The sounds of the electric guitar made it to outer space. In 1977, both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space with remnants of international life and culture onboard. On each vessel was a gold-plated phonograph record with 115 sounds and images curated by a team led by astronomer Carl Sagan. Along with selections that included the likes of Bach and Beethoven, Sagan decided to throw in – however controversial it was at the time – Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry, an American rock’n’roll anthem defined by its rollicking electric guitar lick.
These guitars use very cheap materials. I bought a washburn WM24v PROE for $300 and it come with Mahogany body & neck, phenolic fretboard, emg81/85 and original floyd rose... Ibanez RG costs $400 and comes with basswood body, bolt on maple neck, rosewood fingerboard, shoddy pickups and a licensed floyd that WILL NOT stay in tune. Poor quality for money, if you get a Ibanez go for a fixed bridge/string-thru because their trems are HORRIBLE! Original floyd is the only way to go!
The only proper way to make a "high string action" Martin guitar play correctly is to do a "neck set". This repair involves removing the neck on the guitar, and refitting the neck at a slightly increased angle, which lowers the string action. If done correctly, this does not affect the value of the guitar (and in fact can make it more valuable, as the guitar is much more playable). Generally speaking, most players would agree if the "string action" is more than 3/16 inch (5 mm) at the 12th fret, the guitar needs a neck set. This measurement is taken from the bottom of the low-E string, to the top of the 12th fret.
Description: Natural Model. Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, Classical Tuners - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!
The full-size electric guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul SL, Ibanez GRGA120 Gio, Indio 66 Classic, Indio Retro DLX Quilted Maple, Jackson JS11 Dinky, Squier by Fender Affinity Series Jazzmaster, Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat, and Yamaha Pacifica PAC012. The short-scale guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul Express, Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro, Jackson Dinky Minion JS1X, Jackson Rhoads Minion JS1X, and Squier by Fender Mini Strat.
As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.

^ Jump up to: a b Peterson (2002, pp. 36–37):Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA: The Guild of American Luthiers. Number 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011.

So you want to shred without all the lettuce. You want to strum without losing all your Benjamins. You want an electric guitar without spending loads of money…is what these metaphors mean. Probably over-explaining it now. If you’re looking for an affordable electric guitar that doesn’t sacrifice quality, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s take a look at ten notable electric guitars for under $500.
Half a step down from standard, used by bands such as Emmure, TesseracT and Meshuggah in their earlier days, Jeff Loomis (now formerly of Nevermore), Cannibal Corpse mid-career, ERRA, Hypocrisy on End of Disclosure, Adema, American Head Charge, Sonata Arctica in their album Unia, Mushroomhead, Korn in Neidermeyer's Mind demo album, Revocation, Dir En Grey since "Dum Spiro Spero," After The Burial on Forging a Future Self album, Chad Kroeger of Nickelback on the song "This Means War" (Ryan Peake used a six-string), Slayer (on War Zone and Here Comes the Pain from God Hates Us All), and Trivium on Silence in the Snow, The Sin and the Sentence, and all live performances of songs previously written on standard tuned seven string guitars.
When I was a kid in the 60s, all of the Japanese brands (probably ALL made by Teisco) had a really bad rap and only kids ended up with them. Some were very cheaply made, with weak metal, thin chrome plating, funky finishes and thin pickups. I owned a Rodeo, which was terrible. But then, who knew much about guitars then? Nowdays, anything has character.
Shreddage 2: Absolute Electric Guitar is our answer to the challenge of total guitar sampling. It is a complete instrument with elegant scripting, intuitive mapping, and incredible depth. This virtual guitar for Kontakt is the ultimate weapon for rock & metal music, built from the ground up for realistic playing in any hi-gain style. All samples were recorded on a 7-string guitar and are provided clean/DI so you can use your own custom amp tone - or use the included Peavey ReValver HPse.
I have a Samick Avion AV7 that I've been having trouble with a buzzing low E string when strumming with the first four frets. The bow is .013" and I set the 12th fret E string height to 2.5mm which helped, but not cured. I used a depth gauge to measure my frets, most measure at .043-.045" but the last two frets (21,22) measure at .052". At this point, would it be best to loosen the truss rod a 1/4 turn, or should I address the high frets, or could it be something else altogether? Thanks for the information.
Some emulator designs include switchable filters, enabling them to simulate open or closed-backed speaker cabinets, and can come very close to the sound of a close-miked amp, while ambience can be simulated using a reverb processor or plug-in. Even if the amp has a good spring reverb, a little additional digital ambience (mainly early reflections) will help create the illusion of the amplifier being recorded in a room.
Another great book by Nicolas, this one shows you exactly how to create your own personal tone using amplifiers, effects and your guitar itself. Any beginner will benefit from this clearly written guide including everything from a breakdown of all the different ways to individualize your guitar playing technique, to information about virtual effects.
A. Electric guitars either have bolt-on, set neck, or neck-through neck construction. Bolt on necks are simply bolted onto the body, set necks are set into the body and glued, and neck-through construction is where the neck extends all the way through the body. The latter is generally considered the best and most durable, but won't be found on cheaper guitars.
The latest in a grand lineage of guitar-based Kings, Marcus [pictured, top] has - without exaggeration - the chops to bear that weighty association. Mentored by ‘Uncle’ Warren Haynes, he was personally tipped to us by Kenny Wayne Shepherd and leads a band of formidable players that seem able to turn on a dime from Miles Davis jazz jam to blues and searing Southern rock. 
The best way to have a great experience building your first guitar is to do it as a member of as class under the direction of a master Luthier. I built my first Tele-style guitar at Tulsa Wood Arts taught by Seth Lee Jones. You can learn a lot of the tricks and avoid some of the frustrations of doing it on your own. Plus, you make new friends and come away with a beautiful, quality guitar your first time out!
@Josh – Changing the order of the effects in your signal chain can drastically change the sound you get from each pedal depending on where it was before and where it is now. Can you please send us an email to support@strymon.net with further details including a video recording of what you are experiencing so we have a better idea of what is happening?
I still keep in touch with Mark and occasionally pose questions to him about various maintenance concerns. He's pretty busy and it may take a few days before he get's back to me. He has always been willing to help and actually encourages me to take on a lot more of the responsibility of maintaining my basses. Yeah, I spent a little on the front end but I really feel that it's going to payoff for me long term.

About a year ago (or maybe more) I was in a real Marc Bolan/T Rex phase, and I came across a Lotus Les Paul copy in my local Sam Ash used for $199. Like the idiot I am, I played it, and it played and sounded good, so I bought it. Well, that did not sit well with my folks, who made me take it back a few days later. It had a bolt-on neck and was quite heavy, but other than that, it looked sweet. I even was smart enough to take a picture of it:
Any guitar luthier will tell you that the choice of wood is the single MOST IMPORTANT factor that will determine the sound of your guitar. My junk guitar had a body that was made of cheap reconstituted wood shavings instead of actual solid wood. Junk material like that means your sound will also be junk. Any note I played didn’t sustain for more than a single second and it didn’t have that boomy lush sound you normally get from acoustics.
*The expensive Fender USA hardware (supposedly genuine, purchased at Guitar Center San Marcos CA), which includes the 2-point delux strat tremolo, big-apple scratch plate, Sperzal USA tuners, Graphtech nut, and pickup selector. These items should all combine to sound awesome, and coming from a reputable supplier and for the price I paid I would expect to be identical to what is found on a USA standard or delux Fender.

to heat up the tubes in certain amplifiers , when the tubes are heated up you get a better sound and the tubes last longer is what I've been told. remember to change your tubes and have them adjusted on a yearly bases to keep the amp sounding great if you're an experienced player this really comes in handy. Get a pro to do it the first time so nothing bad happens.


Launched in the late 1990s the SE models are manufactured in South Korea by a third-party company (World Musical Instruments) then shipped to re-sellers and dealers in the United States. This is a major part of the cost-cutting technique, in addition to a more flat (as opposed to carved) body shape and cheaper pickups/electronics. So be advised, I’m not telling you that you’re getting a $2000 guitar for $600.
The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.
bought at a tiny store in holland, back then they said to me the guiter was already 20 years old. he was looking a new, and bought it for 1000,- dutch guildens. thats maybe...445,- euro now. thats nothing compared to the prices they ask for a vox guitar they make TODAY! thay are building guitars again and ask pricies beginning by: 2000,- euro's. I wanna know when my guitar was bild, he has a chrome plate at the back with made by japan on it too.
The irony with guitars is that an original 1950s Gibson, for example, whilst capable of producing the most amazing sounds, and playing like butter - may not stay in tune, or intonate quite as well as a modern day equivalent. Consequently old guitars have very often been 'upgraded', with original parts lost. But this can seriously down-grade their value. Replacing missing parts with original or period-correct ones can very much improve a guitars collectability, saleability and therefore value.
Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
Then I remembered Kent Guitars. I thought it would be pretty cool to have a guitar with my last name on it. Although they didn't appear on the U.S. west coast very often, if at all, (I would remember them if they did), It turns out there is a whole crapload of them out there. Information is scattered around the internet in bits and pieces and nobody who was making them at the time is talking about it. So I have started gathering information, limiting myself to the 500,600,700, and 800 series models. The only ones I am interested in owning are the 700 and 800s. I have a 740, an 820, 823, 833, and 834. I may never get the chance to buy another.
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
Though the guitar is played through an amplifier which is often miked and recorded, the engineer or producer may later decide to use a different amplifier tone that's better suited to the character and timbre of the song, while preserving all the nuance and inflection of the original performance embedded in the direct track. The re-amp device allows the dry track to be sent to an amplifier again and properly miked and re-recorded for use as the final track.

Speaker simulators are switchable filter sets designed to reproduce the EQ curves of a variety of speaker cabinet configurations (with varying degrees of success). The subsequent coloration is meant to replicate typical speaker sound and behavior, softening the harsh upper-midrange edges associated with amplifier distortion. Speaker simulator boxes are designed with direct  guitar-amp recording in mind, and are intended to remove the speaker cabinet and microphone link from the signal chain.
The Epiphone DR-100 acoustic guitar definitely falls under the category of “entry-level” or “student” instrument, but sound quality has not been sacrificed for the sake of a lower price point. Many guitar instructors urge their students to invest in this model because of its resonant mahogany components. There can be some buzzing because of its lower action, but beginners will have a better learning experience because of the improved tonality. Epiphone is a strong name in guitars, and considering the low price, the DR-100 is a good buy. We recommend it for the mahogany alone, but the tone quality is also appropriate – and perhaps even better than it should be – for the price.
As we mentioned, this is both a multi-effects unit and an amp modeler. Like the Boss ME-80, you can use it in a regular editing mode where you set up your signal chain using buttons and knobs, or “Pedalboard Mode” which when activated lets you turn 5 effects on/off via the 5 footswitches along the bottom, much like if you had separate pedals on a pedalboard. This is a nice bonus if you play live and want that immediacy. To sculpt your sounds, you use the small up and down arrow buttons to cycle through your effect types, or slots. You’ve got WAH, COMPRESSOR, DISTORTION, AMP/CABINET, EQUALIZER, NOISE GATE, CHORUS/FX, DELAY, REVERB, and EXPRESSION (which sets what your expression pedal is used for, like wah or volume) available for use. For each type, you can cycle through which effect models you want. There are a ton to choose from, over 70 by our rough count. The DigiTech RP500 probably has the most comprehensive list of all the classic effects, from Tube Screamers, to Pro Co RAT, DS-1, Fuzz Face, Boss CE-2 Chorus, EHX Small Stone Phaser, and many more. All the classic amp models are there too, like Vox, Marshall, and Fender, all with appropriate cab models. If you have your own amp or just don’t care for the amp and cabinet modeling, you can bypass it which leaves you with just stompboxes and effects.
While a little on the pricey side, their products are seen as particularly powerful and reliable overall. The H&K Trilogy is well appreciated for its versatility, allowed by the high level of German technology and engineering involved in its construction.  It has easy MIDI control and three channels, a clean, crutch, and lead, all with boost options that give a lot of freedom to musicians who are into experimenting.
A volume pedal is ideal for those guitarists out there who like to use volume swells or fade-ins, and those who don’t want to have to use the volume pot on their guitar to do so! All you do is apply pressure on the front or back of the pedal to get the desired effect and you’re good to go! They’re super simple to use and only change the signal rather than the tone of your guitar or bass.
This aim of this site is to provide high quality SoundFonts (virtual musical instruments in sf2 format) that can be played using a midi keyboard connected to a computer, tablet or smart phone. Emphasis has been placed on real or acoustic instruments particularly piano and other favourites for keyboard players (pads, strings, electric pianos, organs and orchestral) but some SoundFonts here also include high quality guitars, some synths and ethnic instruments. There is also a nice GM set for playing general midi files. The SoundFont format sf2 is widely supported by lots of programs/apps and devices.
For solidbodies there is usually a one- or two-letter prefix indicating the body style or general model. This is followed by a dash and a number which usually indicates the number of pickups (e.g., J-1), although on occasion the number indicates the year of introduction (e.g., TG-54). Guitars bearing a vibrato usually appended an “L” after the pickup number (e.g., MJ-2L).
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If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.

The Telecaster is known for its ability to produce both bright, rich, cutting tone (the typical telecaster twang) or mellow, warm, bluesy tone depending on the selected pickup, respectively “bridge” pickup or “neck” pickup. The bridge pickup has more windings than the neck pickup, hence producing higher output, which compensates for a lower amplitude of vibration of the strings at bridge position. At the same time, a capacitor between the slider of the volume control and the output, allows treble sounds to bleed through while damping mid and lower ranges.[3] A slanted bridge pickup enhances the guitar’s treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings’ tone. This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. These characteristics make the Telecaster a versatile guitar, usable for most styles of music including country, blues, rock, and jazz.
"With a note of music, one strikes the fundamental, and, in addition to the root note, other notes are generated: these are the harmonic series.... As one fundamental note contains within it other notes in the octave, two fundamentals produce a remarkable array of harmonics, and the number of possible combinations between all the notes increases phenomenally. With a triad, affairs stand a good chance of getting severely out of hand."
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This guitar is a good example of the late 1960s Matsumoku made imports that were flooding the Americas.  This model with these pickups were made for many years, starting around 1966 through the early 70s.  That’s a good run!  Based on my research this particular model probably dates from the late 60s.Most of the time I see these guitars with chrome or tortoiseshell pickguards, and this is the first one I’d seen with a white guard.  Has a cool shape too!  These pickups were exclusive to Matsumoku and generally have a good sound.  I’ve measured about 10 of these pickups, and the reading are often all over the place.  Some of these read out near 9k, and some read out under 5k, so obviously the specs changed over the years.  I think the hotter reading pickups came from the later 60s era.Now that Lyle name was owned by the L.D. Heater Music Company out of Beaverton, Oregon.  They had some cool electric models here and there and seemed to really focus on acoustic guitars back in the day.  Most, but not all of the electric models were made by Matsumoku.Most Matsumoku guitars were made rather well, especially the wood parts.  Bodies and necks were always top notch and their finishes hold up better than the average import guitar.  They did some great, burst finishes!  But one weak point on all these Matsumoku electric guitars were the pickup switches.  They just weren’t made to withstand constant use and almost always fail.  Dano at Happy Guitar Repair knows how to rebuild these switches, and it’s just about the only way to bring them back to life.The all-telling Matsumoku plate is back there and the neck pockets on all their guitars were really solid.  If you’re looking to get into these vintage Japanese guitars, Matsumoku models are always a good place to get your feet wet!Mike Dugan loved this particular model, even though the frets were vintage Japanese tiny, and the pickups read out a little weak, sometimes a guitar just has a little chime and zing, and this one had it.  Enjoy peeps!


The AC15C1X is a modern take on the venerable AC15, with improved reliability and built-in effects. Vox's familiar clean and overdriven tone is ever present, courtesy of its three 12AX7 preamp tubes and two EL84 power tubes that drive a 12" Celestion Alnico Blue speaker - a speaker that many Rock and Blues players prefer. The amp has a dedicated Top Boost input for those who want Vox' distinct jangly tone. Finally, it comes with tremolo and reverb effect to add space and texture to your guitar tone.
A volume pedal is ideal for those guitarists out there who like to use volume swells or fade-ins, and those who don’t want to have to use the volume pot on their guitar to do so! All you do is apply pressure on the front or back of the pedal to get the desired effect and you’re good to go! They’re super simple to use and only change the signal rather than the tone of your guitar or bass.
Tuning machines: Geared mechanisms that raise and lower the tension of the strings, drawing them to different pitches. The strings wrap tightly around posts that sticks out through the top, or face, of the headstock. The posts pass through to the back of the headstock, where gears connect them to tuning keys (also known as tuners, tuning pegs, and tuning gears).
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.
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ACT TRMOLO REPLACING THE STRINGS ACT tremolo allow two styles of string installation. 1) The strings are installed by putting the ball end into the string slot and hooking the ball end below the string catch at the rear of the tremolo unit. 2) The strings are installed by putting the ball end into the string slot and hooking the ball end in the string catch at the bottom of the tremolo unit.
PRS really took off back in the ‘90s when it seemed just about everyone had swapped out their Les Paul for a PRS. Eventually they capitalized on this trend and made the PRS more accessible by introducing the SE line of lower-budget guitars. But these aren’t beginner’s guitars. Even though they cost less than a standard PRS, they’re still high-quality instruments.

Guitar amplifiers vary in wattage. If you're playing to a massive audience, you'll want several 100-watt amps; however, for everyday use, that is overkill. If you merely want it for practice, a 10-watt solid state guitar amplifier will do, and if you're playing to a small venue, you'll probably want to consider a 20-watt valve amp. It's surprising how much sound a little amp will produce.

Had a seven string Ibanez with loose/worn frets worked on. Steve knew right away that the frets had to be tacked and it could use a fret re-crowning and gave me a quote for 125$. I thought it was a bit high but trusted him because of the good reviews. Came back a couple weeks later and he had re-crowned the frets, tacked all the loose frets, tightened down some more loose hardware and did a set-up for only 100$. I am overall quite satisfied with the quality of the work and the pricing. I will be going back to have my acoustic worked on.


The pickup itself consists of a long magnet, or a number of cylindrical magnets in a row, around which is a wire coil. The vibrations of the electric guitar’s strings cause changes in the magnetic field of these magnets, which in turn is able to induce a current in the coiled wire. This current is then passed on to the amplifier, which produces the sound. The stronger the magnets used in the pickups, the more sensitive they are to the string’s vibrations.
In terms of the electronics, Yamaha went with a System 66 piezoelectric platform. The preamp packs a standard three-band EQ couple with a built-in tuner and a flexible mid-range control. Needless to say, it gives you more than enough room to dial in a decent tone. Quality-wise, this might be the best acoustic electric you can get in this price range, period.
Vengeance and Gates’ ascent to the top of the metal guitar heap did not always seem inevitable. Avenged Sevenfold began life as a somewhat traditional Orange County–style metalcore act, as evidenced on their 2001 debut, Sounding the Seventh Trumpet, for which Vengeance served as the primary guitarist. But the band has been reinventing and refining its sound ever since. By A7X’s third effort, 2005’s City of Evil, they had morphed into a swaggering, thrashy unit with an adventurous edge that showed itself in everything from the grand, instrumentally dense songs to the band’s theatrical image.
This guitar continues to rake in good reviews and recommendations, even from experienced players who are looking for a compact couch guitar. This says much about its build-quality, tone and production consistency. If you are just starting out and you are not sure what to get, or you're simply looking for an affordable grab-and-go guitar, then checkout the Yamaha JR1.
There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.
Passive pickups are similar to internal microphones that essentially just pick up the vibrations and soundwaves and send it straight to the amp. You bypass the need for a preamp that means you typically lack the ability to enhance, shape, and change sound and tones. Simply put, if you just want the ability to plug in for acoustic goodness, a passive pickup is a decent device. However, if you want to achieve more controlled volume and other features, you’re going to need to install a preamp at some point or simply opt for a guitar with an active pickup.
It has been stated repeatedly that the CEO is a challenge, toxic whatever and yes, all of it is true. Many if not most people who take a management position here don't last a year. This is especially true at Corporate where at any given time half of the positions are open because employee turnover is off the charts and they are horrible at recruiting talent to get replacements hired. That's a really bad combination to have in a company. So the first question you have to ask yourself is: do you want to show a job that only lasted six to twelve months on your resume with a company that has a positive, almost cult like global brand image? Or another way, how will you explain your short tenure to the next company you interview with and make them believe you weren't the problem? When I was outside Nashville and told people I worked for Gibson 100% of them said "that's a great company" even though they had no clue. It's highly likely your next potential employer will think that way as well.

Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.

A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
Market sentiment is overwhelmingly positive, with many reviewers describing how the Seagull S6 Classic M-450T exceeds their expectations. Build quality and playability gets the bulk of commendations, along with its clear sound and good acoustic projection. Some even dare to compare the Seagull S6 Classic with super expensive guitars from major brands.
Lolol lame azz I knew if I kept reading your BS comment you would start nameing all your crapy azz guitars haha lol no one cares or gives a flying fuck what you have or own.... (What you must of sounded like when you were 12 and lame as today) Oohhh I'm sooooo cool I have jimi's guitar and eric's guitar cause I'm their nephiew ya there my uncles hmm mm both of them I own and play with there guitars all the time woooo hooooo...............
@Umberto – Thanks for supporting Strymon! 🙂 The best place for the Lex is where it sounds best to you. If you like how it sounds in front of your drive pedals, I recommend using it in that location. I also want to note that turning up the PREAMP DRIVE on the Lex can lead to lower effect output volume and recommend using the pedals on-board boost (up to +6dB of boost) to counter this loss of volume.
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yeah i know the GSP has 2 EQ ( well 3 if i wanted to use up a slot in the OD section ) but i use both EQs on the GSP and i prefer a external eq, that i can adjust on the spot depending on that patch, rather then going in and changing the EQ each time on that patch. I use 3 different guitars each one is totally different in sound, so the external EQ really helps.
I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it. Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low! Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone. I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money. But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed. My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems. Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.
 The type of guitar strings you choose, and how often you change them will not only dramatically affect your tone, but also impact the playability of your guitar. By learning about the different string options available for your guitar, you can find the strings which strike the best balance between great tone and playability. The key components affecting tone and playability come from string gauge, string winding method and the string construction material.

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The Zoom G3X features a built-in wah-wah expression pedal that controls the sound parameters in real time. It has over 100 effects and 22-amp models that bring out the amazing sounds of your guitar. This distortion pedal also features a stompbox with over 100 stage-ready effects. For computer recording, this pedal has a USB audio interface for Mac and PC. In addition, it has a balanced line-level output, an onboard chromatic tuner, and an integrated drum machine. Its 40-second looper gives it overdubbing capabilities.
The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World.
The Univox/Aria Les Paul openly copied its American original, but would never be mistaken for it because it continued many characteristics typical of Japanese production at the time; a bolt-on neck with the usual narrow fingerboard, sitting relatively high on the body, zero frets, block inlays (with rounded corners) and rounded ends. The headstock was a copy of the Gibson open book. And, obviously, it didn’t have Gibson humbuckers, favoring instead a design with 12 adjustable poles in a metal cover with a narrow black insert slit in the middle, sitting on black surrounds. Controls were standard three-way with two volumes and tones. The knobs were those tall, skinny gold kind seen on many early Japanese copies. Hardware was gold-plated. These first Univox Les Paul copies survived into the early ’70s, but were probably gone by around ’74. By ’71, the model was called either the Mother or the R&B Guitar Outfit and was available in either black (U1982) or gold (U1983) finishes. Also by ’71, the Univox logo had changed from the early plastic version to the more common outlined block letter decal.
The Takamine brand helps prevent big brand manufacturers from setting their prices too high - by showing them that great guitars can be produced at reasonable prices. On top of their bang per buck reputation, Takamine is considered as the pioneer of installing built-in pickups into acoustics, something that is now a common configuration offered by majority of guitar builders. The Takamine P3NY showcases how impressive tonewoods and electronics can be implemented without ridiculously jacking up the price.
The Mahogany body and neck with rosewood fretboard makes it a highly resonant and great sounding guitar whilst the dual Alnico Classic pickups with push pull coil tapping provide a world of tonality. A SlimTaper D Shape neck profile makes it comfortable for beginners to learn on, whilst pro players will enjoy the ergonomic design 2 hours into their set or rehearsal! Available in more finishes here.
i have played fender most of my life .Fast neck and comfortable .However when my musical interest changed to southern rock i decided to buy a gibson . The mahogony body sounds different as does the string thru design of my firebird .Now i play both .Out of the box i prefer gibson and dont need to change a thing .I see many fender players always looking for “that sound” changing pickups pots etc.and using many boxws to change the tone.All i use with my gibson is a wa wa and overdrive

If you know that you want to use your mini amp to reduce the audio footprint of your jam sessions as much as possible, you’ll pretty much have your pick of the litter among miniature models. That’s because even the most powerful of these amps can produce viable tone at a very low volume, as manufacturers know that this demographic needs the ability to play quietly. If you want to maintain a certain degree of audio fidelity and flexibility, you might need to aim for one of the slightly larger mini amps out there. Models with at least five, and preferably 10 watts will be the best for generating a realistic and presentable guitar tone. Some of these are even nice enough that you could use them to perform at any venue capable of miking the amp itself.


The Zoom G3X features a built-in wah-wah expression pedal that controls the sound parameters in real time. It has over 100 effects and 22-amp models that bring out the amazing sounds of your guitar. This distortion pedal also features a stompbox with over 100 stage-ready effects. For computer recording, this pedal has a USB audio interface for Mac and PC. In addition, it has a balanced line-level output, an onboard chromatic tuner, and an integrated drum machine. Its 40-second looper gives it overdubbing capabilities.
Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965. Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars. Martin ukes are considered to be the best for craftsmenship and sound. The Koa wood models are more collectible than mahagony models. The fancier style 5 models are worth more than plainer styles 0 to 3. All sizes are collectible.
Rack-mount gear has become somewhat of a lost art for guitar players since the late 90’s. Nonetheless, rack gear is great for people who want programmability of preset tones, the ability to interchange components, and those who love seeing bright lights flicker as all of your gear goes to work! So for the rack-gear heads that still exist on this earth, we’ve compiled what we think are the 10 best rackmount pre-amplifiers of all time.

FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.
The golden question is: What is the difference between acoustic and electric guitars. The primary difference between the two types of guitars is that acoustic guitars produces sound entirely through vibration. Its sound is emitted through the vibration of the string when it’s plucked back and forth. Electric guitars, on the other hand, are powered through electricity and electromagnetism generated through its components are what drives the sounds that come out of it.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers always knew how to rock a party; it took John Frusciante to turn them into an arena-packing band with a sound they could call their own. Frusciante is a remarkably elastic stylist and a gifted sculptural arranger who pushed the Chilis to explore new worlds without getting in the way of their funk-pumped energy; he beefed up their sound with both well-placed fire (the volcanic, Hendrix-style solo on “Dani California”) and remarkable elegance (the indelible opening chords of “Under the Bridge”).
Now, for most players, deciding what should go where on a signal chain simply came through trial and error along with a good dose of common knowledge. And while a player’s signal chain should be his or her own, those of you out there new to creating a solid signal chain can benefit from some of the general 'rule of thumb' type of advice that can get you started in the right direction.

Of course, any item is only worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller. iGuide?is "just a guide." Please be aware that PRICES VARY WIDELY from region to region. Current estimated values are the result of much research. And we invite anyone to help add and update data. Read the "What's A Wiki" section below for more info on how to help.
Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.
Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!
Guitar picks are really cheap, maybe $.25 to $.50 each. The best way to know which kind you like best is go to a music store and buy $5.00 worth of picks of different thicknesses, sizes and materials, take them home and try them out over the course of the next several weeks or months as you learn to play. There is no right or wrong answer to this question, its all a matter of personal preference. You'll figure out for yourself which you like best.
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I was lucky. Went into to a small local music store and they had it for a long time and were trying to get rid of it quick. Got it for about $800. The previous Rick 12 I had (with narrow neck) I bought for $400, fixed broken nut, then sold to West LA Music for $750 cash so I could get the Petty model. Transactions that were definitely worth it at the time.
ESP Guitars makes seven types, the Eclipse series, James Hetfield Truckster, and Kirk Hammett KH-3 from ESP, the LTD EC series and Truckster, the Edwards E-LP series, and the Navigator N-LP series, which are based on the Les Paul design. Certain EC models have 24-fret necks and active electronics using EMG pickups instead of the standard passive pickups and 22 frets found in the traditional Les Paul. The Edwards and Navigator lines are made in Japan, and available only on the Japanese market; they come standard with Gotoh hardware and Seymour Duncan pickups (EMG pickups in a few models), and unlike the EC and Eclipse series guitars, which are updated variants on the Les Paul, these are made to be as close to the Gibson 1959 Les Paul design as possible, in the vein of the late 1970s and 1980s “lawsuit” model guitars from Tokai, Burny, and Greco, complete with Gibson style headstocks.
Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.

In a way, the Ovation story (to use Robert Frost’s famous metaphor) is one of roads not taken. Of course, as the philosopher, Hegel, so neatly noted long ago, the paths tend to join up again, and the resulting synthesis works out fine in the end. It certainly worked that way for Charlie Kaman, whose choice of paths ultimately led to the synthesis (in more ways than one!) of Ovation guitars.


The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.

As for Acoustic guitars go, you are somewhat limited by the make and model of the guitar. You can make differences in tone by the type of picks you use and also the thickness of your strings. Actually the string factor goes for both electric and acoustic. The thicker the strings the fuller the tone. Its kinda whatever you can stand on your fingers. I like to use 11’s. Stevie Ray Vaughan used crazy thick gauges of strings and had an incredible tone. Bottom line…you have to try different things and experiment to find the right tone!
I dont know but im looking for a good bass guitar too. Depends on your price range. Personally I realy like Ibanez basses and think they do really good low to mid price range basses. If you are looking at a professional quality basses you should look at Rickenbacker, Musicman (stingray), Fender, Lakland and Shadowsky as they are the main brands for professional basses.
Gibson did not take Fender too seriously at first; Fender were just an amplifier company that made a few guitars. They didn't regard the solid-body Broadcaster launched in 1950 as a serious musical instrument, lacking the depth of tone of a Gibson electric-acoustic. But music was changing, guitarists wanted different sounds, and music was getting louder. Fenders instruments proved to be more appropriate for the emerging musical scenes. Over the next decade Fender created a number of solid-body guitars that defined genres. Guitars like the Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision and Jazz basses proved to be exceptionally popular and have stayed in production ever since.
We're not suggesting you become your own handyman 24/7. If your house roof tiles are falling to bits, you'd call a pro, right? But basic setup can be done, and if you eventually need help from a guitar pro, it's good to be able to explain what your bugbear is. Guitar players and guitars are all different, and it's simply good practice to think about what you do and don't like about your treasured instrument.
There's a sick little used Chinese Peavey going for $90 at my local guitar shop. It plays great, but nobody seems to want it. I'm already picking up a MIM strat from there, but after I save up a bit more change I think I'll grab it as well. You always have to dig for the good players, and sometimes you just happen to be lucky enough to find a cheap one on a fluke, doesn't matter where it's from.

Most reverb pedals fall into the ambient effect category, similar to delay and echo in the way it manipulates your signal. It's likened to the delay effect because it's technically a timing effect which, in the world of signal processing, can be described as "sound after sound." In other words, the original sound is produced and another sound follows.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.

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Fujigen went on to achieve lasting fame as the manufacturer of Greco guitars in the ‘70s and Fender Japan in the ‘80s and early ‘90s. But Fujigen’s work in the ‘60s is our focus. The Fujigen hardware is the easiest way to tell these guitars apart from Teiscos. For example, Fujigen embossed "mic 1" and "mic 2" into their metal control plates, while Teisco did not. This is just one example, but it requires a bit of reading and studying about the nuances of that hardware to positively identify the Fujigens for what they are.
I can't believe this! Blackstar are designed and built by retired Marshall professionals and they have every last bit of knowledge on tube amps, heads, and combos. I own a Blackstar HT-1R, it is 1w but it feels like 100w just the way the Blackstar team have combined their ideas and structures and balanced it out with tubes. And line 6 is further up the list? You are mistaken bro. Another thing. These are bloody expensive and aren't very well known but Two Rock make probably the GREATEST amps ever made and I would kill to fire one up!
I just read all of the comments and couldn't believe how long it too for someone (John Corcoran) to mention Les Paul. As for the 'tard who "knows" better players than Robert Johnson, just remember that Johnson INVENTED the sound and everyone else is just copying him or building upon his foundation. This list might work better split up by genre. Segovia may be one of the best guitarists ever, but he doesn't work with the others on the list. Stanley Jordan is incredible, but he'd be out of place on this list. What about Charo – yes, the Coochie Coochie girl from Hollywood Squares plays a mean classical and flamenco guitar! TopTenzMaster – let's see a bunch of subcategory lists…
Tremolo bars - Many lower-end guitars are designed to look cool and are equipped with floating bridges for super tremolo bends and flutter. They look cool , but a sad fact is many of these lower end models have low quality hardware. There is nothing more frustrating than being a newbie, buying a hot looking guitar, and have to fine-tune it every 2 minutes. Avoid this, or buy a decent bridge for around $100.00 extra and install it.
1961 is the sweet spot for Fender Strats IMO: the best 3-tone sunburst and tone! My 1961 Strat has been called one of the best sounding vintage Strats by Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music, who has been working on vintage guitars since 1968. This Strat is the closest thing to that incredible Strat; this is a very rare opportunity for anyone looking for the classic vintage Strat tone without equal!
Martin's OM, or "Orchestra Model", available from 1929 to 1933, has a rare combination of features. The joining of a long-scale (25.4") neck with a small body makes it an extremely responsive and playable guitar. In many ways the OM models were the first truly modern flattop guitars. They were the first Martins to have necks with 14 frets clear of the body. The OM has a wide neck (1 3/4" as opposed to the dreadnought's 1 11/16") which appeals to fingerstyle players. The string spacing is slightly greater at the bridge than on other models too, although not as wide as a classical guitars. The neck shape of old OMs is a bit unique too, although this is variable since each neck was handmade. OMs have a wide but thin backshaped V-shape which is very comfortable. Finally, the OM's smaller body size makes the guitar easy to hold, especially in the seated position. Compared this to the D dreadnought which is larger both in body depth and width (dreadnought players seem to use straps and stand up so the guitar's size is less of a factor).

Can be useful after the distortion pedals to shape the sound, and they can also be used as a boost pedal. Remember that boosting here will increase the signal going into the following pedals, and in some cases this may cause 'clipping' (unwanted distortion if the input to a pedal is too high). I don't tend to use EQ much these days, but this is where I placed it when I did, just be careful with how much you boost.
@Christos – As mentioned in the article above, wherever they sound good to you is the best place to put them! However, traditionally people tend to put filter pedals near the beginning of the chain (like wah pedals), and volume pedals as well. An EQ can go first if you just want to EQ your guitar signal before running into your effects, or last if you want the EQ applied to your entire signal chain, or somewhere in between. It really depends on what you personally are going for.
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Scratch and Dent - Demo Model full size electric guitar from Davison is the perfect way to start playing at an affordable price with features you'd normally expect on a much more expensive instrument. With a built-in humbucker pickup for that "rock" sound, you can plug this guitar into any amplifier or software system. It has a high gloss finished body and a contoured body for ultimate play-ability. Perfect for the aspiring guitar player of any age, this Davison is also Teacher Approved.

I don’t think beginners should spend a ton of money on their very first electric guitar. However, around the $300 mark you have a lot of options for really great entry level electrics. So, if you’re a beginner with a little more cash available, I say skip the “starter packs” and buy some good, solid gear to begin your journey. Choose from this list and you won’t need to upgrade for many years.
In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.
Here we have a VERY WELL MADE 1978 Vintage Japanese Quality Replica of G!b$@n Dove Acoustic guitar. This is a "SUPERB" top of the line model its Premium woods used in its construction along with very good workmanship see the bindings and the detail wow...and has now over the past 28 years has wonderfully aged into a very nice vintage guitar in its own right. The Vintage aged spruce top is of a high quality on often seen today with a woderful aged finish, also see the sides back & neck all made of premium grade mahogany WoW! The finish is SUNBURST and was done by a master no doubt I compair this very favorably with any G!b$@n for its fit & finish and sound! Believed to be from the same factory as the Aria and a few others exported to St. Lousi music in the 70's...this example is in very good - excellent original condition rated 8.5++/10 Quite a clean example. The frets are in good condition the neck is straight and tuners work well all and all a very enjoyable player with a wonderful rich tone. A Gig bag or case is optional and is available. Dont be fooled by the low price under $400 this guitar would cost over $1200 today out of Japan! Thie is a Bargain find get her before shes gone. .
Another thing that endears them to many guitarists is that they source 100% of their woods from sustainable sources and they use hydro-electric power. When it comes to the environmental footprint of a guitar, this is an area where Seagull are out in front and the big name brands, who while working hard to improve their own environmental impacts, are still playing some degree of catch-up.
Morning everyone, well it is here in UK anyway. Who can help with my find. It's a Dia Hummingbird labelled F 315 but no serial number. So from what I can find Dia was a brand used by Matsumoku but I can only see electrics under Dia brand when I search. However it looks identical to a Aria F315 Hummingbird on eBay USA at present, and identical to an Aria Pro II from the 1976 catalogue but labelled W 30 model I believe. I won't put a link on here in case I'm breaking rules. It has that weird aluminium compensated bridge and seriously, this one looks brand new with two tiny dings that would make it a second or an ex-demo if it was on sale. Action at low E 12th is about 2.7mm and about 1.8 at high e. It's in such good condition I began to question if in fact it is a 'knock off of a knock off' though why anyone would think that would work I can't guess. It is very very playable, and at first I wasn't keen on the tone though sustain is great (despite bridge) but I changed to heavier strings (13) with much improvement. I'm seeing a luthier friend next week who is finishing off work on a brilliant Terada FW 613 (D18 clone if you like), but I'm wondering whether to get him to replace the whole alloy bridge. I can do a couple of pics if anyone is interested. Any help in identification of maybe year (guessing 1976) and origin greatly appreciated. I think it's a keeper, but should I change that bridge ? Has anyone done similar on one of these compensated aluminium designs and what were results. Many thanks.
Gold Plated strings are really just 80/20 Bronze & Zinc wound nylon strings.  They are also used to produce the bass wound strings of a set of classical strings.  They maintain their place in the market due to having a much brighter tone than silver plated strings and are used by many professionals due to their capability to project louder and sharper.
Potentiometers are used in all types of electronic products so it is a good idea to look for potentiometers specifically designed to be used in electric guitars. If you do a lot of volume swells, you will want to make sure the rotational torque of the shaft feels good to you and most pots designed specifically for guitar will have taken this into account. When you start looking for guitar specific pots, you will also find specialty pots like push-pull pots, no-load pots and blend pots which are all great for getting creative and customizing your guitar once you understand how basic electric guitar circuits work.
Believe it or not, Eddie Van Halen hadn’t even heard rock music until he and his family moved from the Netherlands to Pasadena California in 1967. After hearing Cream, he quickly abandoned piano and drums for the guitar, learning the instrument by picking licks off records by Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and Jeff Beck. These influences were merely a springboard, though. Eddie was quickly able to put his own mark on everything he played.

This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.

The F-50 was the bottom of the line, a single cutaway with a single DeArmond humbucker pickup, like those on the previous acoustic hybrids, in the neck position. Controls were one volume and one tone control mounted along the edge of the lower treble bout, with black, chrome-topped knobs. This had a trapeze tailpiece with a sort of Cabinet of Dr. Caligari “M” cutout of the center. This was finished in a brown to yellow two-tone sunburst. The first prototype bore the serial number 179828. 1,165 F-50s were built from the middle of 1962 to the spring of 1965.

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Love love love this guitar! I ordered it because it reminds me of my Dad's old Kay archtop that I initially learned to play on. The retro jazz style of this guitar is awesome. My musician friends love it and and like the sound of it although they haven't heard it plugged in yet. It took me a very short while to get used to the strings (made by the company for this guitar) and while they have a tinnier sound than what I'm used to for an acoustic guitar, they do deliver when it is plugged in. Overall it really seems to be more of an electric-style guitar. The neck is narrow and the body is small - something that I am so happy with! It is extremely playable. I may switch to bronze strings to get a warmer tone, but for now I want to give these strings a chance to sing. I also ordered a case from the company that fits this guitar, and for the price, it is awesome as well! Very light and the guitar fits perfectly and securely. At a recent gig, a complete stranger came up to me to look at and admire this guitar - it truly is a beautiful instrument. The woodgrain is rich and not as red as the pictures make it look. I feel like Stu Sutcliff - don't really need to know how to play - I can simply stand in the background and look cool ;-)

Acoustic guitarists can sometimes get left out in the cold when it comes to multi-effects pedals. Fortunately, the team at Boss have been listening to your requests for an innovative multi-effects pedal for acoustic guitar, and ended up creating a complete live performance option for players of all levels. In fact, they’ve crafted the best multi effects pedal for acoustic guitar that you could find in the Boss AD-10 Acoustic Guitar Effects Processor.

At the higher end of the market, you will definitely want to consider theGibson Memphis ES Les Paul Studio. A stunning marriage of the ES hollowbody and Les Paul solidbody shapes, this is a model that combines playability, power, sustain and tonal warmth to perfection. Equipped with ’57 Classic and Super ’57 Classic pickups and boasting solid construction throughout, the ES-Les Paul Studio is perfect for anything and everything you could imagine. Each model is supplied with a Gibson Memphis hardshell case to get you out and about in style.
If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
Even if you are on a budget, it’s always worth looking in the higher price brackets and considering something a little more expensive, which will offer better sound quality (which is always encouraging), better build quality (usually more comfortable to hold and play), looks cooler (which will keep you motivated), and will last you longer – allowing you to grow with the guitar. It’s best to buy at the top end of what you can afford. For additional inspiration, make sure to check out this electric guitar list.
ESP is another Japanese guitar brand that makes this top 10 list with its many artist endorsements and actual user recommendations. Founded in 1975, it started as a builder of custom made parts for guitarists who want to personalize their existing instruments. Now ESP is known worldwide for their hot-rodded versions of popular guitar shapes, and other unique and eccentric designs, built to please modern rock and metal players.
Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Amplified Parts makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.
Same woods sounding different? OF COURSE!!! Look, I’ve been a carpenter for over 30 years and can absolutely inform you that there is a marked variation of characteristics of wood in the same species…density, tap tone, characteristics of how the individual piece reacts to being worked with tools…heck for all anybody knows internal stresses (for example as indicated by how a 12″ wide piece of wood reacts to being ripped down the center…many times both pieces end up being bowed and such) might play a big factor in how said piece of wood sounds musically…shrugs shoulders…
So many new guitarists, and even not so new guitarists, play with the volume and tone knobs turned all the way up all the time and then shell out lots of money for pedals when they are not satisfied with their tone before taking advantage of what the guitar can do (and it's a lot). Then of course, your amp's tone controls can refine things even more.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place between "jazz-clean" all the way to "blues dirty." If you're aiming high, Ibanez has an ARTSTAR for you.

Unless it's broken and will need to be replaced, start with obtaining a new nut that is anything to your liking, preferably a blank nut rather than a pre-cut to avoid improper string height. If cutting a blank try copying your old nut and make adjustments if needed using the neck as a guide after cutting out the nut. To do this take a sharp blade that is easy to work with such as an X-acto and cut the finish that holds the sides of the nut. Make sure to cut all of the finish as it will break apart when you take out the nut.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽
Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo

I can't believe this! Blackstar are designed and built by retired Marshall professionals and they have every last bit of knowledge on tube amps, heads, and combos. I own a Blackstar HT-1R, it is 1w but it feels like 100w just the way the Blackstar team have combined their ideas and structures and balanced it out with tubes. And line 6 is further up the list? You are mistaken bro. Another thing. These are bloody expensive and aren't very well known but Two Rock make probably the GREATEST amps ever made and I would kill to fire one up!
While all acoustic guitars share the same basic construction and design elements, there are important differences that affect their sound and playability. Each guitar shares those basic characteristics above, but now that you know how an acoustic guitar is designed and built, you will want to consider some of the variables that change how each guitar feels and plays. These variables include:
Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
This is a guitar tuning and style of playing on the Classical Guitar that has been developed by Ian Low. It was recently publicized in the form of a series of videos posted onto his YouTube channel on 14 July 2016. The 6 strings are tuned to F, G, C, E, C# and C using the standard guitar strings EADGBE strings to allow a different style of harmonic playing.
The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.

Delay/echo: Delay/echo units produce an echo effect by adding a duplicate instrument-to-amplifier electrical signal to the original signal at a slight time-delay. The effect can either be a single echo called a "slap" or "slapback," or multiple echos. A well-known use of delay is the lead guitar in the U2 song "Where the Streets Have No Name", and also the opening riff of "Welcome To The Jungle" by Guns N'Roses.[86]
Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965. Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars. Martin ukes are considered to be the best for craftsmenship and sound. The Koa wood models are more collectible than mahagony models. The fancier style 5 models are worth more than plainer styles 0 to 3. All sizes are collectible.
The Model EP-17-T was a regular-sized thinline with a single round cutaway, bolt-on neck, non-dipped three-and-three head, dots, three pickups, adjustable bridge, plain trapeze tail, elevated guard, three rocker switches plate-mounted on the upper shoulder, and controls on a rectangular strip on the lower bout. All three were offered in shaded mahogany finish.
Many players use more than one effect – in this case, they place them next to each other on the floor, joining the output of one pedal to the input of the next using a small guitar lead called a “patch lead”. This allows them to use more than one effect at a time and toggle and combine them as they wish. Most players with multiple effects pedals attach them to a board, imaginatively called a… “pedal board”. This makes the pedals easier to transport and carry around. They set up and plug together all the pedals on the board, so when the user gets to a gig they can just plug in and play without having to set everything up again.
This is an interesting one - by fitting a MIDI pickup to your guitar you can record your performances as a MIDI track as well as live audio. This can then be assigned to any software or hardware MIDI-triggered instrument to double up or even replace the guitar part. Some DAWs now also allow the extraction of audio to MIDI data from a recorded audio part, but the MIDI pickup route is more accurate where electric guitar is concerned.
Everyone from Jazz guitarists to lovers of Queens of the Stone Age style heavy rock have fallen in love with the Artcore series since it was first introduced in 2002. Fusing expert workmanship with affordability, the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar, Transparent Black Flat is one of the best cheap electric guitars you’ll find on the market today. It’s budget friendly price tag makes it a fantastic choice for beginners whilst the high-quality pickups and superb tonewoods are the reason why so many pro level players will choose it for the stage and studio.
Very cheap acoustics are usually not such a great idea. Often their sound quality is poor and they are hard to play. I often see students selling them after a six-month struggle (if they managed to stick with it that long!). So if your budget is very tight, I would not get an acoustic. You may think you save a little money because you don't need to buy an amplifier as well, but as I said before you don't have to use an amplifier to practice anyway.
Separate bass amplifiers which do not contain speakers, often called "heads" or "amp heads", are usually integrated units, with a preamplifier, equalizer (bass and treble controls) and a power amplifier combined in a single unit. Some players use separate preamplifier/power amplifier setups, where one or more preamplifiers drive one or more power amplifiers. In the latter example, a bass player can use a bass-specific power amplifier or use a sound reinforcement system power amp. Bass amp heads are available in high-wattage power ratings that are not available in combo units. For example, the Ampeg SVT8-PRO amp head puts out 2,500 watts RMS at 2 ohms, a power level that is high enough for the largest 8x10" cabinets and the largest venues (stadiums, outdoor festivals, etc.).

In this buying guide, you’ll learn the essentials of what effects pedals do and which ones to look for depending on the kind of tone you want to experiment with. Here’s the quick overview: effects pedals (also called “stompboxes”) are electronic devices that connect in-line with your guitar and amp to change the signal going through them. Some work with analog circuits and some are digital, but they’re all powerful tools for shaping your sound in endlessly creative ways.

In this buying guide, you’ll learn the essentials of what effects pedals do and which ones to look for depending on the kind of tone you want to experiment with. Here’s the quick overview: effects pedals (also called “stompboxes”) are electronic devices that connect in-line with your guitar and amp to change the signal going through them. Some work with analog circuits and some are digital, but they’re all powerful tools for shaping your sound in endlessly creative ways.
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The MG-100 has so many features, its hard to name them all. But, here we can list: 13 classic amp models via NUX's TS/AC technology, vintage 3-band passive EQ modeling for every amp model, 6-band graphic EQ designed specifically for electric guitar (120hz,250hz,750hz,1.6khz,3.2khz,6.4khz), 11 cabinet models, seamless and quick preset switching , loop sounds can be played with drum machine, rhythm beat synchronously. The aux in jack makes it easy to practice along with MP3, CDs and other inputs. Large color TFT LCD panel (160 x128), graphic interface making the overall operation easy and intuitive. A total of 72 presets, 36 factory + 36 user presets.

Go to iOS Ram List  Both the above sets convert your device or PC to the equivalent of a high-end sound module for your midi keyboard.  It has the full 15-velocity-layered version of the Yamaha C5 Grand (592mb) along with lots of other sounds. This set also includes extra string sounds that are in the Nice-Strings-PlusOrchestra set (all except the harp).
In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.
The core of this guitar is its twin horn double cutaway mahogany body, which follows after the original SG. But as expected in this entry-level price range, they exchanged what's supposed to be a mahogany neck for maple with 12" radius rosewood fingerboard. Specifications remain faithful to the original, with a scale length of 24.75" and 1.68" nut width. The generic pickups installed sound surprisingly good for the price, but like many have done, the pickups can be easily swapped out for more hard hitting humbuckers to get more out of the guitar.

In reality, arenas and festival grounds are the only places where anything bigger than a half stack would make sense. In smaller venues, the problem is always the same: amps can't be louder then the drums or the vocals. Listen to any good recording of your favorite bands and you'll notice that the kick drum, snare drum, and vocals are the highest in the mix. If you don't replicate this live the songs sound lost and washed out.
Generally, a band sounds the best to the audience when you have an attentive, knowledgeable sound person who is paid well by the band or venue. He also needs the right tools to balance the sound for the room. If all of the instruments onstage are blasting at full volume, the poor PA can’t keep up- and the people in the first few rows have their heads torn off by whatever instrument amplifier they are unlucky enough to be standing in front of. This results in an unbalanced mix that the sound person can’t fix. It might sound awesome onstage, but you want the audience to have a great experience too, right? With monitors, side fills, several amps/cabs, and a fort full of cymbals onstage, things get loud quickly, and everything competes for the same sonic space. It is easy for band members to get into ‘volume wars’ while the sound dude/dudette takes everyone out of the mix but the vocals right before they throw up their hands and shake their heads. The audience might not know what sonic problems are occurring, but they definitely will hear it. An audience member describing a gig like this to a friend might say, “I saw this band, but they sounded terrible.” No one wants that kind of review. We spend a lot of money on guitars, pedals, amps, and microphones. But many  musicians at the gig just set everything up and hope for the best. 
Many community, vocational or technical colleges offer technical and musical programs for those who wish to become guitar technicians. Many are instrument construction and/or repair programs. Guitar tech courses include construction, set-up, structural repair, fretwork, structural design and finishing for acoustic and electric guitars. Any courses involving musical theory and music technology may be helpful in advancing a guitar tech's career.
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I’m starting at guitar too at sixty years old, my opinion is that it’s not the guitar, but the time put into practicing, you can dup any type of sound with the features from amps, and guitar processors. You can even make an electric guitar sound like an acoustic. I purchased a line 6 150 watt amp, and a processor from line six, and I can dup any type of guitar sound. I built my own guitar
With this in mind, rather than taking the category chronologically, let’s accept our good fortune in today having all of history’s distortion sounds at our fingertips—so next time out, we’ll look first at those which transform the guitar and amp’s natural tone least, working toward those which balls it up most. In other words, from the least synthetic to the most synthetic-sounding of the genre.
This comment is directed towards the video of the gentleman changing guitar strings. I have an LP Junior, so I don't thread my strings through the guitar body. But I'm curious why he is turning the guitar completely over, flipping the guitar towards himself each time when he could in fact just lean the guitar away from himself, leaving the back of the guitar facing him? I know that seems a bit nit picky, but it would be tremendously more efficient just leaving the guitar on its side with less risk of the string damaging the guitar surface. Any thoughts or am I just missing something?

In 1954, Fender introduced the Fender Stratocaster, or "Strat". It was positioned as a deluxe model and offered various product improvements and innovations over the Telecaster. These innovations included an ash or alder double-cutaway body design for badge assembly with an integrated vibrato mechanism (called a synchronized tremolo by Fender, thus beginning a confusion of the terms that still continues), three single-coil pickups, and body comfort contours. Leo Fender is also credited with developing the first commercially successful electric bass called the Fender Precision Bass, introduced in 1951.
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
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