Usually what a lot of people complain about when they say a small amp has a lack of power, they mean that the lower tones feel a little lacking. Well, picking the right amp, and placing it right, should allow the lead guitar to shine with the high tones, while also being powerful with the low tones. Yes a smaller amp will; forever have issues with low tone, but correct construction, presence of vacuum tubes, and even simply the correct placement can all solve these problems during small gigs.
In order to keep your guitar clean, there are some tips that you should be aware of. When taking the strings off to clean the system, do so two or three at a time. If you are not changing strings, wipe them with a dry cloth after every session. Wiping down the fretboard with a damp cloth occasionally is enough to keep it in good shape. The pickups, tuners, bridges, and nuts can be cleaned in much the same way. The pickups on your guitar should be cleaned with a dry cloth. Be sure to only use gentle cleaning products on your guitar.
Pitch correction/vocal effects: Pitch correction effects use signal-processing algorithms to re-tune faulty intonation in a vocalist's performance [96] or create unusual vocoder-type vocal effects. One of the best known examples of this is Autotune, a software program and effect unit which can be used to both correct pitch (it moves a pitch to the nearest semitone), and add vocal effects. Some stompbox-style vocal pedals contain multiple effects, such as reverb and pitch correction.
A great debate has raged hot and heavy throughout the guitar playing world since George Beauchamp and Rickenbacker invented the electric guitar. It's a debate that's ignited feuds, torn apart families and has surely broken some hearts and continues to this day. What debate drawn from the innocent depths of guitardom could illicit such a foul and unexpected response?
TC Electronics implemented their TonePrint technology into this stompbox. TonePring allows you to import your own presets, which you previously design using a piece or proprietary software. Such a configuration of features and controls ensures borderline endless possibilities. None of that matters much if the quality of tone itself isn’t on par. In this case, you definitely don’t have to worry about that.
hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.
The original electric guitars were hollow. Well, scratch that — the original Electric Spanish guitars were hollow (stick with us for the third installment of “Fundamentals of Guitar Anatomy” on pickups. The first pickup was made for a lap steel guitar!) Gibson took the words Electric Spanish and turned them into an acronym — ES. We commonly refer to these as hollow body guitars.
This is because you won’t have to go through all the hassle of doing research on pickups, then finding a way to mount them without damaging your guitar. While magnetic pickups are surely quite easy to install, contact pickups or blended systems with microphones and preamps might require removing the top, drilling, using all sorts of screws and plates, etc.
Jazz guitarists use their knowledge of harmony and jazz theory to create jazz chord "voicings," which emphasize the 3rd and 7th notes of the chord. Some more sophisticated chord voicings also include the 9th, 11th, and 13th notes of the chord. In some modern jazz styles, dominant 7th chords in a tune may contain altered 9ths (either flattened by a semitone, which is called a "flat 9th", or sharpened by a semitone, which is called a "sharp 9th"); 11ths (sharpened by a semitone, which is called a "sharp 11th"); 13ths (typically flattened by a semitone, which is called a "flat 13th").
@Josh – Changing the order of the effects in your signal chain can drastically change the sound you get from each pedal depending on where it was before and where it is now. Can you please send us an email to support@strymon.net with further details including a video recording of what you are experiencing so we have a better idea of what is happening?
Of course, the effect is not as good as using a professional studio but most users report that reproduction is very good for a simple computer application. The interface of Guitar Rig is extremely well laid out and even for those new to amps and guitar effects, it doesn't take long to navigate your way around. If you intend to use Guitar Rig for live performances, a convenient Live View displays the most essential readouts and level monitors to keep your eye on.
One reason that some bass players choose to use a "bass stack" rather than a combo is that the separate component approach enables bassists to use different speaker cabinets for different shows or activities. For example, a bassist playing a stadium may use an 8x10" cab for this show, but then bring a 4x10" cab for a nightclub show the next day, or a 1x12" cab for a studio recording.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Earvana - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst
Contrary to popular belief, magnetic pickups are used on both acoustic guitars and electric guitars. These pickups sit in the sound hole of a guitar, so they don’t require any drilling or permanent modification. They’re also commonly an aftermarket addition (the John Lennon signature guitar is the only exception to this trend that springs to mind).
One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.
Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
   These prices reflect the opinion/perception of the editor of guitarrepairshop.com. while these are prices one could expect from a quality repair shop, repair rates can vary. A full time repairman can have as much training time and investment in tools as any mechanic. Shop overhead costs are on par with those of any other profession, so if you take your instrument to a professional shop, expect to pay professional rates. And expect professional work. While this list reflects prices one would expect to pay at a professional shop, rates will vary. Expect to pay by the hour for some extensive restoration jobs. Rates based on an hourly charge of $60.00 p/hour. Shop minimum labor charge - $60.00 Prices updated January 2014
When it comes to acoustics, you can’t beat Taylor’s eco-sourced Tone Woods. The 114e features a solid Sitka Spruce top and layered Sapele back and sides, giving the Taylor a rich and full-bodied sound that is hard to tell apart from solid wood bodies more than twice the price. The electrics and built-in preamp are top notch and you can’t beat that Taylor neck for finger-friendliness if you’re just starting out with chords.​

I am 60 years old. I want a guitar (acoustic). I have decided on to retrain myself towards finger pickin style. I am researching knowledge and the tonal properties of the wood / tonal qualitites. I have very small (5.1). My hands are small. Neck demensions are very important towards please let me be trained so i can determine neck width and shape for my guitar


The S670 QM is a speedster's guitar, with locking tuners and a razor thin "Wizard III" Maple neck, developed by Ibanez to be specifically fast and easy to play. Players with smaller hands or those who like to use their thumb to grab notes on the sixth string will find the neck particularly accommodating. So this model (and many of the Ibanez designs) score high marks for playability.
So the actual vibrating length of the string should be the same in all cases, and if that's all that affects the magnetic field then none of the other things mentioned above should affect that signal. Do a simple test protocol such as plucking each string with the identical pick, record the waveform, overlay them and look for differences in the waveform.
A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:
At this time (and for a while now) the best guitars are made in Japan and Korea. However Japanese guitars carry a premium which you don’t find to the same degree on Korean guitars. So Korean guitars will offer the best value and quality for price. There is a Cort factory in Korea, however 1) The Korean Cort factory also makes entry level guitars and 2) Cort also have other factories in other countries which have much lower standards. There are some good/excellent Cort guitars but there are also many bad ones with shoddy workmanship. So Cort as a brand name isn’t enough to guarantee a well made instrument - you also need to check it’s made in Korea, and also that it’s one of the better models (price will probably be a guide). All the brands made at the largest factory, the World Instrument Co. one (which makes PRS SE and Chapman guitars among others) are built to a very high standard.

The Kay Gold Line professional series became synonymous with that rich gutsy Blues/Jazz sound that eventually became rock. This unique blues sound was not available from any other guitar of that time. For the past decade vintage Kay instruments have been fetching high prices and have had increasing interest from collectors and players because of the cool, campy look and that unique Blues/Jazz sound.
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The extra-versatile twin-channel layout with independent controls delivers a wide variety of tones from clean to overdrive. The Sonzera 20—which we recently reviewed—packs a hell of a punch for players who need a versatile workhorse amp that pairs well with pedals and sounds incredible on its own for any style of music. While the Sonzera 50 Combo is well suited to the stage, the 20 is easy to haul to gigs, has a lower output that’s better suited for the studio—and its “American style” voicing thanks to its 6L6 power tubes (the Sonzera 50 features EL34 tubes).
So half of it is finding a happy place in terms of neck size. The other half is the setup. String height is usually adjustable, with electric guitars, which is a good thing in your case. Lower string height means you don't need to push down on the string as hard to play the notes. When you find a guitar that feels good to you but the strings are kinda hard to push down, talk to the store about having it setup and intonated with a very low string height... some people use the term "fast" action.
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.
REGOLAZIONE DELL'INTONAZIONE (FAT20) Per garantire l'assenza di movimento, ogni selletta è provvista di una vite di fissaggio. Per regolare l'intonazione, allentare la vite di fissaggio della selletta con una chiave a brugola da 2 mm (D). Per regolare l'intonazione, inserire una chiave a brugola da 2,5 mm nella vite della selletta sul retro del tremolo.

He or she might even graduate to an acoustic guitar with steel strings long before ever obtaining an amplifier for the acoustics in question, let alone an electric guitar to plug into it. And who are the heroes of the guitar? For the last 50 years it's been Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, and Tom Morello, to name just a few innovative names. All of these players made their reputations on electric guitars pumping through amplifiers, and at least one of them–or one like them–is likely the reason you picked up a guitar in the first place.
Combining Reverbs: You don't have to generate all of the reverb sound from a single plug-in, and using two different reverbs can also help you to save CPU power. For example, though a nice convolution reverb gives a good, believable sound, long impulse responses tend to eat up CPU. By using the convolution reverb for the early reflections, and then using something like Logic 's Platinumverb or Waves Trueverb to add the reverb tail — which is less critical to our perception of the sound — you should get a convincing but less processor-intensive result. Matt Houghton
Chicago’s vintage guitar shop is located in Ravenswood just west of Lincoln Square. Rock N Roll Vintage is your one stop shop in Chicago for new guitars, vintage guitars, Chicago guitar lessons, guitar pedals, and we are currently the largest synth dealer in the Midwest. Looking for a specific guitar? Rock N Roll Vintage Guitar Shop carries Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Rickenbacker and other popular guitars and basses including boutique amps. We have one of the largest selections of effects pedals in Chicago with many hard to find boutique pedal brands.

The truth is that I've never known what it's like to not want to play music of my own because I come from an Irish family that all played instruments. Luckily for me, my parents were very young when I was born -- they were like sixteen, seventeen -- and they were from a tradition of people playing instruments, accordions, pennywhistles, guitars, harmonicas and things like that -- cheap little instruments. But because they were young and moved over to Manchester, they liked rock and roll and pop music of the day.
This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers had no tone controls. The first tone controls were simple, mainly providing treble adjustment. The limited controls, the early loudspeakers, and the low amplifier power (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. Some models also provided effects such as an electronic tremolo unit. In confusion over nomenclature, Fender labeled early amplifier tremolo as "vibrato" and called the vibrato arm of the Stratocaster guitar a "tremolo bar" (see vibrato unit, electric guitar, and tremolo).
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
PRS scale length falls between Fender and Gibson at 25 inches. These are typically set-neck guitars, often with carved tops. This style is a nice alternative for players who are looking for a middle ground between the warmth and resonance of a Les Paul and the tighter feel of a Strat. You’ll also see a lot of guitars that have that PRS look but are built to a different scale length.
Planning for this review started right after the January 2018 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Anaheim, California. We didn’t notice any significant introductions in the under-$200 electric guitar category during our time there, but new guitars can appear at any time. We’ll be watching out for them, and we’ll get our hands on them as soon as we can.
After we decided on our parameters, I selected the models by scanning Amazon and the websites of music stores such as Guitar Center and Sam Ash. We didn’t test battery-powered models because they tend to put out less volume and usually deliver lower sound quality. (Plus, most beginners probably won’t be busking on the streets.) We also didn’t test some of the super-cheap, no-name amps available on Amazon, figuring that these were unlikely to produce a really good sound that would keep a beginning guitarist interested in playing. I found 24 models that fit our criteria. I then rejected any amp that had a lot of quality-control complaints in user reviews, that wasn’t available through at least a couple of online or brick-and-mortar outlets, or that the manufacturers were unable or unwilling to provide.

The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
Want to visit our guitar shop? We electric and acoustic guitars in a comfortable laid back environment steps away from the Damen Brown Line, 81 and 50 CTA bus. The guitars we carry are more than just used guitars. Each guitar has a story - whether it’s where it was played, when it was built or how it was treated. Our guitar shop specializes in guitars for players and collectors. Vintage guitars and used guitars are inspected and set up by our Luthier before leaving our shop. Stop by our showroom often as our inventory changes frequently.
Harmonizers – Commonly used for vocal harmonies, these pedals can do a lot to beef up your sound. You can also use them in creative ways, like Steve Vai and Robert Fripp, who have been known to disable the main signal altogether so that their music is coming only from the pitch-shifted output. Using a modern harmonizer can be as easy as setting it to the key you’re playing in, and many even support more than one harmony at once.
Gibson Les Paul and Fender electric guitars can retail for several thousands of pounds, but electric guitars for beginners are available for less than £100. One example of a cheap electric guitar is the LA Electric Guitar + Amp Pack, which features everything a beginner needs to start playing the guitar right away for under £90.00. It includes a 15 watt guitar amp with 6.5" speaker for practising, a guitar lead, a strap, a padded gig bag, a set of spare strings, a pick and a 2-year warranty. The electric guitar itself has a neck made from maple - the most common type of wood used in necks - which helps to expand on the treble sounds of a guitar due to its hardness. The guitar is capable of producing a wide variety sounds, thanks in part to its 3x single coil pickups with a reverse wound middle pickup, which enables users to experiment with playing different styles of music.
Sometimes a guitar cab gets mic'd up differently night to night, plus every voice is unique, and every snare drum "speaks" differently (just ask a drummer). All of these minute changes and differences can and will affect the EQ decisions you'll have to make. This is why I'm such a strong believer in ear training and learning how certain parts of the frequency spectrum present themselves outside of their source-specific applications. That being said, these tips can be helpful as a place to start your search, but are not gospel by any means. So without further adieu, let's begin.
Tonhöhe ebenfalls gehoben und kann auf die gewünschte Tonlage eingestellt werden. Der Ibanez DOWNSHIFTER erlaubt es, die Tonlage einer Saite durch einfache Hebelbetätigung auf eine vorgegebene gewünschte Position zu senken. Um präzises Tuning für sowohl Auf- und Ab-Positionen zu erzielen, müssen Sie beide Hebeleinstellungen vor Betätigung des Downshifters voreinstellen.
Want to get a good impression of how the SJ 200 sounds? Well Dylan can show you how it strums, Emmylou how it picks, or listen to Pete Townshend thrashing nine bells out of his one on Pinball Wizard. You might also want to take in George Harrison’s Here Comes the Sun or anything by the Everly Brothers. As you'd expect, given the "reassuringly expensive" (i.e. enormous) price tag, the build quality throughout is faultless, superb. The first thing you notice when you sit down to play it is just how sweetly the neck sits in your hand and how easy it is to play. It’s a big lump of money, but when you buy the SJ 200 we guess you’re not just buying the guitar, you’re buying a piece of history.
In addition to the Les Paul, Gibson is a brand well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes and constantly innovating, introducing concepts such as the humbucker, the digital guitar, and – most recently – the Min-ETune automatic tuning unit. Since the fifties, Gibson electric guitars have been used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King.
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.
Yet another awesome 6 strings right handed electric guitar. The body is finished in solid basswood while the neck has a bolt on . The fingerboard is made of rosewood with 22 frets . It mostly comes in  black colour. It is quite affordable, with prices ranging from INR 9,071 depending on various market factors. you can click below to get more product details such as offers available:
A real household name, Yamaha make everything from motorcycles to grand pianos! But the Japanese company also produce a great range of affordable electric guitars, which they have done since the early sixties. Their very successful Pacifica range was launched in 1990, and includes their entry-level PAC012 to their premium PAC611, and everything in between.
The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:
At £499, the MBC-1 is designed to hit a completely different price point to the Muse genius's full-fat Manson models, and although still designed by both Matt and Hugh, it's made in Indonesia by guitar-making giant Cort. Price aside, a quick strum lets you know this is a Manson through and through: it rings like a bell, the sort of acoustic response you'd expect from a quality guitar, but not always at this price. In style, the MBC-1 is a pretty accurate repro of the instruments used by Matt. That big upper shoulder won't be to everyone's taste, but in playing position, it's not only lightweight (3.52kg) but with forearm and ribcage contours, it fits like a glove. And the bolt-on maple neck feels superb, too, with a deep C profile and sloping shoulders that tell your hand it's thinner in depth than it actually is. Unusual at this price, too, is the compound radius fingerboard, which flattens out as you move up the neck; with tidy jumbo - but not over-tall - frets, it's a fast, fluid player, as well, which makes it one of the best electric guitars for hard-rock players. Pickup-wise, we have a fairly hot Alnico-powered humbucker at the bridge and a single coil at the neck. Along with a master volume, tone and three-way pickup selector, the upper shoulder also holds a kill button for stutter effects.
One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.
George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds brought the electric twelve-string to notability in rock and roll. During the Beatles' first trip to the United States, in February 1964, Harrison received a new 360/12 model guitar from the Rickenbacker company, a twelve-string electric made to look onstage like a six-string. He began using the 360 in the studio on Lennon's "You Can't Do That" and other songs. McGuinn began using electric twelve-string guitars to create the jangly, ringing sound of the Byrds. Both Jimmy Page, the guitarist with Led Zeppelin, and Leo Kottke, a solo artist, are well known as twelve-string guitar players.
Unfortunately, not many reference materials are available to document in complete detail, but we can hit some of the highlights, and illuminate a number of relationships along the way. If you have catalogs, ads or pictures of guitars that can help fill in some of the blanks, please let me know (Michael Wright, PO Box 60207, Philadelphia, PA 19102).
MOD® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All effects pedals operate on a 9V battery.
B.C. Rich manufactured a ten-string six-course electric guitar, the Bich, whose radical shape positioned the machine heads for the four secondary strings onto the body, avoiding the head-heaviness of many electric twelve-string guitars. However, many players bought it for the body shape or electrics and simply removed the extra strings. The company recognized this and released six-string models of the Bich, a shape now generally incorporated into their standard Warlock.

Sure, the Teach Yourself to Play Guitar: A Quick and Easy Introduction for Beginners book is for those brand new to the hobby. But experienced players will love the chord chart that comes with it. It includes the basic major and minor ones along with the more uncommon ones for a great reference. Some of the riffs are a bit obscure, but it doesn’t detract much from its value.
Echo – There is some crossover between delay pedals and echo pedals, but as a general rule, you can think of echo effects as extended delay effects. It’s a brother of reverb pedals, producing the canyon-like echoing you would naturally hear in a wide-open space. With long enough settings, an echo pedal can even let you harmonize against your own notes as they repeat.
Time controls the length of time between any two repetitions of your signal. It is most often measured in milliseconds (ms). Most delay pedals don’t have a delay-time readout that would enable you to determine exact delay times in milliseconds, so you typically just adjust the Time knob to get an approximate time based on the unit’s available range. For instance, the Boss DD-7 (street $179) has a Mode knob that selects between four time ranges—up to 50 ms, 51–200 ms, 201–800 ms, and 801–3200 ms—and the Time knob then adjusts the setting within the selected range.
In the Guitar Setup & Maintenance course, Greg Voros devotes an entire DVD to electric guitars. Rather than talk in the abstract about setting up all electric guitars, he’s picked two very popular ones to use for demonstration purposes. He’ll teach you how to adjust the action, the bridge, and the pickup heights, as well as how to adjust the neck for precise relief, in order to get the best action possible on your electric guitar.
A compressor acts as an automatic volume control, progressively decreasing the output level as the incoming signal gets louder, and vice versa. It preserves the note's attack rather than silencing it as with an Envelope Volume pedal. This adjustment of the volume for the attack and tail of a note evens out the overall volume of an instrument. Compressors can also change the behaviour of other effects, especially distortion. when applied toward the guitar, it can provide a uniformed sustained note; when applied to instruments with a normally short attack, such as drums or harpsichord, compression can drastically change the resulting sound. Another kind of compressor is the optical compressor which uses a light source (LED or lamp) to compress the signal.
The Hi-Flier guitar, which was possibly built in the Matsumoku factory, underwent multiple phases during the course of its production. Each of the Hi-Flier’s four manufacturing phases came with a variety of feature changes, ranging from simply switching the color of the pickguard to actually fitting the guitar for humbuckers rather than the P90-style pickups it originally came with.

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