At Ibanez, there has always been a goal to be anything but traditional. For over half a century, Ibanez has been pushing the world of guitar manufacturing forward, consistently breaking new ground. It's this drive that led them to become one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to make a name for themselves in Europe and North America. With unparalleled commitment to quality, Ibanez Guitars are considered among the upper echelon by musicians of all playing styles around the world. A quick look at some of the musicians who play Ibanez guitars is sure to leave you very impressed. Artists such as Head and Munky of KoRn, Noodles of the Offspring, Mick Thomson of Slipknot, Fletcher Dragge of Pennywise, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani all trust their sound to Ibanez guitars. Now it's your turn to do the same. Ibanez makes an impressively wide selection of guitars, so you're sure to be able to find one that is perfect for you here. Say, for example, you're a beginner who's looking for a great acoustic guitar? If that's the case, you'll love the JamPack IJV50 Quickstart Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar Pack. This set features everything you need to get started, including a beautiful dreadnought, as well as an electric tuner, a gig bag, a guitar strap, and an accessory pouch. If you'd rather a versatile acoustic-electric, you'll love an option such as the V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar. This guitar is highlighted by its outstanding playability and fantastic tone. With an incredible response and dynamic range, this guitar is perfectly suited for small clubs and larger venues alike. Of course, if all you want to do is plug in and pump up the volume, you're going to want to check out the JS1200 Joe Satriani Signature Guitar. This candy apple dream is built with top-tier electronics and sleek overall construction. With a resonant tone an impressive sustain (thanks, in part, to its DiMarzio humbuckers), this guitar is a progressive player's dream. Regardless of your playing style, there's an Ibanez here with your name on it that is ready to be played. With expertise that is second to none, Ibanez is a name you can trust in the music world.

Yea, really depends on your area. At the local Guitar Center, the guy seems to know what hes doing. Overworked and underpaid if what iveheard about GC and Sam Ash techs is true though. Theres a local tech who got his site to be one of the top results and hes busy as well. Perfect work. And even though hes busy, hes fast too. Thats why his site is one of the top results though.


Combining Reverbs: You don't have to generate all of the reverb sound from a single plug-in, and using two different reverbs can also help you to save CPU power. For example, though a nice convolution reverb gives a good, believable sound, long impulse responses tend to eat up CPU. By using the convolution reverb for the early reflections, and then using something like Logic 's Platinumverb or Waves Trueverb to add the reverb tail — which is less critical to our perception of the sound — you should get a convincing but less processor-intensive result. Matt Houghton


A note on right versus left when referring to the hands. Traditionally all guitarists, regardless of right or left hand dominance, were made to play a right handed guitar, most likely due to the lack of left handed instruments. To this day left handed guitarists and guitars are still fairly rare. When guitarists refer to the right hand, it can be assumed to mean the plucking hand, while the left hand is used to fret the strings.
Meanwhile, Royston, due to the loss of a lucrative government contract in one of its other companies, went into liquidation in 1969. As a result, Vox went through a series of owners including a British bank and Dallas-Arbiter. The AC30 continued to be built alongside newer solid-state amps, but in a series of cost-cutting moves different loudspeakers with ceramic magnets began to be used, as were printed circuit boards and solid-state rectification. Particleboard replaced some plywood parts in cabinet construction, and at one point an all-solid-state version was introduced alongside the classic tube-powered model. Rose-Morris, Marshall Amplification's British distributor, bought Vox in the 1980s when their deal with Marshall ended. They tried to reinvigorate the Vox brand, continuing to build the AC30 along with a few other decent modern designs. In 1990 they sold the company to Korg.
Add bite or presence by boosting between 2kHz and 6kHz, depending on the tone you're after. Little over 4-5kHz is produced by a guitar speaker, though going for a brighter DI'd clean sound is quite legitimate for artistic reasons. Similar-sounding electric guitars that may be conflicting within a mix can be separated to a limited extent by adding bite at different frequencies, though choosing two different-sounding guitars and/or amp sounds and examining the arrangement carefully usually works better. As a rule, single-coil guitars are best for cutting through a busy mix without taking up too much space, while humbucking pickups create a thicker sound which may be beneficial in recordings where there is only one guitar part.
It is easy to make the mistake that the tone control set-up in an electric guitar is a simple single stage Resistor / Capacitor filter, where the two components are in series, the other side of the capacitor goes to ground, the signal is applied to the other end of the resistor and the output is measured across the capacitor. If that were so then your first calculation is roughly correct, while in a practical situation in the second, the capacitor would be fed from the impedance of the signal source. Lets say this is a test generator with an impedance of 600 ohms – the -3dB cut off would be around 12kHz. This is not the case for the typical electric guitar.
In a pinch, you can check for standard string action using a business card; it should just fit between the fret and the string at the 12th fret. Be prepared to adjust the neck at least a couple of times a year, particularly if you live in an area with large humidity swings between summer and winter. If your action is very low and you're still having difficulty playing bar chords, etc., you may want to switch to lighter gauge guitar strings. Be prepared to re-adjust the neck after you restring, because lighter strings exert less pressure on the neck, so you may now have an underbow.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple & Wenge - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Gibraltar Standard II-8 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 808 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Cobalt Blue Metallic, Galaxy Black - Made In: Japan
By the early 1980s, the radical experiments of early 1970s-era fusion gave way to a more radio-friendly sounds of smooth jazz. Guitarist Pat Metheny mixed the sounds of blues, country, and “world” music, along with rock and jazz, playing both a flat-top acoustic guitar and an electric guitar with a softer, more mellow tone which was sweetened with a shimmering effect known as “chorusing". During the 1980s, a neo-traditional school of jazz sought to reconnect with the past. In keeping with such an aesthetic, young guitarists of this era sought a clean and round tone, and they often played traditional hollow-body arch-top guitars without electronic effects, frequently through vacuum tube amplifiers.
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JS32 Dinky is one of those old school models that has stuck around, and for a good reason. The guitar is similar to the SL2, however it brings a much more neutral experience. It’s all about that Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge, two kicking humbuckers, and a fretboard that is built for speed. While I wouldn’t say it’s the best guitar I’ve ever played, Jackson JS32 Dinky gives its competition a run for their money.
Another way of categorizing bass equipment manufacturers is by which part of the market they are targeting. While Peavey and Yorkville products are aimed at the generalist mass market, some bass equipment manufacturers, such as Acoustic Image or Walter Woods make expensive "boutique" equipment that is aimed at a niche market within the professional musician market. Acoustic Image amplifiers and speaker cabinets tend to be used by professional acoustic folk and jazz musicians, and Walter Woods amplifiers are associated with professional acoustic jazz bass players.
We all are now living in a great time considering the choices that we currently have. Even though it is a good thing every so often, it can actually be complicated to decide and buy the best electric guitar. If you one to have it for a serious reason, it will be realistic to own the one which comes equipped with guitar essentials like strap, carry-bag, picks, and if possible a good practice guitar amp.
Next was Eunice's ‘electric guitar’. It was beautiful and hardly used. However a common problem with guitars of this era were the horrible pickguards made from celluloid that would off-gas while in storage and then wreak havoc over the guitar’s other parts. Upon closer inspection the guitar was actually dripping wet from the many years of storage in the hard case.
Designed to be the greatest all-rounder, the Grand Auditorium shape was the perfect blend of size, shape, volume and comfort, and its modern-day incarnation has seen the likes of the biggest pop star on the planet these days, Taylor Swift pick one up. People forget that before mega-stardom, Taylor was a respected country artist, and it was on a Taylor Grand Auditorium that she plied her trade.
In 1992, two more models were added, the single-cutaway BC-40 and the 5-string B-540. Although widely admired[who?] for their high quality and lovely appointments, they proved to have limited appeal due to their $2000-plus list prices. By 1997, all four of these initial basses were dropped in favor of the B-1, a lower-priced ABG with laminated mahogany sides as part of Martin’s 1 series of guitars. The BM, an even less expensive model in Martin’s now discontinued Road series soon followed; it had laminated mahogany sides with a solid mahogany back. Also around this time electronics became standard on Martin basses. The most recent additions are the BC-15, a single-cutaway version with a mahogany top, the BC-16GTE, also a single-cutaway with solid Genuine mahogany back and sides with a gloss top, and the 00C-16GTAE, which is a slimmer thin-line version of the previously mentioned model. As a special edition, Martin offered the Alternative X Bass with jet black High Pressure Laminate back and sides and a Graffiti-patterned Aluminum finish top. This bass was very similar in build to the other guitars in Martin’s X series. There have been two Limited Edition Martin acoustic bass models. The first, the SWB Sting Signature Model, was released in 1999 and was made with woods certified by the Rainforest Alliance’s SmartWood program[citation needed]. The SWB’s top is made with book matched solid Sitka spruce reclaimed from pulp logs, the back, sides and neck are solid certified cherry, and the fingerboard is certified katalox. Sting’s signature is inlaid between the 18th and 19th frets, and a label inside the body states that a portion of the sale price is donated to the Rainforest Foundation International[citation needed]. The second and more recent Limited Edition is the B-28KV Klaus Voormann Signature model released in 2008 for the German market. It has a Sitka spruce top with Solid East Indian Rosewood back and sides and a black Ebony fingerboard. The headstock features a unique art design by Klaus as a circular inlay making each bass a one-of-a-kind. In addition to these U.S.-made instruments, Martin also markets Sigma ABGs made in Korea.
Birmingham’s Table Scraps add a grunge-y Midlands mud to the garage rock sound established by the likes of 13th Floor Elevators and The Cramps. Guitarist Scott sticks to a “three-pedal limit”, using a Death By Audio Fuzz War (“a versatile monster”), Echo Dream 2 and Boss DD-3 to jarring effect to create freaky, DC59’d melodic lead bursts. As Scott says: “Once you try 12-string everything else only sounds half as good.”
Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: S-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Five Alarm Red, Desert Sun Yellow, Magenta, Black, White
When you're in the market for an instrument, whether it's brand new or new-to-you, our impressive selection gives you plenty to choose from and we'll be happy to help you find the right fit. Maybe you need some equipment for a few gigs or a short tour? Our rentals department can hook you up. There are even lessons and free workshops here to discover, so you can always learn more about music no matter your skill level. For all the details, you can drop by to visit us in-person or give us a call.
At the end of 1931, Beauchamp, Barth, Rickenbacker and with several other individuals banded together and formed the Ro-Pat-In Corporation(elektRO–PATent-INstruments) in order to manufacture and distribute electrically amplified musical instruments, with an emphasis upon their newly developed A-25 Hawaiian Guitar, often referred to as the “Frying Pan” lap-steel electric guitar as well as an Electric Spanish (standard) model and companion amplifiers. In the summer of 1932, Ro-Pat-In began to manufacture cast aluminum production versions of the Frying Pan as well as a lesser number of standard Spanish Electrics built from wooden bodies similar to those made in Chicago for the National Company. These instruments constitute the origin of the electric guitar we know and use today by virtue of their string-driven electro-magnetic pick-ups. Not only that, but Ro-Pat-In was the first company in the world specifically created to manufacture electric instruments. In 1933 the Ro-Pat-In company’s name was changed to Electro String Instrument Corporation and its instruments labeled simply as “Electro”. In 1934 the name of Rickenbacher” was added in honor of the company’s principal partner, Adolph Rickenbacker. In 1935 the company introduced several new models including the Model “B” Electric Spanish guitar which is considered the first solid body electric guitar. Because the original aluminum Frying Pans were susceptible to tuning problems from the expansion of the metal under hot performing lights, many of the new models were manufactured from cast Bakelite, an early synthetic plastic from which bowling balls are made.[2]
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.

The Lotus Vantage copy (Washburn Eagle, Aria Pro II Cardinal series, or Ibanez Artist) double cutaway (batwing) guitar with a solid body, 3 per side tuners on headstock, rosewood fingerboard with brass inlays, brass nut and neck-through construction (though there may have been a bolt-on model). This was usually finished in emerald green, polished mahogany or stained blue/white breadboard style and occasionally gloss white with 2 exposed humbucker pickups.

In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
Gibson 2012 SG Special '70s Tribute Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$649.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 SG Faded Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$659.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar, Left Handed (with Case)   New from$2,299.00In Stockor 12 payments of $191.59 Free Ground Shipping Gibson 2019 LP Junior Tribute DC Electric Guitar, Left Handed, (with Gig Bag)   New from$799.00In Stockor 12 payments of $66.59 Free Ground Shipping See All Left-Handed Electric Guitars

Schooled in flamenco and jazz, Robby Krieger pushed beyond rock at a time when most players were still bound to the blues. In the Doors, he had the improvisatory flair to follow Jim Morrison's wildest journeys, wrote some of their biggest hits ("Light My Fire"), and picked up the slack in their keyboard-drums-guitar lineup. "Not having a bass player… made me play more bass notes to fill out the bottom," he said. "Not having a rhythm player also made me play differently, to fill out the sound. I always felt like three players simultaneously."


One final thought, although we're selling guitars here this is clearly a labor of love. If VintageSilvertones.com works out and can sustain itself we will be expanding the site. If you're not into buying a guitar now you can pick up a cool T-Shirt with a Rockin' Silvertone Guitar on it!. We will be adding new designs shortly to the t-shirt offerings. So stay tuned for more information or not!
My very strong opinion is that you should find an experienced guitar player, who plays in the style that you aspire to.  Tell them very clearly that you want help finding a beginner guitar that is in good condition and is easy to play.  Don't worry about resale value, looks, brand prestige, etc..  Get that person to help you find something that you can afford.  This is especially true for acoustic guitars (easy to play electrics are easier to find).  This might very well be a used guitar.  Try hard not  to buy a guitar because a salesperson told you it was a great beginner guitar and that it would be easy to play -- unless you really, really trust that salesperson.  It is true that the more money you are willing to spend then the easier it will be to find a guitar you can easily learn on but there are cheap guitars out there that will fit the bill.
WIRING Lay your beautifully finished guitar on a soft towel so you don't scratch it and cover the back with a cloth as wel so you don't splatter solder on it. How you wire you guitar up depends on the layout you have chosen. Mine was a simple one tone, one volume and three way switch set up. I have gone with the Les Paul set up on other guitars which is a two tone and two volume before as well. What ever set up you go with just follow the schematic that either came with you pickups or get one from Seymour Duncan. They also have instructional videos that are done by Seymore Duncan himself on Strats and Les Pauls. I recomend watching these if its your first time wiring a guitar.
I think it's OK to find out what the knobs are supposed to do, so you know roughly what to expect, but I would thoroughly recommend just sitting for half an hour and playing around with all of them, just seeing what sounds you can get. You'd be amazed what tonal variety you can get from moving the volume knob before you go anywhere near the tone knobs.
Footswitches allow for handsfree control of your multi-effects pedal, so having more of them is good, as long as you're OK with the added bulk and weight that they require. Some processors have a stompbox mode feature that lets you utilize footswitches much like a traditional pedalboard, but most of the time the switches serve as preset selectors, along with other secondary uses.

Semi-hollow Body Guitars: The first and most classic semi-hollow body is the Gibson ES-335, which was quickly embraced with Chuck Berry and later sonically reinvented by Freddie King, Alvin Lee, Larry Carlton and a host of others in the ’60s and ’70s, who pushed semi-hollow Electric Spanish models into the ’60s and ’70s with aggressive technique and tones.


Since real knobs occupy space, this multi-effects processor is quite bulky, a welcome compromise that makes it easier to setup and adjust on the fly. The pedal comes with 59 effects and includes 9 amp models that feature Boss' COSM technology, the standard tech that they now employ on many of their effects and amps. You can combine up to 8 of these to craft your preferred tones, which you can then save into its 36 user presets. Other features include a built-in tuner, a 38-second looper and the ability to record your guitar sound directly to a computer via USB.
Shecter is known for manufacturing quality rock and metal friendly guitars at reasonable price points, and I think that they use evil model names to keep their instruments from the hands of pop and ballad players. The Hellraiser C-1 FR-S showcases what this company can give metal players in the mid-tier price point, and with its name, it is obviously not meant for choirs and church music.
The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.

From its beginnings in 1970, Mesa/Boogie was beloved for its small-but-powerful Mark series amps; in 1989, however, the company decided to take its game to a new audience. The result was the Rectifier range of bigger and beefier Dual and Triple Rectifier amps. Since then, the Dual Rectifier has become one of the most popular rock amps on the planet.

When you have signature models for two of the most impressive guitar virtuosos in the world, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, there’s certainly something you’re doing right. Such is the case with Ibanez. Started as a sub-brand beneath sheet music and music-product distributing company, Hoshino Gakki, Ibanez began in the 1920s, specializing in importing the guitars of respected Spanish builder Salvador Ibáñez. In the 1930s, they adopted the maker’s name as a show of respect. In the 1960s through the 70s, the brand shifted focus to making high-quality knockoffs of Fender and Gibson models, until Gibson’s parent company filed a lawsuit for copyright infringement. After settling out of court in 1978, the brand again began making original models, including signature guitars for the likes of Kiss frontman Paul Stanley (who plays a guitar similar in shape to the Iceman pictured above) and Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead. Now they specialize in precision instruments for musicians who like their music loud, hard, and fast.


We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 



Clarence Leonidas “Leo” Fender was established this brand in 1946. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) manufactures the stringed instruments and amplifiers, such as solid-body electric guitars, including the Stratocaster and the Telecaster. This brand is the kings of hearts and getting the popularity from blues to quick rock tempo. Fender’s Precision and Jazz Bass models are now considered to be the standard to which most other electric bass guitars are measured. It’s famous for best guitars which are made ever in the history.

Unfortunately, not many reference materials are available to document in complete detail, but we can hit some of the highlights, and illuminate a number of relationships along the way. If you have catalogs, ads or pictures of guitars that can help fill in some of the blanks, please let me know (Michael Wright, PO Box 60207, Philadelphia, PA 19102).
Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.
The Les Paul SL from Epiphone is a great choice for a beginner guitarist looking for classic LP vibes. With two single-coil ceramic pickups and a lightweight body, this model should be able to cover a variety of musical styles and genres while coming in at a very attractive price point. The Les Paul SL is available in 6 distinct styles including Heritage Cherry Sunburst, Pacific Blue, Natural Yellow Sun, Turquoise, Vintage Sunburst and Ebony.

That’s not to say Gibson always met expectations during its storied past. “I dreamed of having a Gibson guitar and I achieved that dream,” Hook said. “It was a hollow-bodied EB-1 [a bass guitar] but it was medium scale so it was a s--t guitar and it sounded like s--t and I had to put new strings and a new bridge on it. It still sounded duff so I copied the shape and amalgamated it with a Yamaha.”

ACTION: fret low E at first fret and measure the distance from the bottom of the to the top of the 15th fret. It should be 5/64". Do the same with the high E, measurement should be 3/64". Now measure the string height at the nut; underside of the string to the top of the fret. Low E and A should measure 2/64", D and G =1.5/64" and B and high E = 1/64". If string height at nut is correct, recheck string height at 12th fret with strings open. Measurement for low and high E's should be the same as measurement taken at the 15th.
Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!
This is normally when I tell you about a crowdfunding campaign, but there isn't one currently running for this device, so if you're interested in getting a ToneWood-Amp when it's launched, sign up at their website to register for pre-ordering. There is no commitment to buy one for signing up, but if you sign up now, you can then order one at half-price ($90) when the pre-order campaign goes live (mid-October).
The Alvarez AG75CE is on the upper range of $500 acoustic guitars. This particular model is a cedar top with rosewood back and sides. It also features scalloped and forward shifted bracing which makes for a bigger sound. Owners of this guitar are posting rave reviews citing it’s quality of build and great tone. The cutaway is a nice feature for those that want to reach the upper register of the guitar, and it looks cool too! It is a grand auditorium body, which does not quite have the bass of a dreadnought but offers a more balanced sound. Great for singing along. This guitar is a great choice for intermediate players looking to not break the bank.Check it out here.
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
I'm actually the designer of this devices and I myself had bought all the software in Apple. I'm really a big fan of JamUp, Bias, and Ampkit. Personally I like all the functions provided by JamUp such as JAM, LOOP, 8-track recording as well as the guitar effects and amps. But the Amps in Bias is a litte more juicy than in JamUp. A good way is using Bias amps in JamUp which just make a good combination of the two software. They can be used in that way :)
I started playing & kinda grew up then (although my wife would dispute the 'grew up' part). We used to play mostly 9s or 10s. It depended on the quality of the neck on the guitar we could afford. A good guitar neck/fret job would let you go to the lighter 9s. You couldn't get all the great pedals then, so sustain was often achieved with some feedback, which is a product of TURNING UP the volume. Lighter strings seemed to feedback more easily. Lighter strings don't last as long as heavier ones, so unless you love re-stringing, 10s are a good compromise. I think Billy Gibbons still plays 8s, but he has a guitar tech that probably changes them for every show.
After a peak in the 1970s, driven by the use of several high profile players, another lull occurred in the early 1980s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray and Buddy Guy in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.[citation needed] Yngwie Malmsteen is known for playing a Stratocaster in the Neo-Classical genre.
This gives you a wonderful bass line, and will dramatically improve your sound, as well as helping you to develop a good rhythmic strumming style right from the first. Singing the song is a matter of timing. Listen to the song a few times and you’ll get it. It’s easier than trying to explain time signatures, and timing. You’ll know when you get it right. Just keep listening.
The amplifier includes buttons for four different amplifier simulations: Clean, Crunch (a typical rock/blues sound), Metal (self-explanatory), and Insane (a version of Metal that our panelists found so distorted as to be nearly unusable). Like the Champion 20, it has a gain control (which is labeled Drive), and it adds a midrange control to its bass and treble controls.
It can be tough to know where to start when you’re looking at as many options as there are in the world of effects pedals. In fact, your first pedal may not even be a pedal at all – many amplifiers have built-in effects sections so you can get your introduction without having to attach an external stompbox. But if you have a more straightforward amp, or if you’re ready to try effects units that go beyond its built-in capabilities, there are some great varieties for novice users. And don’t forget that you can always look up the preferred pedals of your favorite guitar hero to inspire your own collection.
Thanks for the post on ’66 Deccas and the video. I have a red sunburst DMI-203 with the chrome pick guard as in your picture. My first electric guitar in 1966 was the same instrument with no name on the headstock but with paperwork saying GHI/Heit. Bought it in a department store plus a Concordia amp for $50. Sold it in ’69 when I needed cash for a car (for $75!). I picked up the Decca about 10 years ago. Vintage Guitar magazine did an article of some work done on it in it’s Jan. 2014 issue.
A very stylish black guitar by ENCORE with a great 'Humbucker' pickup.......The simplicity of this instrument makes it a joy to play and It sounds as good as it looks! Used....but in great condition and showing only minimal signs of use (no scratches, chips or dings) and is in full working order. The scale is full length (not 3/4 or 7/8)...but the body size is smaller and lighter than a typical stratocaster (see image for comparison), which makes this guitar perfect for a younger / smaller person or anybody who might like a very robust but lighter instrument. All reasonable offers considered.
There are different ways to play electric guitar. One is to just play the electric guitar, and to take it as it is. Another way is to play the guitar as a sort of synthesizer. With the right effects (delay, reverb, volume swells, added octaves), no one would even know that it was a guitar. Neither way is wrong, but we refer to both as "playing electric guitar" even though they're being used in completely different ways that may as well be different instruments. Drama ensues.
...Wow! I JUST bought this electric guitar from a pawn shop for 37 dollars. I could instantly tell it was a 60's guitar, so I had to have a closer look. Mine has the tailpiece clam, but it was missing the whammy bar, so my dad built me one. It didn't even work, at all. A good cleaning fixed that though, it now works perfectly. Now it's fun little piece of history.
A semi-hollow thinline version appeared in 1968/69, designed by German guitar maker Roger Rossmeisl. Today two versions of the Thinline are available, the ’69 version has two standard Telecaster pickups and a mahogany body, while the ’72 version, based on the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, yields two Fender Wide Range pickups and a solid natural swamp ash body. In 2011, Fender released the Modern Player Telecaster Thinline as a part of the Modern Player series. The guitar features two MP-90 pickups, similar to the Gibson P-90. The Fender Custom Shop has a production model referred to as the “50’s Telecaster Thinline”, designed by master builder, Chris Fleming. Given that the first Thinlines appeared in the late 1960s, this name may seem inappropriate. However, the Custom Shop model, with its ash body and maple neck/fingerboard, as well as Nocaster pickups, shares enough DNA with the 50’s versions of the Telecaster to make the name a good fit.
Listen, I realize I’m recommending a lot of Yamahas here, but I swear they are just that good when it comes to QUALITY and PRICE. I don’t know why that is, but it’s something a lot of guitar players have discovered. They’re just really good and very affordable. You’ll find a lot of guitars that are better, but they will cost you. I’m recommending every single guitar here for a reason. Keep that in mind.
Distortion sound or "texture" from guitar amplifiers is further shaped or processed through the frequency response and distortion factors in the microphones (their response, placement, and multi-microphone comb filtering effects), microphone preamps, mixer channel equalization, and compression. Additionally, the basic sound produced by the guitar amplifier can be changed and shaped by adding distortion and/or equalization effect pedals before the amp's input jack, in the effects loop just before the tube power amp, or after the power tubes.

A selection of makers within the high-end, hand-built crowd of today do offer variations on the opamp-based template discussed above. Blackstone Appliances bases its Mosfet Overdrive on a discrete transistorized circuit centered around, yes, mosfets, and Klon’s Centaur pedal uses… well, who the hell knows? They cover the entire circuit board in epoxy goop to keep the cloners at bay, but this expensive overdrive certainly sounds different. Other popular boutique overdrives are found in the Barber Electronics LTD pedal, the Crowther Audio Hot Cake, and the Fulltone OCD.
Once CNC (computer numeric control) equipment was introduced into guitar factories starting in the late 1980s and continuing on into the 1990s, it became far less of an issue where a guitar was made. Many of the CNC machines were made in Japan. In some cases the difference between an American-made guitar versus a Japanese-made guitar versus a Korean-made guitar was little more than where the machine was located. To make a guitar in the USA involved putting a Japanese-made CNC machine on a boat and sending it to the US whereupon it could be programmed in the USA and then American or other wood could be fed into the machine, which would spit out components made to tolerances within a few thousandths of an inch of the programming. By contrast a Japanese-made guitar would be produced by leaving the CNC machine in Japan, programming it with a disc done in the USA, and then importing wood to be put into the machine which would spit out components to the same specifications as those which would be made by a similar machine in the USA. A Korean-made guitar could be remarkably similar since the Japanese-made CNC machine could be sent to Korea whereupon the same process could be done there. By 1990 the quantity of guitars made in Japan was nowhere near what it had been earlier, but Korean production was in high gear. While some Japanese instruments have come to be viewed as quite desirable and collectible, I have seen little evidence of such activity with respect to Korean instruments, but the fact remains that the better-quality Korean guitars are remarkably good and most certainly are suitable for use on stage or in the studio.
Although early Les Paul imitations in the 1960s and 1970s, such as those made by Höfner, Hagström, Harmony Company and Greco Guitars differed from Gibson’s design, with different electronics, and even bolt-on necks, in the late 1970s some Japanese companies came very close to perfecting copies of the original 1958–60 Standards. These guitars later became known as “lawsuit” guitars. The lawsuit was brought by the Norlin Corporation, the parent company of Gibson guitars, in 1977, and was based on an Ibanez headstock design that had been discontinued by 1976. Ibanez settled out of court, and by 1978 had begun making guitars from their own designs.[citation needed]
Splitting the humbucker #1: by grounding the coil-tap and connecting the hot lead to output we’re rendering the coil closer to ground useless because both of it’s leads are grounded. What we’re left with is the coil closer to the hot lead. Since we only have one coil, it will not be hum-cancelling on it’s own. It’s common to split a humbucker, so it can be wired with another coil in parallel, making the noiseless combination, especially on H-S-H guitars.

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An effects unit is also called an "effect box", "effects device", "effects processor" or simply "effects". In audio engineer parlance, a signal without effects is "dry" and an effect-processed signal is "wet". The abbreviation "F/X" or "FX" is sometimes used. A pedal-style unit may be called a "stomp box", "stompbox", "effects pedal" or "pedal". A musician bringing many pedals to a live show or recording session often mounts the pedals on a guitar pedalboard, to reduce set-up and tear-down time and, for pedalboards with lids, protect the pedals during transportation. When a musician has multiple effects in a rack mounted road case, this case may be called an "effects rack" or "rig". When rackmounted effects are mounted in a roadcase, this also speeds up a musician's set-up and tear-down time, because all of the effects can be connected together inside the rack case and all of the units can be plugged into a powerbar.
The smallest Taylor guitar available. The Baby Taylor series has been hailed for its easy-to-transport size and affordability. Features include sapele laminate back and sides with an optional Sitka spruce (identified as a BT1) or mahogany top (identified as a BT2). A larger bodied option is also available called the “Big Baby” (BBT introduced in 2002), which is a 15/16-size dreadnought with a neck that is standard scale (25-1/2”) and narrow width (1-11/16”). The Big Baby however only comes with a Sitka spruce top.

The quarter-sawn mahogany neck has a rounded “C” neck shape and it’s topped with a smooth 22-fret A-grade dark rosewood fretboard with small block pearloid inlays. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured also features an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles for added sustain and clarity and Memphis Historic Spec II humbuckers. In addition, this classic axe now has MTC Premiere Controls.

FWIW: I have the same guitar, and it is around the same vintage as yours, with a 4 digit serial number and the headstock truss-rod adjustment. As you can see from the response from SLM, the headstock truss-rod adjustment was on the earliest Alvarez guitars. I have another Alvarez from 1981-2, that adjusts in the sound-hole. You'll see a lot of people claiming that they have, or are selling, 70's vintage Alvarez guitars, but have sound-hole truss-rod setup. To me, that's the first indicator that a guitar might be post 1980'ish. And actually, due to the neck attachment issues, I gravitate towards the 80's vintage, as they have had less time to have their neck angle change from string tension.
Another tone option for a guitarist is to put a pickup out of phase with another pickup, producing a thin "inside-out" squawky kind of sound. When 2 pickups are in phase, they work together and reinforce each other. When they are out of phase the 2 pickups are working against one another and the resulting sound is the "leftovers" from these cancelations. The closer the 2 pickups are, the greater the cancelations, the thinner the sound and the lesser the volume. Therefore, the neck and bridge pickups out of phase is the best choice for this type of sound.
Out of all the hopped-up Caucasians who turbocharged the blues in the late Sixties, Texas albino Johnny Winter was both the whitest and the fastest. Songs like his 1969 cover of "Highway 61 Revisited" are astonishing showpieces of his lightningfast thumb-picked electric slide playing. Jimi Hendrix sought him out as a sideman, and Muddy Waters recognized his talent at first glance, becoming a friend and collaborator: "That guy up there onstage – I got to see him up close," Waters later said. "He plays eight notes to my one!"
You know Eddie Van Halen, that legendary guitar player who pretty much knocked the music world on its ear with his innovative sounds and playing style back in the late ‘70s. For years he partnered with brands such as Kramer, Ernie Ball and Peavey to create signature models of his guitars, as well as the real guitars he used onstage. Now he has his own company: EVH.
Seeing one in the hands of Ed Sheeran was a huge shot in the arm for the small-body acoustic market, and now players are picking these up as good-quality, usable guitars which are equally at home in the living room as they are on the stage. The Martin LX1E is perhaps the best known and best respected small body acoustic, and can hold its own tonally against many of its regular-sized peers.
Have you ever looked at a hollow or semi-hollow guitar on the wall at your local music store and wondered how the heck they get the electronics in there? The short answer: it’s do-able, but not easy. In fact, it’s widely considered to be one of the most difficult jobs in the wide world of guitar maintenance. My tech charges extra for doing electronics work in a hollow-body, and he’s definitely not the only one.
In 1967 Vox introduced a series of guitars which featured built in effects such as Distortion (fuzz tone), Repeat Percussion (percussive tremolo), Treble/Bass Booster and a wah-wah operated by the heel of the picking hand pushing on a spring-loaded lever over the bridge. The Delta phantom style guitar and bass, the Starstream teardrop 6-string, and Constellation teardrop bass had such effects.
One of the earliest studio effects created by taking advantage the distance between the record and playback heads on tape recorders, delay duplicates the original signal and repeats it after the original sound is played. This can be repeated over and over for an echo effect, or be a single repeat that produces the slap-back sound popular in rockabilly. The time between repetitions can be very short, measured in milliseconds. Or it can be longer and more dramatic. Delays can also add a rhythmic element to your playing. There are many different kinds of delay effects available, and most offer a number of different types in the same unit.

These chords will form the foundation of your guitar playing and are, thankfully, rather easy to learn. With a little practice and patience you will find them coming together quickly. The beginner guitar songs use the chords below and introduce them gently. These songs are a great way to build up your guitar foundations to a level of solid competency. By playing through them in order and being patient with each one you will quickly develop your skills.
We saved the most affordable amplifier for the last. This Donner electric guitar amp might have only 10-watts, but it does not lack other features. The controls include Gain, boost Select Switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass and are pretty intuitive. The tone is clean and damn big for such a small model. Other than that this model also has 3-Band EQ, 1/8″ Auxiliary Input Jack for Jam-Along with Media Player and, of course, the handy-dandy Headphone Output Jack for Silent Practice (unless you want to be evicted from your apartment for practicing days on end). Best practice amps are not best just because you can practice in your basement and never move the thing. They are pretty functional and easy to carry around. That’s why Donner put durable, hard material on the edges of the amp and a pad of rubber makes it more sturdy. With that your amp will be pretty much indestructible.
You can trace all things loud and riff-y right back to the Kinks' Dave Davies, starting with the fantastically simple power chords of "You Really Got Me," which he recorded at age 17 – setting off a run of proto-metal singles from "All Day and All of the Night" to "Till the End of the Day." Davies, who created the distortion on "You Really Got Me" by slicing an amp speaker with a razor, has laughed off claims that it was actually played by an uncredited Jimmy Page: "Who'd want to play a solo that crazy, anyway? Only Dave Davies could do that."
Whether you’re in the market for an acoustic or an electric guitar will likely impact which brand you may want to purchase from. While lines like Fender and Yamaha offer both acoustic and electric instruments, a guitarist who plays strictly one or the other may prefer to stick to a brand that specializes in that category. A classical guitarist who strictly plays acoustic might gravitate Taylor or Fender for their world class offerings, while a member from a rock band might seek out Epiphone or Gibson’s time tested tone. Most brands will offer instruments in either option, but it's best to know beforehand which ones cater to your needs.
Unfortunately it’s during this critical time that a lot of people get discouraged and may even give up on playing altogether. The first 6 months of learning guitar are critical, statistics show that if someone can still be playing at 6 months they will be much more likely to go on to play guitar for life, so the first 6 months are actually the most important time.
If you decide to use my link to Guitar Tricks when you sign up as a member, I will receive a compensation for my referral. I am not a professional reviewer and my views are biased because I only recommend stuff that I use and like. I appreciate if you follow my links to Guitar Tricks if you like I Really Like Guitars and my review of Guitar Tricks. Thank you!

In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]
1. Intonation: I have a brand-new Epiphone LP that will not completely intonate on the G, A, and Low E. Fretted notes remain sharp. I have replaced the factory strings with new Ernie Balls and tried every trick in the book to move the saddles as far away from the neck as possible. Many LP owners have this problem. Other than returning the guitar to Guitar World, my only other option is swap out the factory bridge with a wider one. You mention the latter option in one of your early comments, and I've decided to try it. I just bought a Gotoh one online. Hopefully, that will solve the problem.
In fact, these units were specifically designed to be used by the novices that want to learn the particularities of playing the guitar.Nevertheless, they are also purchased by veteran players because of their quality and maneuverability. As cost-efficient units, these guitars are a great investment, and you should consider them before placing any orders.
Thanks, guys....well, I don't think I'll be able to play any Agiles but I'll try and get my hands on some Epi's and give them a whirl. How are the stock pickups on both? Definitely in need of a swap? I had an Epi Les Paul an eon ago and don't recall liking the stock pickups, but I was also in highschool then and knew nothing about tone. Also, a quick look at Ebay indicates that any Epi SG in a color other than black or cherry will be hard to come by...
Although originally founded in California in 1979 as a company that made replacement parts for guitars, Schecter now produce many models of their own – both mass-produced and custom shop guitars. Like the others on this list, Schecter provide guitars for some big names and have a range of signature models including the guitars of Dan Donegan, Keith Merrow, and Jeff Loomis.
National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
PRS S2 Vela comes as one of the more extraordinary models in this company’s lineup. This is made apparent by the body shape that stands out from their usual designs. When I had some one-on-one time with this axe, it left a good impression. One thing that really stuck with me was just how light it was. That usually means a thinner tone, but not with this PRS. It plays great, and is pretty smooth.

Many modern players use the first joint of the thumb against the back of the neck, and almost on the upper binding, sort of like gripping a baseball bat, so they can reach over the neck with their thumb tip to play bass notes on the E and A strings while picking melodies out with the other fingers. Tommy Emmanuel, and Andy McKee are particularly adept at this. You’ll need to experiment some to find what works best for you.


The OM-28 E Retro is one of the more recent guitars to come from Martin's OM line, and it is the consummate '30s era style acoustic guitar. The company took their time to carefully replicate vintage OM-28 guitars, from the aged solid sitka spruce top and solid East Indian Rosewood back & sides, down to the smallest appointments - resulting in a guitar that not only sounds amazing, but looks museum-level amazing as well.
The Ibanez pickup sound is great and solidly diverse throughout the 5-options, providing lots of versatility for a variety of different music styles.The tuning is nice and extremely stable, and you can even dive-bomb on the whammy without throwing it out of whack. The frets are perfect, and the action is almost perfect, with that quality feel to it.

What worries Gruhn is not simply that profits are down. That happens in business. He’s concerned by the “why” behind the sales decline. When he opened his store 46 years ago, everyone wanted to be a guitar god, inspired by the men who roamed the concert stage, including Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana and Jimmy Page. Now those boomers are retiring, downsizing and adjusting to fixed incomes. They’re looking to shed, not add to, their collections, and the younger generation isn’t stepping in to replace them.

This is my new, energetic positive corporate music track with confident bright mood, which contains happy optimistic piano and synth solo, driving electric guitars, drums and live bass. This track can be used as a motivational musical background for business websites, computer games, tv or radio jingles, advertising and commercial youtube video, etc. Enjoy!
The Kay Gold Line professional series became synonymous with that rich gutsy Blues/Jazz sound that eventually became rock. This unique blues sound was not available from any other guitar of that time. For the past decade vintage Kay instruments have been fetching high prices and have had increasing interest from collectors and players because of the cool, campy look and that unique Blues/Jazz sound.

Growing popularity of the guitar in the early 1900s, fueled by the growing popularity of folk music and country and western music, led to a demand for louder and more percussive guitars. In response, many companies began to use metal strings instead of catgut. These became known as steel-string guitars. By 1921, Martin had focused production towards this type of guitar.

Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!

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Sure, Marshall and Vox contributed to the sound of British rock in the Sixties and Seventies—but let us not forget the mighty Hiwatt DR103. Although it's often associated with the Who's Pete Townshend (who would test their durability night after night), it was a favorite of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, not to mention the Moody Blues, the Stones and beyond. Although the DR103 looks a bit like a Marshall, it certainly doesn't sound like one. This was the result of a vastly different design.
Dick Dale: Nicknamed “The Beast” by Dale himself, the guitar comes in “chartreuse sparkle” (a greenish-gold color) with a white pickguard and rosewood fretboard, with vintage 50s features and a number of custom modifications. Notably, the guitar comes with a reverse headstock and a reverse angled bridge pickup to achieve the sound of playing a Stratocaster upside-down, which was how Dale learned to play.
Get superior guitar tone and flexibility using this 15-Watt, 1x12 Guitar Combo Tube Amplifier with Celestion Speaker & Spring Reverb from Monoprice! As the title indicates, this guitar amplifier features a 15-watt tube power amplifier and a Celestion brand speaker. It uses three ECC83/12AX7 preamplification tubes and two EL84 power tubes for the amplifier section, plus a Celestion Red Truvox 1215 speaker. The EL84 tube is the tube that powered the Mullard amplifiers favored by the British Invasion bands of the 1960s.
Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.
Now, you may be wondering if there are things to love about Guitarist and there certainly are. The GUI is incredible and simply one of my favorites around. And if you need funk or jazz rhythms fast, then this is your guy — the auto-wah feature saves this plugin. The more you put realism out of your head and strive for interesting tones, the more you’ll like Guitarist.
Do you have a short budget? Then we have included the Dean Vendetta XMT model in my top 10 electric guitars review list. This is very little known guitar and you’d be forgiven if you have never heard of it before. But we can tell you with confidence that once you buy this guitar it will exceed your expectations and this is very much pocket-friendly.
Possibly the most famous of all guitar effects, the talk box has its indelible place in history.  The guitar signal is pushed thru a speaker into a tube that the player holds in their mouth.  This tube is usually run up a mic stand, so that the player can use the embouchure of the mouth cavity to control vowel sounds that are then picked up by the microphone and pushed back through the PA system.
Predating many of the newer brands on this list is another Californian company – B.C. Rich, who has been producing heavy rock guitars since arriving on the scene in 1969. Since the seventies, B.C. Rich has been a name synonymous with high-quality electric guitars featuring weird and wonderful shapes, including the Warlock, the KKV and the Mockingbird.
Most pickup selectors are either mounted to the top of the guitar through a cavity routed in the back of the body or mounted to a pickguard. For pickup selectors that are mounted to the top of the body, simply take a screwdriver and unscrew the pickup selector. You will have to remove the knob on the end of the level before you can slide the selector through the channel and out of the cavity. For pickguard mounted selector, like Fender Stratocasters, you will need to remove the entire pickguard to remove the selector. Simply unscrew the pickguard from the body, flip it over, and rest it on the top of the body. The pickguard will still be wired to the body, so you can’t go very far with it. Then, unscrew the selector. It is important that you take note of what wires are soldered to what lugs before you remove the selector. If you are not familiar with electric guitar wiring, I suggest that you draw a picture of the selector and label the soldered wires. Once you know where everything has be wired, you can cut the wires close to the lugs and remove the old selector.
For metal there are few better performers than this menacing guitar from Schecter; the signature model of Avenged Sevenfolds lead guitarist Synyster Gates. From the pinstripe double-cutaway mahogany body emerges a hugely-playable thin C-shaped mahogany set neck with ebony fretboard, 24 extra-jumbo frets, and Schecters Ultra-Access construction to allow unhindered access to the highest of frets.
It’s not known how long this A group lasted – probably only a couple more years, except for the U-65RN. By ’76, the U-65RN was still around, now promoted with 17 watts, Hammond reverb, tremolo, 10 transistors, and a 12″ heavy duty speaker. This looked pretty much the same, except the logo was reversed in white out of a black metal strip above the grille and the power switch had changed. At some point, the U-65RN was joined by the UB-252 bass amp, offering 20 watts with a 15″ speaker, presumably similar and transistor. These are the only two Univox amps listed in a 1979 price list (contained in the 1980 book), though, as you see over and over, others may still have been available.
Fender guitars are made either in the United States or Mexico. There is a limited number of guitars being made in Japan, but those are only sold on Japanese domestic market. The difference in quality between the U.S. and Mexican Fenders is obvious but not too great. No matter which one you go for, you will get the same refined tone that made this company famous.
Gold models had single coil pickups with clear silver plastic covers and phillips head bolt adjustable pole pieces. The Upbeat model came with an optional transparent black plastic cover. These pickups appeared on Kay instruments through the late 1960s and are sometimes called “Kessel” or “Kleenex Box” pickups.[citation needed] The Jazz Special Bass has a single blade pickup as used on the K-161 and K-162 (tilted slightly towards the neck at the treble side), as well as a distinctive, oversized headstock.
The prime advantage of Epiphone is that you get a guitar built to the same specs as the Gibson Les Paul, at a greatly discounted price. With that being said, an Epiphone is not equal to a Gibson simply because it shares the same design. The craftsmanship is where the two brands differ the most, as USA made Gibson’s utilize higher quality materials than the Epiphone line. Epiphone uses a cheaper mahogany in the construction of its guitars, while the electronic components are lower quality as well.
At the beginning of the Teisco saga, Teisco instruments were primarily built for domestic consumption in Japan. The early guitars were fairly high quality by contemporary Japanese standards. As the ’60s dawned, Teisco increasingly got caught up in the export market, and by the mid-’60s were major players in the low-end or beginner arena, with instruments sold primarily by mass merchandisers such as Sears and at discount department stores which were rapidly developing at the time. It was mainly in this latter niche that Teisco guitars are known in the U.S. In order to give this narrative some structure, I’ve divided the Teisco history into four basic periods: I-Gibsonia; II-Frumpy Fender-ama; III-A New Spectrum of Originality; and IV-Copydelia.
3) Had a little fret buzz on the high E but that was probably more my fault than anything else because I changed the light gauge strings to extra lights which sometimes requires the neck adjustment to be loosened. This guitar is set up from the factory with light gauge strings which means if you put on extra lights, the neck will have a tendency to straighten out too much which brings your strings closer to the frets and sometimes results in fret buzz. An easy fix though...just take a straight edge, like an aluminum yardstick, and lay on the neck, or hold down the string on the first and last fret and you should have just a slight space (approx. 1/64" - 1/32") between the frets and strings in the middle of your fret board. In other words, contrary to popular belief the neck is supposed to have an ever-so-slight dip in the middle and IS NOT supposed to be perfectly straight. My guitar required about a 3/4 turn (loosened) on the neck adjustment to fix the fret buzz. And, remember when adjusting the neck don't expect immediate results. Give the neck time to settle-in adjusting a little at a time and then waiting a couple hours or so before checking it again. If you still have fret buzz after adjusting the neck then it most likely will be at the nut because Yamaha keeps their action really low at the nut. If so, just take a piece of paper and put it under the string at the nut which should be an easy fix.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
What's funny is that guitars with cheap pickups very often sound better direct than guitars with "good pickups". I have an Epiphone Special I with ( presumably GFS ) P90-style pickups and that thing sounds great direct. It's also fine with a band thru an amp if the band doesn't play too loud - if the band's too loud the low mid buildup means you gotta EQ a lotta bass out and it loses it's girth.

As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.

I was at a friends house and he had a couple of his guitar playing buddies over. We got to talking about guitar repair and setups and such. Then one the guys said “the guy I use is the be...st ever...”, and I was all like, “yeah I’m sure the guy you use is great, but the guy I know is better”. This went on, back and forth for a few minutes, when he blurted out, “I use the Cigainero brothers...”. I said “cool, me too” See More


In contrast, wiring two pickups in series produces a longer path with increased resistance, adding volume while preventing the highest frequencies from getting through. With series wiring, the output of one pickup goes into the input of another pickup, while with standard parallel wiring, each pickup takes its own path to the output. Besides being noticeably louder, series wiring emphasizes low and midrange tones, and this is a perfect combination to drive any tube amp into saturation without the help of a booster.
While it’s not as popular as the two previous brands we have mentioned, PRS is on a level of their own. American owned and made, these guitars are an epitome of quality and great sound. They have a completely unique appearance and offer a tone which has a distinctive color. Best thing about this brand is the balance price and performance. You get a lot more than you pay for with PRS.

Seagull is a Canadian company that produces hand crafted acoustic guitars. It has solid top guitars which offer richer sound, broader dynamic range, and sound becomes better as time pass by. The neck of the guitar of the seagull guitar has either Silverleaf maple or Honduras mahogany. Silverleaf is less permeable than mahogany that provides an incredibly smooth sensation but has an identical denseness. Some really good guitars from the line up of Seagull are Original S6 Cedar, Entourage Rustic S6, and Entourage Rustic CW QI.
A friend owns a music store and looked up the "Norma" brand. It said- Norma guitars were manufactured in Japan between 1966 and 1972 by the Japanese to compete with the Gibson HummingBird. The look is almost identical (Check out the Gibson Hummingbird played by Jonathan "BuggieMan" Long from Baton Rouge La. His looks exactly like my Norma. I too was curious for thirty years about my good sounding guitar. Looks aint everything!
Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.
With so many features, it can be tempting to just dismiss it as a low quality jack-of-all-trades unit, but even experts are convinced of its versatility and sound quality. Guitar World concludes: "Costing less than most single-effect stomp boxes, the G1Xon is an incredible bargain that provides versatile multi-effect processing power and impressive performance and practice capabilities."

By the 1960s and 1970s, semiconductor transistor-based amplifiers (also called "solid state") began to become popular. This was in large part because for a given wattage level and feature level, solid state amplifiers are less expensive, lighter weight, and require less maintenance than tube amplifiers. As well, transistor amplifiers are more reliable and less fragile than tube amps. In some cases, tube and solid state technologies are used together, usually with a tube preamplifier driving a solid state power amplifier. There are also an increasing range of products that use digital signal processing (DSP) and digital modeling technology to simulate many different combinations of amp and cabinets.

Jazz guitarist Les Paul spent years tinkering with his own electric guitar designs, but his first creations were initially rejected by Gibson’s parent company in 1946. But just a few short years later, on the heels of Fender’s success with the Telecaster and Paul’s growing popularity as an artist, Gibson struck a deal with Paul to play and endorse their new design for a solid-body electric. Gibson released the guitar as the Les Paul signature model in 1952, and since its release, it has become one of the world’s most imitated and sought-after guitars, with late ’50s vintage models being among the most prized instruments in the world.
Variable 2: Speaker configuration. In Clip 2 you hear cabinets with varying numbers of speakers. First comes the 1x12 sound of a midsized Fender combo amp. Next is a 2x12 Fender-style cabinet. After that is the distinctive sparkle of a tweed-era 4x10 Fender Bassman. The last phrase is a classic 4x12 Marshall stack with 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks. These sounds represent a single mic on a single speaker, yet you can differentiate single- and multi-speaker cabinets due to leakage from adjacent speakers.
Neck of the guitar is bolt-on made from maple with a scarf joint for an angled back headstock. Which in turn increases the tension behind the nut eliminating the need for string trees or string retainer bars. Also on the neck are 24 jumbo frets placed on a rosewood fingerboard garnish by sharks fin inlays for the looks and performance of the guitar.

We've already heard the story of Muddy's rise from a Mississippi planation to a Chicago blues legend but that only took his career so far, at least in his chosen style of music. Eventually, bands that were influenced by Muddy like the Rolling Stones (named after one of his songs), Animals, Yardbirds, Cream and Hendrix became big, raising Muddy's profile but not getting him the same level of success his descendants were having. Marshall Chess, son of the president of the label who worked at the company had the idea to try something different by putting Muddy's music into a psychedelic setting to appeal to a younger audience. After discussing the project with Muddy, he went for it. He wasn't forced into it as some have been led to believe.


My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
Double-neck (or, less commonly, "twin-neck") guitars enable guitarists to play both guitar and bass guitar or, more commonly, both a six-string and a twelve-string. In the mid-1960s, one of the first players to use this type of guitar was Paul Revere & the Raiders' guitarist Drake Levin. Another early user was John McLaughlin. The double-neck guitar was popularized by Jimmy Page, who used a custom-made, cherry-finished Gibson EDS-1275 to perform "Stairway to Heaven", "The Song Remains the Same" and "The Rain Song", although for the recording of "Stairway to Heaven" he used a Fender Telecaster and a Fender XII electric twelve-string. Mike Rutherford of Genesis and Mike + the Mechanics is also famous for his use of a double-neck guitar during live shows. Don Felder of the Eagles used the Gibson EDS-1275 during the Hotel California tour. Muse guitarist and vocalist Matthew Bellamy uses a silver Manson double-neck on his band's Resistance Tour. Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson is also known for using double-neck guitars in the live performance of several songs. In performances of the song "Xanadu" during the band's 2015 R40 anniversary tour, Lifeson played a white Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck guitar with six-string and twelve-string necks, while bassist Geddy Lee performed with a double-neck Rickenbacker guitar with four-string bass and twelve-string guitar necks.
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