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Ovation’s Lyracord backs weren’t the company’s only fling with synthetic materials. In the early ’70s Charles Kaman set his engineers, many of whom were not guitar players, to work on developing a new synthetic guitar, yielding the deep-bowl, acoustic-electric Adamas which went into production in 1976. The Adamas top, called a Fibronic Soundboard, was made of a laminate of carbon-graphite and birch about a third the thickness of a conventional spruce top. Instead of a regular round central soundhole, Kaman engineers positioned 22 smaller holes on the upper shoulders surrounded by epaulets of multicolored woods in a kind of leaf design. The bridges and headstock featured elaborate scroll carving. The neck was reinforced with a patented Kaman bar, a u-shaped cast aluminum insert designed to keep the neck stable even with dramatic changes in temperature and climate. The necks and fingerboards were made of walnut. The fingerboards had hollow triangular maple inlays, tapered beginning at the 18th fret on the bass side to the 24th fret on the treble. Hardware was gold. Until the advent of Ovation’s Collector Series in 1982, the Adamas was Ovation’s flagship, favored by the likes of Larry Coryell and others.
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.
When you've put your blood, sweat and tears into developing your talent, you want your music to sound amazing. And with the proper recording gear, you can ensure your sound is captured exactly how you intended. From audio interfaces to studio monitors to extremely powerful subwoofers, this section's wide range of recording gear offers up plenty of examples of ways to make your recordings better than ever. The right audio/video arrangement can take the stress out of recording, giving you more time and energy to concentrate on what's most important - your music. If you're unsure where to start the search for recording gear, checking out some of the top-rated and best-selling products is definitely the way to go. Want to attach your mic directly to your PC or Mac? The Blue Icicle performs dual functions as an XLR to USB adapter and a studio-quality microphone preamp. Offering a quick and easy way to perform digital and audio recording, this handy tool is a must for every musician's gear bag. Maybe you're in the market for a studio monitor? If that's the case, the Mackie MR8 mk3 8" 2-Way Powered Studio Monitor is a fantastic choice. Built with a clear focus on accuracy, this low-profile studio monitor is perfect for musicians who really want to capture the full character of their music. This section is also home to an assortment of GoPro video cameras. With a GoPro, you can record your set firsthand from the stage, giving your fans a unique "view from the top." Take a look at the GoPro HERO+ LCD for example - this camera captures your world in stunning HD video. It's rugged, waterproof and built into its own protective case - exactly what you need to record those high-energy shows. Another fantastic GoPro option is the HERO4 Session. Smaller and lighter than any other GoPro currently on the market, the HERO4 Session captures 1080p60 video and 8MP photos in a simple design that's so compact it can go just about anywhere. This is just a quick sampling of what's available when it comes to recording gear. There are lots more products to consider, so spend some time browsing through them - you never know when the right piece of equipment is going to leap off the page and into your professional setup.

This is a great pedal to learn from. The instructions are clear and the circuit is pretty basic. The kit itself is complete and the components are good quality. The effect is unique when compared to other diy pedals, and adds a nice flavor to your sound. About the only thing I would add is an led to know when the effect is on, the circuit can always be modified. To update, I was able to change the .047cap with a .022 cap to get a clearer sound while using my bass with it.....sounds great for some of our rockabilly type songs. So if you would like to use this for your bass just change that one cap and you're good to go.
The least expensive practice amps and basic combo amps may only have a single indicator light: an LED to indicate when the amp's power is on. More expensive amps may also have LEDs to indicate when the preamp has a signal present from the instrument (helpful for troubleshooting during set-up, because if the amp is not producing any bass sound even when the bassist is playing, and the "signal present" light is illuminated, this indicates that a signal is reaching the amp); when a limiter or similar speaker protection feature is activated (e.g., Peavey's DDT system); when clipping is occurring; or when the amp is in standby mode. Amps with a built-in tuner typically have several LEDs to indicate when the note being played is flat, sharp, or in tune.
In a market filled with increasingly good Japanese copies of Les Pauls, the Ovation offerings fell, well, flat, despite obvious high quality. In ’75 both the Breadwinner and Deacon switched to Ovation humbucking pickups, metal covered with twin rows of six pole pieces. A very short-run Deacon 12-string debuted as well in ’75. In ’76 the blue finish on the Breadwinner was ditched and the Deacon acquired red, black and natural finish options. As synthesizer technology caught on in the late ’70s, some of these guitars became popular for adapting to synth playing, primarily because of their “high-tech” image.
Bending: Bending is a pretty common element of Tab. You can tell that you are supposed to bend a note by an upward pointing arrow next to one or more numbers. The distance you are to bend the note will be defined by an indicator next to the arrow. It might be a “full” bend or a “1/2” bend. Once you are exposed to a couple of bends you will quickly catch on to the basic idea.
Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
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