From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  
Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.
A question which causes much thought and divide! Catch 22 to a degree: you can't play songs till you've learnt some chords, but just knowing some chords will mean you actually can (though you are not aware of it) play loads of songs. There is a plethora of songs out there with only three chords (some with only two!). Their differences are that the order of chords is slightly different for each - with the exception of the thousands of 12-bar tunes!
You've come to the right place.  We offer a wide range of vintage and used guitars and basses including a great selection of Fender instruments.   We're guitar players who recognize and appreciate how important Fender has been to the evolution of Rock and Roll.  Please browse our web site, give us a call or visit our Chicago show room.  We're constantly searching for Fender guitars, new gear is arriving daily and they often sells before we have a chance to list them on our web site.  
Compared to the guitar amp rankings, the bass amp list is largely dominated by heads rather than combos. Notably, many of the entries on this year's rankings come from the recent wave of ultra-portable, Class D bass amp—a topic we've covered before. Clearly, this subcategory of bass amp is dominating the market, and it's likely that there will be at least a few new entries under that heading at NAMM next month.

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The “Studio” model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The intended market for this guitar was the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” were centered on optimal sound output. This model retained only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contributed to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omitted several stock Gibson ornamentations that did not affect sound quality, including the binding on the body and neck. The two notable exceptions to this are the Studio Standard and the Studio Custom. Both models were produced in the mid-1980s, and included body and neck binding, though with dot fingerboard inlays instead of more ornate trapezoids. The first Studios from 83 to 86, except for Studio Standard and Studio Custom, were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a chambered mahogany body and top and a satin finish and is the lowest priced Gibson USA Les Paul.
80/20 Bronze strings are a mixture of Bronze and Zinc.  They are also referred to as Bronze/Brass strings and are extremely common, much like Phosphor Bronze.  One of the main differences is this variety produces a very bright tone that enhances articulation and pick attack.   This effect can be lost very quickly depending on how much the player sweats and how often they clean their strings.  This choice can be a little more demanding on the wallet, due to having to change them more often.
Kaman and his technicians began by building traditional square-backed guitars, but by the sixth prototype were using oscilloscopes to develop the now familiar bowl-backed shape, its spherical shape being self-reinforcing, thus eliminating the need for bracing. After some experimentation, the carved, round-crowned Ovation three-and-three headstock was developed. The modern Ovation guitar with a Lyracord back was born.
Like most things involved with creative pursuits like making music, there isn’t a steadfast right or wrong way to do things, but if you encountered any of the problems above you’re definitely doing things wrong (unless you play in a German nihilist industrial noise band, in which case, go nuts). This article will help you avoid those scenarios by describing some of the basic rules and suggestions for placing different effects in the ideal order in your rig’s signal chain and how to achieve the best possible tones when using several stomp boxes together. If you’ve ever wondered how to put together your own pedal board, this info will give you a good start toward obtaining the best sound and most versatility out of your rig.
The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.
While larger frets do seem to result in a rounder tone, perhaps with increased sustain too, they also yield a somewhat less precise note than narrower frets—at least, as examined “under the microscope.” Unless it is very precisely shaped, and frequently dressed, the broad crown of that jumbo fret can “blur” your note ever so slightly, which might even be part of the sonic appeal for some players—the way, for example, a tweed Deluxe is a little blurrier or hairier at most volume settings than a blackface Deluxe. Be aware, however, that the phenomenon can work against some sonic goals too.
Last but not least, we feel like it is important that we talk about a unit’s tonewood. As expected, it has been proven that the kind of wood that is used in the construction of one model can actively influence how that particular unit sounds. To put it shortly, the wood is the material that can help you define just how the model that you like sounds before testing it.
To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy Electric Guitars at the lowest prices in India.
Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
I received a Dorado 12 string as a birthday present in the late 1990s, installed a passive pickup, and played it around the house and at small venues for fifteen years or more. For an all-laminate, smaller body 12 string with a trapeze bridge, it sounded great. The neck was comfortable, too. I had a 1965 Gibson B-25 12 for a few of those years, but the neck was way fatter than the Dorado, which I passed along to a friend in need. I can't say the Dorado sounded better than the Gibson, but it sure out-jangled it. Wish I still had it!
Yes and he lost the finger tips on his left hand and attached makeshift fingers out of thimbles but managed to play some of the greatest evil licks ever. I love Eddie but he screwed up Van Halen terribly by getting rid of Dave and turning it into a girl band. Duane was awesome and highly skilled and a sought after studio musician. Clapton is the master.
Artwork: Improved Fender pickups from 1944. 1) A general view of a guitar with the pickup shown in blue and the strings colored orange. 2) An end-on view (looking down from the head toward the bridge) shows one version with a single pickup coil (green) spanning all six strings. 3) Looking from the side, you can see how the strings thread through the pickup coil. 4) In an alternative design, there are six separate pickup coils, one for each string. From US Patent 2,455,575: Pickup Design for Instruments by Clarence Leo Fender and Clayton Orr Kauffman (filed September 26, 1944, issued December 7, 1948). Artwork courtesy of US Patent and Trademark Office.
A companion to the Spectrum 5 guitar was a solidbody bass version with the Spectrum 5 body shape. This was the Teisco EBX-200/Teisco Del Rey EBX-200 Super Deluxe Bass. It had two small pickups with two center half-slots and two sliding on/off switches, with volume and tone and was described in the U.S. catalog as having the 5-ply ebony neck. The neck had the three-and-one hooked head and an ebony board with dots, not the picks.

Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece
bought at a tiny store in holland, back then they said to me the guiter was already 20 years old. he was looking a new, and bought it for 1000,- dutch guildens. thats maybe...445,- euro now. thats nothing compared to the prices they ask for a vox guitar they make TODAY! thay are building guitars again and ask pricies beginning by: 2000,- euro's. I wanna know when my guitar was bild, he has a chrome plate at the back with made by japan on it too.

Distortion became more popular from the mid-1960s, when The Kinks guitarist Dave Davies produced distortion effects by connecting the already distorted output of one amplifier into the input of another. Later, most guitar amps were provided with preamplifier distortion controls, and "fuzz boxes" and other effects units were engineered to safely and reliably produce these sounds. In the 2000s, overdrive and distortion has become an integral part of many styles of electric guitar playing, ranging from blues rock to heavy metal and hardcore punk.


The Tele is often called a workingman’s instrument for its simplicity.  It also happens to offer tons of tone variants, just like the Strat.  The neck pickup, with its distinctive “lipstick” look, can go from perfect blues tones to jazz, just by rolling back the tone knob.  Danny Gatton was known to take full advantage of the many sounds the Tele could produce, even in one song, by rolling the tone knob to produce the “wah wah” effect that most players achieve through a foot pedal.
One full step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as Volbeat, Mötley Crüe, Nightwish, Pantera, P.O.D., Sepultura, Dimmu Borgir, Cradle of Filth, Watain, In Solitude, Agalloch, Inquisition, Drive-By Truckers, Soulfly, Children of Bodom, Symphony X, Oceansize, Death, Decrepit Birth, Dream Theater, All That Remains, Exodus, Gojira, Shadows Fall, Mastodon, Asking Alexandria on their Stand Up and Scream, Ghost, Lordi, and Kreator. Used in a vast majority of songs by musician Elliott Smith. Also used in Nirvana's songs "Come As You Are", "Lithium" and "Drain You", by Metallica in their songs "Sad but True", "Devil's Dance", their cover of "Whiskey in the Jar", some of their covers on The $5.98 E.P.: Garage Days Re-Revisited ("The Small Hours" and "Crash Course in Brain Surgery"),"Dream No More", "The Thing That Should Not Be" and in live performances of "The God That Failed" and "Seek and Destroy"; by Bullet for My Valentine in several songs on Scream Aim Fire, by blink-182 in "Adam's Song", in Doug Anthony All Stars live performances and by John Fogerty.
While the other digital amplifiers we tried (the Blackstone ID:Core Stereo 10 V2 and the Line 6 Spider Classic 15) offered a similarly wide range of good sounds, most of our panelists preferred the Champion 20 simply because it was easier to use. Lynn Shipley Sokolow preferred the simplicity of non-digital amps such as the Vox Pathfinder 10, but she said, “The Fender is the best of the digitals because it’s easy to understand the controls.”

Hi Paul, sorry you’re having trouble. If you’ve got one of the ‘import’ type switches described above you have 8 contacts (lugs). The “5 positions” are the 5 resting positions the switch lever can be set to (which correspond to your 5 possible pickup selections). You need to get the hang of switches before you attempt to rewire one of these so if the idea of a 2-pole 3-way switch doesn’t make sense then you should probably put the soldering iron down and look for a local guitar tech who can help you, your local guitar shop is a good place to ask.


The Indiana Thin Body Acoustics give you all the sonic punch you need but in a more compact body size. Starting with a spruce top that's matched to mahogany back and sides, the I-TB2 Series were created for acoustic players that find that a traditional dreadnought body size is a bit too bulky. Having a tighter profile gives these guitars and almost electric guitar feel and they're perfect for the stage or studio. Great action and playability right out of the box! An on-board 3 band EQ gives you total control at the touch of a button and all players love the extended cutaway for upper fret access. Sealed diecast tuners, nickel silver frets, gold hardware, high gloss finish and 10 Year Warranty make the Indiana Thin Body Acoustic series a great alternative for any player.
Type – the dielectric used in the capacitor. Polyester and polypropylene are most common, with ceramic capacitors also being popular, especially in lower-end instruments. Reissues of vintage instruments often use reproductions of vintage paper capacitors, which are also popular aftermarket replacements. Finally, audiophile-grade polypropylene film and foil capacitors are sometimes used in custom instruments, although their size can prove problematic as they're designed for use in audio amplifiers and consequently have working voltages in excess of 500 V, far higher than anything encountered inside an electric guitar.[16]
Now, you said that most people you see just crank the tone knob to the maximum and leave it there. That’s fine, and some genres of music actually have no need for a tone control. Heavy metal and hard rock and their derivatives have almost no need for tone control. Guitarists either keep the tone knob wide open and never touch it, or they just buy a guitar that don’t have a tone knob (nor a neck pickup). Guitars made and designed for metal are built this way. I think a lot of country musicians also keep the treble wide open to get that biting shimmery single coil tone.
Brand new in ’64 was Teisco’s first double-cutaway, the Model EP-9, a small-bodied thinline hollowbody archtop. The EP-9 had a pair of pickups, mainly the oval kind with center poles. This had the old center-humped three-and-three head (no open-book dip), and the rectangular edge inlays. Controls were placed on the lower treble bout on a triangular plastic plate, with one volume and one tone, and two on/off rocker switches.
What about Esteban?….lol. There’s no way to make a top ten list, as there are so many extremely talented players. Glenn Campbell is an outstanding guitar player. Lee Roy Parnell is second only to Duane Allman as far as that style of slide playing. Although Willie Nelson doesn’t shred, he is an incredible talent. Duke Robillard, Danny Gatton, Robbie Robertson, Steven Stills, Alvin Lee, Tony Rice, Bryon Sutton, Brian Setzer… there are so many wonderful incredibly talented musicains….thank God! It would suck if everyone played the same. Variety is the key…learn to truly love the art of music. Just like blonds, brunettes and redheads they are all wonderful! If you even try to list the top ten of anything, you are only shortchanging yourself.
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When I was a kid in the 60s, all of the Japanese brands (probably ALL made by Teisco) had a really bad rap and only kids ended up with them. Some were very cheaply made, with weak metal, thin chrome plating, funky finishes and thin pickups. I owned a Rodeo, which was terrible. But then, who knew much about guitars then? Nowdays, anything has character.

Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.

Let's discard the keyboard idea. And the human hand idea. Let's isolate the guitar player from the instrument. The player can manipulate only three parameters - the tone, velocity and duration of sounds to be generated. We have that in MIDI. (Okay, the guitar player can dance and wear a costume, but for our purposes, that's not part of the equation.)

The vibration of the wood isn't in question at all. It does indeed vibrate and if you put a microphone up to the wood of the guitar as it's being played (and if you can manage the feedback) you'll no doubt hear the tonal qualities of the wood. You can knock on it to hear that. It's like knocking on a door. ANY wooden door or any processed wood for that matter.
For example, if the note E (the open sixth string) is played over the A minor chord, then the chord would be [0 0 2 2 1 0]. This has the note E as its lowest tone instead of A. It is often written as Am/E, where the letter following the slash indicates the new bass note. However, in popular music it is usual to play inverted chords on the guitar when they are not part of the harmony, since the bass guitar can play the root pitch.
Hi Timothy, sorry it took a while for me to respond. Yes, from your first statement it sounds like you’ve correctly understood the operation of ‘normal’ guitar pickup selector switches (i.e. standard 3 and 5 position), the wiper contacts overlap as they move across each other. Unfortunately I’ve never seen anything that matches your 4 pick-up idea, if I were you I’d start looking at the 5-position mega switches which have lots of possibilities but can get pretty complicated. Good luck!

Flat tops from 1945 to 1969 are considered good quality and have good sound, although they are not as collectible as the 1920's to 1944 steel string models. This is largely due to the change in bracing and materials Martin started using in 1945. Rosewood models of Brazilian rosewood are most collectible from this era. This is because Brazilian rosewood was basically unavailable since 1970 due to export problems. Because of this, these models are considered more collectible.
Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.
After these is the overdrive/distortion, in this case our ST-2 Power Stack. The CS-3 Compression/Sustainer (and the PW-10 V-Wah) can improve the ST-2’s sustain and tone by increasing the signal to it, so they’re placed before the ST-2. Many players use a compressor just for this reason, and the “fixed wah” sound, which is a wah pedal turned on but not continuously swept, is very common in rock and metal lead tones.

The name has a long and involved history that is interwoven with that of the resonator guitar. Originally coined by the Dopyera brothers when they formed the Dobro Manufacturing Company, in time it came to commonly mean a resonator guitar, or specifically one with a single inverted resonator. This particular design was introduced by the Dopyeras’ new company, in competition to the already patented Tricone and biscuit designs owned and produced by the National String Instrument Corporation.
I wanna weigh in, I’m just an average player but having one of the best luthiers around and talking to them really gives you an idea of what quality your getting from a guitar. I play a martin DC 16gte, my singer plays a Chinese knock off Taylor. No one can tell the difference when he switched to the real genuine 314 CE Taylor (basically made the same way as the Chinese one), and we get no complaints about either guitar. Save your money, (buy quality) or buy the Chinese knock off and find it’s made the same and it will make you the same money playing and feel just as good in your hand as the 1000 dollar plus Taylor. Conclusions for Taylor or martin fans is don’t go name brand cause they (known or unknown) swear by them, is all personal preference, try everything in every price range find what’s right for you. My $750 DC 16gte Martin was right for me. My singer the 914ce Taylor Chinese knock off (327 bucks new) suits him better than his 1200 dollar original Taylor 314ce.
I have to say I'm an Impact Soundworks fan. I haven't listened to the Archtop demos, but another one from them is Django Gypsy Jazz Guitar. The sound is stunning to me, both lead and rhythm. However, it depends on what style you're going for. It's not going to be as versatile as some other acoustic options, but what it does it does very well. I don't have it but it's on my buy list. I own Shreddage II SRP and it's my favorite electric because of the interface and playability.
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
If you like the traditional look of a Fender Stratocaster, but want something a bit more modern with a little more output for heavier blues, rock, and metal tones, the ESP LTD SN-200HT is a fantastic value for the money. You’ll get a great range of tones thanks to the humbucker in the bridge position, and two single coils in the middle and neck positions.

Although I left it up to our panelists to decide what they think is most important in a beginner’s amp, we all agreed on a few parameters. First, the amp should have no glaring technical flaws—it shouldn’t produce excessive amounts of noise or hum, and it shouldn’t exhibit audible signs of distress, such as buzzes or rattles. Second, it should produce enough volume that the guitarist can jam with instruments such as piano, saxophone, and a small drum kit.

By the time After The Rain came out, the blues critics created enough of a backlash that it started affecting sales. Muddy must have realized that the records were upsetting his blues fanbase which had been loyal to him for over twenty years. Perhaps he feared he'd lose them forever if he stayed in this direction and that the young fanbase he had now might not stick with him as long. It wasn't until 1970 and after a more normal electric blues record (Fathers and Sons) that Muddy started talking badly about Electric Mud and then only mildly at first. Muddy released some great records in the rest of his lifetime, but he never experimented much with his music again.
The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
When B.B. King heard T-Bone Walker, he "thought Jesus Himself had returned to Earth playing electric guitar." Walker invented the guitar solo as we know it, building a new style on fluid phrasing, bluesy bends and vibrato. It was the clear tone and melodic invention of his 1942 single "Mean Old World" that blew everyone's mind, and Walker refined his approach through hits like "Call It Stormy Monday." "I came into this world a little too soon," Walker said. "I'd say that I was about 30 years before my time."
Normal people define cool as laid-back, excellent or highly skilled, but most guitarists define cool as Jimmy Page circa 1975 in a black velvet bellbottom suit decorated with embroidered dragons, playing a Les Paul slung down to his knees. As the musical mastermind behind Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest rock bands of all time, Page elevated the guitar riff to an art form, crafting orchestrated overdubbed parts that bludgeoned listeners like the hammer of the gods.
Fender is considered as an American manufacturer of amplifiers and stringed instruments, which was founded by Clarence Leonidas Fender in the year 1946. They provide a wide range of guitar. It has comfortable necks and  smooth fingerboard. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. The guitar will available at Rs. 12,199/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit fender.com.
In the following years both Dobro and National built a wide variety of metal- and wood-bodied single-cone guitars, while National also continued with the Tricone for a time. Both companies sourced many components from National director Adolph Rickenbacher, and John Dopyera remained a major shareholder in National. By 1934, the Dopyera brothers had gained control of both National and Dobro, and they merged the companies to form the National-Dobro Corporation.

The Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar features a rosewood top on a mahogany body. The maple and walnut neck with a slim Wizard neck profile is topped with a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with jumbo frets and Tree of Life vine inlays. This model also has a striking wooden pickguard and matching headstock, as well as wooden control knobs, earning it the nickname “Woody.”
I can give my own story as why I decided to go direct at shows when the band I am in uses our own PA. In a 5 piece band, with dense guitar, a busy keyboardist/organist, a 5 string bass, 3 vocalists and a cymbal-happy drummer, things were getting loud onstage. Our singer would have the monitors close to feedback all night (and it would feedback several times in the night). Live recordings, both in the room, or miked on TV or radio were a mess of frequencies, since setup times were quick, and we hoped for the best. My amp, a Mesa/Boogie with 6v6s & EL84s sounded amazing. But everyone said they couldn’t hear the vocals. When we listened back, we heard what everyone else (didn’t hear). We were a sonic mess. We tried clearing it up with EQs and amp placement. It sounded clearer onstage, but microphone leakage and feedback were still a problem, and the band had internal ‘volume wars’ with each other. Truth is, we didn’t always have a great soundperson. We were carrying a lot of gear. The venues we played and the sizes of the stages and audiences varied wildly. After several poor sounding gigs that left my ears ringing (even with earplugs), I started investigating. The first decision was to go with IEMs. This would eliminate the bulky monitors (with 1 poorly placed handle, mind you) and stop the feedback problems. It would free up stage space. The next problem was realizing that the amps onstage easily could overpower the IEMs that were directed right in our ears. So I came to the conclusion that the only way past this problem was to get rid of all of the amps. 
So many new guitarists, and even not so new guitarists, play with the volume and tone knobs turned all the way up all the time and then shell out lots of money for pedals when they are not satisfied with their tone before taking advantage of what the guitar can do (and it's a lot). Then of course, your amp's tone controls can refine things even more.
Microprocessor technology allows the use of digital onboard effects in guitar amps to create numerous different sounds and tones that simulate the sound of a range of tube amplifiers and different sized speaker cabinets, all using the same amplifier and speaker. These are known as modeling amplifiers, and can be programmed with simulated characteristic tones of different existing amplifier models (and speaker cabinets—even microphone type or placement), or dialed in to the user's taste. Many amps of this type are also programmable by way of USB connection to a home computer or laptop.[15] Line 6 is generally credited with bringing modeling amplification to the market.[18][19] Modeling amplifiers and stompbox pedals, rackmount units, and software that models specific amplifiers, speakers cabinets, and microphones can provide a large number of sounds and tones. Players can get a reasonable facsimile of the sound of tube amplifiers, vintage combo amplifiers, and huge 8x10” speaker stacks without bringing all that heavy equipment to the studio or stage.
I kind of think what I do is like producing with my feet because I do a lot of that in my own shows. Particularly when I'm playing guitar with other bands, I'm always changing reverb [settings] and modulation types and the very sorts of things that [maybe no one else realizes what's going on], but it keeps me interested. I think because I come from a time before that was possible, it's a magical thing for me.
THE NECK POCKET The next step is to rout the neck pocket and body cavities. For the neck pocket I like to use a 1/4" bit and leave the scrap wood edge around the body to give the router the extra support it needs when routing the neck area. To find out how deep you will have to rout the pocket measure the total thickness of the heal of the neck. Then measure the hieght of the bridge from the bottom to the top of the groove the string will sit in on the saddle and add about 1/8" to it. That allows for the string clearence over the frets. The subtract that from the overall thickness that you came up with when you measured the heal of the neck. That will give you a pretty accurate depth that you will need to carve the pocket down to. Be very careful when you rout the neck pocket! You don't want to make it too big otherwise you end up with gaps between the neck and the body and you don't want to go too deep because it can be impossible to fix. Rout a little bit at a time, and set the neck in each time to make sure you get the proper fit. It shouldn't fit to tight and the pocket should be slightly lager than the heal of the neck because you will have paint accumulation in it which will shrink it a little.

The electric guitar ("El Gtr" in engineer shorthand) is one of the easiest instruments to record. Even a modest rig-a good guitar coupled with a decent amplifier-makes the engineer's job a cinch, offering plenty of level, a variety of easily adjustable tones, and-with most modern amps, at least-an assortment of "flavor enhancers" such as tube saturation, overdrive, and compression. In addition, the limited bandwidth of a typical electric-guitar track is ideally suited to the frequency response of affordable dynamic microphones. But that doesn't mean that using the age-old standard of miking guitar amps-a Shure SM57 shoved up against the grille cloth-is the best way to get El Gtr to stand out in a mix.
Some amps have a bright cap on the volume pot. The purpose of this cap is to allow your amp to provide a bright, clear tone at lower settings on the volume pot. The more the pot is increased, the less effect the cap has. When the pot is turned all the way up, it should be completely out of the circuit. Like they do with a bright switch, drive pedals can interact with a bright cap and result in less-than-pleasant drive tones. If your amp has a bright cap and you don’t like the way it responds to some pedals, or you find it excessively edgy at low volumes, consider having a competent amp tech change the bright-cap value or remove it altogether. This can be a worthwhile and easily reversible mod.
1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.
It was also common for people to have a winter saddle and a summer saddle, as they were called, to make up for the flux in humidity and its effect on the wood across the seasons, if they were sensitive to string height. Authentics have a glued in saddle, as did all Martins once upon a time. That usually means the saddle is destroyed in the process of removing it, so a new saddle, or two new saddles in the case of a winter/summer set of saddles would be required. But I have heard of people who were able to save the saddle when it was removed.
Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.
First up we have the most widely used and most useful pedal ever created – the Distortion pedal! If you’re wondering “What is a distortion pedal” the clue is in the name with how this pedal sounds. It basically takes your signal (the guitar) and distorts it, adding volume, crunch and sustain to your sound and is basically used as a contrast to the natural sound of your guitar. Often used in the chorus of some of your favourite songs.

We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Some single cabinets use mixed speaker sizes, although this is less common. Examples include MESA Engineering's 1x15"/4x10" cabinet,[8] Peavey's PVH 1516, which has 1x15" and 2x8" speakers.[9] and Traynor's TC1510 combo, which has 1x15" and 2x10". Other large single cabinets with speaker sizes other than 10", 12" or 15" are less commonly used, but they do exist. Examples include the 6x8" and 8x8" cab configurations. Users of two cabinets may use two 4x10" cabinets (more easy to transport than a single 8x10" cab), a 15" cab and a 2x10" cab, or other variations (e.g., a 2x15" cab and a 4x10" cab).
Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.
Very cheap acoustics are usually not such a great idea. Often their sound quality is poor and they are hard to play. I often see students selling them after a six-month struggle (if they managed to stick with it that long!). So if your budget is very tight, I would not get an acoustic. You may think you save a little money because you don't need to buy an amplifier as well, but as I said before you don't have to use an amplifier to practice anyway.

Get ready to rock with the First Act Electric Guitar with Amp. It's scaled down for smaller players, yet it's designed with the same materials, electronics and appointments as First Act's full-size guitars for full rock sound. One high-output humbucking pickup delivers big rock distortion and classic clean tones. The maple neck and rosewood fingerboard offer a solid feel and warm tone. Classic hard tail bridge pumps up the sustain. Independent volume control means the ultimate in sound tweaks.
The Pro Series DK2 is a rugged, performance-grade workhorse that’ll do just as well on the stage as in the studio. It has a lightweight okoume body—a tonewood that shares many qualities with mahogany—as well as Jackson’s fast maple ‘speed neck,’ a compound radius ebony fretboard and 24 jumbo frets. A recessed Floyd Rose 1000 double-locking trem system completes the shred-friendly features on the guitar.
Bass effects that condition the sound, rather than changing its character are called "sound conditioners." Gain booster effects pedals and bass preamplifier pedals increase the gain (or volume) of the bass guitar signal. Bass preamplifiers for double basses are designed to match the impedance of piezoelectric pickups with the input impedance of bass amplifiers. Some double bass preamplifiers may also provide phantom power for powering condenser microphones and anti-feedback features such as a notch filter (see "Filter-based effects" section below).
As these same makers ramped up for digital production, digital choruses naturally joined the team. The effect as produced digitally might sound broadly similar, but it is done differently than in the analog circuits. Digital chorus pedals double a signal and add delay and pitch modulation to one path, the latter wobbling below and above the pitch of the unadulterated signal, which produces an audible out-of-tuneness when the paths are blended back together. It’s hard to fault the power and range of control that digital technology affords, and this version of the effect has been hugely successful, but many guitarists still prefer the subtle, watery shimmer of the analog version. Conversely, the same ears often find the digital variety makes them a little queasy.

Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).


Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
The tremolo effect is a fluctuation in the guitar signal’s volume. By lowering and then raising the volume of the guitar you get a very cool effect. As you adjust the rate of the volume change you get faster fluctuations in volume. Tremolo is one of the early effects found on some  guitar amplifiers, though it was often mislabelled "vibrato." Vibrato is a variation in pitch, not volume. 

There’s a bolt-on thin U-shaped maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and 24 extra-jumbo frets, which makes fast playing and string bending a breeze. As we highlight in our full review, the EC-10 is voiced by two ESP-designed passive LH-100 humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions, which are loud enough to cope with rock and metal lead playing, although articulate and warm when playing without distortion.


If you have been looking for an electric guitar that effectively blend tradition with modernity; the Gibson Les Paul Faded 2017 is the excellent choice that fit such description. This guitar stands as the perfect union between the old and the new—featuring a 490R modern and 490T humbuckers, closely followed with 22 frets designed for amazing bends and great feel.


Les Paul created an early solid-body electric guitar in his spare time after work at the Epiphone factory in the early 1940's famously known as "The Log". It is believed that this was the first solidbody 'Spanish guitar' every built. He went on to develop the idea further until he took it to managers at Gibson sometime in 1945 or 1946 who immediately...
AmpliTube's effects are as noteworthy as its amp modeling capabilities. The current version comes with up to 51 effects - modeled after rare vintage gear like Ibanez Tube Screamer, Arbiter FuzzFace, MXR Phase100, MXR Dynacomp, Electro Harmonix Memory Man and many more. What sets AmpliTube apart from the competition though is its very intuitive interface. No parameter is more than two clicks away, and its realistic looking graphics are extremely easy to operate - even allowing for drag and drop operations. If you want a quick setup software, AmpliTube is your best bet. Price: usually about $200 - Check out Amazon.com for the latest price and reviews
Reverb creates a sense of space, but it also increases the perception of distance. If you need something to appear at the front of a mix, a short, bright reverb may be more appropriate than a long, warm reverb, which will have the effect of pushing the sound into the background. If you need to make the reverb sound 'bigger', a pre-delay (a gap between the dry and wet signals) of up to 120ms can help to do this without pushing the sound too far back, or obscuring it.
There are times when a single-coil just doesn’t have enough twang. I’ve encountered Strat neck pickups that are just too wooly to provide me with that saucy, SRV/Hendrix-style rhythm juice. Or, sometimes an anemic bridge pickup just needs an extra dose of snap to push it into Tele-like territory. If so, this simple mod could be just what you’re looking for.
The Fender Blues Junior III has quickly become an industry standard amplifier for those chasing that coveted creamy Fender Blues tone. You have 15 watts of pure tube warmth in an easily transportable package and gorgeous sounds emanating from the 3 x 12AX7 preamp tubes and 2 x EL84 Power tubes. A perfect amplifier for small gigs and practice rooms as well as those in need of a quality amp to record with.
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The Gibson Firebird immediately comes to mind. This is a smaller, more rounded Explorer-style guitar first produced back in 1963, and it has undergone a wide range of incarnations since. The modern Gibson Firebird HP has a neck-through design with mahogany body wings, a mahogany/walnut neck with a rosewood fingerboard, 495R/T mini humbuckers, and a reverse headstock.

Decide between an active and passive DI. The most obvious difference between the two is that an active DI requires a power supply for you to operate, while passive DIs do not. Beyond that, due to differences in design, each of these has strong suits that should be taken into consideration. For example, the transformers used in passive DIs are more resistant to the hum created by ground loops, making these ideal for on-stage performing.[8][9] Additionally:
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, 5-ply top binding with pearloid outer layer, elevated tortoise pickguard with b/w binding, backstripe of two horizontal lines surrounded by two rows of diag lines (like a Style 45), bound ebony fingferboard, style 45 fingerboard snowflake inlays, trapeze tail piece, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, bound peghead, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
This has always been one of the most revered brands of guitars amongst professional musicians. They sell one of the most affordable and durable electric guitars. The acoustic and classic guitars sold by this brand are ideal for students and beginners. The dreadnought sized body with cutaway has a Sitka spruce top with nato back & sides. The neck has 20 frets & dot inlays on the fretboard and made of nato. The bridge and fingerboard are made of rosewood. Yamaha’s own System55T. The starting price of a Yamaha acoustic 6-string guitar is 6990 INR.approximately.
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.

Can you scientifically prove the role of these influencers? Lab geeks and gadget gurus can measure signal strength, decibels, frequency distribution, gamma radiation, and other ranges. They can graph this data, create new data by creating logarithms, create even more data by creating even more logarithims, but they can’t decide what’s good or bad. Like it or not, you simply can not use a computer to prove that a ’63 Strat sounds “better” than a cheap 1988 import.
Another tone control we almost all come in contact with is the amplifier tone stack, as sketched out in Figure 3. A sequence of evolution at Fender led up to the 1957 Bassman becoming the prototype for most amplifiers’ Treble/Bass/Mids control knobs. Marshall and Vox used a similar system. The amplifier “tone stack” is just that – a stack of two or three potentiometers which provide treble, bass, and sometimes midrange controls.
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Our site has a wealth of information about what goes into making a Taylor guitar and how to make this very important decision. We have guides for how to find the right fit for you. Learn about the subtle differences in shapes and styles. Delve into different types of woods and construction, which are vital to the flavor and tone of an acoustic. Explore the Taylor line by series to find the look and style you want for your instrument.
Pitch shift effects, which includes harmony and octave pedals, are a lot of fun, and add depth and flavor to a guitar player’s sound. The effect works by taking the fundamental note being played on the guitar, and adding another note either above or below the original. Simply adding more notes will often produce odd, off-key notes if you’re not careful. Most modern pitch-shifting effects use advanced technology to make sure the added notes work harmoniously with the original.
I remember the first time I saw Eddie Van Halen on MTV, the way he played two hands on the fingerboard during his short “Jump” guitar solo. I loved his cool “Frankenstein” guitar, so named because he cobbled together a variety of guitar parts and decorated his creation with colored tape and paint. Even as a 13-year-old who grew up primarily listening to, and playing, classical music, I felt compelled to run out and buy his band’s “1984” LP at my local Tower Records store.

But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar.
The pickup coils are wired to the amplifier through an electrical circuit. The circuit usually also contains volume and tone controls, which allow the basic sound to be adjusted by turning knobs on the guitar body. A guitar with two pickups will have four knobs on its body: one to adjust the volume and the tone of the sound from each pickup. More complex circuits can be added to change the sound of an electric guitar in all kinds of interesting ways.
On a Strat, you can also replace one of your tone pots with a “blender” pot. This allows you to “blend” in the neck pickup when your selector is in the bridge or bridge/middle positions, and allows you to blend in the bridge pickup when in the neck or neck/middle positions. You can have the neck/bridge on, or all three on at once. There are slight, but noticeable, tonal changes from one end to the other, as the blend pot does have some attenuation. You do have to buy a specific blender pot to do it right; otherwise when turned down it won’t shut the third pickup off all the way. Super cool mod, and doesn’t change the look of your Strat.

Replace or upgrade your guitars pickup selector and other switches with the highest quality switches available from Switchcraft, CRL, Fender, Oak Grigsby Gotoh, Philmore and other top brands. Lever/blade style switches, toggle switches, mini switches, rotary switches, slide switches and other styles. For pickup selector and mini switch technical data, visit our Pickup Selector & Mini Switch Connections page to view drawings with the internal switch connections of each switch position. And if you are upgrading or replacing your pickup selector switch with a different type or style, check out the Pickup Switch Terminal Cross Reference page to view the corresponding terminals of the most common pickup selectors and switches.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.
Legend has it that funkadelic's "Maggot Brain," the 10-minute solo that turned the late Eddie Hazel into an instant guitar icon, was born when George Clinton told him to imagine hearing his mother just died – and then learning that she was, in fact, alive. Hazel, who died of liver failure in 1992 at age 42, brought a thrilling mix of lysergic vision and groove power to all of his work, inspiring followers like J Mascis, Mike McCready and Lenny Kravitz. "That solo – Lord have mercy!" says Kravitz of "Maggot Brain." "He was absolutely stunning."

More often than not, we always find it interesting to see and hear if there is any possible way an entry level electric guitar can outshine or even just come close with an expensive guitar model. These comparisons would mainly starts on looking at how they are built, time spent making them, where it is made and components used on the whole guitar. Having those as criteria in mind and as reality of it. So far it is given that it is going to be all in favor of the expensive models by a margin.
That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.
The No. 140 Supro Capitan was a handsome f-holed archtop, which was Regal-made. It sported an arched spruce top with a maple body. The hardwood neck had an ebonized fingerboard with pearl position dot and jumbo frets. An oval Supro logo plate sat on the faceplate. A single rectangular metal-covered pickup (with holes exposing the poles) sat just to the bridge side of the middle position. This pickup had six separate coils! It had a “crystaline pick guard,” probably tortoise, and adjustable compensated bridge, National-stamped trapeze tailpiece, and one volume and one tone control situated just behind the �guard. It came with a grey Servitex tweed case, and in ’42 cost $71.50.

Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.
Now we switch gears to a company called Unicord, which was owned by Sid Hack. At some point in the early ’60s (probably in around ’64), Unicord purchased the Amplifier Corporation of America (ACA) which was located in Westbury, New York, a northern suburb of New York City. ACA made Haynes guitar amplifiers and an early distortion device powered by batteries.

Jazz rhythm guitar often consists of very textural, odd-meter playing that includes generous use of exotic, difficult-to-fret chords. In 4/4 timing, it is common to play 2.5 beat intervals such as on the 2 and then the half beat or "and" after 4. Jazz guitarists may play chords "ahead" of the beat, by playing the chord a swung eighth note before the actual chord change. Chords are not generally played in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, like a rock rhythm guitarist would play.

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