Call of Duty: Black Ops III is the ultimate 3-games-in-1 experience. In Campaign mode, you must navigate the hot spots of a new Cold War to find your missing brothers. Players can play the campaign cooperatively or solo and are now always connected to the intelligence grid and their fellow operatives during battle. Multiplayer features a new momentum-based chained movement system, allowing players to fluidly move through the environment with finesse, using controlled thrust jumps, slides, and mantling. Black Ops III multiplayer also introduces the new Specialist character system, which allows players to master 9 characters' battle-hardened weapons and abilities through a challenge-based unlock progression system. No Treyarch title would be complete without its signature Zombies offering. "Shadows of Evil" has its own distinct storyline right out of the box, set in the fictional 1940s Morg City, where four particularly troubled individuals — the femme fatale, the magician, the detective, and the boxer — star in this film-noir inspired horror story.
For practice, tone, playback and recording the Cube series is hard to beat. Integrates with iDevices for playing along with music and gives you all the effects and amp sounds you need in one place. The Roland CUBE-10GX Guitar Amplifier Combo is super lightweight and compact making it a great practice amp for home or studio use. If you're in need of a bass amp, the Roland Cube 20XL Bass Guitar Amplifier is a great solution too.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai
Super nice guys! They were really helpful from the get go and didn't hover like a lot of shops do to try and make a sale. Found out the gentleman behind the counter was actually from back home in Ohio and we traded some stories. He then directed us to some great places to have lunch and even gave us tips on what airline to take on our next trips out. Will definitely visit again just for the atmosphere and friendliness of he staff.
The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.
Kadence guitar has soothing sound quality with a bright tone, which indicates you have to go for higher gauge strings if you need bass-heavy sound output. This guitar is manufactured in our home nation – yes in India! was established in -2006. They produce an acoustic range of guitars that are available at a starting price of 5000 INR. approximately. Guitars in this brand that have a superior quality of sound start from 10,000 INR.
Splitting the humbucker #1: by grounding the coil-tap and connecting the hot lead to output we’re rendering the coil closer to ground useless because both of it’s leads are grounded. What we’re left with is the coil closer to the hot lead. Since we only have one coil, it will not be hum-cancelling on it’s own. It’s common to split a humbucker, so it can be wired with another coil in parallel, making the noiseless combination, especially on H-S-H guitars.

The Epiphone Dove Pro continues to work its old school magic into the hearts of guitarists, new and experienced alike. Its classic styling seems to be a major part of its appeal, as most reviewers attest to. Value for money comes in as close second, with many satisfied that they are getting a great looking solid guitar at a very justifiable price point. It is used in many different musical styles, including country, folk and even rock.
The Pocket Pal is a recent addition to the Hohner standard line of harmonicas. It is somewhat unusual because it is slightly shorter in length than most harmonicas, leading to its namesake of being pocket handy. It is Chinese made, which is unfavorable to most harmonica players, but the Pocket Pal has caught on as an inexpensive, yet quality harp. Like the Old Standby, the Pocket Pal is designed for use in country music.[26]

Potentiometers (Pots) for audio are used to adjust tone and volume. Pots are resistors with three terminals and a sliding contact (the wiper) that creates an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used (one side and the wiper), it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Potentiometers are most commonly used as control devices, such as volume control on audio equipment. A potentiometer for Audio applications would feature very low to no introduced noise.

The best guitars?  Look at what the best players use.  Certainly Gibson and Fender are in the mix, but these are typically priceless, early production or highly customized one-off units.  If you want something more or less off the shelf that is in the same range of build, tone and feel quality look at the following (BTW, you can't get these at Guitar Center, which is probably why they haven't been mentioned yet):
It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.

The display borrows a lot of its design cues from Guitar Hero—which is probably a good thing, since so many players are already familiar with that system. Like GH, Rocksmith has vertical columns to show you which frets to hold, and the notes move toward you until they reach a line that represents the moment you're supposed to play them. However, GH's display didn't need to move since there were only five buttons. Because it has to span the entirety of an actual guitar neck, Rocksmith's display floats up and down. If you're playing primarily notes between the fourth and seventh frets, for example, it will show you just those frets on the screen, then slide up to the 10th or 11th when it's time for you to play those.

This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
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The weapon of choice for today’s modern recording musician, the Axe-Fx is as good as it gets in terms of modeling amps. Used by countless musician both live and in the studio, this machine has proven to deliver for just about every musical style under the sun. Notable users of the Axe Fx include Alex Lifeson, Steve Vai, Misha Mansoor, and many others famous musicians. The Axe-Fx II features a high resolution speaker simulator with 150+ “Factory” models and room for 512 “User” cab locations.  It contains a vast virtual inventory of hundreds of vintage and modern guitar amps, speaker cabinets, guitar stompbox and studio effects, and more. The options are pretty much endless.
Even though recorded sound traces back to late 1877, the widespread access to this technology has only become available some 60 years later. As we go back in time, reaching 1940s, we run into the first ever instance of reverberation being used in music recording. It didn’t really take long for this trend to become popular, spreading throughout the world. However, back then there were no effects pedals or anything similar. Devices we have today were science fiction at best. Old school producers had to resort to various other means to achieve the reverb effect.
This is an amazing acoustic guitar for the new generation of guitarists that is quite presentable, especially in stage performances. It comes with a black border and has a free gig cover. The fret board is made from rosewood, which makes it quite easy to handle. It has incredible rigidity, with truss rods on both sides. It produces a considerably high quality of sound and is cost effective with prices ranging from about INR 4,999. This may sometimes be accompanied by free packing and shipping. Find more information on the site link below:
GuitarFX™ guitar software (it's on the market since 1997!) enables you to turn your computer into a guitar effects processor. Simply plug your guitar into the microphone or line input of your sound card, run this software, then press "Start" button. To stop playbacking pre-recorded guitar sounds click once on a picture of a small red lamp placed left to fx-slot with "Playback wav" title. Enjoy real-time crazy distortion smoothed by power filters and shaped by multi-band equalizers! Author of GuitarFX™ offers several presets, including "hard rock", "high gain lead" and "solo" effects. However, you can click through several menus to easily create custom tones. They can be saved as pre-sets for future use. Pre-sets can be assigned to "hot keys" F1..F12. Among the effects, you can apply 4 types of distortion, noise gate, wah-wah, compressor, EQ, flanger, reverb, chorus, delay and a number of other filters and effects. You can save your recordings to your hard drive. GuitarFX has the "software effects chain builder" with 16 fx slots. Clean guitar signals go to the top fx slot, then they are passed through all fx slots from the top to the bottom and go to the sound card output from the bottom fx slot. You can move any fx slot up. To do this place your mouse cursor on the top part of the appropriate "Tune" button and then do right mouse button click. Also you can move any fx slot down. To do this place your mouse cursor on the low part of the appropriate "Tune" button and then do right mouse button click.
The Guitar Store is not only the best guitar store in Seattle, but the best guitar store in the WORLD. First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful. My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do. Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff. Can't rave enough! Definitely found my guitar store for life! Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
The SD is a classic. This had a more exaggerated Jazzmaster shape than the T-60. It had a dramatically swept back lower horn, and an offset pair of waists, looking as though it’s been slightly melted. These had bolt-on necks with the elongated Strat-style head, with round logo stickers. A rectangular plastic control panel was mounted above the strings, with large thumbwheel controls and on/off rocker switches, while a large-ish pickguard was mounted under the strings. The controls on the SD-4L were especially interesting, taking their cue from the Italians, no doubt. The thumbwheels were for volume and tone, while there were a total of six rocker switches. Four of these were on/off for each of the four pickups, but in between were two more. Their function is unknown, but a good guess would be phase reversal between the front and back pairs of pickups. Both models had the rectangular fingerboard edge inlays. With “L” designations, both had vibratos. These consisted of a fairly simple bar for string attachment with a series of springs behind it, all covered with a hinged metal cover. The handle was extremely long. Pickups were the beefy tall rectangular type with metal cases and black plastic center tops with exposed pole pieces (these could be screws or squares). The SD-4L had four pickups, in two pairs, while the SD-2L had two. If I couldn’t have a Spectrum 5, I’d be looking for one of these (I am!).
Slash is a longtime fan of legend Seymour Duncan’s hand-wound pickups, and for his new Epiphone Firebird, Slash choose custom Seymour Duncan "Slash" open coil-humbuckers for the rhythm (APH-1) and the lead positions (APH-2). These were Slash’s first custom pickups made with Seymour Duncan and feature Alnico II magnets and are slightly overwound for a boosted output. Each pickup has a single conductor cable, a long-legged bottom plate, and a wooden spacer. Controls include individual Volume and Tone pots with traditional Black Top Hat knobs with metal inserts and pointers along with a Switchcraft 3-way Toggle switch. Tone controls for both pickups also feature Sprague "Orange Drop" capacitors (0.022uF, 600V, 5%), the same capacitors Slash uses on his custom designed Les Pauls.
If you are new to electronics, the essential tool you most likely need to buy is a decent temperature controlled soldering station. A basic one such as a Weller WLC100 can be had for less than $40 and will do the job just fine. Really nice ones with digital temperature readouts from Weller or Hakko are $100-$150 and as much as you will ever need for a home pedal shop. The soldering pencils have interchangeable tips, so you can keep a selection of different sizes. The one that normally comes with a new station will be suitable for most through-hole pedal kits.
Yes...I've seen a VST guitar plugin (can't remember the name) where you play chords on the keyboard with the left hand and the software converts them into guitar chord voicings, then you "strum" with the right hand by hitting different keys....and each key does something different...up-strum, down-strum, rake, mute, etc. I actually thought it sounded pretty damn good considering. Definitely close enough for background rhythm guitar work.

Here we have a very nice example of the Yamaha Red Label fg230-12... This example is in very good - excellent original condition. The woods used on this guitar are of a very high grade ... spruce top, Honduran Mahogany back, sides and neck please see pics for the details but very nicely grained woods!... workmanship is impeccable... the guitar plays like a real with very good action and the intonation is set dead on... The neck is solid Mahogany and is slightly beefy..I love the feel of this guitar and when you hear is you will be in 12 string heaven... no cracks or repairs ... the condition is vintage used its about 40+ years old you know ...with several minimal scratches but still overall a very beautiful vintage guitar. The wood has aged and mellowed with time to yield a wonderful rich tone only a 30+ year old quality instrument can offer. This one has that quaity rich sound along with the playability with the right aging now and with its beauty ...its a no brainier... Also available is a cool $100 vintage hard shell case see pics Thanks for your interest!.
Headphone amps are great for playing in a moving vehicle, at the beach, in a hotel room, or in the airport lounge, and they can even output the signal to tape or disc, suitable for recording. They start at around $200 and are well worth the price if portability, privacy, and authentic tone are important for your practice routine. The Korg Pandora (shown in the following figure), Scholz Rockman, Ibanez Rock ’n’ Play, and Zoom 9000 series are just some makes and models.
Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
Ultimately, if you’re mostly playing rock, heavier blues, or any shred or metal styles, you might prefer jumbo or medium-jumbo frets. However, for country, rockabilly, surf, or old-school ’50s rock and roll, narrow frets could be the way to go. In any case, though, if your frets are in good condition and your guitar is set up right, the size of that wire in and of itself shouldn’t stop you from sounding great on whatever you play.

While some Supros were more or less re-branded Nationals, many represented totally unique designs in the Valco line. When the Supro equivalent to the National Grand Console was introduced in 1958, it featured a radically different body design. In place of the National’s conventional all-wood construction, the Supro 1475B Console Sixteen featured two wooden necks connected by three chromed metal rods that ran all the way through each neck. It’s not obvious why this design was chosen; it doesn’t have any advantages other than its unique aesthetics, and I don’t believe it could have made construction any cheaper. The Supro was cheaper than the National – $175 vs $235 – but the difference was likely due entirely to the more “exclusive” name on the National.
Whether you use it to move on to fingerstyle guitar or integrate it into a hybrid technique, mastering the right hand in this finite way will make you a better player. In addition to the progressive book, you can download the song samples, which are enriched with the ability to slow them down, change keys, and set looping points to help you master parts one at at time.
The body of the PRS SE Standard 24 is made of mahogany and features a tobacco sunburst finish, vintage cherry, or translucent blue finish. Compared to most other body styles, this one is a lot more comfortable to play even though mahogany isn't the lightest tonewood out there.  The balance offsets any weight issues. The neck is a maple piece that comes with a standard rosewood fretboard and PRS classic bird inlays. The pickups PRS chose for this build are their S2 HFS Treble and S2 HFS Vintage Bass units. Their performance and color are pretty unique when compared to other designs out there. Looking at the hardware, we see a PRS S2 tremolo bridge on one end, while the headstock houses a set of PRS S2 locking tuners. Combined, these two components give you the ability to achieve great tremolo effects without losing intonation or tuning.
I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.
The first recording of an electric guitar was by jazz guitarist George Barnes who recorded two songs in Chicago on March 1st, 1938: Sweetheart Land and It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame. Many historians incorrectly attribute the first recording to Eddie Durham, but his recording with the Kansas City Five was not until 15 days later. Durham introduced the instrument to a young Charlie Christian, who made the instrument famous in his brief life and is generally known as the first electric guitarist and a major influence on jazz guitarists for decades thereafter.

Founded by a father and son, Ryohei Tahara and the unknown Tahara. I do not know which was the father and which was the son. The company existed until the late 1979 when it was bought up by Saga Musical Instruments. In all, the company existed less than a decade as Tahara. Both the Maya and El Maya badges are attributed to Tahara. Saga Musical Instruments exists to this day.
Now, as others have mentioned, there is a switch that controls which pickup (or pickups plural) you want to use at any given moment. Seeing as each pickup is placed at a different point under the strings, the vibrations are slightly different. The closer the strings are to the bridge at the bottom, the more 'narrow' and intense the vibrations get. Thus the current generated from the magnets lead to different sound characteristics.
Looking for Used Gear? You may have just discovered your future. Music Go Round franchisees started out as customers of our stores. They have a love of music, they love gear and they understand the industry. Most importantly they’ve taken their passion and turned it into a business they’re proud of which is an asset to the music scene in their community. Who wouldn’t want to own a business where every day they were doing what they truly love? Sound interesting?
Reverb pedals come with all kinds of different layouts. Even so, some of the controls are virtually universal. The first one we would like to mention is the dry/wet knob. This control is what you use to mix your original signal and the effect itself. When the knob is turned all the way to dry, there will be zero reverb present in the signal. As you move towards wet, the amount of reverb increases.
Time to turn our attention back to the guitars themselves. The following are some of the better low-cost electric guitars available on the market today; refer to an anatomy of electric guitars to see definitions of guitar pieces and places. When you're deciding, go to a store and try them out for heft, comfort, stability, sound quality, and appearance. Shop around, comparing, for instance, online prices against local store prices. This is an investment, so choose wisely.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
If you do have lead solder, the melting temperature is much lower, making for easier connections, but remember to wash your hands after you're done, and not to touch your face while working - lead is poisonous. With lead-free solder, the rosin lets off toxic smoke, so use a small desk fan to blow it away from you while you work, and open a window if possible.
It has a 32bit float point DSP for better sound and True Simulation of Analog Circuits (TSAC) technology to give great modeling with your choice of 60 amplifier models. It has built in looping (up to a massive 60 seconds) , a sample-based drum machine and MP3/WAV player, sophisticated user interface and big colorful LCD display. MG20 is the pro solution for guitarist who wants great tone and function.
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.
My first electric was one of these (1962, I was 14) . My mother bought it by mail order, probably from the Bell's catalogue. I remember coming home from school every day for what seemed like weeks hoping it had arrived! It was very crudely made with a plywood body (mine was in a red finish). The neck was wide and flat (think that was ply too!) and the action appalling! I remember the original strings were copper wound and left you with green fingertips! I remember the price was around 14 pounds, quite a lot at the time! Even at that age I wasn't impressed for long and soon traded it in for a Hofner Clubman. Wish I still had it now though!
Often forgotten when it comes to in-depth reviews, the best acoustic electric guitar can be pretty tricky to find. Guitarists often know what they’re looking for when it comes to a standard electric or acoustic guitar, but there are some additional things to look out for when it comes to the fusion of the two. On a bit of a budget? Check out the top acoustic electric guitars under $1000 here. Perhaps you are a beginner, if so - check out the top electro-acoustic guitars under 300 bucks! Want something more luxurious? Try an acoustic electric for under 700 bucks.
The Ibanez RG series is basically synonymous with shreddable metal music. Inspired by the classic JEM series of the glammy 80s rock years, this GRGR120EX guitar is perfect for the guitar player who aspires to be a real metalhead. The body is made of solid alder and it comes with a slick black binding. There are two super-high-output, extra-snarly Infinity R pickups that will respond well to overdrive and distortion pedals. Moreover, a rosewood fingerboard with classic Ibanez sharktooth inlays and sharp black hardware make this guitar look like the real deal.
I have a Mahar bass, the one with the epic (haha) zebra stripes. My wife won it at the state fair in Puyallup throwing balloons or something. She thought it would be cute to have it in my collection. I'm a drummer, but I don't want to miss out on the fun of collecting guitars, why should guitarists have all the fun? Anyway, about the Mahar guitar... it's actually not bad! I pick it up and play it once in a while just for giggles, and have had bass players jam on it. They agree. For throwing some balloons, it's a bargain! Plug it into a decent rig and it doesn't sound bad either. I suppose if you are a virtuoso it would be notable if you had issues with it, but for fun and games it really is better than a toy, like First Act or some junk like that. If you are a beginner, this would be ideal. It plays nicely, and sounds as good as your rig can make it sound. Thumbs up!
Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.
I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.
We considered more than 20 amps for this guide and gave the 10 most promising models a hands-on test. Our testing panel agreed that any of these amps would at least be good enough to get a beginner started, and that for reasons of personal taste, some players might prefer one of the ones we didn’t pick. Here are the others we tried, with a couple of notes about our panelists’ impressions.
• Library content : Choose from 154 patterns covering a wide range of realistic riffs, arpeggios, alternating intervals and chords. The patterns are conveniently grouped into 31 well-coordinated set of presets, suitable for everything from modern pop music to electronics. Autochord mode and convenient presets allow you to execute or program convincing batches of electric guitar, regardless of background music.
Blue Book Publications: Blue Book Publications publishes a number of print guides for musical instruments, and it also maintains a subscription-based website. The website is divided into electric guitars, acoustic guitars, and guitar amplifiers in addition to other instruments. Unlike Used Price, you will have to register for a paid membership with this site to get the information you need to self-appraise your guitar. You can access the prices online or purchase print editions to be mailed to you.
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We are recording between June and July our new album entitled "Brutal Agression" which should be out in October/November, also we were recently invited to Rock al Parque in Bogota, which is one of the biggest festivals in Latin America, joining Cannibal Corpse, Havok, Symphony X, Internal Suffering and many more. After that we will play at other festivals such as Mamut Fest y more to be confirmed, then we will concentrate on album release and touring, which will be accompanied by one or more videos.
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Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony Gold - String Instrument Finish: Natural
Strumming Patterns: Not surprisingly, light distortion works great for strumming patterns, since it’s an effect without any timing or repeating issues.Chords: Depending on where the chords are being played, light distortion can work for swells and ringing chords.Short Arpeggios: This isn’t a place where you will hear a lot of distortion utilized. In some cases it can work, but it’s not a hallmark tactic.Quick Solos: If you’re dealing with a louder bridge solo, light distortion will often be coupled with another effect (delay, tremolo, chorus, etc.) to give it that extra boost.
My first recommendation is Epiphone. It is not just one of the best but it is the best guitar brand for beginners who are looking to buy a guitar to learn the ropes. I have included a few recommendations from this brand in this post. If you don’t know which one to buy and you are a beginner then buy one from this brand and you won’t go wrong for sure.

In 2005, after two years of research and development utilizing Jimmy Page’s actual guitar, Gibson Custom Shop issued a limited run of Jimmy Page Signature guitars based on Jimmy Page’s No. 1 1959. This time, Gibson worked directly from Jimmy Page’s actual guitar, which he lent to Gibson for the project. The guitar featured just one push-pull pot, just like Page’s No. 1, which reversed the phase of the pickups in the up position, which in Page’s own words gave “a close approximation to the Peter Green sound.” Gibson also went to great lengths to replicate the accuracy of the pickups, creating two custom pickups, which were available only in this guitar. The pickups were based on the Burstbucker vintage-style pickups, but featured stronger Alnico magnets and slightly higher output than the other Burstbuckers, as well as slightly higher treble response, which accurately reproduced the sound of the pickups in Page’s guitar. Gibson also replicated the neck profile, which was heavily modified prior to Page acquiring the guitar, and the Grover tuners that Page favored.
Martin’s second major innovation, and arguably the more important, of the period 1915-1930 was the dreadnought guitar.[6] Originally devised in 1916 as a collaboration between Martin and a prominent retailer, the Oliver Ditson Co., the dreadnought body style was larger and deeper than most guitars. In 1906, the Royal Navy launched a battleship that was considerably larger than any before it. From the idea that a ship that big had nothing to fear (nought to dread), it was christened HMS Dreadnought. Martin borrowed this name for their new, large guitar. The greater volume and louder bass produced by this expansion in size was intended to make the guitar more useful as anaccompaniment instrument for singers working with the limited sound equipment of the day. Initial models produced for Ditson were fan-braced, and the instruments were poorly received[citation needed].
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
Welcome to Lefty Vintage Guitars, a site specializing in buying, selling, trading, and consigning high-end lefty guitars. I have been collecting vintage guitars for over 20 years, including Fender and Gibson electrics and acoustics primarily from the 1950s, and 1960s. I also collect high-end modern era lefty guitars, including Gibson Historics and Fender Custom Shop guitars. The rarer, the better! Please browse the Sold Gallery and Showcase Instruments to get an idea of the wonderful guitars I have acquired and sold to happy clients! 

Rule 3 - Experimentation occurs within these groups of effects. While these three major groupings need to follow a strict order, the effects within those groups can be toyed with to invent new sounds. For instance, you can apply a reverb to your echo delay or apply an echo to your reverb. But that general group of time-based effects needs to come at the end of your effects chain, regardless.
The first Hagstrom electrics actually came to the U.S. beginning about 1959, carrying the Goya name imported by New York’s Hershman (Goya acoustics were made by Levin, also in Sweden). These were the now-legendary sparkle-covered hollowbody “Les Pauls” with the modular pickup units. However, while the Goya acoustics continued on in the ’60s (eventually to be distributed by Avnet, the owners of Guild in the late ’60s), the Hagstrom electrics took on their own identity and switched to Merson. The first Hagstrom I guitars were the little vinyl-covered mini-Strats with the “swimming pool” pickup assemblies – basically two single-coil pickups mounted in a molded plastic assembly looking like its nickname, with sliding on-off switches and the Hagstrom fulcrum vibrato (which was also used on early Guild solidbodies). These were followed by similar wood-bodied Hagstrom IIs, then the quasi-SG Hagstrom IIIs in the ’60s. Hagstrom electrics continued to be imported by Merson through most of the ’60s, but by the ’70s distribution had switched to Ampeg, which was responsible for the Swedes, and several thinlines, some of which were designed by Jimmy D’Aquisto. Hagstrom hung around until the early ’80s before disappearing.
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Every skilled worker needs to look after their tools and musicians are no exception. Sure, wear and tear is normal—especially when you play your instrument often—but a little T.L.C. will ensure your musical gear continues to look, play and sound amazing for years. At Guitar Center Repairs, you'll find a dedicated team of certified musicians who take pride in helping you reach your highest level of playing potential. Make no mistake, your music maker is in the best of hands at GC Repairs. When it comes to looking after your musical equipment, certain things should be left to professionals—pickup installation, wiring customization and structural repair, to name a few. Mind you, there are tasks that every guitarist can take care of at home, including regular polishing and restringing. Of course, not everyone has the time to continually look after their instrument and bringing it to Guitar Center is a great way to save yourself time and ensure that the job gets done right. With that being said, GC's services go well beyond cleaning and string changing. For those of you who own a stringed instrument and find the action is higher than it once was, a truss rod adjustment is definitely in order. Or, maybe you want to personalize the look and sound of your guitar—in which case, an expert will be more than happy to swipe out your pickups for a new set, replace the pickguard or perform any other task to give you an axe that’s entirely your own. Honestly, your best bet is to browse this entire section and see what else is offered in the way of repairs, maintenance and modifications. Who knows, maybe your local GC is having a free guitar setup day, so feel free to have a look around this page or take a swing by the store in your area. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff is always happy to speak with other local musicians and setting up a quick appointment for your instrument will do wonders for your musical enjoyment. From nut and bridge replacements to even amp electronic upgrades, Guitar Center Repairs has you covered.
The Les Paul Triumph bass, like the Les Paul Recording guitar was first shipped in 1971, but was based on a slightly older model, the 1969 Les Paul Bass. Functionally, these basses were very similar, although the Triumph did offer low and high impedance operation, without the need for a transformer cable. This owners manual details the basses specifications, suggests a string set, recommended action, and suggests a series of tonal settings for rock, country and solo bass playing.
At first this may seem trivial, but a little experimentation reveals that each effect reacts very differently depending on how the original signal has been altered by previous effects in the signal chain. Initially, this can seem rather frustrating; a pedal that sounds awesome on its own can turn your sound into a real mess when combined thoughtlessly with other effects. I’m going to go into the basics of signal flow and cover the fundamentals of setting up a great sounding pedal board. As you would expect, there isn’t any one “correct” way of doing things. You may find that changing the order gives you a completely unique sound, and that’s great. However, if you’re sorting it all out for the first time, this is a good way to start ordering your pedalboard.
PRS is an American guitar company founded by luthier Paul Reed Smith in 1985. It makes some of the finest high-end electric guitars and custom shop instruments. It was extremely popular in the '90s and eventually spread to Asia, where they started the SE lineup that was more affordable and budget-friendly. However, they are not meant for beginners even though they cost less. They are used by musicians and players of all kinds of genres. The high-end models are classy and can be somewhat expensive.
Sensitivity: Valve amplifiers (current drive) are sensitive to crossover resonances and speaker impedance variations. Quality speaker systems often used passive crossovers that were second-order, constant impedance, and critically aligned to avoid resonant effects. Some quality speakers had copper caped pole pieces, which helped damp impedance variations. Note:- With solid-state amps in voltage drive, power decreases as the speaker impedance rises. With valve amps in current drive, power increases as the speaker impedance rises. Therefore a flat speaker impedance is synonymous with a flat frequency response.
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The Takamine GD71CE is a feature packed acoustic-electric guitar, with its solid top construction, visual embellishments and improved electronics. Takamine equipped this guitar with a solid spruce top and rosewood for the back and sides - a nice tonewood combination known for its articulate sound. It also comes with matching aesthetic appointments that include maple binding for the body, neck and headstock, abalone rosette, rosewood headcap, maple dot inlays, gold die-cast tuners with amber buttons, and the body is wrapped in a nice looking gloss finish. In addition to all this, the Takamine GD71CE is equipped with their TK-40D preamp system which gives you more control over your amplified sound with its mid contour switch, 3-band EQ with bypass and notch filter.
Guitar scales free movie. Guitar Scales This lesson covers the basic ways to play chromatic scales on the guitar. Guitar scale reference - Here is a listing of some basic fingerings for many games. GUITAR SCALES guitar chords guitar scales chord progressions Search our collection of guitar scales, with charts and music playback jam contacts chord name reverse scales metronome forums tuner. Guitar Scales: Lookup guitar scales on

1953 "magic" spruce? Luthier Dana Bourgeois did an interview with C. F. Martin III in 1984. The interview was in preparation for an article by Eric Schoenberg and Bob Green on the history of the OM model and was published in the March 1985 issue of Guitar Player. Bourgeois was asked to sit in on the interview, and in the last two paragraphs of his recollections especially interesting: "One footnote that I do remember distinctly is that Mr. Martin said that in '52 or '53 the Martin Co. bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce in the form of government surplus of building material. Though he preferred Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-40s because all of the large stands had been decimated. Mr. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Red Adirondack Spruce than Sitka was. He could not, however, find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka." This nugget of information caught my attention because for many years I Of course, aside from the color of the tops, the anecdote does not in itself prove anything. But it at least suggests how the story might have gotten started.

After the lawsuit Hoshino Gakki abandoned the strategy of copying "classic" USA electric guitar designs and moved to the popular superstrat era in the mid-1980s. The newer Ibanez models began incorporating more modern elements into their design such as radical body shapes, slimmer necks, 2-octave fingerboards, slim pointed headstocks, higher-output electronics, humbucker/single-coil/humbucker pickups, locking tremolo bridges and different finishes.
A noise gate allows a signal to pass through only when the signal's intensity is above a set threshold, which opens the gate. If the signal falls below the threshold, the gate closes, and no signal is allowed to pass. A noise gate can be used to control noise. When the level of the 'signal' is above the level of the 'noise', the threshold is set above the level of the 'noise' so that the gate is closed when there is no 'signal'. A noise gate does not remove noise from the signal: when the gate is open, both the signal and the noise will pass through.
For a relatively new band, Dream State have - in industry parlance - gained some serious frigging traction, playing Reading/Leeds last year, gobbling up streams in the millions and signing to hardcore label par excellence UNFD. Lead guitarist Aled does a deft line in a tapped arpeggio, while breakthrough single White Lies covers a hell of a lot of ground in its four minute runtime - combining Marmozets’ urgency in its opening and Deftones’ dynamics at the close. 
While the Boss ME-80 doesn’t have anything in terms of extras to really blow expectations out of the water, it includes some nice and handy features. The onboard looper works well and has 38 seconds of loop time, which is enough time to do some basic jamming over some chords. And speaking of jamming, the AUX input on the back of the ME-80 is nice, since it allows you to plug in an iPhone/metronome/mp3 player/any other music playing device and jam along with your music (this is fun and a feature we would actually use). The USB output lets you take patch editing over to your computer, in BOSS's Tone Studio software. Cool, but not necessary since editing patches is actually very easy and actually quite fun on the unit itself (no complicated menus to go through - just fun knobs!). One idiosyncrasy to be aware of is that if you plug anything into the headphones jack, the speaker simulator is automatically enabled. This is great for solo practice in your headphones, but note that that’s the only way to actually switch it on.

I purchased this as a replacement for my acoustic guitar of 15 years. I couldn't be more pleased with the purchase. The construction is excellent without gaps or excess glue around joints. The top is solid sitka spruce which is a very attractive feature at any price point let alone $200. The aesthetics on the DG800 are simple and the design on the head stock is painted and will rub off with time. However that has no bearing on the overall fit and finish of this guitar, both of which are excellent for a <$1000 guitar.
Like most affordable super strat guitars, the Omen-6 has a basswood body, carved into the elegant looking shape that Schecter is known for. The neck is crafted from mahogany and joins the body via a bolt-on joint. It is topped by a 14" radius rosewood fingerboard that has 24 jumbo frets. It comes setup for fast and comfortable playability, with its 25.5" scale length, 1.65" nut width and stylized fretboard markers. Giving this guitar its voice are two Schecter Diamond Plus pickups, which are passive pickups but are still hot enough for driving high-gain pedals and amps.
If you play an acoustic guitar but don’t own an amp and prefer not to (perhaps because you almost always play into a PA system) then this preamp is ideal for your situation. Not only does it give you the added control over your tone but, it also eliminates the need for an acoustic amplifier entirely, similar to the Venue DI. It’s also much cheaper than an amp.

Most users and experts agree that the Zoom MultiStomp MS-50G is a high quality and high value pedal. But it's not just about bang per buck, because many are satisfied with the quality of its effect and amp emulations. Even Music Radar is convinced of its performance saying, "While not all of the sounds are going to appeal to all players, there are enough usable tones here to make this a very practical item for just about anybody who uses effects."
PRS guitars are among the best on the market. Their style, tone and design are unique, giving them a pretty good chance against much more established brands. PRS Custom 24 has been my go-to choice, and will remain so in foreseeable future. If you are looking for good old American craftsmanship combined with a killer tone, PRS is definitely worth checking out.

Most guitars and basses have one or more tone knobs, which offer a simple form of EQ control. Using these tone knobs adds or cuts the treble frequencies of the instrument’s signal. Most guitar and bass amps also have some tone control available, usually in the form of a 3-band EQ section, allowing you to control bass, mid, and treble frequencies with independent knobs. These knobs boost or cut frequencies when you turn them up or down. Some amps and effects offer more precise control of equalization as we’ll see next.
If you have ever played or listened to metal, you probably know about Ibanez. This brand has been around for a while and has become a patron saint of those who like harder sounding music. Built for speed, Ibanez guitars bring are finely tuned instruments which enable the player to explore the limits of their skill. On top of that, any Ibanez guitar is going to be great value for the money.
Now that you know the general protocol to a pedal chain, remember there are no strict rules in music. Introducing alternative ways of setting up your effect signals is what starts new trends and even leads to the development of new genres. There are also indisputably more choices in pedals then ever before. Vintage classics have been reissued in mass, are sounding better then ever, and have become affordable (but I doubt you’ll see that DeArmond toaster pedal version any time soon).
The MG-100 has so many features, its hard to name them all. But, here we can list: 13 classic amp models via NUX's TS/AC technology, vintage 3-band passive EQ modeling for every amp model, 6-band graphic EQ designed specifically for electric guitar (120hz,250hz,750hz,1.6khz,3.2khz,6.4khz), 11 cabinet models, seamless and quick preset switching , loop sounds can be played with drum machine, rhythm beat synchronously. The aux in jack makes it easy to practice along with MP3, CDs and other inputs. Large color TFT LCD panel (160 x128), graphic interface making the overall operation easy and intuitive. A total of 72 presets, 36 factory + 36 user presets.
If you want to test the waters, here are the some of the best free guitar effects software packages. Aside from the limited freeware software, there are Lite or Trial versions of commercial programs which you can get for free, but with limited in features. The good thing though is that even when they lack features, they work and sound just as nice.

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I'm going to assume that if you're reading this, you've probably been to two dozen guitar sites, all with varying, if not conflicting information on the correct way to do a setup. I've been there too, I've watched guys on youtube filing down frets with a dremel tool. Now it didn't look right to me, but maybe it works for him. The reality is there is more than one way to do something, and that's OK. If the end result is a great sounding instrument, it doesn't matter how you got there. So I'm going to show you my way of how to get to a great sounding electric guitar. And if you should choose to do something differently, and it works, great!!. Part of having some fun in life is experimenting, I encourage it.
Pickups are transducers that convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating guitar string into electrical energy by way of electromagnetic induction. It is a fundamental concept studied in physics and electronics that a changing magnetic field will generate a current through a coil of wire. The electric guitar pickup uses permanent magnets and pole pieces to form a steady magnetic field in the vicinity of each individual guitar string. An opposite magnetic polarity is induced in the metallic (steel core) guitar string when mounted above its respective pole piece and when the string moves, the otherwise steady magnetic field changes accordingly. Wire is wrapped around the poles thousands of times to form a coil within the magnetic field to pick up an induced current and voltage.
When it comes to guitar amps, American Musical Supply carries iconic cornerstone brands such as Fender, Marshall, Vox, and Orange. These are the names that have formed the foundation of guitar rigs worldwide for decades. We also stock the most innovative new models from such brands as Blackstar, Fuchs, Line 6, Paul Reed Smith, Supro, and a host of other incredible companies anchored by passionate engineers, technicians, and designers. With the myriad of choices available from AMS, how does one decide? All it takes are a few questions to get started.

Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.
Your own write-up suggests that the RP500 is "best of the best" for nailing classic amps/effects, and for being affordable; additionally your own write-up suggests Zoom should not be "best of the best" since it's tonally inferior to both the Digitech and the HD500X. Finally, the M5 isn't even a multi-effects pedal. It can model any single effect, that is all: it shouldn't even be mentioned here. Otherwise I like the actual write-ups: they're informative.
The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar Bass has major “cool” factor, and the sound holds out, too. With a P-bass style single in the neck position, and a J-bass style single in the bridge position, you’ll actually get the best of both worlds in terms of tonal options on the pickups. You have a choice between basswood (on the sunburst and crimson models) and agathis (on the black model), so there isn’t anything special about the woods they’re using in these basses. But the slim, fast-action, C contour of the maple neck will give you a nice, smooth J-bass feel that plays well above this guitar’s pay grade.
With the massive range of options available, you'd have to spend the whole day here to go through every one. There are six and twelve-strings, models specifically made for beginners, limited edition double necks; you name it, you'll find it! For a real classic, strap on a Rickenbacker 330 electric guitar. A staple in 60's mod culture, the unique hollowbody construction, slim neck and contoured body make the Rickenbacker 330 so easy to play that it has held the status as one of the all-time greatest guitars for decades.
With that said, it’s important to make a distinction between reverb pedals and echo pedals. These two are often time a source of major confusion. Here’s the deal. Reverb is similar to an echo in a sense that you are hearing the sound as it bounces off a surface. However, reverb is fairly quick and happens almost instantly. Echo effect, on the other hand, takes much longer to reach back to the user. One way to understand the difference is to yell in a smaller room, and then go out and yell in a canyon. Similar goes for delays. If you want to learn more about delay pedals, check out our dedicated guide here.
I don't understand why everyone is so "Gibson is the best". They have been going downhill for years. Unless it's a custom shop job, it is hit or miss. the same with Fender. Everyone likes them because of the mystique of the players that played them over the last decades. It's a "lifestyle cult" with name recognition. If you want a guitar that plays and sounds like a Gibson of Fender is supposed to but want to be guaranteed of the quality you are receiving and spend for a fraction of the money, then get a used USA Custom Shop made Washburn. You will never look back. I say used because the Chicago custom shop has apparently closed. Anything made there from about 1993 - 2008 that looks like a competitors guitar will outmatch the competitors version every time. You will notice that it is hard to find a used custom shop Washburn around. That's because they are the guitar worlds best kept secret. The people in the know get them - at a massively reduced price - and keep them. People hang onto their USA Washurns for the most part and there i a reason for that. They are that good.
For beginners looking to practice their first notes, chords and songs, nothing more than a couple of watts is needed – in fact, most dedicated practice amps won’t offer much more than 10 watts. If you are planning on jamming with a full band or starting to gig in small venues (think bars, clubs and small halls), then anything from 15 to 50 watts will suffice. Bigger gigs, including auditoriums and outdoor festivals, will demand upwards of 100 watts.
My epi is very nice (Almost like a gibson for 1/3 of a gibson price) and obviously, my Jackson is far superior than my other guitars. But I'm just have mid end ibanez guitars and they are very good guitars. The high end ibanez are awesome and worth less than high ends of other brands in most cases having with the same quality (or superior in very cases).
This is a guitar that we’ve featured before as our top pick for those who are looking for an electric acoustic for less than $500, so there’s no surprise that it’s back as one of the very best prospects at any price at all. Epiphone might be Gibson’s more affordable brand, but that certainly doesn’t mean you aren’t getting very high quality when you choose the Dove Pro.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 

Looking for a super-hot, aggressive metal tone? You need a dedicated high-output humbucker that will crush any amp. Whether passive or active, it’s humbuckers that dominate the heavy rock and metal genres, offering huge power, mix-cutting melodic lead tone, and noise-cancelling abilities – just what’s need when the volume and gain increase. For gigging metal guitarists, humbuckers are pretty much essential. This genre has some great affordable options that will turn any axe into a tone monster, as well as some high-end signature pickup sets from legends such as Dimebag Darrell and Mick Thomson, while the premium James Hetfield Humbucker Set from EMG is one of the best purchases a gigging metal guitarist can buy!
For the younger children in the 4-8-year-old range, a scale length of about 22.7 inches is a good fit. Although some electrics come in scale lengths down to 22.2 inches, the extra length will keep your child from outgrowing the guitar too soon. For comparison, adult full-size guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster have a scale length of 25.75 inches while Gibson Guitars are an inch shorter. So if you are confused that what to buy for your new learner or the little one, you can go with the product that fits perfectly in your requirements.

In the image above, the first higher peak we see is E4 (i.e. the low E-string on a guitar in standard tuning), the second peak is E5 (i.e. an octave higher) and the following high peaks are B5, E6, G#6, B6, D7, and so on. Remember that the test rigs only have two strings, both tuned to E, and plucked open. So what you are hearing is a mish-mash of tons of overtones that shape the character of the “tone” that you hear.

In terms of sounds, jazz requires a balance of warmth and clarity. While many solid body guitars can do an approximation of a jazz sound using a clean tone played through the neck pickup, in reality a dedicated jazz guitar will offer this particular sound without becoming overly woolly when lines are played at any speed. Let’s take a look at our pick of the 5 best jazz guitars.
You can use compression not only to keep levels under control but also to increase sustain. Sometimes a guitar part will work better in a track if the sustain is created using a little less overdrive augmented by compression rather than relying on overdrive alone. Even a heavily overdriven guitar sound can be made to appear more powerful if compressed, as its average energy level is increased further, though any noise will also be rendered more obvious. Clean guitar parts can also benefit enormously from compression, as it creates a more dense, even sound and can emphasise the picking attack of the notes when a longer attack time is set. Using a faster release time, so as to cause audible level pumping, can make for exciting rock guitar sounds, but some compressors pump more gracefully than others — Dbx models are quite popular in this respect.
In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as

Telecasters are another guitar in Fender's lineup which include a single cutaway to get at those higher frets. These guitars feature two single coil pickups which can be used separately or with each other for producing large-scale sounds. Telecasters are well-known for producing a thin, biting sound which is common in country music, but nowadays they are popular amongst indie musicians as well. These aren't the ideal guitars for heavy metal or rock music. If you want to concentrate on country or indie music, a Telecaster can do the job for you.
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This list is insanely bad! First of all, John Mayer is only as good as your typical high school amateur. And before anyone starts spouting off, I’ve tried to find some obscure videos of him to prove myself wrong. But I can’t, it’s all Minor Pentatonic stuff with nothing innovative added to it. Secondly, how about some finger pickers on the list: Doyle Dykes, Scotty Anderson, Chet Atkins, Merle Travis, Tommy Emmanuel. Let’s not forget DANNY GATTON the greatest guitar player you’ve never heard. Also, if we’re talking about the best of the best, BRENT MASON should ALWAYS be in a Top Ten list, although he never is. But, you’ve heard him on all sorts of Nashville recordings. Acoustic guitar players like Andy McKee, Ewan Dobson, Don Ross, (I wish I knew more than that but I only recently discovered their Chuck Norris like awesomeness). Never limit yourself to the mainstream! There are many guitar players that are mentioned only because they are famous and have influence because of that. They may come up with a catchy riff or played in a well known band. But, that doesn’t make them a truly great guitar player.
Decide between an active and passive DI. The most obvious difference between the two is that an active DI requires a power supply for you to operate, while passive DIs do not. Beyond that, due to differences in design, each of these has strong suits that should be taken into consideration. For example, the transformers used in passive DIs are more resistant to the hum created by ground loops, making these ideal for on-stage performing.[8][9] Additionally:
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
I was interested in this book, and almost walked away after reading many negative reviews which complained about black and white photos and numerous typos. Then I noticed it was available in a Kindle version, for only $9.99. I ordered the Kindle version, and have no regrets. I have read it on my iPad, and gleaned a lot of useful information from it. I have not encountered any typos, and the colored wiring diagrams and numerous photos are just fine. It seems that the paperback version suffered from a poor layout and printing job, which is a shame, since it is obvious to me that Mr. Swike put in the effort to make a good product, which the Kindle version surely is. Anyone interested in a simple but comprehensive intro to wiring their Strat/Tele/Les Paul will find this a good reference. I also enjoyed the Varitone circuit presentation, and the explanation of how capacitor values affect treble/bass response.

From 1959 to 1967, the Stratocaster was made with a rosewood fretboard as standard, as well as color choices other than sunburst, including a variety of colorful car-like paint jobs that appealed to the nascent surfer and hot-rod culture, pioneered by such bands as the Surfaris,the Ventures and the Beach Boys. Fender would paint any guitar from the DuPont car color range for 5% over purchase price.

There is some debate about who actually designed the solid-body, arch-topped Gibson Les Paul, which was introduced with a trapeze tailpiece as a Goldtop in 1952. To hear the guitarist Les Paul tell it, he was the man responsible for his namesake, pushing his prototype on Gibson executives as early as 1940. But guitar author and collector George Gruhn believes the great musician may have had little do to with the electric guitar's final...Continue Reading
What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.

I once had RARE rogue made in the early 90s, set up exactly like some of the best ibanez.s. Shark fin inllays, cool headstock, grover tuners, real floyd rose, etc, even the pickups used were authentic dimebuckers. Rogue made these to compete with bigger names and sold them for around $200, best guitar ever. I wish I had never sold it. I still have pics if anyone wants to see it.
Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
Standard Series :[1] Brown Sunburst, Black, Arctic White, Lake Placid Blue, Candy Apple Red, Midnight Wine, Copper Metallic SunburstAmerican Standard Series (as of 2012):[1]Black, 3-Color Sunburst, Olympic White, Jade Green Pearl, Charcoal Frost Metallic, Candy Cola, Mystic Red, Mystic Blue (alder), Sienna Sunburst (ash)American Special Series (as of 2010): 3-Color Sunburst, 2-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red, Olympic White, Surf Green
The key feature that makes the GT-1000 stand out from the crowd is the inclusion of the ingenious AIRD (Augmented Impulse Response Dynamics) technology which ensures your effects respond correctly with the likes of tube amps and don’t muddy your sound. You can read more about the AIRD technology here, but in a nutshell, it ensures the dynamics of your unique amp are preserved. With other multi effects, you might find have to turn your amp emulations off if you want your effects to respond correctly to YOUR amp, but with the GT-1000 you won’t have to do that as you can select which type of amp you’re playing with and the pedal will respond correctly.
Dive bomb is a guitar technique in which the tremolo bar is used to rapidly lower the pitch of a note, creating a sound considered to be similar to a bomb dropping. One of the most recognized pioneers of this technique is Jimi Hendrix. Other notable musicians who are widely known for using this technique are Eddie Van Halen and Joe Satriani. - winner333
Here we have a beautiful player with great heritage.. This guitar was an Import from Japan back in 1978 its a very well built guitar and employs the same x bracing seen on Martins. Workmanship is very high as is materials the vintage tone woods are beautifully mellowen and the tone has opened up nicely on this and so the volume is good on this guitar with a new set of straings now sounds like quite big a Piano...clear and clean god volume and reasonible bass.. Very good sound from this one..t also plays quite nicely with good play action not to low not to high...it plays very wel.. structually no cracks or serious anything to speak up just the most minimap superficial nicks as this vintage guitar qualifies for the xcllent vintage condition catagory. The finsh is wonderful and glass like shine to it and has a beautiful warm patine to it you can't get without waiting the near 40 years for it to age this way... this guitar will make somon a wonderful D-18 /28 style instrumnt to enjoy for another 40 years... If your like us you love vintage instruments and this is a bargain of a great lttle player, for a song.. You will be pleased. Thanks for looking if interested contact Joe at : gr8bids@comcast.net .
When you’re starting to become serious about playing the guitar, the question of “what amp should I get” is bound to pop up. There’s quite a deal of variety out there, with many brands and models, and constant innovation adding new features to choose between with each passing year. It’s enough to baffle even an intermediate player, let alone a rookie who’s just getting started. To ensure that you get the right amplifier for your needs, you’ll first need to know a bit about how the amp’s specifications translate to real life.
It also has an overwhelming amount of sheet music in it. These music sheets allow you to practice what is being taught in the given chapter, which is nice, but going through the books, I felt there was a lot left unexplained. This was probably a result of them trying to simplify things as much as possible, but this actually leaves holes in the padawan guitarist's knowledge.
Ovation are relative newcomers to the world of vintage guitars, only launching their range at the 1967 NAMM show in Chicago. Ovation started as an off-shoot of founder Charles Kamen's work in the aviation field, studying vibration and resonances in helicopter blades. Whilst other respected American manufacturers relied heavily of quality nautral products and the artistry of their master luthiers, Ovation came very much from a science and engineering perspective: they used oscillographs to test existing instruments, and came up with the famous Ovation rounded back design, and suggested the use of a synthetic material, Lyrachord, claiming it to be more resonant that any wood.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown
I'm also retarded. And my father used to beat me with my decca.... Im also the ex-ceo for decca inc. Your guitars are worth mere pennies.... litterally, Deccas were originated in the late 60s for young children to pretend to be their idols.. Deccas were packaged in cereal boxes as ready-to-go kits.. you assembled them yourself... they are made from old left over popsicle sticks.. So Im glad to put your high hopes and sleepless nights of wondering whos going to come up to you and tell you your old guitar is rare and worth thousands... Because frankly it will just never happen..
After choosing the best guitar brand for you, there are still things you need to consider before buying an electric guitar. First, you must consider how much you’re willing to spend. You need to set a budget and pick your guitar accordingly. Take into consideration that electric guitars require gear like cables, amplifiers, and pedals, which you will also need to include in your budget. The second important thing you need to keep in mind is your music preference. The style of music you want to play has a major role in the kind of guitar you should get. Take a look at the guitars of your favorite musicians and make your choice based on that. Lastly, bear in mind that there are lots of different body shapes for guitars. The three most popular categories are single cutaway (ex: Les Paul), double cutaway (ex: Stratocaster) and exotic (ex: ESP). The right guitar shape will ensure your satisfaction and will make playing your instrument much more enjoyable. Keeping all these things in mind will guarantee that you pick the best guitar for yourself.
First off, I would like to say I had a lot of fun building this. Also, my hat goes off to the person that hand wrote all the tiny labels on the parts. With that being said, I couldn't get it to work. No sound at all, and only the light came on when I hit the switch. Now the fact that it didn't work could totally be an error on my part, but who knows. Now what I didn't like about this product is this: the casing is pretty small, so everything is pretty cramped (which may also contribute to why I wasn't able to get this to work, although, if you read other reviews, which I recommend for further useful information, some managed just fine), some pieces were mislabeled (There is a review that sorts this out), and the directions aren't very clear...well I thought they were clear enough, but look where that got me, so be ready for that. So 3 stars for fun, good price, and faster than expected delivery.
"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)
In 2000, for the anniversary of the Squier line of Stratocaster guitars, that year’s model was offered in a limited-edition green finish. The “Crafted in China” Squier Affinity Strats are different from their immediate predecessors; most have plywood bodies, larger headstock shapes, and somewhat inferior small parts. The pick guards generally now have 11 holes and screws, departing from the original ’50s style. Many people attribute the Affinity’s decline in quality to the introduction of the changes in 2000. The next major change for the Affinity line was a reduction in body thickness from 1.75″ to 1.5″, noticeable in size and weight.
Almost all bass amplifiers are designed for use with an electric bass, which has magnetic pickups. When a double bass player is plugging their instrument into a typical bass amp, the signal usually comes from a piezoelectric pickup mounted on the bridge or beneath the feet of the bridge. The direct signal from a piezoelectric pickup does not usually sound good when it is plugged into a standard electric bass amp. Many upright bass players who use piezoelectric pickups use a preamplifier or preamp-equipped DI box before the signal is sent to the bass amp. The preamplifier helps to ensure that the impedance of the pickup signal matches the impedance of the amplifier, which improves the tone. Some preamplifiers also have equalizers which can be used to modify the tone.
And while he'd heard its calling, Swank didn't move into the field until death arrived at the music shop where he was working. The resident guitar repairman suffered an aortic aneurysm and died. "It was terrible," Swank says. "He was a good friend of mine, but he still had a bunch of stuff in his shop." But Swank was able to step in and finish some of those jobs, and then more jobs began pouring in. The next thing he knew he had built a reputation for himself. "I'm a [guitar] player. I know how I like things to work, how instruments should play."

The three pickups were originally identical in their construction. With the rising popularity of using pickups in combination, Fender introduced a new feature in 1977 coinciding with the standard 5-position switch; a reverse-wound, reverse-polarity middle pickup. As the description implies, the magnetic polarity of this pickup is opposite the other two, as is the direction of the wire winding around the bobbin. This provides a hum-canceling effect (removing hum induced by poorly shielded, medium to high output AC devices) in positions 2 and 4 on the selector switch. This principle had been known for many years beforehand, being applied in the form of Gibson’s humbucking pickup and Fender’s own split-coil pickup used on the Precision Bass.


The Squier Bullet Strat Hard Tail Brown Sun Burst is a fantastic option for beginner guitarists out there and those who need an affordable budget friendly option for recording or practising. This guitar makes our cheap electric guitars that don’t suck list thanks to its high-quality basswood body and comfortable “C” shape profile on the neck that is super comfortable to play. This high-quality guitar also includes a set of three standard single-coil strat pickups allowing you to mix up your sound via the 5-way pickup selector. Solid, chrome hardware and a hard tail bridge for added resonance finish off the guitar nicely whilst the budget friendly price tag makes it affordable for everyone. A Fender Stratocaster style guitar at a fraction of the cost.
One of the earliest studio effects created by taking advantage the distance between the record and playback heads on tape recorders, delay duplicates the original signal and repeats it after the original sound is played. This can be repeated over and over for an echo effect, or be a single repeat that produces the slap-back sound popular in rockabilly. The time between repetitions can be very short, measured in milliseconds. Or it can be longer and more dramatic. Delays can also add a rhythmic element to your playing. There are many different kinds of delay effects available, and most offer a number of different types in the same unit.

But that's not the Ibanez we know today, although the two are related.. Japanese company Hoshino Gakki began importing guitars made by Salvador Ibáñez's company to Japan in 1929. This was so successful for them that they started producing their own similar guitars under this name in 1935. They started making modern guitars simply using the name Ibanez in 1957 and then, not being ones to hold a grudge given that the US Army Air Force destroyed their factory in 1945, began exporting them to the USA in 1971, and as they say, the rest is history.


Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.

It looks like a Gibson. but it’s another Epiphone — the Epiphone Les Paul Special II. This is the other iconic shape in electric guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, and Epiphone make the budget-priced version with this one listed at $170. In another blog we’ll explain the primary differences between Gibson and Fender guitars. For now, just know it’s like an Apple versus Windows kind of debate. Really.
I couldn’t find a professional review of the Les Paul Express. The last time we checked, it had earned an average of just 3.8 stars out of 5 in 17 user reviews on Amazon, but most of the complaints I found on Amazon and elsewhere were from people who got samples that weren’t set up well at the factory. This wasn’t true of our sample, but it was true of the other Epiphone sample we received—and it was true of many of the cheap Epiphones I played in stores.
If you have your heart set on a Stratocaster, but can’t justify shelling-out $600 or more for the USA-made Standard Strats, the Squier Standard Stratocaster is a great place to start. Unlike the even cheaper Strats that are included with Fender’s “starter packs,” this guitar is a definite step-up in quality and features a more modern take on their traditional bridge. I personally prefer this bridge style over Fender’s traditional/vintage 6-screw bridges.
Gibson produced only hollow body electrics until 1952, when the first Les Paul solid bodies hit the market. But that still left a gap. Certain players wanted a guitar with the versatility of a Les Paul, but the warmer, mellow tone of a hollow body — albeit one that could be played at high volume. A solid wood block runs through the center of the guitar’s body, allowing greater sustain and less feedback at high volumes than hollow bodies, while the winged side of these guitars’ bodies still provide for a mellow tone thanks to their acoustic resonance.
I'm seeking a guitar to elicit the rich fat heavy sound. So as I understand a guitar with the H humbucker (double coil) pickup is what I need for that. But there is a wide range of layouts for the guitars. Some of them have S single (single coil) pickup, for example H-S-H layout. Where single coil pickup is mostly used for blues, funk and jazz guitars. And these H-S-H guitars are also recommended for heavy rock (because of the humbuckers).
Most users and experts agree that the Zoom MultiStomp MS-50G is a high quality and high value pedal. But it's not just about bang per buck, because many are satisfied with the quality of its effect and amp emulations. Even Music Radar is convinced of its performance saying, "While not all of the sounds are going to appeal to all players, there are enough usable tones here to make this a very practical item for just about anybody who uses effects."
The conservative way to tell if a Martin is built for steel strings is the bridge. If it's a style 18 or higher and has a belly bridge (and does not have 'banjo' tuners like early OM models), it's pretty much built for steel strings (can't use this indicator on style 17 and lower as these models never used a belly brige until the 1950s). Why? Since Martin didn't implement the belly bridge until late 1929, it's a very conservative indicator that the guitar is built for steel. The belly bridge was the last thing they did to make steel strings usable on their guitars (though certainly many models with rectangle bridges can handle steel strings too.) They started to implement the belly bridge in 1929, and all style 18 models and higher had the belly bridge by 1930. Therefore using the belly bridge as a steel string indicator is a very safe idea (assuming the bridge is original and it's not an OM). Now can steel strings be used on pre-1930 models with a pyramid or rectangle bridge? Maybe, but it's just not as definative and caution should be heeded ("silk and steel" strings would be a good and safe compromise). Note early OM models with banjo style tuners generally should be strung up 'lightly'.
Pedals allow instant variables, with built in effects you have to dial it in every song, I can turn on a chorus on the verse add fuzz on the hook and manage combinations in real time, much more flexible. Also boutique pedals like earthquaker devices and Devi Evers create much more complex sounds within each pedal, it really helps when u are trying to cultivate your own sound.
As suggested by the numerical designation, Martin’s 28 Series was essentially an upgrade or refinement of the earlier 18 Series. Martin typically indicates fancier materials and appointments with a higher number (a D-28 is fancier dreadnought than a D-18, etc.). These consisted of one guitar, the E-28, and one bass, the EB-28. The first prototypes appeared in June of 1980; production began in January of 1981.
Smaller speaker cabinets with one, two, or four speakers, are more commonly used than the 8x10", because while the 8x10" cabinet is able to produce huge volume and powerful bass tone, the cabinets are very heavy and hard to transport. The 2x10" and 4x10" designs are popular for bassists who need less stage volume and an easier-to-transport cabinet to take to rehearsals and gigs. Some bassists own two or more smaller cabinets, such as two 4x10" cabinets. This way, a bassist playing a stadium concert on one day can bring both of her 4x10" cabs, but then if she is playing a nightclub show the next day, or going to rehearsal, she only needs to bring one 4x10" cab.
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Since this guitar is from Taylor it benefits from the company's quality consistency, which applies to all their instruments regardless of price points. While aesthetics and materials are more affordable, it gets the same level of attention to detail and quality as the more premium models. This gives budget limited players the chance to have a true Taylor acoustic that plays like a "dream", and not a watered down version that plays and feels different.

While experimenting with the Vortex for this article, I was impressed by quite how well the ambient mics seemed to turn a close-miked guitar sound into something that sounded like it was on a record, but the downside of this approach for most home recordists will be that the Vortex is not easy to recreate in a smaller studio — so I thought I'd pass on some ways I found to make it more manageable on a smaller scale. One problem most small studios have is that they don't have large numbers of screens, but in practice I found that I was able to get decent results by putting the guitar cab in the corner of the room and using one or both of the room boundaries in place of the screens. Visconti's trick of aiming ambient mics at the studio glass also turned out to be handy to increase the apparent distance of the farther ambient mic.
Not everyone's ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. Now, I'm not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it's probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts.
Perhaps not as famous as its brother, the EMG 81, this awesome EMG 85 still rocks and makes a worthy appearance in our chart. Perfect for the neck position (although equally solid in the bridge), the EMG 85 features Alnico V magnet-loaded close aperture coils to deliver a natural tone with a huge output, with no loss of clarity as the volume is pushed to its highest.
Gibson’s electric guitars generally sport humbucker pickups, known for their thicker, rounder tone. You also get less feedback, which limits the types of delay and overdrive tones you can experiment with, but ensures a cleaner and more consistent sound. Gibson mainly uses mahogany for their guitar bodies, which is what gives it that slightly darker sound.

Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!

Fast forward a few hundred years to the world of guitar pedals. The first registered portable effect pedal for guitarists built in 1941, called the DeArmond 601 Tremolo Control, was a clumsy toaster oven-shaped unit with a heavy granite-like exterior. The tremolo effect worked by reducing the signal from the guitar several times a second through an electrolytic hydro-fluid located in a glass canister inside the unit. When activated, the main voltage motor rapidly shook the canister, causing the fluid (water, windex, and even mercury) to stir and splash against the pin and the guitar signal to ground, creating a “watery” tremolo sound.
Why Martin electric guitars have never been more popular isn’t too hard to figure out. Martin, whose expertise has always been in top-notch acoustics, never really put a lot of effort into marketing its electrics. They were always well made, and, especially in the necks, clearly “Martins.” In the final analysis, however, it probably comes down to being victims of the success of their acoustic brothers, and players have just never seemed to warm up to the idea of Martin “electric” guitars. For the savvy collector with a taste for quality and relative rarity, Martin electrics remain excellent and attainable prizes.
I am not completely sure this tuner info is completely accurate. Sorry about that... Remember as a general rule Grovers were used on style 21 and above, and Klusons were used on style 18 and lower. There are some exceptions (like during 1940 to 1945, and pre-1930s). On pre-war Grover tuners, there are basically two types used on Martins: G-93 (round button 'butterbean') and G-98 (scalloped buttons, aka "Sta-Tite"). Both came in 6:1 and 12:1 tuning ratios, with 12:1 coming about in 1938 (and replacing the 6:1 ratio). The post-1938 12:1 ratio Grovers can be always be identified since they combine the thin seamed tuner buttons with the long pointed baseplate, and the tuner gear is screw mounted. The 1938 and prior Grover G98 tuners have a thin seamed button combined with the a square tipped baseplate, and always had the 6:1 ratio. They also had the riveted tuner gear. Ater WW2 the G98 was reintroduced with pointy baseplates and a screw mounted gear, and this was copied by Waverly, Grover, Schaller, etc after the war. Also Martin used original Waverly tuners (open back, rounded base tips, butterbean buttons) after WW2 on 00 and 000 and some D guitars style 18 (and some 28) in the late 1940s and 1950s.
Ask anyone at all if they've heard of Ibanez, and you'll most likely get a 'yes'—even if it's not a guitarist or even a musician that you're asking. It takes a lot for an instrument maker to become as well-known outside the music community as it is inside, and Ibanez is one of the elite luthiers that has managed to do just that. How have they done it? Simple: by making instruments so sought-after that they can be found nearly everywhere. Originally founded in 1957, Ibanez is one of the "original" manufacturers from the formative decades of the electric guitar as we know it today. Ibanez was one of the first Japanese companies to break through to the international music industry as well as, even more impressively, the very first brand to mass-produce seven and eight-string guitars. That makes extended-range guitars an important part of the Ibanez legacy alongside their many classic 6-string models. Some of the most renowned Ibanez instruments include hollow body guitars like Pat Metheny's signature model, and distinctive solid body axes such as the Iceman and Fireman series. You'll also find a wide assortment of basses, including 5 and 6-string models that join the 7 and 8-string guitars in the extended-range Ibanez family. There are plenty of acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars and basses to choose from as well, not to mention mandolins, banjos and ukuleles. Ibanez has a prolific catalog that spans the whole guitar family, offering something for anybody who loves to work the strings. In addition to stringed instruments, Ibanez is also renowned for a broad range of effects pedals, amplifiers and accessories. The TS808 Tube Screamer, for example, is an effects pedal that's beyond legendary. The unmatched warmth and tone of its overdrive makes the TS808 a must-have item for countless guitarists. Connect it to an amplifier like the TSA30 Tube Screamer 1x12 Combo Amp, and you're rocking an amazing recipe for serious vintage sounds. Ibanez was an early player in the electric guitar game, and their instruments, pedals and amps are certain to be on stages the world over for decades to come. Make yourself one of the artists that takes Ibanez onstage at every gig and this gear will pay off in spades with the incredible sounds that made them an industry giant in the first place.

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