All Gibson-brand guitars are currently made at three facilities, depending on the type of guitar. Solid body electric guitars such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Gibson SG are made in Nashville, Tennessee. Semi-acoustic guitars such as the Gibson ES Series are made in Memphis, Tennessee. Full acoustic guitars such as the Gibson J Series are made in Bozeman, Montana. The Nashville and Bozeman facilities are off-limits to visitors, but the Memphis facility gives regularly scheduled factory tours.
Microprocessor technology allows the use of digital onboard effects in guitar amps to create numerous different sounds and tones that simulate the sound of a range of tube amplifiers and different sized speaker cabinets, all using the same amplifier and speaker. These are known as modeling amplifiers, and can be programmed with simulated characteristic tones of different existing amplifier models (and speaker cabinets—even microphone type or placement), or dialed in to the user's taste. Many amps of this type are also programmable by way of USB connection to a home computer or laptop.[15] Line 6 is generally credited with bringing modeling amplification to the market.[18][19] Modeling amplifiers and stompbox pedals, rackmount units, and software that models specific amplifiers, speakers cabinets, and microphones can provide a large number of sounds and tones. Players can get a reasonable facsimile of the sound of tube amplifiers, vintage combo amplifiers, and huge 8x10” speaker stacks without bringing all that heavy equipment to the studio or stage.
One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.
The pickups on this guitar are really cool and not found on any other model that I’ve seen.  They are really loud single coils reading out at 5.58k at the bridge, and 5.90k at the neck.  The pole piece screws even have some “gold foil” surrounding them, which is really cool and not usually seen.  These pickups sound very close to vintage American p90s, and they have this loud, articulate, sparkly clean tone combined with a really grindy dirty tone.  These pups are special, seriously!  Also, those switches were standard fare through the late 60s on most Matsumoku guitars.
This Japanese company produces a wide range of musical instruments, but the real draw for guitarists will be with beginners and intermediate players. Yamaha offers a solid selection of products at a price that is more budget friendly than some of the other entries on this guide, making it a good place to start for players getting their first guitar.
While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally. (more...)

The music industry is one that has really felt the effects of the digitalization of the world over the last few decades. In the 1970s and '80s, recording, composing and production work would have been done manually with a complicated series of hardware mixers, synths, sequencers and other devices. Today, all you have to do is plug into a computer running the music software that's relevant to the task. These programs and tools don't only make it possible for you to work faster; you can also get started sooner, since a large selection of software packages are available to download directly. You won't need to wait for shipping: just download and start working.


For many years, Martin has used a model-labeling system featuring an initial letter, number, or series of zeros specifying the body size and type; traditionally 5- is the smallest (and technically a terz, tuned a minor third higher than a guitar, at GCFA#DG), advancing in size through 4-, 3-, 2-, 1-, 0-, 00- and 000- (though these are commonly referred to as “Oh”, “triple-oh”, etc. they are, in fact, denoted by zeros, keeping the numerical-size theme constant. These instruments originally had in common a neck that joined the body at the 12th fret. In 1916 Martin contracted with Ditson’s music store to produce a much larger store-badged guitar to compete sonically in ensembles; this boxy thunderer was named the Dreadnought in honor of the most horrific weapons system of the day, a British Navy battleship so large it could fear nothing, or “dread nought”. Indeed, HMS Dreadnought was its name, and it proved an apt product tie-in between the huge ship and the huge guitar. In 1931, Martin introduced D-bodied guitars under their own name, and a new standard was set. Around the same time, to meet the needs of banjo players wanting to cash in the guitar’s new popularity, Martin unveiled a second line of letter-named guitars, the OMs. Taking the body of the 000-, squaring its shoulder to meet the body at the 14th fret, and lengthening the scale, they created a truly legendary line of instruments (OM- wood-and-trim packages ranged from the plain -18 (mahagony back and sides) and -21 (with rosewood) to the full-on pimpmobile OM-45. The 14-fret body of the OMs proved so popular that it quickly became the standard for 00-, 000-, and D- models as well. There things stayed for about 45 years; then, in 1976, Martin debuted the M-36 and M-38. Keeping the narrow-waisted shape and moderate depth of the 000-, and combining it with a width slightly more than even that of a D-, the M-s (sometimes called 0000-) were phenomononally well-balanced in their tone. These have lately been joined by the Gibson-Jumboesque J, and the even larger SJ. The numbers/letters denoting body size and shape are generally followed by a number that designates the guitar’s ornamentation and style, including the species of wood from which the guitar is constructed. Generally, the higher the number, the higher the level of ornamentation. Additional letters or numbers added to this basic system are used to designate special features (such as a built-in pickup or a cutaway).
Additionally, Gibson’s president Ted McCarty states that the Gibson Guitar Corporation merely approached Les Paul for the right to imprint the musician’s name on the headstock to increase model sales, and that in 1951, Gibson showed Paul a nearly finished instrument. McCarty also claims that design discussions with Les Paul were limited to the tailpiece and the fitting of a maple cap over the mahogany body for increased density and sustain, which Les Paul had requested reversed. However, according to Gibson Guitar, this reversal would have caused the guitar to become too heavy, and Paul’s request was refused.[12] Another switch: the original Custom was to be all mahogany and the Goldtop was to have the maple cap/mahogany body. Beyond these requests, Les Paul’s contributions to the guitar line bearing his name were stated to be cosmetic. For example, ever the showman, Paul had specified that the guitar be offered in a gold finish, not only for flashiness, but to emphasize the high quality of the Les Paul instrument, as well.[12] The later-issue Les Paul models included flame maple (tiger stripe) and “quilted” maple finishes, again in contrast to the competing Fender line’s range of car-like color finishes. Gibson was notably inconsistent with its wood choices, and some goldtops have had their finish stripped to reveal beautifully figured wood hidden underneath.[citation needed]
One of the greatest things about being a touring musician is having the opportunity to see, hear and play with some of the greatest guitarists on the planet. Over the course of my career, I’ve performed with legendary guitarists like Ted Nugent, Steve Cropper, and Glen Campbell, to drop just a few names. Playing lead for a headline act like Toby Keith also allows me to watch fantastic guitarists like Keith Urban and Brad Paisley take the stage before me.

Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.
Jimi Hendrix: Right-Handed vintage white body flipped upsidedown for left-handed use with an oval profile maple-cap neck. The controls and electrics are vintage-modern to ensure stability. The guitar is strung upside down with the strap button on the lower horn, the backwards 68 thick black CBS headstock decal is so that—in front of a mirror—the player sees the guitar as it would appear if Jimi Hendrix played it. As well as this upside-down lefty Strat for right-handed players, Fender also made four exact copies of the Vintage white Stratocaster Hendrix used in many performances, the most famous being Woodstock (1969).

Mother-of-pearl rosette inlay. If you’ve had acoustic guitars with mother-of-pearl accents, you’ll appreciate the beauty of the mother-of-pearl inlay around the sound hole. This particular rosette pattern is inspired by the 1920’s Domingo Esteso design, which will be a treat for those who love specific historic details like this. Even if history isn’t your concern, the mother-of-pearl colors enhance the pattern.
Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.
On entering a studio, some guitarists ask if they should leave off the effects they normally use and add them in later. Of course, this can be done; however, if the effects are integral to the desired sound and you are ‘playing’ the effect as much as you are the instrument – fuzzboxes, heavy spring reverb, long delays and so on – it might be difficult to create the right feel during the take without them. If there is uncertainty as to whether the effects are spot-on, split the signal to retain the option of reworking the sound during the mixing process.

Also in 1952, Kay introduced the matching K-162 "Electronic" Bass, which was the first commercially available thinline-hollowbody electric bass guitar, and the second production electric bass guitar after the Fender Precision Bass debuted in 1951. Due to the use of K-162 by a bassist of Howlin' Wolf, Andrew "Blueblood" McMahon, it is commonly known as the "Howlin Wolf" bass. These instruments[clarification needed] are believed to be the first semi-hollow electrics[citation needed] (i.e., thinline-hollowbody electric with solid center-block), predating the Gibson ES-335 by six years. Their unique design[clarification needed] featured a flat top with no f-holes, a free-floating arched back, and two braces running along the top. The result was a semi-acoustic instrument that was feedback-resistant while retaining natural acoustic resonances. In 1954, Kay added the K-160 bass to its catalog with baritone tuning, according to the catalog,[citation needed] "tuned like the first four guitar strings but one octave lower." Structurally this bass was basically same as K-162 bass, except for the higher pitched tuning and the addition of a white pickguard.


The neck wood is used for the headstock and for the back of the neck (where your thumb rests when playing the instrument). Be careful not to confuse the neck wood with the fretboard wood, as they are separate and different. All our necks are handcrafted from quality tone woods. If you're just starting out, we recommend you choose the wood that appeals to you most based on its appearance, and don't worry too much about how the type of wood affects the sound or performance of the instrument.
@BLAKTORX - Charvel is a great brand for metal and shred that is really starting to regain some prominence in the music world. I really like the Pro Mod Series. Music Man, too, makes some good gear, but I tried to keep my list to 10. The Ibanez GIO series guitars are good for beginners. Seems like you're into metal. In that price range you might also check out the Jackson JS Series.
Third, the amp should be easy to use: If the controls are hard to figure out, they’ll likely frustrate those who’d rather spend their time playing than trying to figure out how their amp works. Also, every guitarist will at some point have to use someone else’s amp, so starting with an amp that has a fairly common control set will help you learn to dial in your sound when using an unfamiliar amp.
Last and not necessarily least, consider the ever-popular closet and sound blanket trick. This involves a speaker cabinet, a closet or large cupboard, and at least a pair of the thick, padded blankets normally used professionally for sound insulation or by moving companies (quilts and regular bedding blankets are ineffective). You'll lose some speaker "air" and room interaction, but you'll be able to crank the amp and avoid unwanted noise complaints. Assuming the blankets are properly placed, the volume level should seem no louder than that of a distant stereo system blaring at someone's party.
Though it gained immense popularity during the rock ‘n’ roll days of the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar was invented in 1931. The need for the amplified guitar became apparent during the Big Band Era as orchestras increased in size, particularly when guitars had to compete with large brass sections. The first electric guitars used in jazz were hollow archtop acoustic guitar bodies with electromagnetic transducers. By 1932, an electrically amplified guitar was commercially available. Early electric guitar manufacturers include Rickenbacker in 1932, Dobro in 1933, National, Epiphone and Gibson in 1935 and many others by 1936.

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Effects are electronic devices and circuits that process the electronic signal input from an instrument or mic. Also referred to as FX, they run the gamut from limiter or expander settings so subtle you can barely detect them to sci-fi modulation effects so extreme that the original sound is virtually undetectable. Think of your guitar or bass as your artist’s palette of primary colors. Effects are the equivalent of your brushes, tools, and color-mixing skills that add near-limitless creativity to your artistic vision.
“Volume pedals work well just before any delay or echo effects, as you can fade in and out of delays smoothly. A volume pedal at the very end of the chain just before the amp input will control master volume, and can also be used as a mute. Reducing the signal at this point will also reduce any noise. I put clean boosts right at the end—also just before the amp input—to ensure that any effects earlier in the chain would not be overloaded.”
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.
So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.
Freshly Realeased from the JVG Vintage Vault..... Just serviced with fresh set up & cosmetic clean up remove grime etc, lube & adjust tuning gears, rehydrate the woods and polish out to the Beauty you see now...detailing & set up here at the JVG shop she's 100% ready NOW and a real rare style beauty too. She's a very clean example of a real Vintage guitar its over 35 years old and is a Japanese Vintage Acoustic guitar. She Plays like butta now! .
In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.
Think of where you presently are in your journey as merely preparation and training. You are getting in shape to learn to play by developing some basic skills and building finger strength and callouses and coordination. Progress will be very slow in the beginning but if you persevere, you will reach a point where progress comes at a far more rapid pace.
In the present scenario many brands are providing the better quality Guitars and serving their customers the best services. Nowadays music industry is demanding better performances. For performing the best people are switching one to other brands. The brands are competing with each others to maintain their selves in to the top 10 chart. So please strike down to your strings for the right notes.
Traditionally, the vast majority of professional engineers prefer to record electric guitars through a mic’d up amplifier, rather than use a DI (direct injection) box, even though specialist guitar DI units are readily available. That said, there are many pracitcal reasons to split the signal from the guitar and use a DI box in conjunction with an amp. If you find out later that the recorded amp sound doesn’t work in the mix, or you wish you hadn’t committed a particular effect ‘to tape’, the pure guitar sound can be re-amped and subsequently reprocessed without the need to discard a great take. You can route the DI’d signal through a modelling plug-in and blend that with the mic’d amp sound, too.

Greetings from Adam Reiver! Welcome to the new FU-Tone website! (Formerly FloydUpgrades.com) FU does so much more than upgrade parts for "Floyds" and FU just seems so fitting for the circumstances of the name change! I have been working on improving tone with the greatest guitarplayers in the world for the last 25 years. I have found out what works and what does not... I am happy to share this with you. Tone is selective! FU is dedicated to help you find what is best for YOU! Using the best materials available, FU manufactures the ultimate in high performance guitar parts used by the PROS! Obviously, FU specializes in locking tremolo parts but if you dig around the site you will find upgrades for your Strat, Les Paul, Tele, Acoustic and more. In my dedicated effort to bring you the best of the best, I will continue to design and manufacture new FU products as well as bringing in other items that I think are cool. Check back often, feel free to ask me questions and keep chasing TONE!

Umm, no. Jimmy Page and Hendrix have both alluded to the fact that without Robert Johnson, they would never have existed. His albums were released before the 50's and 60's. To think that most of these guitarists (and by effect the people influenced those artists as well) didn't have their hands on Robert Johnson or Mississippi John Hurt albums which they learned from is preposterous. Please stop typing.


When discussing the science of tone, it’s safe to assume that we all know how electric guitars work. Pickups are electro-magnets that sense string vibrations and produce a signal that ultimately blares out of the amplifier. Of course, we all know that myriad other factors influence the sound, as well. Body shape, wood choice, string selection, pedal effects, rack effects, humidity, amount of people in the room, and the guitar player’s recent fight with his girlfriend are just some of the items that can alter a guitar tone from performance to performance.
Control knobs and buttons are typically on the front of the cabinet or chassis, though in some cases, the knobs are on a recessed panel at the back of the top of the amplifier. The most basic amps only have a few knobs, which typically control volume, bass and treble. More expensive amps may have a number of knobs that control pre-amp volume (or "gain"), distortion or overdrive, volume, bass, mid and treble, and reverb. Some older amps (and their re-issued versions) have a knob that controls a vibrato or tremolo effect. The 1/4" input jack is typically mounted on the front of the amplifier. In the simplest, least expensive amplifiers, this 1/4" jack is the only jack on the amplifier.
If you wanted to wire a 4 conductor Dimarzio or Seymour Duncan in this way, just look at the diagram. Solder the 2 "middle wires" together, tape the connection, then solder the outer wires to the output. Be very careful when working with 4 conductor wiring. The colors and polarity are very important. You could easily make a mistake and wire an "out-of-phase" arrangement which would have low output, a squawky, thin sound AND the humbucker would NOT be hum canceling.
It is famed as the producer of some of the intriguing piece of guitar around like arch top ones, the SG series, Flying V, ES175, Firebird and more. In fact, the ES 175 was the first popular electric guitar around the world at the time. Another peculiar offering under them is the Les Paul Melody Maker, which has been the go-to option for many around the globe.
When you’re talking Gibson, mahogany is frequently going to factor into the brew. And that’s a wonderful thing. This is the classic ingredient of the multi-wood body, and one of the most common neck woods also, but is very often used on its own in single-wood bodies. On its own in an SG, Les Paul Special, or Les Paul Junior, mahogany’s voice is characteristically warm and somewhat soft, but extremely well balanced, with good grind and bite. It has the potential for good depth, with full (though not super-tight) lows, velvety highs, and a slightly compressed response. Overall, think round, open, warm.
Guitar Center Albuquerque provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Albuquerque area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Albuquerque can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Correct bridge placement determines a guitar's intonation when playing fretted notes. The distance between the guitar nut and bridge is the scale length. Placing the bridge too close to the neck shortens scale length and makes fretted notes sharp. Moving the bridge too far from the neck increases scale length and creates flat fretted notes. No amount of tuning helps a guitar with a poorly positioned bridge. Any fretted note falls high or low of the desired pitch.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
I am a fan of inexpensive guitars. Why but something so valuable you can’t take it out or afraid it will get damaged. Get an inexpensive guitar that is closest to the expensive ones you desire. Basically the construction and woods are the same just made inexpensively to sell to the masses. Watch who plays the secondary brands and get full cred. I have a squire cabronita, squire telecaster with upgraded coil tapped humbucker/single coil pickups, gretch electromatic single cutaway soildbody, and 2 Harley Benton les pau l type guitars with p90s and coil tapped tumblers for less than 175.00 each. Every guitar is a beauty and a joy to own.
Valco manufactured Spanish acoustic guitars, metal-bodied resonator guitars, electric lap steel guitars, and vacuum tube amplifiers under a variety of brand names including Supro, Airline, Oahu, and National. They also made amplifiers under contract for several other companies such as Gretsch, Harmony, and Kay. In the 1950s they began producing solid body electric guitars.
You finally bought that guitar you've been eyeing for a long time. You open the case, gently remove it from its plush cradle, and hold it in your arms. A fresh pick in your fingers, you begin an elegant and complex arpeggio that ranges across the fretboard. Suddenly, right in the middle of the run, the strings start buzzing. You check your technique and it's fine. So what's the problem?
Pickups and body styles are just scratching the surface when it comes to guitar features. No matter how overwhelming things may seem, though, if you’re only a novice or hobbyist there’s no need in fretting (get it?) over every single feature. Instead, look to the features we mentioned and go from there based on what type of music you want to play. If you’re a big blues and classic rock guy, powerful, full sound is necessary: you’ll likely want a semi-hollow or solid body guitar with humbuckers or P90s. Want to play old school country or folk? Check out hollow bodies. Are you a fan of alternative and punk? Consider a thin solid body with single coil pickups.
Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!
A common misconception of the Lyle brand, among others, was that Norlin sued Matsumoku for copying their designs and shut them down. The actual lawsuit was indeed filed by Norlin, only not against Matsumoku but Elger/Hoshino--the American division of Ibanez--over elements of the Les Paul and SG guitar designs that Norlin/Gibson had since claimed as a trademark. The case was eventually settled out of court. Japanese companies preemptively altered the designs of their guitars in such a way that they would not be "exact" copies of Gibson guitars. The true story of the demise of the Lyle brand is largely unknown to this day.

These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
If you’re new to the world of guitar or bass, a looper pedal is a great way to hone your skills. A looper pedal is not an effect, but more a tool that allows you to record chord progressions, notes or riffs and then play it back through your amp. It’s ideal for playing a chord progression or rhythm section, looping it and then playing a lead line or riff over the top – like two guitars playing together.
Guitar FX BOX is acting just like a good collection of analog effect pedals. Just plug your guitar into the sound card input and your guitar will sing and scream. You can apply a wide range of high quality effects to guitar, voice, and other inputs real-time - I/O delay is really low, almost undetectable. This is achieved using DirectSound, WDM streaming or ASIO for fast access to the sound card hardware and special DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Besides high sound quality, Guitar FX BOX features intuitive user interface, supports presets and hot keys for quick presets changing, MIDI/Game controllers pedals, configurable tuner, metronome, file input/output. Currently included effects: Overdrive/distortion, Amp&Speaker cabinet simulator, Echo, Pitch shifter, Reverb, Wah-Wah, Chorus, Tremolo, I/O Equalizers, Dynamic compressor, Phaser and Volume swell.
I know this is one of those questions where there's not any one single correct answer, but I'm curious what neck relief specs others are using for their SG? I've read enough articles on the web to acknowledge that there's clearly no consensus, as there probably shouldn't be, considering different playing style, string gauge selection, etc. Yet I still would be interest what others find useful as a starting point. Recognizing that neck relief is just one step (the first) during set-up. According to one useful article that I read (http://mysite.verizo...guitarsetup.htm), when the question was put to Gibson, their response was:
During the NSF grant cycles, the STEM Guitar Project has exceeded initial estimates of faculty impacted by recruiting over 450 STEM educators, with an additional 500 faculty exposed via national education conferences. Thus far, this effort is impacting over 20,000 students nationally over the 8 years because of faculty members adopting or adapting the curriculum developed through the project.
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. Guitars may have a fixed bridge or a spring-loaded hinged bridge, which lets players "bend" the pitch of notes or chords up or down, or perform vibrato effects. The sound of an electric guitar can be modified by new playing techniques such as string bending, tapping, and hammering-on, using audio feedback, or slide guitar playing. There are several types of electric guitar, including: the solid-body guitar; various types of hollow-body guitars; the six-string guitar (the most common type), which is usually tuned E, A, D, G, B, E, from lowest to highest strings; the seven-string guitar, which typically adds a low B string below the low E; and the twelve-string guitar, which has six pairs of strings.
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