The most common alloy (mixture of metals) used in pickups is alnico; this is a combination of aluminium, nickel, and cobalt. Alnico magnets were once the strongest known, but they have since been eclipsed by the rise of the rare earth magnets, which can also be used in pickups. Samarium cobalt magnets and neodymium boron iron magnets can also be used, although are perhaps less common. Additionally, ceramic magnets, based on iron oxide with strontium or barium carbonate, can be utilised.

As a new learner, the biggest reason for you wanting to begin with a full-sized guitar as opposed to a slender Stratocaster or a stylish Les Paul, has to do with your love for classic heavy rock tones. In this day and age, when you have scores of guitars with dizzying combinations of single-coil and humbucker pickups, along with complex toggle options, the Davison Full Size Black Electric Guitar keeps it really straight and simple. This is one of the few electric guitars that I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing straight out of the box, with hardly any setting required. And lest I skip the most important purchasing criteria here, you are not just buying a 39” electric guitar but a full-fledged Davison Guitar Beginner Starter Package. So you have a lot more going for that hundred bucks you spend, with a cool gig bag, strap, guitar picks as well as a compact amplifier and cable.


FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer (and practical playability). Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.

As jazz-rock fusion emerged in the early 1970s, many players switched to the more rock-oriented solid body guitars. Other jazz guitarists, like Grant Green and Wes Montgomery, turned to applying their skills to pop-oriented styles that fused jazz with soul and R&B, such as soul jazz-styled organ trios. Younger jazz musicians rode the surge of electric popular genres such as blues, rock, and funk to reach new audiences. Guitarists in the fusion realm fused the post-bop harmonic and melodic language of musicians such as John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Ornette Coleman, and Miles Davis with a hard-edged (and usually very loud) rock tone created by guitarists such as Cream's Eric Clapton who had redefined the sound of the guitar for those unfamiliar with the black blues players of Chicago and, before that, the Delta region of the Mississippi upon whom his style was based. With John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Clapton turned up the volume on a sound already pioneered by Buddy Guy, Freddie King, B.B. King and others that was fluid, with heavy finger vibratos, string bending, and speed through powerful Marshall amplifiers.
It doesn't even seem to matter which kind of Guitar amp you have or when plugged into any PA system. This guitar is a keeper. it comes with Godin Nickel Strings which is why unplugged it may sound too tinny to some ears, but after changing to Elixer Acoustic Strings, it sounds much better unplugged and really shows off plugged in. It now can give my Acoustic six strings a real run for my attention. At gigs and open mics, people come up and ask,,,what the Heck is this Bruce? Looks and sounds amazing. My only wish is that it had the same Pick-up system as on my A6 Ultra, two separate Pick Ups and Controls and two 1/4 in outputs.
The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.

You probably won’t have to do this, but if you do, here’s how to go about it: First, slacken the affected strings and move them to the sides of the saddles. Then take some needle-nose pliers and remove one end of the retaining spring (different styles of bridge will use different types of retaining spring – sometimes there is an individual one for each saddle, in which case you might even need to remove the whole bridge to do this).
DADGAD was developed by Davey Graham in the early 1960s when he was travelling in Morocco, to more easily play along with Oud music Among the first to use this tuning were the folk-blues guitarists of the 60s like Bert Jansch, John Rebourn, Martin Carthy, and John Martyn. It was many years later in the 1970s that it became established for accompanists of traditional music, predominantly Scottish and Irish. Due to this popularity it is sometimes referred to as "Celtic" tuning, although this is misleading given it's origin and it's primary early use in a quite different field of music. Often vocalized as "Dad-Gad", DADGAD it is now common in Celtic music. In rock music, has been used in Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir".[8] Pierre Bensusan is another noted exponent of this tuning. The post-metal group Russian Circles also employ this tuning, and also plays it in the form of all the notes becoming a half-step down: D♭-A♭-d♭-g♭-a♭-d♭'. Three down-tuned variations are used by the band Sevendust: A Drop C variation, or C-G-c-f-g-c'. (used on the song "Unraveling"), a Drop B variation, or B'-F♯-B-e-f♯-b, and a Drop A# variation, or A♯'-F-A♯-d♯-f-a♯. Neighboring tunings D-A-d-e-a-e' and C-G-c-d-g-a have been used by Martin Carthy. Also D-A-d-a-a-d', was used by Dave Wakeling on the English Beat's 1983 "Save It For Later".

As this effect is more pronounced with higher input signals, the harder "attack" of a note will be compressed more heavily than the lower-voltage "decay", making the latter seem louder and thereby improving sustain. Additionally, because the level of compression is affected by input volume, the player can control it via their playing intensity: playing harder results in more compression or "sag". In contrast, modern amplifiers often use high-quality, well-regulated power supplies.
These chords will form the foundation of your guitar playing and are, thankfully, rather easy to learn. With a little practice and patience you will find them coming together quickly. The beginner guitar songs use the chords below and introduce them gently. These songs are a great way to build up your guitar foundations to a level of solid competency. By playing through them in order and being patient with each one you will quickly develop your skills.
In major-thirds (M3) tuning, the chromatic scale is arranged on three consecutive strings in four consecutive frets.[83][84] This four-fret arrangement facilitates the left-hand technique for classical (Spanish) guitar:[84] For each hand position of four frets, the hand is stationary and the fingers move, each finger being responsible for exactly one fret.[85] Consequently, three hand-positions (covering frets 1–4, 5–8, and 9–12) partition the fingerboard of classical guitar,[86] which has exactly 12 frets.[note 1]
Choosing guitar strings is like choosing lenses and frames for your glasses.  There is a right strength of lens for you and when you switch frames it may take some adjusting to get used to.  This analogy is referring to the bridge height, nuts, and truss rod tension.  Do take your time to experiment but once you settle it's best to keep using the same gauges so you can dodge the lengthy set-up process from happening again.

The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
In fact, it’s the same hand-fabricated bobbin, Alnico II bar magnets and plain enamel mag wire that featured on the original. And with a similar construction comes a similar vintage P-90 tone, with plenty of brightness and bite. Available in both bridge and neck models, the Antiquities look the part too, with authentic-looking aged black plastic dog-ear covers.

In this lesson we will study Tennessee Stud as performed by Doc Watson. The tune has a great bluegrass type intro that repeats throughout the song. It applies many of the basic bluegrass principles we have discussed in the Bluegrass Genre section. The chords used are not difficult, however the timing and arrangement are a little tricky. Best to learn a section at a time.
Want to visit our guitar shop? We electric and acoustic guitars in a comfortable laid back environment steps away from the Damen Brown Line, 81 and 50 CTA bus. The guitars we carry are more than just used guitars. Each guitar has a story - whether it’s where it was played, when it was built or how it was treated. Our guitar shop specializes in guitars for players and collectors. Vintage guitars and used guitars are inspected and set up by our Luthier before leaving our shop. Stop by our showroom often as our inventory changes frequently.

The four-string guitar is better known as the tenor guitar. One of its best-known players was Tiny Grimes, who played on 52nd Street with the beboppers and played a major role in the Prestige Blues Swingers. Multi-instrumentalist Warren Ellis (musician) of Dirty Three and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is a contemporary player who includes a tenor guitar in his repertoire.
Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.

If you’re a beginner, you may still be in the process of exploring different playing styles or developing your own. In this case, it’s best to go for a versatile guitar that can accommodate a variety of acoustic playing styles. Fortunately, the guitars on this list are also versatile players. Some, however, may cater to a more specific style. For instance, the Taylor 214ce’s bright sound and the Seagull Maritime’s wider nut make these models great for those who do a lot of fingerstyle playing.
Many Sixties rock acts made political statements, but the MC5 were among the first rockers to make a serious commitment to revolution, aligning themselves closely with the White Panther Party (a Black Panther offshoot organization) and effectively serving as the White Panthers’ agitprop machine. Their blue-collar Detroit roots lent a certain gritty gravitas to their stance. These weren’t effete rock stars dabbling in left wing chic but working-class guerrillas with ammo belts strapped across their bare chests and guitars brandished as rifles.

Sound also factors into this, though I'd argue equipment is less critical than playing technique. But a muffled high-impedance humbucker makes it much harder to bring out the right notes than a twangy Tele singlecoil. And in particular, distortion can quickly make an utter mess out of an only slightly muddy clean signal. So, keep the gain down when playing more chordal stuff, and treble up especially when doing delicate arpeggios etc..
What makes the THR100HD special is its clever digital power amp, which faithfully mimics the operation of real valves. Then there's the fact that you get two of everything: two preamps, both with a built-in booster function that behaves as a stompbox; two effects loops; two power amps; two XLR line outs. What you see is very much what you get, with a five-position amp voice selector, which packs three overdrives - crunch, lead and modern - and two cleans: solid, and er, clean. There's also a channel volume control, because the master volume control works inside Yamaha's Virtual Circuit Modelling environment, adding more drive to the THR's digital power amp simulation, which in turn has five different valve choices, as well as Class A or Class A/B operation. Lurking on the rear panel are two speaker-simulated balanced XLR line-outs, with a ground lift switch that uses the latest Impulse Response cabinet simulation. There are superb Fender-influenced cleans, bluesy touch-sensitive crunches and a choice of classic or modern lead tones, all footswitchable for your convenience. The tones are so convincing it's really hard to believe there are no valves. The interaction of the clever digital power stage with the loudspeaker is just like that of a good valve amp, and the virtual valve choices are uncannily authentic.
Hertz Guitar is a well known brand, which manufactures high quality guitars. The company was originated from Shanghai,China and North Korea. Their musical instruments were introduced on September 2009. They offer world class quality instruments from world class branded production houses. They maintain international standard. It mainly focuses on musical instruments as well as accessories. They manufacture a wide range of guitar. Available at below Rs. 12,040/- (approx).

With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:


Synthesizer: Plug your bass guitar into a synthesizer pedal and you can access four different waveforms (saw-tooth wave, square wave, pulse wave, or your own bass wave form) that give you a wide variety of synth tones, each of which can be tweaked in several different ways. Some synth pedals offer a hold function that continues to play the tone as long as you depress the pedal, allowing you to play other musical phrases over the tone that's being held.               

Because IRs can be recorded in virtually any space, convolution reverbs generally come with a library of IRs ranging from small live rooms to famous venues, top studio rooms, forests, canyons, railway stations and just about anything else you can think of. They sound very convincing, and there's plenty of variety to be had, but once the IR is loaded, there's only a limited amount of editing you can do without spoiling the natural sound. Usually you can apply EQ and also change the envelope of the reverb decay to make it shorter, and adding pre-delay is not a problem, but after that you pretty much have to take what you get. Some companies, such as Waves, have managed to create additional controls but, as a rule, the further you move from the original IR, the less natural the end result.
Speaking of overdrive and distortion, I come from the slightly less-is-more school. I recently heard Eddie Van Halen say he likes to crank things until they’re ready to explode, and then backs them down just a hair. I dig that way of thinking, and it applies whether you get your distortion from a pedal, a cranked NMV (non-master-volume) amp, or an amp with a more modern preamp-gain circuit.
Because any acoustic guitar can be made into an acoustic-electric, from what I’ve seen — and this is simply an observation, not a blanket statement — most of these sacrifice both quality of guitar and quality of pickup to sell affordable instruments in the name of convenience. So for the introductory acoustic player, here is my advice: Skip the acoustic-electric section and find a plain ol’ acoustic guitar that you like. When the time is right, plenty of companies make a variety of pickups designed for acoustic guitars, which will give you more options when selecting a method of amplifying your acoustic.
In fact, guitarists are on a whole different planet when it comes to defining cool. When you play guitar, you can get away with all kinds of acts normal people could never attempt. Face it: An ordinary dude could not walk down the street wearing a leopard-skin jacket, high-heel cowboy boots, flowing silk scarves and dozens of silver bangles without getting beaten up within minutes.
Because most electric guitars offer far more adjustability than acoustic guitars, the setup and adjustment of the guitar is more important than it is with acoustics, which don’t have much to adjust. We decided John and I would test the electrics first right out of the box, with their stock strings and factory setup, then get a professional to set them up with Ernie Ball Regular Slinky strings in gauges from .010 to .046—for decades, this has been one of the most popular string sets for electric guitars. Our setup technician was Avishay Shabat, who heads the Guitar Groomer repair shop in Woodland Hills, California, and who also manufactures his own line under the Shabat Guitars brand.
One reason that some bass players choose to use a "bass stack" rather than a combo is that the separate component approach enables bassists to use different speaker cabinets for different shows or activities. For example, a bassist playing a stadium may use an 8x10" cab for this show, but then bring a 4x10" cab for a nightclub show the next day, or a 1x12" cab for a studio recording.

For the typical two-figure Boss pedal price, the RC-1 gives you the stereo connection, some onboard memory and a little more recording time. However you do lose the true bypass and analog dry-thru circuit that makes the TC Electronic Ditto so attractive to guitar players. Still, for acoustic rigs, I find the Boss RC-1 to be the most ideal looper pedal option and a better value than something like the Ditto. 


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These guys are great! I took my Martin in for a refret, and it might have been the cleanest I have ever seen it done. Played better than it did when I got it. So after that show of quality work I took... my old Guild to them. It had developed a little belly bulge and warped top. Mark got that thing sounding and playing like brand new. They are priced honest and fair, and do work in a very timely manner. I am done looking for my guitar shop. I highly recommend these gentlemen. See More
Here we have a real vintage Rare IBANEZ CONCORD beauty from the Golden Era of the Best Japanese Martin D41 style guitars period... This example is Ibanez Model #679 and is the Top of the Line and is an exact Martin copy and is a great " Law Suit " model from the era where Ibanez set out to make the best guitars worldwide period...Fit and finish even after 30 years it is simply superior it appears to be thin old school Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish, this guitar was constructed using the best woods very ornate intricate triple bindings with lots of beautiful inlaid abalone on the Brazilian Rosewood fretboard and the spruce top body WoW...please do have a very good look ...This example has employed the best exotic woods in its construction, The top looks to be solid no seam edge showing at sound hole some pick wear and looks solid, the sides & back also look the same on the inside and outside grain matches so again it looks to be solid?.... A high grade mahogany neck, Sitka spruce top, Choice Indian Rosewood sides & back, and what seems to be a beautiful Rich Chocolate brown Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard with gorgeous abalone, frets show some wear lower several yet plays excellently all the way up with very good action and fast & plays easily...Neck width is a nice slim-med super comfortable 1-3/4" at the nut with no buzzing all the way up action is good set at 5/32nds @ 12th fret. This guitar has been well played and well taken care of and is a good professional grade instrument ready to record tonight. Cosmetically this is a 8.5 out of 10, A real vintage player that has not been abused at all yet has been lovingly well played its tone has richly mellowed with the years and only improved with its age and now after 30 years it shows this wonderful patina that can not be replicated that only comes with age, vintage is not for everyone some like it new we understand that this vintage Martin Copy Japanese Guitar however is not new or is it in mint condition yet it is very beautiful in vintage terms of mellowing with age and patina Wow this is for the TRUE VINTAGE LOVER... also you Ibanez Collectors of Japanese vintage. Its Sound is second to none it has nicely articulate lows with nicely contrasting bright highs and the mid-range has a good punch and ring when finger picked, full on sweet big tone when strumming open cords. This one is a real pleasure to play and is EZ on the eyes too. These are really great old classic guitars and are getting very difficult to find now in anywhere near this kind of vintage condition...its all original and the original tuners work very well with no need to change them out they are keeping the guitar tuned well...no cracks or repairs non needed , excellent original neck set and angle, intonation is good. This Rare beauty is conservatively JVG condition rated at very good - excellent in a 30 year old Vintage guitar...amazing looks and tone & playability in a real vintage collectible that your not going to want to put down.. Every bit as good as the much more expensive Martin for a fraction of that. Any questions ask? gr8bids@comcast.net .
I'll start off by saying I am a novice guitar player. I've been playing off and on for 30 years, but more off than on. I've been playing on a hand-me-down Yamaha acoustic that was once a great guitar, but through many years of moving, poor storage and not doing anything other than the occasional set of new strings, that Yamaha just did not play well. One reason I was so off and on is that I could never get a clean sound from the Yamaha. I just thought I was not capable of learning guitar. Then, about a year ago, I tried out a friend's Fender acoustic and, after apologizing in advance for my poor playing ability, found that the same chords I struggled with on the Yamaha sounded crisp and clean on my friend's Fender, and I didn't have to make my fingers bleed
The old ones were SOLD as cheap guitars. These new ones, at their price points, are probably decent instruments at the very least, and possibly even very good ones. I doubt they have much in common with the Kays from the 70s aside from how they look, which as other people have detailed, is probably just for nostalgia purposes. Lots of aging rockers with fat salaries who might've learned on those guitars a few decades ago!
Bass guitars (like guitars) in many ways are like cars. Their appearance is a major factor in your buying decision. But also like cars, especially for the first-time buyer, there are far more important factors to know about in order to ensure you buy a bass guitar that is both properly playable and that stays in tune, enabling you to make progress with it. 
Among other things, Peavy is somewhat famous in the guitar amps world for being one of the first manufacturers to produce a close-to-tubes type of sound from their transistors amps. While this achievement might not have seemed perfect for the most discerning of ears, their solid state guitar amplifiers are good enough for the general public not to tell the difference.

So what is the point of getting a small guitar amp? I mean you can get a whole lot of sound out of a medium sized amp without all of the sound issues that the small amps have. And yeah they are more ungainly and harder to lug around, but at least they have the sound and power required to handle a live performance and even band practice. Plus you can turn down the sound and practice at home just as well, right?’
Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.

More and more are finding themselves downsizing their pedalboards, if not totally swapping all their stompboxes for a multi-effects unit. There are also many who are looking to upgrade their existing guitar processor. Whatever your case may be, it is our intention to help you find one that fits your needs, or at least point you to the right direction.


The amps are interesting and also pretty much impossible to I.D. These were, of course, tube amps. Their basic cosmetics consist of two-tone tolex or vinyl covering � contrasting dark and light � arranged vertically with a wide band in the middle, just slightly narrower than the grillcloth. Cabinets had rounded edges, and, in fact, sort of look like ’50s TVs. One was a small practice amp, with two medium sized amps about 15″ or so high, and one humongous amp, complete with six 8″ speakers (which looks like the later HG-8).
The semi hollow construction with sapele top and mahogany back body provide a warm tone that resonates nicely, especially when coupled with the Infinity R Humbuckers. The comfortable medium sized frets make the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar a great option for the jazz and blues players out there and the high-quality hardware such as ART-ST bridge and tailpiece are reliable and hard wearing.

The STRATosphere is in no way sponsored, endorsed, or affiliated with Gibson Brands, Inc. LES PAUL®, SG®, ES®, EXPLORER®, FLYING V®, GIBSON®, the corresponding body shape designs and headstock designs are registered trademarks of Gibson Brands, Inc. The STRATosphere is not an authorized dealer or reseller of Gibson products. Therefore, Gibson products purchased through The STRATosphere are not covered under warranty by Gibson Brands, Inc.
A rivalry sprang up between Fender and Gibson, creating some of the solid-body electrics most coveted by musicians and collectors, including the 1952 Gibson “Les Paul” model with a curved top and a combination bridge-tailpiece (the guitar was designed primarily by McCarty, with input by the famous guitarist who endorsed it), the 1954 Fender Stratocaster, and a 1958 version of the Gibson Les Paul with a new “humbucking” pickup that transmitted less background interference from electrical equipment.
Another clarification about brand names is in order. Teisco guitars can be found mainly bearing at least eight brand names: Teisco, Teisco Del Rey, Kingston, World Teisco, Silvertone, Kent, Kimberly and Heit Deluxe. Teisco was the name used mainly in Japan but also on a few occasions here in the United States. Most Teisco guitars were imported into the United States by Chicago’s W.M.I. Corporation � originally owned by guitar importing pioneer Jack Westheimer � bearing both the Teisco Del Rey and Kingston brand names. By the mid-’60s W.M.I. was providing Teiscos to Sears and Roebuck carrying the Silvertone moniker. I’m not sure the World Teisco brand ever got to the U.S.; my guess is that it was an export designation that went to other markets. Some of the early Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen and Jacobson were purchased from Teisco. The distributors responsible for either the Kimberly or Heit Deluxe brand names remain a mystery at this time. It is possible that you may encounter other brand names on Teisco-made guitars sold through other distributors, but these will be in a minority. If you know of any other names, please let us know.
In the face of this mounting conservatism, Ovation entered the solidbody marketplace with an in-your-face design consistent with the radicalism of its Lyracord bowl-backed acoustics. In ’71 it unveiled the battleaxe-shaped Breadwinner, followed by its upmarket brother, the Deacon, in January ’72. As you might expect, despite the unusual shape (rounded upper edge, deep single cutaway at the double octave, s-curved lower edge, and asymmetrically scooped out lower bout) these also featured some innovations. Both had two-octave bolt-on Ovation fingerboards, the former unbound with dots, the latter bound with diamonds. Both had mahogany bodies, the Breadwinner with a kind of spackle finish (white, black, tan or blue), the Deacon a sunburst finish. The Breadwinner had a molded plastic bridge/tailpiece assembly with adjustable plastic saddles and chrome hardware; the Deacon had a similar unit with metal saddles with gold hardware. Early Breadwinners had the jack on the back of the body, but this quickly migrated to the pickguard; some transitional examples have both jacks on the back and pickguard. These Ovation guitars were remarkably ergonomic, well-balanced when standing and cradling comfortably on the knee if you preferred to sit.
Complex though some of these techniques are, probably the most powerful use of multi-miking I've encountered during my investigations comes courtesy of Jack Douglas, who makes creative use of phase cancellation between microphones. "For guitar overdubs, the best EQ in the world is the phase EQ, which you get by using multiple mics on a speaker. For example, take a Shure SM57, a Sennheiser MD421 and your favourite condenser, and set them up in a triangle with the two dynamics at an angle up against the grille, but off axis. Then take your favourite condenser mic, put a 10dB pad on it, and place it about a foot away, facing the speaker, on axis.
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Our Most Recommended electric guitar is Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC012 Electric Guitar. Yamaha has been a power player in the music industry for many decades. The Pacific Yamaha Series is one of the best series for the last decade for its high quality tone and amazing play experience. The Yamaha Pacifica Series was designed for the focus of one thing: Yamaha’s customers.
We don’t have many cutaway styles or Jose Ramirez guitars in our review list, but this is one of them, and it just happens to be a “hybrid,” or a classical guitar with an electronic pickup. Handcrafted in Spain, the 4NCWE model is a cedar-top with Indian rosewood on the back and sides. Like the other Ramirez guitars we have listed, this comes with a hard-shell case, so you won’t have to worry about the guitar being broken in transit.
Here we have for your consideration the Booming classic vintage Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an eary 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges this is a great guitar. This example was built over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards workmanship are wonderful quality as well as some of the best woods available in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged and is a true SINGING vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label. The frets have good height and appear newish and though to probably to have had a fret job done sometime in it's past. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings and scratches from a well loved and played instrument. This fine example is on the way... We upon receiving we will remove strings clean and detail the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, set intonation and set up this guitar to play very well and may include new bone nut/saddle/strings we have several of these old Yamahas and they are amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics and additional info soon to come... Interested ? ask Thanks .

The cool thing about this setup is the EQ bypass feature. In other words, you can completely nullify any effects of the EQ and tap into the raw tone of the guitar. That works great for those who want that authentic tone or to let the mix engineer handle the rest. Overall, this Takamine is rock solid in all aspects. It is a great alternative for anyone who's looking to extract the most out of their money who wants to try something other than a Martin.
One of the first successful methods was to record a track as you would any other. Then you would take the recording and play it through a speaker that is placed in a very large room. The magic happens when you put a microphone somewhere in that room to essentially record the sound of a recording. However, by placing that speaker in a large room, they have added a layer of natural reverb.
Manne guitars - This Italy based guitar manufacturer produces instruments with unique features. The first Manne guitar was built in 1986 and they continue to provide finely crafted instruments based on some very original design concepts. Manne's design philosophy: hand craft the finest stringed instruments then offer them to the public at a reasonable price.
Some professional-grade amp heads, such as Ampeg's SVT400-PRO, have an audio crossover, an electronic filter that enables a bassist to split their bass signal into a low-pitched signal (which could be routed to a cabinet suited for low-pitched sounds, such as a 1x15" or 2x15" cabinet), and then send the middle and high-frequencies to a different cabinet suited to this register (e.g., a 2x10" or 4x10" cabinet with a horn-loaded tweeter). Amps with a crossover can either have a single crossover point pre-set at the factory (e.g., 100 Hz) or a knob is provided to enable the bassist to select the frequency where the bass signal is split into low and higher-pitched signal. The SVT400-PRO has a user-adjustable crossover knob. Amps with an adjustable crossover point can enable bassists to fine tune the sound of their bass sound. For example, in some halls, a bassist's usual crossover point may sound too "boomy" or rumbly; turning the crossover knob to send more of the low-pitched bass signal through the 2x10" cab may reduce this problem.
Unfortunately, there is no single unified format used for Ibanez serial numbers. Ibanez guitar production is outsourced to several companies and facilities through the world and the numbering schemes are different in each region and/or factory. The information on this page is culled from several sources both on-line and off-line and represents a distillation of the available information. It applies primarily to electric guitars, but some information may also be applicable to acoustics.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender's Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.
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