.
Many people "re-amp" direct guitar tracks recorded to a DAW using amp-modeling software, with good results. Plug-ins are wonderfully suited to the virtual  recording environment, allowing for fast access to a plethora of modeling amplifier and speaker cabinet combinations, hence tones, effectively replacing a roomful of amps, cabs and microphones. Programming the virtual amplifier is the same as tweaking the knobs on the real thing, and the same is true for programming software dynamics and effects processors in relation to their hardware equivalents. As the realism and sophistication of modeling technology continue to develop, so does the viability of virtual re-amping as a production technique.
3. Peavey Vypyr VIP 2 40-watt 1x12 ($199): This amp is an all-in-one powerhouse, equally capable of handling electric guitar, bass and acoustic all in one amp. Not only is it capable of effects modeling, it can also handle instrument modeling, giving the player access to acoustic, violin, bass and many other stringed instruments. As far as effects go, it boasts more than 25 effects with controllable parameters and with over 40 watts of power, it’s even ideal for rehearsal.
But if you never play with a tone as dark as the fully-rolled off sound, you might consider a lower-value cap. The next example is an .033μ (also know as 33n and 333), another popular choice, followed by the smaller .022μ (also know as 22n and 223), and the even smaller .01μ (also know as 10n and 103). As the cap gets smaller, the minimum tone knob settings gets less dark. As the overall range of the tone pot decreases, it may be easier to locate any desired “nooks and crannies” between the highest and lowest settings.

Of music written originally for guitar, the earliest important composers are from the classical period and include Fernando Sor (b. Spain 1778) and Mauro Giuliani (b. Italy 1781), both of whom wrote in a style strongly influenced by Viennese classicism. In the 19th century guitar composers such as Johann Kaspar Mertz (b. Slovakia, Austria 1806) were strongly influenced by the dominance of the piano. Not until the end of the nineteenth century did the guitar begin to establish its own unique identity. Francisco Tárrega (b. Spain 1852) was central to this, sometimes incorporating stylized aspects of flamenco's Moorish influences into his romantic miniatures. This was part of late 19th century mainstream European musical nationalism. Albéniz and Granados were central to this movement; their evocation of the guitar was so successful that their compositions have been absorbed into standard guitar repertoire.

Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Mahogany - Back: Solid Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Dovetail - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Maple - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Maple - Hardware: Open Gear Tuner, Chrome - String Instrument Finish: Open Pore Natural
Adding to their already good value, most multi-effects come with built-in features that are essential to gigging and practicing, first of which is a built-in tuner. Looping is also a good feature to look for, thankfully it now comes standard for most units. Having the ability to record straight to a computer is another handy features that should be considered, as well as the ability to edit the settings via your computer or mobile device. Built-in metronome/rhythm is also a nice plus, especially for those who want to take their skill to the next level.

This website is not affiliated with the Samick Musical Instrument Mfg. Company in any way. We do not deal in the buying or selling of instruments of any kind, nor do we offer evaluation services for your instruments. Most prices listed are MSRP, taken from catalogs and price lists, and have not been adjusted for inflation (unless specified) and do not reflect the actual street value a model may have sold at. More on prices here: MSRP.
While I have been able to find ways to get it to work for me most of the time, I have found that the controls for the video looping feature are not as precise as I would like them to be. There is definitely room for improvement. Another thing that I am missing is the option to control the speed of the video playback. Some competitors allow for the video playback to be slowed down or sped up while retaining the correct pitch. Guitar Tricks have been listening – Improvement have been made!This is a great help if you want to practice to play along at a slightly slower speed or if you want to review something in more detail. Luckily I have found a little helper too that allows me to control the speed of the video until Guitar Tricks are including this feature into their video player. I am using the MySpeed tool from Enounce. They advertise it to speed up videos to save time watching them. It also works a treat slowing videos down.

I have a 12-string Lyle in really good shape. Bought as a b-day present from me back in late 1970's from a pawn shop. I need to take it to a luthier to have it set up better, but it sounds really good. Just right now the action is a little high, but not that much wear. For a long time, I put it away, finding it hard to chord as a relative newbie back then. But now, I am more than ready. It does say it was made in Korea ~ which makes it seem a little more rare. The sound is still great or maybe even better! Wish I knew what it was worth, but I hope the guy I find to set it up will know more.


The Hi-Flier likely is among the first of Univox's guitars. For those who don’t know, the Hi-Flier takes after the Mosrite Ventures. This guitar gained significant influence in Japan, particularly because of the Ventures’s enormous popularity in the country at that time. The Ventures were an instrumental group who rose to fame worldwide in the ‘60s, and, despite their decline in the U.S. in the ‘70s, remained “Beatlemania huge” in Japan up until today. Along with the Ventures-esque guitar, a Hi-Flier bass was designed as well, which was nearly identical to its six-stringed counterpart.
Gold Plated strings are really just 80/20 Bronze & Zinc wound nylon strings.  They are also used to produce the bass wound strings of a set of classical strings.  They maintain their place in the market due to having a much brighter tone than silver plated strings and are used by many professionals due to their capability to project louder and sharper.
Since they're usually not sure if they'll stick to it I wouldn't spend a ton on it. Make sure it at least plays well. Learning on a poorly constructed guitar can really take the fun out of the whole process and may even convince you that guitar is harder than it really has to be. You can also fix many issues with less-expensive guitars by bringing it to a luthier.
I cut my template with a jig saw and a fine tooth blade to make sure it kept a straight edge. Then i mounted it to the body blank using small screws in the ares that would be routed out later like the neck cavity area and where the pick ups would be. You will want to start routing a bit outside your line or the edge of the template so you can get you router bit to the depth it will need to be at for the ball bearing to follow the template. I use a 1/2"x1" bit with a ball bearing guide on top.I make several passes around the body, lowering the router 1/4" at a time for smooth easy cuts. Once you have made your pass were the bearing runs along side the template, it is much easier to rout and you will end up with a nice squared edge to the body.

During Michael Laskow's 20-year tenure as an engineer/producer, he worked with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Eric Clapton, Cheap Trick and countless others. He continues to write articles for magazines like Recording and Electronic Musician. He's also the founder of TAXI, an independent A&R company that links record labels with unsigned artists and songwriters.
If you have ever played or listened to metal, you probably know about Ibanez. This brand has been around for a while and has become a patron saint of those who like harder sounding music. Built for speed, Ibanez guitars bring are finely tuned instruments which enable the player to explore the limits of their skill. On top of that, any Ibanez guitar is going to be great value for the money.
"Vintage" fretwire is most usually known as "medium" fretwire and that size in today's measurements is usually .080-.040"; what you would see commonly on a Fender RI or Martin acoustic.  I mention this as fretwire does vary and some "vintage" wire back in the day on the guitars was as narrow as .070".  It is commonly referred to in Dunlop numbers as 6230.

Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
Italiano: Leggere Tablature per Chitarra, Español: leer los acordes de una guitarra, Deutsch: Gitarren Tabs lesen, Português: Ler Tablaturas de Guitarra, Français: lire une tablature de guitare, Русский: читать гитарную табулатуру, Nederlands: Gitaartabs leren lezen en spelen, Bahasa Indonesia: Membaca Tab Gitar, 中文: 看懂吉他谱, العربية: قراءة تابات الجيتار
A question which causes much thought and divide! Catch 22 to a degree: you can't play songs till you've learnt some chords, but just knowing some chords will mean you actually can (though you are not aware of it) play loads of songs. There is a plethora of songs out there with only three chords (some with only two!). Their differences are that the order of chords is slightly different for each - with the exception of the thousands of 12-bar tunes!

A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:


This is the first, and quite possibly the best reason to invest in a good miniature guitar amp. It will allow you to play with a tone that’s enjoyable at a volume that won’t get you kicked out by your condo board. Even if you live out in the middle of nowhere, and can blast your Dual Rectifier full stack as loudly as you’d like, you still have to take the feelings of those you live with into account. Few marriages remain happy when a loud instrument is in the mix. That’s also why a mini amp is a great gift for a young student guitarist. You won’t have to hear them butcher the relatively simple line from a David Bowie tune for days on end.
Smaller combo amps may be easier to transport and set up than using separate amplifier and speaker units, and as such, they are a popular choice for many bass players. Bass players in quieter, more acoustic genres (e.g., jazz quartets which play in a wine bar or a folk music group which plays in a coffeehouse) may be able to use smaller, more modestly powered combo amps. Bassists who play in genres more associated with a high stage volume (e.g., hard rock or electric blues) may tend to use, larger, more powerful (in wattage) combo amps. While a gigging musician will typically only bring one combo amp to a show or recording session, some bassists in major touring bands have two or more combo amps on stage, with an "A/B" switching pedal used to select different amplifiers. In this way, a bassist could have a vintage tube combo amp and a modern solid state amp, and then switch between them to select a different tone for different songs.
Compared to the previously mentioned good guitar brands, ESP (Electric Sound Products) guitars are relative newcomers to the scene. The Japanese company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and they produce mostly electric guitars and basses. The company became very popular among metal guitar players, however they are versatile enough to be used for any style.
One other effect that depends on EQ modulation is the wah pedal. As you rock forward on the pedal, the sound becomes more trebly. As you rock back, the treble range is muted. In the middle positions, a wah produces a nasal, midrange-heavy tone that is interesting and useful in its own right. Since you can change the wah's tone constantly while you're playing, it's a very dynamic and expressive effect that can become an integral part of your playing. Jimi Hendrix was one of the first guitarists to exploit the wah’s capabilities.

The Meisterklasse is a high-end harmonica on the modular system, made in Germany, featuring chrome-plated cover plates, an anodised aluminium comb, and extra thick 1.05mm nickel-plated reeds. One other feature that sets the Meisterklasse apart from most other Hohner harmonicas are its full-length cover plates, which extend all the way to the ends of the harmonica's comb rather than sharply angling down before the ends to form an adjoining surface parallel to the reedplates and comb. The only other Hohner harmonica possessing this quality is the curve-framed Golden Melody.[25]


While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.

I bought a Palmer acoustic-electric about 10 years ago, for 185.00, used, it's white, with black trim, and still plays very well. I also can't find out where it's made, the neck is still straight, and the tone is good. It says hand crafted inside, and model p-38-12 and a letter I don't recognise, or is a misprint. the pick-ups are near the last frets, small screws, almost hidden. The neck is kinda wide, but you get used to it. Thats all for now, I'll bet all their guitars are pretty good.


The jumbo frets give you extra room for shredding, which is great because this guitar plays fast and smooth, so you’ll definitely be shredding on it (once you work up the chops). It employs Ibanez’s classic bolt-on neck with the ultra-deep cutaway for high access to the fretboard and rounds it all out with a three-way selector and plenty of onboard tone controls.
I love this guitar! I am so happy with this axe and haven't put it down since it arrived. I don't think that you will find a better value in the Martin lineup, especially for an all solid wood guitar and a free HSC. People complain because this wasn't made in the USA, but I don't think that anyone would complain after playing this beauty. The action right out of the box was perfect, just like any high end Martin should be (plays like my HD28 and D18). This thing plays like butter and is silky smooth. Some people complain about the stratabond neck, but I love the feel of it and it is rock solid and should last forever! The finish and style of the guitar is very minimalistic, which is something that I love. It may be too plain for some people, but I love it. Something just
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C.F. Martin & Company is a U.S. guitar manufacturer established in 1833 byChristian Frederick Martin. Martin is highly regarded for its steel-string guitarsand is a leading mass-manufacturer of flattop acoustics. Martin instruments can cost thousands of dollars and vintage instruments often cost six figures. The company has also made several models of electric guitars and electric basses.
switches between each pickup, weather its 2 or more you've got one to switch between each of them. pointed up = neck pickup (suggested for solos and high pitched stuff) middle = both pointed down = bridge (suggested for metal or lead guitar) the fenders with a 5 way blade switch its all the way up = same way , solos up a bit = neck and middle pickup middle = all the pickups (this can vary between guitars) down a bit = middle and bridge down = the bridge by itself some guitars with two pickups have a 5 way blade which you hear 5 clicks , this isn't a broken guitar if its the case you got an awesome slightly new thing called a coiltap which makes say a les pauls neck pickup split the sound inside the pickup and giving you a more fender sounding pickup sound... very cool.
I’ve played Martin D35 and O18 for decades and fooled around with Maton and Cole Clarke’s for a bit, but switched to James Goodall’s ( 6 and 12) which are simply stunning instruments. Why they’re not mentioned here is a mystery to me – especially if it’s quality of woods and craft and tone you’re chasing. I love the Martin’s but Goodall stole my soul.
Chords in a song are arranged according to chord progressions, which are chord intervals that work pretty much the same as single notes in a scale. It’s very important for you to learn chord progressions for the various keys, because then, as long as you know what key the song is in, you can figure out the chords in it very easily. There may be times when you want to change the key of a song to one you can sing or play in better, and for this, knowledge of chord professions is critical.

After covering the Top 5 Guitar Plugins You Need To Know and 5 Best Multi Effects for Beginner Guitar Players and 5 Guitar Stomp Box Pedals Every Guitarist Needs let’s face it: probably half of our sound comes from our amplifiers. That makes them kind of important… and with so many little things to consider, from size and reliability to power output and built-in effects, you might appreciate some suggestions. So without further ado, here are my Top 10 recommendations (in no particular order) for beginner Guitar Amps to get you started.
After the Beatles 1965 summer tour, Paul McCartney frequently used a left-handed 1964 4001S FG Rickenbacker bass, as its tone was better suited to recording than the lightweight Höfner basses he had used previously. The instrument became popular with other bassists influenced by his highly melodic style, as it produces a clear tone even when played high up the neck, its deep cutaways allowing easy access to the higher frets.
Semi-hollow Body Guitars: The first and most classic semi-hollow body is the Gibson ES-335, which was quickly embraced with Chuck Berry and later sonically reinvented by Freddie King, Alvin Lee, Larry Carlton and a host of others in the ’60s and ’70s, who pushed semi-hollow Electric Spanish models into the ’60s and ’70s with aggressive technique and tones.
If a metallic object (such as an electric guitar string for example) is vibrated above a magnetic coil the magnetic field is disturbed and an electrical current is produced. This current then travels through the pickups connecting wires, eventually making it’s way to your output jack where it is transferred to your guitar lead and ultimately to your guitar amp where the small signal is amplified to produce the sound associated with an electric guitar.

well it all depends on your budget. If you're looking for a beginner guitar go for pluto 39 inch model it will cost you around 5.5k. Don't go below this as all those cheap guitars are useless after 6 to 7 months of use. If you can increase your budget then I'll suggest a cort AD810, pluto 41 inch semi acoustic model, or a fender SA150. These will cost you around 7k to 10k but these are the best you can buy as a beginner! Just remember that your first guitar should not sound crapy and it should be good on your fingers. I hope this helps. Happy guitaring!

An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”


If any item fails to meet your expectations at any time, please return it for a refund or exchange. From tuners to endpins, everything we sell at Stewart-MacDonald is backed by our rock-solid guarantee of satisfaction. This is how we do business, ever since selling our first 5-Star Banjo Head in 1968. We proudly continue this tradition by offering quality products and standing behind them.

The valvetronix XL-series builds on the success of the original valvetronix digital amplifier. A range of tube-powered modelling amplifiers, with hi-gain sounds designed to span the entire range of heavy rock music. The XL-series uses VOX's patented Valve Reactor technology, producing the sound and feel of an all-tube amp. Models: AD15VT-XL 15-watt 1×10" speaker, AD30VT-XL 30-watt 1×12" speaker, AD50VT-XL 50-watt 2×12" speakers, AD100VT-XL 100-watt 2×12" speakers.
Prior to dennis, i had never taken guitar lessons. Always tried to teach myself. I struggled since i had no structure, i would consistantly get lost, which would make me put the guitar down due to frustration. Deciding to hire dennis was a break thru for me, and honestly wish i would have looked into it much sooner. Not only has my skills progressed, which they due weekly at a much faster rate then when i was trying to learn on my own, but my confidence and motivatation has increased greatly. I look forward to meeting with dennis each week and building off of what he taught me the previous week. The amount of patience dennis has is great, and the way he explains different things so that i understand is awsome. Would definetly recommend dennis to anyone, whether they have just purchased their first guitar, or they have tried numerous times to teach themselves, or even if you have alot of the basics down, but looking to take your knowledge and playing to the next level.

Back again! I sold the Eagle Jazz bass copy, but have acquired a hollow body 3/4 bass that we believe said Lyle or Aria on the peg head (badge gone). Interestingly it seems like possibly a copy of a Kay design, florentine cutaway with a sunburst. Three of the tuners are missing the bushings, and I'd love to know how to get replacements! I may have to manufacture something, but don't own a metal lathe. Also found a Strat copy that says Mark II on the peg head, nice mahogany neck, in a dumpster along with a Jackson Dinky. Stole parts off the Dinky to make the Strat copy whole, and I like it better than the Mexi-Strat and Squier Affinity start I had, so I sold those, and the Jackson after replacing the bridge parts I'd stolen off it. Besides, I still haven't got all the magic marker off the pick guard on the Mark II (recently heard they were made by Cort, or whoever makes Cort). I bought a Telestar (believe it was made by Teisco) in a thrift store for maybe $12.99 or something like that. I love the pickup sound, but the neck doesn't get any wider as it approaches the body and the frets get closer together. I also have a San Antonio made Alamo like that, and sold off a Silvertone (made in Japan) tiny hollow body with that issue. The necks are hard to play! But I like that pickup on the Telestar so much I can't part with it.
A 6 stringed guitar, black satin in color. It is gloss finish and comes without a case. The body is made from Mahogany and the neck from the Flamed maple. The guitar consists of tone,volume and 3 way pickup switch. It was introduced alomost 20 years ago and includes all the charm present in its cousins from USA . The device can be acquired with as little as INR 19,755  and more details can be found at:
A guitar needs to receive regular maintenance if it is to keep its intended levels of playability and sound quality. Caring for a guitar involves a process known as a setup. This describes a group of fine-tuning procedures that work together to bring the instrument to its highest potential. The cost of a guitar setup is often well worth the value of the service. New strings will be added, their height adjusted, intonation will be set, and the neck may be adjusted to allow for the proper amount of relief in the wood. Most guitars need to be setup at least once a year to account for swelling of wood and shifting of parts that are caused by changes in humidity. Guitar setup cost is usually around $50, but can fluctuate wildly depending on what adjustments are needed for your specific instrument.
Do you know what does custom shop means? Like custom shop cars and motorcycle, furniture. With Top Guitars it pertains to woodworking, most of us would define a custom shop as one dealing with made-to-order goods with certain specifications. Someone comes into my realm with a certain vision. That vision may be on a set of architectural prints or still locked in their brain waiting for extraction. In either case, it’s a vision or plan that they have, not me.

The "Chrome Edition" harmonica is also based upon the MS reed plates. Featuring a crystal glass comb and specially engraved chrome-plated anniversary cover plates. The bottom cover plate has the serial numbers from 1 to 1857. It is also packaged with an anniversary booklet. The "Standard Edition" model features a clear acrylic comb and the top cover plate is specially engraved.
Phase Shifter pedals found their way into the guitar community in the 70’s with pedals like the MXR Phase 90, Mutron Phase Shifter, EH Small Stone, Foxx and others. The sweeping sound it produces is unmistakable and a legendary trademark of many guitarists sound. The MXR Phase 90 can be heard all over Van Halen 1 and II. Brian May used the Foxx phase on “Sheer Heart Attack,” The Eagles “Life In The Fast Lane”, and Led Zeppelin’s “The Rover” to name but a few.
In the end I decided to go with the .033μ. Everything larger sounded too wooly to me on the neck pickup. If I didn’t play much EBow, I might even consider the .022μ. But you might make a different choice, especially if you were using brighter pickups. You won’t know for sure till you try it out with your instrument, amp, and hands, but I hope this gives you some idea of what to expect.
A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studios who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.
Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
The Guild Starfire V Electric guitar is a deluxe cutaway with loads of outstanding features that gives a fully expressive voice to the user’s playing style and taste. Designed as a semi-hollow electric guitar, the Guild Starfire V features a beautiful thin line body with little twin Guild LB-1bucker pickups that make it suitable for rock, blues, roots and a lot of other variety of music styles.
A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.

The trusty traveler guitar:  There are many makes and models, and of those that we reviewed, some that are cheaply priced (i.e. under $150) are just that- cheap.  Traveler guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and some more complex models offer foldaway design that buckle at the neck joint.  Additionally, there are acoustic electric models if you desire the flexibility of plugging in.  First, it is best to determine "why" you are seriously considering a travel guitar before getting into the research.  Answer that question for yourself first, and it could steer you away from a specific traveler guitar and toward a different size acoustic guitar body.  Also, it might re-affirm your choice.  Consider the following questions:


This is a beautiful example of a 34 year old Japanese crafted Ibanez acoustic guitar that has the tone and the beauty, Love the Sunburst finish on this guitar that did a beautiful job with the thin Poly finish it stands up to the test of time and still shines like glass today just have a good look. It has a Spruce top… cant tell because of the sunburst if its solid or not but will assume its laminated…. Back – Sides & neck are all very nice grade Mahogany. Fit & finish as good as a $2000 guitar of today but this beauty has well aged woods now being well over 33 years old you could spend 3 x times the money and not get a better vintage guitar . The tone is surprisingly rich and with good volume it makes an excellent strumming or fingerpicking guitar. Its playing string action is very good making it a breeze to play and fun. The neck is real nice substantial and a medium profile with a soft V it feels like a vintage Guild from the 1960's ... nice job Ibanez!...Its in very good vintage condition too with several minor doinks to its top and a couple minor on the back and so on but overall its in very good condition both structurally & cosmetically and looks very good overall. The neck's frets are still good and fingerboard and frets have been lightly polished as has the entir guitar cleaned hydrated and polished and just look at the results, a new Martin bone nut has just been fit & installed as well as new Martin Marquis 80/20 Bronze light gauge strings, nicely setup to play very well like a much more expensive guitar now. Original tuners are doing a great job to this day some 34+ years later... Here is a very good Japanese Vintage Guitar of quality for a very good price too, She is not new or mint of course it has doinks and just a couple of fine hairline checks in its top I did not see at first its very hard to see but they are not wood cracks just fine hairlines to the finish and of no structural consequence what so ever. This guitar Plays and sounds very well and will make someone very happy its condition is JVG rated at easily 8.5/10 very good vintage, neck is straight without cracks fit and finish and workmanship are all in the excellent range. Great Japanese guitar for a great price… The 1980 Ibanez V300 TV, crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This guitar plays GREAT! .
Recently while cruising around EBay I was able to find pretty strong evidence that the 700 and 800-series Kents were made by Kawai. Or maybe... the necks of the 700 and 800-series Kents and the Kawais were made by the same manufacturer. I don’t know if Kawai kept the factory that made Teisco operating after it was acquired. It appears that Kawai had more experience building hollow-bodied guitars than Teisco. So I call the 700 and 800-series Kents Made by Kawai. You can call them Made by Teisco if you want. Of course, the possibility exists that they were both made by an entirely different company. Who knows? The 1960’s were like a ‘wild west’ period of Japanese guitar making.
POLISHING Once you have completed the wet sanding you wil have a pretty smooth surface that is almost a dull shine. You can either hand polish the finish or use a polising attachment to buff it out. Stew Mac has a polishing pad that attaches to you drill. Or you can get 6" foam bonnets from an auto parts store that will fit over the sanding disk attachment you may already have. It is best not to use any thing made from cotton because it will cut through the finish. Stew Mac also has polishing compounds that you will use in order working you way down to the swirl remover. It's on the expensive side so I use McGuires polish that you can get from the auto shop. If you use a buffing attachment make sure that you uae a different attachment for each grade of polish. Don't use the same pad for each one. Also remember to wait 10 minutes after buffing before you wipe off the surface. The lacquer gets hot and soft after buffing so give it time to cool. You will have to hand polish the cutaways, don't attempt to use the buffer on the edges of the guitar or cutaways because you will burn though the finish.

Extra Features: This is where we’ll bucket a bunch of extras that could be important to you, depending where you are in your guitar playing journey, and what gear you might already have. Some multi-effects pedals include handy tools like a tuner, a looper pedal, a built-in expression or wah pedal, an input for an external expression pedal, the ability to double as a USB interface, the ability to be powered by batteries, and so on and so forth. It comes down to personal preference, but we generally like to see the inclusion of a tuner, and looper pedal, since both are extremely useful tools for most guitar players no matter their skill level.

One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
A favored brand of a number of against-the-grain musicians – like Jack White of The White Stripes, Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, and the late great David Bowie – Eastwood is unique in that, alongside their catalog of more traditional guitars, they’ve also taken it upon themselves to bring back a number of more obscure models through the revived Airline brand. For instance, the ’59 Custom 2P pictured above was originally offered by VALCO in a catalog sale through Montgomery Ward from 1958 to 1968. Their vintage style instruments are updated with modern manufacturing techniques, giving players the opportunity to pick up rare offerings at a reasonable cost. But perhaps the coolest thing about this company is their custom shop. Set up almost like a Kickstarter, the shop allows customers to bid on defunct, new, and bizarre guitars and go on to build whichever models meet their funding requirements.

electric guitar chords Acoustic guitar acoustic samples acoustic guitar loops Electric Guitar sounds Electric guitar Electric guitar loops Electric guitar samples Electric Guitar sounds guitar guitar loops Electric guitar samples drums drum loops dance dance music dance loops loops for music synth effects synth efx synthesizer sounds synth sounds synth loops synth samples digital synth digital synthesizer synthesizer synsthesizer sounds keyboard soundsSound loopsmu


Let's start with the scenery. The guitar riff I'll use today was conceived using an effects chain made up of a delay pedal (the Electro-Harmonix Memory Boy). The pedal doesn't have a tap tempo feature, so I had to adjust the delay time by ear as precisely as possible while playing the song. Recorded in the "classic" way, without racking my brains and simply putting a mic in front of the amp, I get something like this:
There’s plenty of substance under all that style, too. Two DiMarzio-designed Fusion Edge humbuckers power the S series axe—they aren’t exactly after-market pickups, but are designed in collaboration between Ibanez and the pickup brand. These ceramic humbuckers are aggressive, articulate and loud, ideal for modern metal. And for a touch more versatility, both pickups have also been coil-split.
AT LAST!! some gd stuf about john frusciante, hes the best living guitarist in my opinion. i don't get people who think those random metal shredders should belong in the top 10 list…. bein insanely good just on technical stuff means nothing… its kinda like shredding as fast as possible on a pentatonic scale, people will respect the skills, but wheres the soul? this is the exact reason why hendrix and jimmy page always get on these lists but not guitarists like buckethead, i mean seriously he has less tone then any of the GnR guitarists.. if slash is not on the list, theres no way the kfc man can get any close. to all the haters, tom morello is a very innovative guitarist and by far more creative then buckethead. I swear the world is no longer a place for good music.

As the name implies, TheFretWire DIY 175 kit is based on the popular ES-175 hollow body guitar, following its shape and configuration, but using more cost effective materials. More importantly, it lets you customize your own archtop as you prefer - you can make it into a classic jazz box, or add some cool paint jobs to turn it into a rockabilly style instrument.
I have tried many different wiring schemes as well, with 3-way switching, 3-way with coil taps, and even bypassed the tone control (since I never dial back the tone in my playing anyway). I have played this guitar through high-gain amps (Carvin V3, all three channels, Carvin Vai Legacy), through VOX AC15, Vox AC30 (both with Greenbacks and with Celestion Blues speakers), and an Orange 2x12 combo. In all of these excellent amps where my Carvin SC90 guitar sings and sparkles and does whatever I want it to, this Frankenstrat with Duncans or with Carvin P'ups sounds like a fart after 12 glasses of cheap Charles Shaw wine.
This string overview is useful for understanding what choice to make that suits your play style the best.  As players, we are always searching for the highest possible functionality, while balancing tone and playability for the genre we play.  Check out what brand and gauge your guitar heroes use to help you zero in on your perfect string set and keep on rocking!
For notation and composition work, some of the common choices are Avid Sibelius 7, Makemusic Finale and PG Music Band-in-a-Box. Or, for DJ-ing and remixing, check out the Native Instruments Traktor series, Avid Torq or the software packages from Venue Magic. There truly are dozens of options available for you to take advantage of the benefits digital editing has to offer. Whether you're an independent artist mixing tracks on your own laptop or a professional sound editor working on a major TV series or indie film, the right music software is here to handle your needs.
The highly resonant basswood body offers a warm tonality which is ideal for the metal fans whilst the high output Schecter Diamond Plus pickups provide everything from crystal cleans to bone crushing riffage when you throw some distortion on your amplifier. Tune-O-Matic bridge with string through body ensures your notes reverberate a lot longer than regular bridges, so those big solos and riffs really stand out. The bolt on maple neck with 24 X-jumbo frets make it an extremely comfortable guitar to play and highly reliable. Ideal for beginners and pros alike.
The three Teisco amps included the Teisco-88, the AMP-71R and the Miny. No details are available on these, but they were fairly rectangular cabinets with top-mounted controls. The Teisco-88 had “Teisco” and a big “88” on the grillcloth. The ’66 model was a tube amp, so this likely was, as well. I suspect the others shown were tubers as well. The Miny had the italicized T logo on the front. The AMP-71R had reverb.
This beautiful wood is not a very common tonewood for the construction of a guitar body, but you may see it more commonly in neck construction. However, it has been done to build a guitar body, and it was done well on the famous Gibson J-200 that the Epiphone EJ-200SCE also imitated. It’s a very solid, hard, and dense wood that has amazing sound punch and bright tones.
I'm seeking a guitar to elicit the rich fat heavy sound. So as I understand a guitar with the H humbucker (double coil) pickup is what I need for that. But there is a wide range of layouts for the guitars. Some of them have S single (single coil) pickup, for example H-S-H layout. Where single coil pickup is mostly used for blues, funk and jazz guitars. And these H-S-H guitars are also recommended for heavy rock (because of the humbuckers).
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With a history dating back to 1833, Martin acoustics rank as the most historic and iconic guitars ever made. From the small-bodied parlor guitars of the 19th-century to the landmark dreadnoughts of the 1930s and beyond, Martins have and continue to define the form and sound of the instrument. Take a look here for examples every type of vintage Martin acoustic including icons like the D-28, D-35, 000-18 and many more.
Before World War II, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors in the guitar market—especially when it came to archtops. With legendary models like the Broadway, Deluxe, Emperor and Triumph, they were a force to be reckoned with on the hollow-body electric guitar scene. In the 1940s, Epiphone went from one of Gibson's competitors to one of its subsidiaries, paving the way for Epiphone Electric Guitars to become synonymous with many Gibson models.  Despite this drastic shift, Epiphone continues to be renowned for their archtop electric guitars even today. Models like the Wildkat Royale and the limited edition ES-335 Pro are worthy throwbacks to that golden era of electric guitars, giving you authentic vintage sound that's perfect if you're into classic rock. Another Epiphone original that's still available today is the solid-body Wilshire. The impact that the Wilshire had on guitar design is so strong that it's still one of the first mental images that comes to mind when we think ""electric guitar.""

Fingers: The numbering system for the fingers on your fretting hand is very simple but also important. Your index finger is your first finger, your middle finger is your second finger, your ring finger is your third finger, and your pinky is your fourth finger. Again, super-simple but really important for when you start learning where to put your fingers to make chords.
A tremolo effect simply alters the volume of a signal at a preset interval, within a preset range. Some amps have this effect built in, and in some cases it’s called vibrato (a misnomer that caught on long ago and has stuck around to this day). Tremolo sounds much like hitting a note and then turning your volume knob up and down rapidly. Most tremolo effects have two controls: speed and depth. Adjusting speed changes how rapidly your volume fluctuates. Adjusting the depth controls the range of volume from loud to soft as the tremolo fluctuates.

Humbucker pickups were designed to deal with hum while also offering tonal characteristics beyond those of single-coil models. This design incorporates two single-coils wound together in series, with the polarity of the magnets arranged opposite each other. This design helps to eliminate hum. Hence it’s name. Humbuckers usually have a thicker, louder, more powerful tone when compared to single-coils. While they are very versatile, humbuckers lend themselves to rock, heavy metal, and jazz styles. Famous guitarists who use humbuckers include Slash, Jimmy Page, Joe Pass, and Duane Allman.

Every skilled worker needs to look after their tools and musicians are no exception. Sure, wear and tear is normal—especially when you play your instrument often—but a little T.L.C. will ensure your musical gear continues to look, play and sound amazing for years. At Guitar Center Repairs, you'll find a dedicated team of certified musicians who take pride in helping you reach your highest level of playing potential. Make no mistake, your music maker is in the best of hands at GC Repairs. When it comes to looking after your musical equipment, certain things should be left to professionals—pickup installation, wiring customization and structural repair, to name a few. Mind you, there are tasks that every guitarist can take care of at home, including regular polishing and restringing. Of course, not everyone has the time to continually look after their instrument and bringing it to Guitar Center is a great way to save yourself time and ensure that the job gets done right. With that being said, GC's services go well beyond cleaning and string changing. For those of you who own a stringed instrument and find the action is higher than it once was, a truss rod adjustment is definitely in order. Or, maybe you want to personalize the look and sound of your guitar—in which case, an expert will be more than happy to swipe out your pickups for a new set, replace the pickguard or perform any other task to give you an axe that’s entirely your own. Honestly, your best bet is to browse this entire section and see what else is offered in the way of repairs, maintenance and modifications. Who knows, maybe your local GC is having a free guitar setup day, so feel free to have a look around this page or take a swing by the store in your area. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff is always happy to speak with other local musicians and setting up a quick appointment for your instrument will do wonders for your musical enjoyment. From nut and bridge replacements to even amp electronic upgrades, Guitar Center Repairs has you covered.
The sound blew away guitarists when units first popped up in guitar stores. If the dizzying harmonic swirl didn’t just make you puke, it really sent you tripping. Interestingly, many tired of it a lot quicker than they did the phaser’s subtler, less imposing “swoosh”, and consequently it’s difficult today to name a fraction as many great guitar tracks with flangers slapped all over them as with phasers. For the latter, we’ve got the Stones’s “Shattered” (or just about anything from Some Girls), the Clash’s “Lost in the Supermarket” from London Calling and loads from Sandinista, and heavier rockers from early Van Halen to recent Foo Fighters. In the flanging corner, we’ve got The Pat Travers Band’s “Boom Boom, Out Go The Lights” and… well, I’m sure there’s another somewhere. Okay, maybe the intro lick to Heart’s “Barracuda” redeems it some.
Most Humbuckers are wired in anti-phase, where the opposing polarity of the localised magnetic fields cancel each others out at selective points, creating a lower bandwidth region in the high frequency domain. Less bandwidth = lower noise. If done correctly, with carefully designed pickups, it will not affect the tone, but traditionally it did, because Hillbilly wannabe technicians made the things on their knees.
A Distortion pedal is a must, it really helps bring out those chords, solos and riffs and makes sure they stand out. It gives you the volume jump when you need it and changes the overall sound of your guitar, giving it power and aggression. Of course, you don’t always have to dial in the pedal for bone crushing riffs as a distortion pedal can provide a smoother sound, but at least the option is there!
One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.
The Firebird did have some other unique features such as its banjo style tuners and mini humbuckers that produced a different sound than the full humbucker pickups Gibson typically offered.  Many notable players preferred the Firebird: Mick Taylor from the Rolling Stones used it on the album Exile on Main St.  Allen Collins would also use this axe on stage with Skynyrd alongside his Explorers.  The great Texan blues guitarist Johnny Winter was known for playing slide on his 1963 Firebird to great effect.  Dave Grohl, of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame, used his white Firebird to create a modern rock sound.
Yeah there is no double about it the Epiphone Special 11 is unreal value for money and even though I have over the years filled my Den with guitars some worth a lot of money the Epiphone Special 11 is my go to guitar. I just cannot fault, great tuners, pickups and basically the only guitar I have that stays in tune 90% plus of the time. It is also the lightest of my guitar collection weighing in at about 5.5lbs. For $299 Australian they are an absolute steal. If I could only have one guitar I would go to this Epiphone Les Paul Special 11 ever time.
Make sure that only the notes you deliberately play actually sound. Guitar strings aren't isolated systems like the tone generators of a synthesizer; if you simply leave them open they may ring even though you've never actually played them. Always watch out carefully for such “rogue sympathetic vibrations” and make sure you properly stop strings that sound in unintended ways.
Launch price: $4,200 / £3,235 | Body: Mahogany with carved figured maple top | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.594" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 58/15 LT Treble humbucker, 58/15 LT Bass humbucker | Controls: 2x volume, 2x tone (with push-pull coil-splits), 3-way selector switch | Hardware: PRS two-piece bridge, Phase III locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: McCarty Sunburst, McCarty Tobacco Sunburst, Orange Tiger, Trampas Green, Violet, Antique White, Black, Black Gold Burst, Blood Orange, Champagne Gold Metallic, Charcoal Burst, Emerald, Faded Whale Blue, Fire Red Burst, Frost Green Metallic, Gold Top, Gray Black
Some bridges allow players to introduce vibrato into their performance by means of moving a vibrato arm (aka a whammy bar) that moves the bridge up or down. Bridges with this function are often called tremolos. (Note that this is musically incorrect since tremolo means a repeating variation in volume, not pitch, but has been used so long it is accepted terminology.) A tremolo system allows the player to rock the bridge back and forth to adjust the pitch of the notes being played. This is called a floating bridge, and is popular on many guitars. For beginners, it may be better to avoid a locking tuning system for their first guitar. They can be tricky to adjust properly, and can make even a simple string change frustrating for the inexperienced. However, if your budding Steve Vai has his heart set, don’t let that stand in the way.
There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.
Try different gauge strings. As you know, guitarists can be creatures of habit. But heavier strings can help both your tone and fingering strength, while lighter strings may suit bigger bends. Experiment! Billy F Gibbons has the thickest tone but his top E is only a .007. Stevie Ray Vaughan’s top E was a .013. Changing string gauge may just bring out your best inner-self.

I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)

If anybody needs a Bridge, I have a Teisco Roller Bridge for sale, it is a a copy of a Gretsch Roller bridge but includes a solid steel Base like a Rickenbacker Bridge Base. The string saddles are rollers which are adjustable side-to-side for proper string spacing, and each side of the bridge is adjustable for Height. It is in excellent condition, probably from 1965 thru 1968. On a scale of 0 to 10, it is a 8.
Second, you might be wondering if it’s just better to get a cinematic VST or one that takes from a range of instruments. Fractured does have cymbals and bass kicks but, of course, the guitar creates these and this gives them a lot of offbeat character. You could easily get a more rich and deep bass kick with a drum VST, but then you lose that quirkiness that propels and highlights Fractured.  
Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.
Paul Kossoff, of Free and Back Street Crawler, favoured a 1959 Les Paul Standard. In 2011-12, Gibson’s Custom Shop made a reproduction of Kossoff’s Standard, featuring a so-called “green-lemon” flametop, two-piece carved maple top, mahogany body and neck, Custom Bucker humbucking pickups and kidney-bean shaped Grover tuners similar to those Kossoff had installed on the instrument. 100 Kossoff models were made to resemble the guitar at the time of Kossoff’s death in 1976, with another 250 in a VOS finish.
It should be noted that some bridge assemblies have pre-set, non-adjustable saddle pieces. The Gibson "tune-o-matic" bridge is just one example. On these bridges you will have an overall height adjustment post on either side of the bridge. For these bridges, measure the height at the 12th fret for the low and high "E" strings and make your height adjustment for each side at the respective post. The other string heights will be defined by the bridge assembly.
Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.

Being by nature rather sceptical, I have to admit to initially dismissing many of the recording methods in this article as 'studio snake oil', and because there was usually too little time during my own sessions to experiment with new ideas, I'd usually end up with an SM57 glued to the speaker grille by default. Taking the time out to trial the above techniques in the studio showed me quite how much I had been missing — not only much better raw recordings, but also tremendous extra flexibility at mixdown. But don't take it from me — listen to the audio examples for yourself and make up your own mind. If they don't expand your recording horizons, I'll eat my SM57...
The brilliance of Guitar Rig is the ability to create so many different tones. This is in large part due to the variety of amps that are modeled in the software. You have a choice between Citrus, Ultrasonic, High White, Tweed Delight, Plexi, and Lead 800, among others. I’m sure you can guess what Native Instruments’ clever amp names translate to in the real world.
Honeyman-Scott’s solos were concise and economical, getting the point across in only a few measures. His solo on “Kid” is a pop song unto itself that evokes the Beatles’ finest melodic moments, while his three- and four-second bursts on “Tattooed Love Boys” unleash more emotion, fire and style than most guitarists can convey in an extended 15-minute solo.
Many compressor pedals are often also marketed as "sustainer pedals". As a note is sustained, it loses energy and volume due to diminishing vibration in the string. The compressor pedal boosts its electrical signal to the specified dynamic range, slightly prolonging the duration of the note.[92] This, combined with heavy distortion and the close proximity of the guitar and the speaker cabinet, can lead to infinite sustain at higher volumes.
Small amps can benefit from being placed on a stand, rather than the floor, as reflections from the floor can muddy the sound. A stool or something similar will do if a stand isn’t available. For the same reason, when using larger stacks or combos with several speakers, try mic’ing one that’s furthest from the floor. Placing an amp against a wall will increase the bottom-end response, and placing it in a corner will emphasise the low end further still. A mellow tone can be achieved by pointing the amp into the corner and mic’ing from behind.
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In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
Looking for Used Gear? You may have just discovered your future. Music Go Round franchisees started out as customers of our stores. They have a love of music, they love gear and they understand the industry. Most importantly they’ve taken their passion and turned it into a business they’re proud of which is an asset to the music scene in their community. Who wouldn’t want to own a business where every day they were doing what they truly love? Sound interesting?

Les Paul developed one of the first practical solid-bodied electrics made of wood, which he dubbed "The Log". He built the prototype himself -- possible the first practical solid-bodied electric -- in the late 1930s. In 1941, he approached Gibson about making it, Gibson, but they weren't initially interested. Meanwhile, Leo Fender had been independently been developing his own solid bodied guitar, which was released commercially as the Esquire in 1950. By then, lots of people were recording electric guitar.

I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
Learning guitar chords is often one of the first things beginner guitarists do. You only need to know a few popular chords in order to be able to play a huge amount of songs. This beginner’s guitar chords article will provide you with the necessary chords you’ll want to learn for both beginner and intermediate players. Before jumping into learning the chords provided in the guitar chords chart below, I wanted to first explain what a guitar chord actually is. What Is a Guitar Chord? As wikipedia defines it, “a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar”. Although a

Rather than superfluous power, I suspect the copywriter really meant something like superior!! However, then again, maybe they did get it right, because they featured a 6A6 preamp tube that was exceptionally weak and microphonic. These amps also had a chassis built in Chicago, by Chicago Electric, with a cabinet made in Chicago, by Geib. These had performance problems and in 1937, National Dobro went back to using Webster chassis with Geib cabinets.


However, amplifiers can also be quite loud. Maybe you’ve got a fancy one, big enough to make everyone in a bar cover their ears. Or maybe you don’t have one at all, and have been playing on acoustic guitar. Either way, you may not have known that you can simulate the trademark sounds of famous amplifiers using something you probably already have: a computer. Using your computer as an amp isn’t too complicated, and it opens up a world of possibilities that the analog audio world can’t deliver on a budget. Some newer practice amplifiers have headphone jacks so you can play without making a racket, but those are only starting to become widespread and the majority of hobbyist electric guitar players would rather spend big money on a good stage-ready amplifier than a mediocre one to accompany their practice amp. If you’re an electric guitar player looking for a way to practice quietly or with headphones, this is the tutorial for you. You will need: An electric guitar A computer running Windows XP or better (Windows 7 or newer preferred) An instrument cable (both sides quarter-inch and mono, same cable used to plug guitars into amps) A ¼-inch to ⅛-inch mono adapter
The Fender Stratocaster born in the early 1950's in Southern California, and more precisely in Fullerton, near Los Angeles, hometown of the Fender(tm) Musical Instrument Co. Since it's official debut in early 1954, the Fender Stratocaster(tm) has proved to be possibly the most successful electric guitar ever manufactured. Quite a legend in it's own right! The Strat(tm) - as it is affectionately known has to be acknowledged as one of the major landmarks in the history of the guitar. It enjoys a popularity undiminished by time and changing fashions and remains quite clearly a firm favourite among many generations of players, no matter what their style of music....... Fender Stratocaster 'Tex Mex' Jimmie Vaughan signature model - $999
Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.
This is a tricky one, because I’d hate to see anyone miss out on a bargain. Unless you really know what you’re doing, buying a used guitar is a risky venture. Definitely, you shouldn’t buy a second-hand guitar without seeing or trying it out. Again, sticking with well-known brands is wise. Look carefully for worn fret boards (pitted holes under frequently-played notes) and grooves in the frets themselves. Check along the neck to see if it’s not too bent— it’s supposed to be slightly curved. Getting problems like these fixed professionally can be expensive and you might as well buy something new in the first place. The bottom line here is that high-quality instruments that have been properly maintained don’t lose any value. A good second-hand guitar should cost you as much as a good new one — but yes, those bargains are out there, too.
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.
Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo

In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.
Schecter has built a strong reputation for itself as one of the best manufacturers of affordable guitars for musicians worldwide. Their commitment to quality and innovation has made them a leading brand name for high quality guitars that are affordable for every budget. The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar is one of their flagship electric guitars that not only delivers performance, but also uncompromising quality.

Schecter has built a strong reputation for itself as one of the best manufacturers of affordable guitars for musicians worldwide. Their commitment to quality and innovation has made them a leading brand name for high quality guitars that are affordable for every budget. The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar is one of their flagship electric guitars that not only delivers performance, but also uncompromising quality.


When it comes to multi-effects pedals, the Zoom G3X delivers big-time. Voted the top multi-effect pedal in our research by a large margin, the G3X hits high marks for quality, value for the money, portability, and most of all ease of use. Aside from giving you a multitude of effects, this unit is also an amplifier simulator, tuner, fully functional looper, doubles as a USB audio interface, and has a built-in expression pedal. Zoom has stiff competition in the multi-fx “battle of the brands,” and we were surprised to see their G3X come out on top against solid offerings from Boss, Digitech, Line 6, TC Electronic, and more. When you watch some videos or demo this unit yourself, it’s hard to not get excited about it.
Ooooohhhhh.... I used the Firebird 12 for two weeks on sessions in 1973.... I STILL solo the tracks I used that on... it's the BEST BEST BEST BEST OF ALL TIME !!!!!!!! FOR ANYTHING !!!!..... in fact, as I remember, the octave strings were wound different than the way Ric does it (high-low) and that even added to the incredible sound.....wanna sell the Firebird 12?
The functional attribute of this guitar is not the only factor that it gets credit for. The instrument comes with a neck & body binding together with trapezoid inlays that produce the classic looks that you would always love to display on stages. These are features that are truly amazing especially when you are under the stage lights doing a performance both during the day as well as at night. Such nice appearance will obviously give you more courage to keep on soldiering on with your ambitions of becoming a professional guitarist.

Sturdily constructed with a solid basswood body, bolted maple neck and rosewood fretboard, this black electric guitar has an attractive glossy finish. The list of add-ons include a high quality Hollinger BC-08 practice Amplifier (10 Amp), string-winder cable, strap, gig bag and pitch-pipe picks. The intonation as well as playability of the Davison full size electric guitar has been enhanced owing to its single, high quality humbucker pickup, chrome bridge system and diecast tuners. Last but not the least, the practice amp is suitably equipped with a headphones jack for noise-free practice sessions, as well as an overdrive mode for cool distortions!
Hello all. I have a brand name guitar, which was very popular in the 1980s, and still is being manufactured under Gibson today. I didn't see it in your list though. It's a Kramer Stagemaster. It's a beautiful guitar, which I may never part with. Strat-Style with Neck-Thru-Body & Floyd Rose Trem. The headstock states Kramer American. These were passed off as American made models, however I understand that they were actually made in Japan. The style and appointments are strikingly similar to my Ibanez Proline 2550 from the same era, which has 'Crafted in Japan' written on the headstock. I know that Kramer made a lot of American made guitars out of Neptune, New Jersey, however these were all bolt-on neck guitars. Does anyone know where these Neck-Thru Kramers were made, or why they have American printed on the headstock if they are not tues American made guitars?

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It’s probably fair to say that drive pedals of all shapes and sizes outnumber the other types of effects. This is due to the fact that they form the backbone of your overall tone. It’s also probably fair to say that it’s one of the most subjective tonal changes you can implement. One man’s muff is another man’s screamer, so to speak. There are certain classics within the genre which may act as a gateway to stronger forms of grit though. Ibanez’ famous green Tubescreamer pedal is used by countless players on account of its versatility, whereby it can form the basis of a good quality blues tone. Or it can complement a distortion pedal by ‘boosting’ or tightening up the signal. Another favourite is the Electro Harmonix Big Muff, which has been used for decades by players looking to add a distinct fuzziness to their tone.
That really depends on what you are going for. There are good arguments for before everything and right after the tuner, but also for after the distortion and before your modulation pedals. If you put yours right after the tuner in the front of your chain, you can equalize your guitar tone before it hits anything and adjust your pedals accordingly.
Electric guitar necks vary in composition and shape. The primary metric of guitar necks is the scale length, which is the vibrating length of the strings from nut to bridge. A typical Fender guitar uses a 25.5-inch (65 cm) scale length, while Gibson uses a 24.75-inch (62.9 cm) scale length in their Les Paul. While the scale length of the Les Paul is often described as 24.75 inches, it has varied through the years by as much as a half inch.[citation needed]
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