Now, if you are an electric player who doesn’t like using any pedals, that’s perfectly fine. Just be honest about the reasons. If you just like the sound of your guitar and your amp, cool. If you just want to keep things simple, I understand. That’s your preference, and it doesn’t make you better in any way than someone else who does. If you’ve been a genuine listener of music, you’ve seen and heard players who’ve blown their audiences away on un-amplified classical guitars, and players who blow us away with lots of pedals on their boards.
However, it does give you a good flavour of the Martin and is a very playable plug-in, one of the best ways to see proper guitar emulation in action without paying for it. There are tab and effects options and a keyboard for playing it (we’ll assume if you can play a guitar, you’ll opt for the real thing, anyway). While it is free, we think you’ll be sorely tempted to upgrade, which will set you back $169.
There are times when a single-coil just doesn’t have enough twang. I’ve encountered Strat neck pickups that are just too wooly to provide me with that saucy, SRV/Hendrix-style rhythm juice. Or, sometimes an anemic bridge pickup just needs an extra dose of snap to push it into Tele-like territory. If so, this simple mod could be just what you’re looking for.
The Kay Guitar Company has been the major producer of guitars since 1890. Most players do not realize that in 1928, Kay was the first company to start production of electric guitars in the USA. From 1952 through 1964, The Kay Guitar Company excelled at producing quality professional electric guitars with unique designs and features. The Kay Gold Line professional series became synonymous with that rich gutsy Blues/Jazz sound that eventually became known as Rock and Roll. This unique Blues sound was not available from any other guitar of that time. For the past decade, vintage Kay instruments have been fetching high prices and have had increasing interest from collectors and players because of the cool look and unique Blues/Jazz sound. Part of this special Blues sound came from the triple chamber design and the hand-wound blade pickups on the Kay K161V Thin Twin and the Kay K162V Electronic "Pro Bass" Guitar.

Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.
Vox's first electric guitars, the Apache, Stroller and Clubman were modelled after solid-body, bolt-neck Fenders, which at the time were not available in the UK. A four-string Clubman Bass followed shortly after. These first guitars were low-priced, had unusual TV connector output jacks and were produced by a cabinet maker in Shoeburyness, Essex. Vox president Tom Jennings commissioned the London Design Centre to create a unique new electric guitar, and in 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. The first Phantom guitars were given to The Echoes to trial and were used by them until 1970. They were used on many of the recordings by The Echoes and records they did with other artists such as Dusty Springfield. Aside from the unusual body and headstock shapes, Phantoms featured copies of the Fender Stratocaster neck and its attachment, the Strat's three single-coil pick-ups and standard vibrato bridge that in this case copied a Bigsby unit. Aside from being a bit awkward to hold for seated playing, the Phantom guitars now approached professional quality, performance and price. Phil "Fang" Volk of Paul Revere & the Raiders played a Phantom IV bass (which was eventually retrofitted with a Fender neck). It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which had only two pick-ups (rather than three) and was made specifically for Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones, again using a Bigsby-like "Hank Marvin" bridge. By the end of the decade, Stones bassist Bill Wyman was shown in Vox advertisements playing a teardrop hollow-bodied bass made for him by the company, subsequently marketed as the Wyman Bass. Many guitar gear authorities dispute that he ever actually used the instrument for recording or live performance. See also Vox Bass Guitar. Vox experimented with built-in effects and electronics, with guitars such as the Cheetah, Ultrasonic, and Invader offering numerous built-in effects. Ian Curtis of Joy Division is known to have owned two white Vox Phantom VI Special effects guitars which had push button effects switches on the scratch plate. Amongst many innovations were the Guitar Organ, which featured miniaturised VOX organ circuitry activated by the contact of strings with fret contacts, producing organ tones in key with guitar chords. This instrument was heavy and cumbersome with its steel neck and external circuit boxes, and rarely worked correctly, but was a hallmark of the ingenuity of this company.
Here are our choices for the five best YouTube channels. We made sure they all have plenty of content for novice players, but you’ll find lots of videos for advanced musicians, too. Some of them are hosted by people who are simply passionate about playing guitar and want to share that passion without trying to make a million bucks out of you. Don’t forget to show them support.
Based on SGM-v2.01 (http://www.geocities.jp/shansoundfont/) with improved quality aoustic guitars (21mb) and basses (50mb) and also designed to run on apps such as Sweet Midi Player. This is a great GM SoundFont and the one I use on iPad/iPhone and PC.  You can comfortably run this GM Soundfont in Sweet Midi Player app on most iOS devices. For Windows PC you can install a new GM soundfont using the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth.

I can't believe this! Blackstar are designed and built by retired Marshall professionals and they have every last bit of knowledge on tube amps, heads, and combos. I own a Blackstar HT-1R, it is 1w but it feels like 100w just the way the Blackstar team have combined their ideas and structures and balanced it out with tubes. And line 6 is further up the list? You are mistaken bro. Another thing. These are bloody expensive and aren't very well known but Two Rock make probably the GREATEST amps ever made and I would kill to fire one up!
Turning our attention to the main controls on the front, it actually doesn’t look as intimidating to use as some owners of it make it out to be. Yes, you can get lost in tweaking and tinkering with amp models and effects until you’re blue in the face - but we actually find the interface to be nice and uncluttered, with all the footswitches and knobs nicely spaced out. On the top left there’s a small screen with some knobs surrounding it, and this is where the majority of your tweaking and editing will take place. Across the top are seven knobs which are meant to replicate what you would find on your amp. If you’re interested in the amp modeling part of the POD HD500X, you’ll appreciate having things like DRIVE, BASS, and PRESENCE immediately available. Two footswitches on the far left of the unit are responsible for up/down menu navigation, eight switches labeled FS1 to FS8 are assignable to individual effects, and finally there are two switches dedicated to the Looper function, and Tap Tempo/Tuner. You can also clearly see an expression pedal built-in on the right of the unit.

My granddaughter really liked this book. I know it was used but the CD and the wall chart were missing. I wish that would have been noted in the comments. Some of the other book sellers noted that one or the other of these were missing so I didn't order from them. Nothing was noted in the comments on this. My granddaughter was happy with the book and wanted to keep it.
Chorus pedals really made their mark in the 80’s with the likes of the Boss CE-1 and CE-2, the Electro Harmonix Small Clone and the TC Electronics Stereo Chorus. I found a nice definition of chorusing on Wikipedia: “Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or “vibrato” to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.” A chorus is a modulation effect but the modulation we hear is produced by delaying the wet signal a very short duration causing the doubling effect we hear. So it is actually a time based effect.
Squier Affinity Telecaster: The Tele features the same tonewoods as the Strat, with a slightly different single-cutaway body style. It also has two pickups instead of three, and a fixed bridge. Single-coil pickups have a thinner sound compared to humbuckers, and it case of the Telcaster they create the signature twang that put the guitar on the map.

Started in 1997 by Steve Suhr and Steve Smith, this Lake Elsinore, California-based guitar-building brand is the finest in a relatively new wave of manufacturers. They do not have a line of guitars, per se. Instead, they make every single guitar to order. This high-end boutique style manufacturing in a large-scale format was all but unheard of until the internet changed the world. Now, this brand can offer dozens of shapes, pickup combinations, finishes, etc. reasonably. But don’t let the fact that their guitar shapes seem like knock-offs of other long-standing brands fool you. Any Suhr guitar you’ll encounter is going to be of the utmost in quality of construction and sound. There simply is not a better custom brand out there with the same vast catalog of offerings. There are literally thousands of possible combinations, so if you are looking for a unique and superb instrument and are willing to pay for it, it’s hard to say there’s anything better.
I've contacted them once before and they are SO eager to please. None of those steps is an issue for them at all. I don't condone buying out of China but that is a pretty sure fire way of squeezing the best quality guitar out of an otherwise shithouse marketplace. If you just order and wait, they are just going to pick one off the shelf, and that's not what you want. You need to push them to make your guitar.
Washburn Guitars have a history built by skilled luthiers and musicians who share a passion for guitar. There are plenty of new modern and traditional designs, like the Washburn Parallaxe Series which has futuristic and modern voicing, great for metal genres. The Washburn Jazz Series has mellow tones and more traditional construction and playability. View all information
If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 
Certain features make Vintage® guitars a “bigger bang for the buck.” Subtle changes to traditional guitar designs have been made so they perform much better. For instance, on the spring block, the holes are staggered in a way that allows the strings to leave the block and pass over the saddles at a consistent angle that helps keep those strings in tune. Trev also developed tuning keys called EZ-LOK™ that work like a locking tuner, but actually don’t require any mechanical manufacturing. There’s nothing to unwind when you’re slacking the strings using the vibrato, and they always come back to pitch. The same goes for our pickups. Trev doesn’t have a high-dollar pickup range to protect, so he can produce pickups that will sound as good as any company can wind anywhere in the world.
There are different ways to play electric guitar. One is to just play the electric guitar, and to take it as it is. Another way is to play the guitar as a sort of synthesizer. With the right effects (delay, reverb, volume swells, added octaves), no one would even know that it was a guitar. Neither way is wrong, but we refer to both as "playing electric guitar" even though they're being used in completely different ways that may as well be different instruments. Drama ensues.
The classical guitar also became widely used in popular music and rock & roll in the 1960s after guitarist Mason Williams popularized the instrument in his instrumental hit Classical Gas. Guitarist Christopher Parkening is quoted in the book Classical Gas: The Music of Mason Williams as saying that it is the most requested guitar piece besides Malagueña and perhaps the best known instrumental guitar piece today. In the field of New Flamenco, the works and performances of Spanish composer and player Paco de Lucía are known worldwide.
Play a classic 6120 or Duo Jet and it can seem a bit, well, old-fashioned. A growing number of players desire the brand’s looks, sound and unmatched vibe, but also want something a tad more versatile and user-friendly. Enter this latest Players Edition model with its neck set lower into the body for improved access, higher-output Filter’Tron-style humbucking pickup (Full’Trons) and a modernised Bigsby vibrato where through-stringing replaces the notorious ‘hooking the ball-end over a peg’ system that scuppered any chance of a quick change. Mate these modern tweaks with another recent innovation (for Gretsch, at any rate), the Centre Block range, and you have a guitar ready to compete with anything out there - in virtually any style.
Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.

Extremely eclectic, Page has a diverse array of guitaristic influences, which includes blues guitarists Otis Rush, Buddy Guy and Hubert Sumlin as well as early rockabilly guitarists Cliff Gallup and Scotty Moore. He combined these influences with a strong interest in the occult and plenty of his own studio savvy to paint a musical landscape within every Led Zeppelin song. Page’s landmark use of echo effects in tracks like “How Many More Times” and “You Shook Me,” bizarre tunings in cuts like “Friends” and “Bron-Y-Aur Stomp,” and excursions with a violin bow in songs like “Dazed and Confused” yielded textures that were unparalleled at the time.
Seagull is a Canadian company that produces hand crafted acoustic guitars. It has solid top guitars which offer richer sound, broader dynamic range, and sound becomes better as time pass by. The neck of the guitar of the seagull guitar has either Silverleaf maple or Honduras mahogany. Silverleaf is less permeable than mahogany that provides an incredibly smooth sensation but has an identical denseness. Some really good guitars from the line up of Seagull are Original S6 Cedar, Entourage Rustic S6, and Entourage Rustic CW QI.
Since 1971 Hoffman Guitars has provided a full range of services to guitar players nationwide.   We have always worked to provide the finest in instrument repair services and handcrafted guitars.  We provide a full range of repair services, including factory authorized warranty service for C.F. Martin, Gibson, Guild, Fender, Taylor, Jim Olson and others.  I (Charlie Hoffman) have built over 600 individually handcrafted guitars, which are (or have been) played by such players as Leo Kottke, Tim Sparks,  Dakota Dave Hull, Ann Reed, Jerry Rau, Charlie Maguire and others.  In addition, we carry a fairly complete range of accessories for guitar players (strings, picks, capos, pickups, cases, etc, etc.).  In this day and age it may seem a bit anachronistic but we really believe in customer service and strive to provide the very best.
A touring pro friend of my was given one of these years ago by the McPherson company as a promotional endorsement for him to play on stage. After playing his I have wanted one for years. They are indeed expensive, but recently I was able to purchase one. In my 45 years of playing I have always gone through multiple examples of each guitar I've owned before purchasing, and have (and do) own Martins, Taylors, Gibsons, Tacomas, Fenders, Seagulls, Alvarez, Yamaha, etc. which were all really good in their own right. However, nothing I've played has been as good as the McPherson in terms of tone, volume, sustain, note clarity, playability, workmanship; it's useful whether played solo or in an ensemble setting, and for chords or single line playing. It is indeed the last acoustic guitar that I will ever buy.
We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .010 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!), cleaning and polishing. One of the best things about this guitar is the modification to a factory flaw that most TW's we've seen have. The finger board is too long from the nut to the first fret, thus most all of these we have seen will not intonate, thus not play in tune. We had a compensated nut, modified and installed on this one (see photo collage). I don't know where they acquired it, but it worked like a charm. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 "Round-wound" strings. Guitar looks near new and plays great. No case.

Purchase a more suitable microphone, if necessary. If you have found that your mic really doesn't capture sound the way you need, you'll have to research to find the right mic for your situation. For example, you might use a large diaphragm condenser mic to capture crisp, pop rock tones.[32] However, you should be able to achieve consistently good recordings with the use of either a common:


You would probably be better served to specify a budget, then mention the kind of music you want to learn to play and whether you want an electric or an acoustic. As general advice, within any price range probably a general-purpose guitar would be better for you than something meant for a specific purpose - e.g., no pointy lime green electrics. By general purpose I mean guitars like Strats, Les Pauls, and concert-sized acoustics. Nothing particularly fancy.
Before deciding on how to go about mic’ing the amp, listen to the sound in the room. If the guitar is being recorded as part of a rhythm track in the same room as drums and other instruments, the only option may be to use a close-mic’ing technique, unless you don’t mind dealing with the other instruments bleeding into the guitar track. Recording guitars in isolation, as an overdub, presents more options for ambient room mic’ing. Experiment with mic positioning to achieve the right amount of room sound and the desired bass and treble response. Distance-mic’ing in a very live-sounding room can create an appealing slapback echo-type sound, while close mic’ing gives you absolute flexibility in the mix.   
The GT-70 was a re-styled two-pickup, single-cutaway recalling the F-55s. The cutaway retained the wide horizontal angle of before, however the upper bass bout received a more graceful treatment, with a slight inward curve as it met the neck at the 16th fret. The controls were the same as before; the elevated pickguard had become a large white affair, the tailpiece was the V-notched Bigsby. Pickups remained our familiar DeArmond humbuckers. Gone were the plastic bridges in favor of metal adjustable finetune variety. Finishes were either burgundy or black. The first prototype serial number was 203803. Around 1,450 of these were made between January of 1966 and October of 1968.
"We are extremely excited about this next phase of growth that we believe will benefit both our employees, and the Memphis community. I remember when our property had abandoned buildings, and Beale Street was in decline. It is with great pride that I can see the development of this area with a basketball arena, hotels, and a resurgent pride in the musical heritage of the great city of Memphis. We continue to love the Memphis community and hope to be a key contributor to its future when we move nearby to a more appropriate location for our manufacturing based business, allowing the world the benefit of our great American craftsmen."[36]
Marshall are king when it comes to stacks and rock where fender leads with combos. Marshall offer a wall of sound with punchy lows, strong mids and aggressive highs. But it's not all shrill highs,dial back the trebble a little and you can also get really nice cleans and some real grunt as the crunch sets in. The classic Marshall sound is so coveted that there the market is saturated with imitators. - Antmax
Try different gauge strings. As you know, guitarists can be creatures of habit. But heavier strings can help both your tone and fingering strength, while lighter strings may suit bigger bends. Experiment! Billy F Gibbons has the thickest tone but his top E is only a .007. Stevie Ray Vaughan’s top E was a .013. Changing string gauge may just bring out your best inner-self.

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It is also believed that 'Terada Musical Instrument Co., Ltd. of Japan also made some guitars for Ibanez during this period.' It's thought that 'these would be mostly hollow-body guitars, but may also included some solid-body Artist series models.' There is no proof whatsoever for either of these assumptions. It's most likely that this is a big misunderstanding caused by an over generalization in the database of the "Guitar Dater Project" website, which is not able to assign the right factory to a vintage Ibanez guitar based on its serial number. The false information this website generates has been propogated in numerous advertisements of sellers of vintage Ibanez guitars. There is no proof whatsoever of any solid body Ibanez guitar produced by Terada. On the contrary: the fact that the production of solid body Ibanez Artist guitars shifted to Iida Gakki 1987, while hollow-body and semi-hollow Artist guitars became Artstar labels with H serial numbers, shows that the original production before 1987 came all from the FujiGen Gakki factory, which was experiencing capacity problems during that time period caused by their commitment to produce guitars for Fender Japan. If Terada had produced AR models already, they would have continued doing so. The AR and AS models shared the same necks under the Artist flag. Splitting the production up from a situation in which they were already both made in the Terada factory wouldn't be efficient, so it is highly unlikely that pre-1987 AR and AS models were ever made there.
Want to get a good impression of how the SJ 200 sounds? Well Dylan can show you how it strums, Emmylou how it picks, or listen to Pete Townshend thrashing nine bells out of his one on Pinball Wizard. You might also want to take in George Harrison’s Here Comes the Sun or anything by the Everly Brothers. As you'd expect, given the "reassuringly expensive" (i.e. enormous) price tag, the build quality throughout is faultless, superb. The first thing you notice when you sit down to play it is just how sweetly the neck sits in your hand and how easy it is to play. It’s a big lump of money, but when you buy the SJ 200 we guess you’re not just buying the guitar, you’re buying a piece of history.

Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.
Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.
The SSL-10 had become the SSX-10 ($387), with humbucker/single/single pickups, pretty much the same. This came with jumbo frets, a satin-finished neck and a 14 degree backward pitch on the head. The rosewood ‘board now sported the “wave” or triangular wave inlays popular on Kramers, Charvels and Jacksons of the period. No mention is made of vibrato, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t have a tradition-style unit. Colors were now Carrera midnight blue, metallic black, purple burst, dark red, white pearl and blue pearl, all with chrome hardware.
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. Guitars may have a fixed bridge or a spring-loaded hinged bridge, which lets players "bend" the pitch of notes or chords up or down, or perform vibrato effects. The sound of an electric guitar can be modified by new playing techniques such as string bending, tapping, and hammering-on, using audio feedback, or slide guitar playing. There are several types of electric guitar, including: the solid-body guitar; various types of hollow-body guitars; the six-string guitar (the most common type), which is usually tuned E, A, D, G, B, E, from lowest to highest strings; the seven-string guitar, which typically adds a low B string below the low E; and the twelve-string guitar, which has six pairs of strings.
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The Danelectro 12/6 Doubleneck Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar for sale with Gig Bag deserves the limelight. With its what I refer to as creamburst finish and dual necks, it's bound to draw positive attention. The 12/6 doubleneck features maple necks with rosewood fretboards. Danelectro lipstick pickups are true to the originals with that unique tone everyone loves. There's a 3-way pickup selector and another selector for switching between 6- and 12-string modes. Controls also include dual concentric volume and tone controls allowing for different settings between the two necks. Includes gig bag.MORE HERE...
The Pocket Pal is a recent addition to the Hohner standard line of harmonicas. It is somewhat unusual because it is slightly shorter in length than most harmonicas, leading to its namesake of being pocket handy. It is Chinese made, which is unfavorable to most harmonica players, but the Pocket Pal has caught on as an inexpensive, yet quality harp. Like the Old Standby, the Pocket Pal is designed for use in country music.[26]
During the 1960s, many musicians[who?] preferred Martin guitars built beforeWorld War II to more recent guitars of the same model. The pre-War guitars were believed[citation needed] to have internal bracing carved more skillfully than later instruments, producing better resonance, and tops made from Adirondack red spruce rather than Sitka spruce. Additionally, 1970s Martin dreadnoughts suffered from poor intonation in the higher registers[citation needed]. Some luthiers and repairmen[who?] attribute this to a gradual trend of misplacing the bridge on these guitars: the same jigs for bridge placement were used throughout the history of each model’s production. As the amount of production increased from the Martin factory, the jigs eroded, resulting in inaccurate bridge placement[citation needed]. This was eventually identified and corrected.
The brand continued to release new models through the sixties, seventies and eighties (namely, the RGX Series). Then, in 1990, Yamaha launched the incredibly successful Pacifica range, which combined versatility, reliability and great tone in an affordable package. It was pounced on by beginners who didn’t feel the need to splash out on a Fender. Needless to say, the Pacifica Series is still going strong in 2018.
With $500 in your pocket, buying a good amp becomes a lot easier. In fact, it’s probably as expensive as most casual guitarists would ever need to go. This category includes a big choice of both amp heads and combos, solid-state and tube amps. While they make great practice amps, they are all worthy of small to medium-sized gigs and studio recording. For example, you can find the excellent Peavey ValveKing II. This little amp head offers the same beastly tone as the iconic full-size 6505, with 20 watts of power and solid controls.
Besides his restoration of vintage guitars, one of the most important contributions Paul has made to the guitar world is passing the torch to a new generation of guitar masters by offering Luthier classes that teaches how to build your own electric guitar at his shop. People from all walks of life have attended his seminars, including Mark Colombo, a former offensive tackle of the Dallas Cowboys. Paul is not only sharing his love of building great guitars but also teaching the science of how the magic works. "I have what's known as the 'no-fail policy,'" he says and laughs. "If you can't do the work, I'll do it for you."
I cut my template with a jig saw and a fine tooth blade to make sure it kept a straight edge. Then i mounted it to the body blank using small screws in the ares that would be routed out later like the neck cavity area and where the pick ups would be. You will want to start routing a bit outside your line or the edge of the template so you can get you router bit to the depth it will need to be at for the ball bearing to follow the template. I use a 1/2"x1" bit with a ball bearing guide on top.I make several passes around the body, lowering the router 1/4" at a time for smooth easy cuts. Once you have made your pass were the bearing runs along side the template, it is much easier to rout and you will end up with a nice squared edge to the body.

The biggest determining factor on how easy a guitar is to play is the 'action' - distance from the strings to the neck. When it is very low it is easy to press the strings down to touch the fret; when it is too low the strings will buzz when you play. If a guitar's action is too high it will be very hard to play, and for a beginner, this can be pretty disheartening.
Schooled in flamenco and jazz, Robby Krieger pushed beyond rock at a time when most players were still bound to the blues. In the Doors, he had the improvisatory flair to follow Jim Morrison's wildest journeys, wrote some of their biggest hits ("Light My Fire"), and picked up the slack in their keyboard-drums-guitar lineup. "Not having a bass player… made me play more bass notes to fill out the bottom," he said. "Not having a rhythm player also made me play differently, to fill out the sound. I always felt like three players simultaneously."
A basic overview of how they function might, the volume pot will receive a signal from the pickup selector it will then transfer this signal to both the tone pot and output jack. Pots can also come as ‘blended’ in which case it will control two pickups and may even have a toggle switch dedicated to just the one pot. This is much less common and won’t play a role in assembling an electric guitar kit in most cases.

The first of these guitars was the Slash “Snakepit” Les Paul Standard, which was introduced by the Gibson Custom Shop in 1996. It has a transparent cranberry red finish over a flame maple top, a relief carving of the smoking snake graphic off the cover of Slash’s Snakepit‘s debut album, It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere, hand carved by Bruce J. Kunkel (owner of Kunkel Guitars – kunkelguitars.com), and a mother of pearl inlay of a cobra wrapped up the length of the ebony fretboard. Production was limited to 50, with Slash receiving the first four including the prototype, the only one with the carving on the body turned 90 degrees to be viewed right side up when displayed on a guitar stand. In 1998 Slash’s studio was broken into and his guitars were stolen, including the “Snakepit” prototype, so the Gibson Custom Shop built him a replica. These guitars are by far the rarest and most collectible of any of the Gibson Slash signature guitars, they sold for around $5,000 when new, the Hollywood Guitar Center was asking $20,000 for one in 2002.[citation needed] In 1997, Epiphone released a more affordable version of the “Snakepit” Les Paul, featuring a decal of the smoking snake logo and standard fretboard inlay.[32]


The Boss ME-80 has two modes of operations. MEMORY mode lets you scroll through banks and presets more like a conventional multi-fx unit, and MANUAL mode is what we described earlier, where you can use this pedal as if you had a bunch of effects on a pedalboard and just start tweaking away. MANUAL mode is really where this unit shines, and makes it stand out from other multi-effect pedals. The presets are okay for getting a taste of it, but as is typical of presets many are over the top.
Best Answer:  first off, there are tuning knobs on the end of the neck of the guitar(the neck is the long piece protruding from the body of the guitar) they control the pitch of the strings. When you tune a guitar you want the first string(or the smallest string) to be tuned to the note e.The other strings going up should be the notes b,g,d,a,e. You only need to tune the guitar whenever it gets out of tune. The knobs on the body of the guitar are volume control for each pickup,master tone control, and master volume.The controls differ from each guitar , but they usually follow something like that.Lastly, on a Les Paul there is a switch on the upper part of the body that controls which pickup is being used.-(the pickup selector). A pickup is a magnet that collects sound from the strings and lets it be amplified through a amp.A good amp costs anywhere from 50 to 100 dollars. Good luck on your guitar.
It was a great guitar to learn on, but you are ready for a serious gigging guitar.  Okay, if she was your FIRST love then don't dell her, keep her around for inspiration (plus she ain't worth any money anyway).  Do NOT upgrade her.  Once you start, there will be no end.  Sure great pickups will make her sound great, but you'll also want to replace ALL the electronics, and the tuners, and the bridge, and... well, you get the idea.

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Unless it's broken and will need to be replaced, start with obtaining a new nut that is anything to your liking, preferably a blank nut rather than a pre-cut to avoid improper string height. If cutting a blank try copying your old nut and make adjustments if needed using the neck as a guide after cutting out the nut. To do this take a sharp blade that is easy to work with such as an X-acto and cut the finish that holds the sides of the nut. Make sure to cut all of the finish as it will break apart when you take out the nut.
I've contacted them once before and they are SO eager to please. None of those steps is an issue for them at all. I don't condone buying out of China but that is a pretty sure fire way of squeezing the best quality guitar out of an otherwise shithouse marketplace. If you just order and wait, they are just going to pick one off the shelf, and that's not what you want. You need to push them to make your guitar.

Amazingly well made and a beautiful guitar. The finish is incredible, it looks like a guitar that should cost a $1000 and up. Mine is the red color and found it in a pawn shop looking very rough, price on it was $99 and at first I thought it looked like a $99 guitar so I didn't pay any attention to it. I was looking a some Epi SG400s and a couple of Gibson's but for some reason I went back to the Samick. I had some cleaner with me and I grabbed a rag and started cleaning it up, after a few minutes of scrubbing this beautiful guitar appeared. I plugged it in along with the Epis and Gibson SGs and played them side-by-side and I was amazed at the sound I was getting from the Samick. I compared it along with the other SGs and the finish and the build quality smoked the others. I am all about American made guitars but this Korean made SG has completely changed my opinion about Asian made guitars, especially when I compared it to a $900 Gibson. I wasn't even looking for a new guitar but I couldn't let this one get away. I bought it and have played it for hours every day for the last week. It's amazing, the neck is the smoothest and easiest to play that I've ever seen, I like it much more than my Ibanez RG with the Wizard II neck I've got. I am now looking out for other Samick Artists Series guitars and if you see one for a good price try it out.
Whether he was playing as a Muscle Shoals studio musician or as one of the lead guitarists in The Allman Brothers Band, Duane Allman was brilliant. Both his standard playing and slide playing were some of the smoothest and most adventurous the world has ever seen. To hear Allman at the height of his guitar playing prowess, give a listen to “The Allman Brothers Live at The Fillmore East.”
In attempting to amplify acoustic guitars, inventors and musicians alike soon discovered an issue that is still problematic for many of today’s acoustic guitarists — feedback. Hence, the evolution of solid body electric guitars, spearheaded by Vivi-Tone in 1934. Rickenbacker followed up by distributing the Electro Spanish in 1935 (Electro Spanish later being shortened to ES by Gibson for their line of hollow body and semi-hollow electric guitars), and the Slingerland Songster 401 was introduced in 1936. But some guitarists — mainly jazz and blues musicians — came to miss the warm, full-bodied tone that can only be generated by the free-space resonance of tops and backs made from quality tonewoods. And so it is that we also have the hybrid design of semi-hollow body electric guitars.
Japanese classical guitarist Shiro Arai founded the Arai Co. in the 1950s as an international importing company, which expanded to manufacturing in the 1960s adopting the "Aria" brand name. The explosion in popularity of the electric guitar in the 1960s led them to begin manufacturing and distributing several different brands, Lyle being one of them. Arai attended the NAMM trade show and saw many of the American guitar designs that had attained popularity in the U.S. This greatly influenced Arai to produce similar models.
zircon wrote:Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.

Great article. Thank you!However I've had a lot of experience with Squier guitars. They often come in at $200, sometimes on sale for $129 but I live in a college town and have had many Squiers. All have very sharp fret ends which discourage beginners not knowing they must be filed. IDK about any of the others but this is my only complaint. Squier quality and playability (after fretwork) is amazing at that price point.
Bass guitars (like guitars) in many ways are like cars. Their appearance is a major factor in your buying decision. But also like cars, especially for the first-time buyer, there are far more important factors to know about in order to ensure you buy a bass guitar that is both properly playable and that stays in tune, enabling you to make progress with it.  

Thank you Ola and David for this excellent article. The approach is totally scientific: you try to study the impact of one element of a system while keeping the rest of the settings identical (same pickups, same strings, same picking, etc.). The wood used modifies effectively the electrical spectrum composition and therefore the sound we hear. All the difficulty is that the wood is a part of a very complex system (woods combination, building type, pickups, strings, effects, amplification, restitution, etc.) and, without a solid knowledge or skills, it could be difficult to choose the right elements of the system to get what you want…

But the question remains, was that environment good for the artists or for the equipment? Think of it this way: experienced chefs know very well the value of a seasoned pan or grill. Flip on any show from the Food Network and you’ll see cooks bragging about their 30-year-old griddle and how it imparts an amazing flavor to their corned beef hash. Preparing food leaves behind actual physical substances, unlike immaterial sound waves, so that comparison doesn’t work exactly. But the dirt and dust and grime could certainly effect the equipment. In a similar way, we have to ask ourselves, was that dirty studio, then, a source of inspiration or were the dirty, beer-smelling microphones actually improving the music? Regardless, the studio imbued the recording with an undeniable quality. Many guitar nuts can identify a particular instrument while listening to a song. Recording experts can do the same thing with studios.

When you've put your blood, sweat and tears into developing your talent, you want your music to sound amazing. And with the proper recording gear, you can ensure your sound is captured exactly how you intended. From audio interfaces to studio monitors to extremely powerful subwoofers, this section's wide range of recording gear offers up plenty of examples of ways to make your recordings better than ever. The right audio/video arrangement can take the stress out of recording, giving you more time and energy to concentrate on what's most important - your music. If you're unsure where to start the search for recording gear, checking out some of the top-rated and best-selling products is definitely the way to go. Want to attach your mic directly to your PC or Mac? The Blue Icicle performs dual functions as an XLR to USB adapter and a studio-quality microphone preamp. Offering a quick and easy way to perform digital and audio recording, this handy tool is a must for every musician's gear bag. Maybe you're in the market for a studio monitor? If that's the case, the Mackie MR8 mk3 8" 2-Way Powered Studio Monitor is a fantastic choice. Built with a clear focus on accuracy, this low-profile studio monitor is perfect for musicians who really want to capture the full character of their music. This section is also home to an assortment of GoPro video cameras. With a GoPro, you can record your set firsthand from the stage, giving your fans a unique "view from the top." Take a look at the GoPro HERO+ LCD for example - this camera captures your world in stunning HD video. It's rugged, waterproof and built into its own protective case - exactly what you need to record those high-energy shows. Another fantastic GoPro option is the HERO4 Session. Smaller and lighter than any other GoPro currently on the market, the HERO4 Session captures 1080p60 video and 8MP photos in a simple design that's so compact it can go just about anywhere. This is just a quick sampling of what's available when it comes to recording gear. There are lots more products to consider, so spend some time browsing through them - you never know when the right piece of equipment is going to leap off the page and into your professional setup.


The actual key that this song was written in is Bb (B flat) and can be a bit difficult for beginners; I prefer using a capo for this song and playing it in the Key of C. Using the capo to play this song doesn’t change how the song sounds, but it makes playing the song a lot easier. Using your capo on the third fret, you chord progression will look like C – G – Am (A minor) – F.
It usually has 8 terminals – two poles with 4 terminals each. Each pole has one common terminal and 3 switched. The first thing you want to figure out is which terminal is common. Note that terminal on the left is connected to the lever all the time – that’s our common terminal. The other three terminals are connected to the lever only in certain switch positions. Represented as a schematic, each pole would look like this.
All of the complex air-coupling interactions, along with the resonant properties of the tonewoods themselves, are a key reason that different acoustic guitars will have different tonal qualities. The sound is a complex mixture of harmonics that give this type of guitar its distinctive sound. Some of the most important varieties are the classical guitar (nylon-stringed) and steel-string acoustic guitar.
At one point, Fender switched to producing guitars with the bridge pickup located farthest from the highest-amplitude portion of the vibrating strings, slightly “over-wound”, thus increasing the signal output from that pickup. Even more overwound pickups (“hot-wired” designs) became popular, either for all three pickups (a “hot” configuration), or for the bridge position only (so-called “Texas Hot” due to its popularity among Southern Rock guitarists).
The looper is a little more limited and offers shorter loop time than its competitors (20-seconds), but hey, at least it has a looper. The inclusion of a USB means you can hook the DigiTech RP500 straight to your computer and start recording riffs and ideas. If you like, you can use the included Cubase LE software for all your recording needs. Furthermore, just like with the other pedals on our list, you can manage and adjust your presets from the provided X-Edit Editor/Librarian software, which is quicker and easier than scrolling through the menus on the unit itself. The DigiTech website has a pretty extensive Tone Library, where you can download and use a bunch of patches.
For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.
Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.
Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.
When people ask "What are the guitar string sizes?" they really want to know about the gauges, the term referring to the diameter of the string.  The answer is... that's not quite how it works.  Yes there are standard gauges but in several standard sizes like light, medium, and heavy.  Each, when properly tuned, will exert a different tension on the guitar's neck and if you jump to another size you'll probably need to adjust the truss rod and get used to the new action of the fingerboard.

This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
I’m super excited for this post as it’s the culmination of some of the biggest names in online guitar lesson providers coming together to offer their advice and insights on guitar chords. Understanding the right way to play guitar chords is one of the first things you’ll learn as a beginner guitar player. It can also be quite frustrating when you are just starting out.That’s why I decided it would be a great idea to get a bunch of experts together all giving their insight into learning more about the wonderful world of guitar chords. I basically asked everyone two questions:

Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.
1)	Mic your guitar cabinet, running the mic signal into a simple mixer with your effect units patched in on effects sends and returns. Run the mixer into a power amp and full-range speakers, or powered full range monitor speakers (the “wet” cabinets), placed on either side of your dry cabinet. Set the effects units 100 percent wet and blend in the amount of effect you want into the wet cabs. Use a MIDI foot controller to change presets on the effects units, and add an expression pedal to control things like the output volume of the effect signal, or the feedback of a delay. For live applications, the soundman can mic your dry cabinet separately and take a stereo line-out signal from your mixer for the effects, panning the effected signal hard left and right in the PA. Guitarists such as Eric Johnson and Larry Carlton have used this approach. 

That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.
Often, multi-effects pedals and processors can be more cost-effective than purchasing multiple stompboxes. They also avoid the potential noise and tone-degrading impact of chaining numerous individual pedals together. That said, many guitarists prefer the way certain dedicated pedals sound or operate, and will collect many single-effect stompboxes along the way. If you are looking at purchasing multiple effect units but don’t have any favorites, purchasing a multi-effects processor can be a money-saving alternative.

A small number of bass units do not fit into the "combo" amplifier, standalone amplifier or separate speaker cabinet categorization or typologies. Some bass amp combos have a removable amplifier. With the amplifier unit taken out of the combo cabinet, the user then has an easily portable amp head (which can be taken to a recording studio for use as a preamp, to lay down bass tracks) and a separate bass speaker cabinet, which could be used with another bass amp head. As well, some amp heads have a small built-in speaker which produces enough sound so that it can be used as a practice amp, so that the bassist can practice when she/he has the head, but not the speaker cabinet. This way, a bassist in a touring band could practice electric bass using her amp head, even if her speaker cabinets were still locked up in an equipment van.
   These prices reflect the opinion/perception of the editor of guitarrepairshop.com. while these are prices one could expect from a quality repair shop, repair rates can vary. A full time repairman can have as much training time and investment in tools as any mechanic. Shop overhead costs are on par with those of any other profession, so if you take your instrument to a professional shop, expect to pay professional rates. And expect professional work. While this list reflects prices one would expect to pay at a professional shop, rates will vary. Expect to pay by the hour for some extensive restoration jobs. Rates based on an hourly charge of $60.00 p/hour. Shop minimum labor charge - $60.00 Prices updated January 2014
Unlike fuzz and distortion pedals, booster effects typically are engineered to boost the signal reaching the amp without adding coloration. Some booster pedals do slightly fatten the tone of the guitar by overdriving the preamp stage of the amplifier. They can be very useful in getting your amp to break up and produce musical-sounding distortion at lower volume levels as well as adding clarity to your solo riffs. A booster pedal can become an essential part of your rig when you have more than four effects in your signal chain or 18 feet or more of cabling between your instrument and amp.
Looper – A time-based effect that records a “phrase” of your playing and loops it back repetitively. These phrases can play sequentially in a song-style format or overdubbed to create dense layers, as used by one-man band style performers, vocalists to beatboxers. Larger loop pedals have more than one pedal for multiple tracks and allow you to add in-built effects to your loops. Remember: If you want to record your chain of effects pedals, make sure your loop pedal is always at the end of effects chain.
Editorial comment – I advise folks when considering fretwork to consider not choosing a size or leveling operation resulting in less than .040” height if they want to play a style with frequent fret hand slurring, i.e. rock, blues, shred etc.  Low fret height is less capable of sustaining a reasonable fret leveling in the future, making it that much closer to refret time.  You don’t have to choose a very tall size if that is uncomfortable for you, but only choose a low height if that is really what you want and are accustomed to.
Hi, my cousin gave me a bass guitar, the brand is called Cyclone by EKS Technology Inc. I looked it up and I could find barely anything. the bass has been in his garage since the early '90s and he told he that Fender bought the brand sometime around then, but I still can't find anything about the brand, apart from that they also produce electric guitars. almost as if the brand has been wiped from history. Any information regarding this brand would be gratefully accepted!
There are times when a single-coil just doesn’t have enough twang. I’ve encountered Strat neck pickups that are just too wooly to provide me with that saucy, SRV/Hendrix-style rhythm juice. Or, sometimes an anemic bridge pickup just needs an extra dose of snap to push it into Tele-like territory. If so, this simple mod could be just what you’re looking for.
Of course, the effect is not as good as using a professional studio but most users report that reproduction is very good for a simple computer application. The interface of Guitar Rig is extremely well laid out and even for those new to amps and guitar effects, it doesn't take long to navigate your way around. If you intend to use Guitar Rig for live performances, a convenient Live View displays the most essential readouts and level monitors to keep your eye on.
Now, there are some basic terms in the electric guitar lingo that you need to be aware of. Below are some of the terms that you need to know before you go out and research about different electric guitars. But if you are musically inept, there are some ways you can compete with the guitar guy. If you learn some points about the electric guitar, such as terms and mechanics of the instrument, you can impress your friends and possibly even will be the guy holding the guitar at your next dinner party.
Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.
From rock to jazz or folk to metal, what separates the great guitarists from the rest is their mastery of the skills taught in this program. From basics like chords and scales to nuances like improvisation techniques, form, control, and inflexion, this certificate program will take your guitar playing to the next level. Few accomplished guitarists have reached their peak alone, and Berklee’s faculty is unparalleled when it comes to delivering the personalized instruction and feedback that will help you turn the fretboard into a playground packed with unlimited possibilities.
Another factor to consider are the alloys used to make the string. Acoustic strings may be phosphor bronze or an 80/20 bronze/zinc alloy, electric strings may be pure steel or a steel/nickel alloy, and the outer winding on the thicker strings may be either round wound or flat wound, which is typically used by jazz guitarists for smooth fingering with less fretting noise. Acoustic and electric strings are both now available with special super-thin coatings to protect them from sweat and corrosion. Coated strings cost more, but generally last much longer. Find out what type of string your favorite player uses, try guitars with different types of strings at your local guitar store, then try a few different sets on your guitar to see what feels and sounds best for your playing style. Major manufacturers include Ernie Ball, Martin, GHS, D'Addario, and Elixir, among others. Make sure you have a string winder to make installing the strings go faster, and some pliers with a fine wire cutter to clip the excess string from the tuning post, a well as some guitar polish - changing strings is a good time to perform some routine maintenance. Keep a clean cloth in your case to wipe down the strings after each use, along with extra bridge pins for your acoustic guitar. Regular string changes are the best way to keep your tone crisp and clear, so grab a pack and tune 'em up!
(https://rytmenpinne.wordpress.com/sounds-and-such/salamander-grandpiano/) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). Some versions on this site have been carefully edited down to 6 velocity layers and looped at the almost inaudible tail ends to reduce Ram usage but the quality is almost indistinguishable.  They are based on a nicely sampled Yamaha C5 Grand. Samples have been normalised, re-attenuated, latency reduced and modified for sf2. Three or more brightness levels are available plus optional resonance.
List of electric guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Electric guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best electric guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
Tonality is an important consideration for many musical instruments, and that’s especially true when it comes to acoustic guitars. The strings, fretboard, sound holes, and body of a guitar all play a role in how the guitar will sound to an audience. The distance between the strings and the fretboard (called the “action”) can also affect sound quality.
Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
Of music written originally for guitar, the earliest important composers are from the classical period and include Fernando Sor (b. Spain 1778) and Mauro Giuliani (b. Italy 1781), both of whom wrote in a style strongly influenced by Viennese classicism. In the 19th century guitar composers such as Johann Kaspar Mertz (b. Slovakia, Austria 1806) were strongly influenced by the dominance of the piano. Not until the end of the nineteenth century did the guitar begin to establish its own unique identity. Francisco Tárrega (b. Spain 1852) was central to this, sometimes incorporating stylized aspects of flamenco's Moorish influences into his romantic miniatures. This was part of late 19th century mainstream European musical nationalism. Albéniz and Granados were central to this movement; their evocation of the guitar was so successful that their compositions have been absorbed into standard guitar repertoire.
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
6.  I’ve said this before but think it needs to be said again… Customer using truss rod to “fix” action.  Result:  Broken truss rod.  Fix:  Well, the fix costs more than the instrument and the guitar was scrapped.  This one depends on where the break occurred and what kind of rod was used.  If it’s a conventional rod and the break is close to the adjusting nut, Stew-Mac has a tool to re-thread the rod and save it.  If the break is farther down the rod or double action you may have to remove the fret board and that my friend is major surgery.
The pickup itself consists of a long magnet, or a number of cylindrical magnets in a row, around which is a wire coil. The vibrations of the electric guitar’s strings cause changes in the magnetic field of these magnets, which in turn is able to induce a current in the coiled wire. This current is then passed on to the amplifier, which produces the sound. The stronger the magnets used in the pickups, the more sensitive they are to the string’s vibrations.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber
A typical digital multi-effects pedal is programmed, with several memory locations available to save custom user settings. Many lack the front-panel knobs of analog devices, using buttons instead to program various effect parameters. Multi-effects devices continue to evolve, some gaining MIDI or USB interfaces to aid in programming. Examples include:
Jump up ^ Hicks, Michael (2000). Sixties Rock: Garage, Psychedelic, and Other Satisfactions. University of Illinois Press. p. 18. ISBN 0-252-06915-3. While most of the documentation on early fuzz boxes has been discarded or lost, the earliest such devices appear to have been introduced in 1962. The best known from that year was the Maestro Fuzztone FZ-1...
In terms of sounds, jazz requires a balance of warmth and clarity. While many solid body guitars can do an approximation of a jazz sound using a clean tone played through the neck pickup, in reality a dedicated jazz guitar will offer this particular sound without becoming overly woolly when lines are played at any speed. Let’s take a look at our pick of the 5 best jazz guitars.

If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.

Note: All versions and platforms of Rocksmith are compatible with the Real Tone Cable. It is a required 1/4-inch audio jack cable necessary for Rocksmith to detect and respond to your guitar playing. All versions of Rocksmith include the Real Tone Cable in the box, except downloaded versions and the Rocksmith 2014 Edition "No Cable Included" Version.
In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.

Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are playing live shows can connect their bass to a DI unit and from there to the PA system. In a well-equipped nightclub or music bar, the audio engineer can then route the bass signal to a stage monitor suitable for bass, so the bass player and band can hear the bass tone. Some standalone bass preamplifier pedals have a DI output, so this output can similarly be connected to a PA system. Bass players who are playing in small venues (coffeehouses, small pubs, etc.) will typically need to bring their own bass combo amp (or an alternative amp, such as a keyboard amp combo), because very small venues often have a very small, low-powered PA system which is used mainly for vocals. Some small venues do not have monitor speakers, or they have only one, in front of the lead vocalist. Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are laying down tracks in the recording studio can plug into a DI unit (any professional recording studio will have one), which is connected to the audio console; the audio engineer can provide the bassist with the sound of their instrument through headphones.
Since they're usually not sure if they'll stick to it I wouldn't spend a ton on it. Make sure it at least plays well. Learning on a poorly constructed guitar can really take the fun out of the whole process and may even convince you that guitar is harder than it really has to be. You can also fix many issues with less-expensive guitars by bringing it to a luthier.
Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?
2.      Weight – a LOT less. This is important if you’re leaving the garage for the first time and don’t have roadies, if (like me) you’re trying to not injure your back anymore lugging equipment), if you’re a touring band trying to spend less on cartage and more on crew, or if you’re a worldwide act who needs to truck and fly your stage rig between continents.

The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
We consider the finest tonewoods to be those with superior projection and sustain, and without weak or bright spots within the tonal range. Many of the wood species from the US Pacific NW meet this criteria, and more. Some were well known by luthiers, but others, like Myrtlewood, Claro, Franquette & Bastogne Walnut, Port Orford Cedar, Redwood, Pistachio, Olive, Osage Orange and Douglas Fir are just now gaining notoriety.
Even by the mid 1970s costs to manufacture instruments in Japan were rapidly rising. Labor was still cheaper than in the USA (it isn't anymore), but real estate, raw material, fuel, transportation costs and virtually all other manufacturing costs were fully as much if not more in Japan as in the USA. The Japanese were able to compete in the international market due not only to low labor costs at that time but also due to highly efficient manufacturing techniques and the fact that their low-cost workers were skilled and highly motivated.
Launch price: $2,099 / £2,499 | Body: Ash | Neck: Roasted maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Roasted maple | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Music Man SH single coil, Music Man SH humbucker | Controls: Volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Music Man Modern hardtail bridge, Schaller M6-IND locking tuners | Left-handed: | Finish: Trans Buttermilk, Trans Black, Trans Maroon, Satin Natural

Carvin is a guitar company with a different business model than the rest. You won’t find them at your local music store because Carvin only makes custom guitars. Their instruments are based around a handful of templates and each feature components that are individually chosen by the buyer. For this reason, it’s very rare to find two Carvins that are completely identical.
The best way to have a great experience building your first guitar is to do it as a member of as class under the direction of a master Luthier. I built my first Tele-style guitar at Tulsa Wood Arts taught by Seth Lee Jones. You can learn a lot of the tricks and avoid some of the frustrations of doing it on your own. Plus, you make new friends and come away with a beautiful, quality guitar your first time out!
Boutique pedals are designed by smaller, independent companies and are typically produced in limited quantities. Some may even be hand-made, with hand-soldered connections. These pedals are mainly distributed online or through mail-order, or sold in a few music stores.[98] They are often more expensive than mass-produced pedals[99] and offer higher-quality components, innovative designs, in-house-made knobs, and hand-painted artwork or etching. Some boutique companies focus on re-creating classic or vintage effects.[100][better source needed]
To celebrate the new generation of shredders profiled in our May/June “Loud Issue,” the SPIN staff decided to find some wheedle in a haystack, taking on the impossible task of ranking our favorite guitar players of all time. Traditionally, the “greatest guitarist” timeline begins with Robert Johnson magically conjuring the blues, nears perfection with Eric Clapton mutating it beatifically, and then ultimately reaches a boomer-baiting Rock and Roll Hall of Fame apotheosis with the free-spirited Jimi Hendrix shooting it into space like feedback-laden fireworks. For this list, we veer toward the alternative canon that kicks in with the Velvet Underground trying to erase that form entirely, making guitar solos gauche and using instruments as sadomasochistic tools for hammering out sheets of white heat.

Amplifiers for electric guitars are more likely than bass amps to have multiple "channels", but some bass amps also have channels. By providing two or more "channels", each with its own gain, equalization and volume knobs, a bassist can preset various settings (e.g., an accompaniment setting for playing a backing part and a solo bass setting for playing a bass solo). In a heavy metal band, a bassist may use a multi-channel amp to have one setting with an aggressive overdrive, while another channel has a "clean" sound for ballads.


The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.


One full step down from Drop D. Utilized by bands like A Day to Remember, Biffy Clyro, Swallow the Sun in all their albums, The Ocean Collective in the Heliocentric / Anthropocentric albums, Slo Burn, Bullet for My Valentine, Evanescence, Children of Bodom, Disciple, Demon Hunter (Only on Demon Hunter), Avenged Sevenfold in "Radiant Eclipse", As I Lay Dying, Asking Alexandria on Reckless and Relentless, Rammstein, August Burns Red, Mastodon (on some songs), Helmet (since the Size Matters era), Converge, System of a Down, What Great Fangs, Black Stone Cherry, Chimaira (since The Impossibility of Reason), P.O.D., Ill Niño, Killswitch Engage, Deftones (in their album White Pony), Disturbed, Gojira (mostly on The Way of All Flesh & L'Enfant Sauvage), Metallica's St. Anger album, (except for the songs "Invisible Kid", which has one guitar in Drop G#, "Dirty Window", which is in Drop C#, and "The Unnamed Feeling", which has one guitar tuned to Drop A#/Bb), Weissglut, Atreyu, Darkest Hour, Breaking Benjamin (on some songs), Mudvayne, Born of Osiris (when using 6 string guitar) Periphery along with some alternate tunings, Cancer Bats, Slipknot (on their demo Mate. Feed. Kill. Repeat.), Zakk Wylde, Escape the Fate, and Skillet, Nirvana on their Bleach album, Porcupine Tree on the songs Anesthetize and Cheating the Polygraph.


Clarence Leonidas “Leo” Fender was established this brand in 1946. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) manufactures the stringed instruments and amplifiers, such as solid-body electric guitars, including the Stratocaster and the Telecaster. This brand is the kings of hearts and getting the popularity from blues to quick rock tempo. Fender’s Precision and Jazz Bass models are now considered to be the standard to which most other electric bass guitars are measured. It’s famous for best guitars which are made ever in the history.
When using subtle detuning to thicken a sound, I suggest trying values of between five and 10 cents and, where possible, adding both positive and negative shifts, to keep the pitch centre correct. Then combine with the dry sound and adjust the level to control the subjective depth of the effect. This is very effective for fattening up guitar solos or backing vocals.
 How to Order Custom Guitar: THIS IS A PRE-BUILD PRICING. You will receive the custom guitar exactly as pictured. Please make sure to choose the required options marked with the RED ( * ) asterisks and it will compute automatically the options you choose. We also offer Optional Upgrades but they are not required. And then once you hit on Buy Now button, go to the top most portion of the website and you can see a cart image logo and click on that then you can see VIEW CART and CHECKOUT to determine the total cost of the guitar including the shipping and the discount.
The goal is to find the body shape and configuration that appeals the most to your eyes and ears. The most straightforward choice for beginners will be the solidbody for its durability. Players who are looking to expand their sonic palette are usually the ones who will take interest in semi-hollow and hollow body guitars. For more information on this topic read The Different Types of Electric Guitars Explained.
Trim:  Heel cap: ebony. Fingerboard: ebony bound in white celluloid with scalloped lower end; 24 frets under A and D, 21 nickel-silver frets under G and C; single abalone dots behind 5th, 7th, 9th, 10th (slightly larger), and 15th frets; double mother-of-pearl dots behind 12th fret. Nut: bone. Bridge: mahogany capped with ebony; nickel-silver-plated steel screws to adjust bridge height and pickup contact. Tuners: six nickel-plated steel, worm-gear machine tuners by Grover with convex head surfaces and decoratively cut plate outline. Endpin: black bakelite; extends through tailpiece. Pick guard: imitation tortoise shell plastic raised on wood brace affixed to top with two steel dome-headed screws. Lacquer: dark orange-brown sunburst.
The person who made up the Top Ten list of best guitars has it all wrong! Of all the guitar companies he lists, Carvin is the only company that still uses ebony as standard material for the fretboard. This is because most other companies refuse to take the time and expense of this type of production. The others all use rosewood because it is cheap, relatively soft and can be "slammed" together quickly by machine; an indication of how they make their guitars in general! No other company who makes guitars even comes close to using the hand selected grade of wood (start to finish) that Carvin does. Take a hint from someone who knows how great guitars made step by step; if you want a guitar made from the best materials you can get, with critical operations still done by hand, order one one from Carvin, try it for ten days, if you really don't like it just return it... No questions and no hassles... Really. If you are not the type of person who cares, or are not willing to do ...more
Acoustic guitars were always subjected to various limitations. Since the body of the guitar is its own source of sound amplification, we had to find other ways to get the sound out there. One of the most popular ways was to put a microphone in front of the instrument. This is a method that is still heavily used today, although it's cumbersome and inconvenient in a lot of applications.
1960's Kay, Model K-1 "SG-Style" Electric Guitar. 1 single coil Pickup. Great, original "see-thru" Mahogany-color finish. Bound fingerboard. Laminated maple neck and laminated Mahogany body. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Stop Tailpiece. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with no visible wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .011 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings.  No case included.
Choosing an electric guitar can be a difficult feat, especially if you have never played electric guitar before. There are so many brands of electric guitars and so many things you need to consider while making your choice. Among the things you need to consider are shape, musical preference, and price. In addition, you need to take a look at the best electric guitar brands to help you choose the highest quality guitars out there that will fit your preference and give you the best playing experience. This is why we have put together a list to give you a look at said brands.
I have an acoustic that I bought from a lady I know who said she has had it since the early 70's. It says 'Maya' on the headstock and the reinforcement rod cover is stamped with 'Takamine'. The sticker inside the sound hole says 'Maya', "We made this guitar for the people who love guitar music", Made by Takamine, Model No. TF1o1S, Japan. On the inside of the sound hole at the top, the wood block there is stamped with 46.6.3. The guitar is only about 3 1/4 inches deep and approx. 15 inches wide at its widest spot. Small guitar with a big beautiful sound.
Phase Three began in 1974, bringing some of the biggest changes to the series with it. Univox swapped in its own humbuckers, made unique in part due to their visible white bobbins. This change took the Phase Three Hi-Flier solidly out of the realm of Mosrite Ventures copy territory and into its own realm, considering the tone and high output changed the sound so significantly. The presence of these humbuckers – found on other Univox guitars of the same era – make the Phase Three versions some of the most highly sought after Hi-Fliers.
Chords are the heart and soul of playing guitar. Many guitar players seldom do anything else, other than strumming chords. The chord is the basic building block of guitar music. A chord is simply a combination of two of more notes played simultaneously. Different combinations give you different chords. There are different classes of chords, such as Major Chords, Minor Chords, Triads, Suspended Chords, Diminished Chords, etc...
I just built this kit, which I ordered directly from Mod DIY. Its the first pedal kit that I have built, although I do have a fair amount of electronics experience. Overall, I was impressed with the kit. All the parts were included, and functioned just fine. The instructions were outstanding, particularly if you use the high-res picture of the inside of a finished model for reference. There was ONE step omitted in the direction, which was to solder a short wire between terminal 3 of the toggle switch to connection 12 on the junction rail. But that was easy to spot.

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