Standard eight-string tuning. Used by Scar Symmetry on the song "The Three-Dimensional Shadow" from the album Holographic Universe (album) and "Mechanical Soul Cybernetics" from the album Dark Matter Dimensions, Deftones, Periphery on "Ji", "Overture", "Extraneous", "22 Faces", "Four Lights" and "Stranger Things", by Fear Factory on "Mechanize", "Metallic Division", "God Eater" and "Soul Hacker" and by Devil You Know on some songs.
I thought I'd give a review from the point of view of someone completely new to the guitar, for those of you out there like me who are wondering if this will really teach you or if it'll be a frustrating waste of money. First off, I'll say that it isn't easy. As someone completely unfamiliar with the frets and the strings, I had a tough time starting out - very slow and clumsy. BUT, you'll see improvement REALLY quickly. I've only been playing for about two hours and although I still suck, I'm having a great time and I'm already loads better than I was when I started out. The only reason I stopped was because my finger got sore from holding down the strings. So far, for someone who's wanted to learn and either never had the time or money to take lessons, or found practice to be tedious and dropped it, or just doesn't have a mind for reading music, this is a definite recommendation. If anything changes as I get further along, I'll update this review. But as of now, I love it!
1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.
NOTE: Due to the nature of electric guitar construction, it is extremely common for these instruments to need fret work to play well. 80% or more of electrics, especially those with bolt-on necks, have high frets in the tongue area that must be addressed in order to play without excess buzzing. This includes most new electric guitars right off the shelf. Please see the section below for fret work pricing.
The C-series archtops were long scale until mid-1934, same as the 000 models. Sometimes a C model is converted from an archtop to a 000 style flat top. A conversion of a short scale C-2 (mid-1934 and later) won't exactly be a 000 either. The neck must be shortened to get the shallower angle required for a flat top. This amounts to about 1/3 of a fret, so the guitar ends up having a 13 2/3 fret neck. This puts the bridge position a little lower on the top, closer to the OM bridge position (but not exactly the same). The other feature on the C models that is different from a 000 is the back arch and the back braces. The archtops have more arch in the back and taller #3 and #4 back braces. Note the 1939 and later C-2 models have no abalone, the neck inlays are pearloid.
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.
Edit: After reading everyone's comments I've decided to let the technician give my strat a first time setup and I'll try to absorb any information I can in order to be able to do it myself one day. I realize many of you have some pretty cool guitar shops that'll do a free setup so I'll try to negotiate something. I'll be sure to record the condition of the guitar itself before the setup in case the technician chips it or scratches it. I'll also check out Dan Erlewine's books like the guitarist below suggested. Thank you all for your advice, I really do appreciate it and I hope to be as wise as you all are when it comes to guitars someday.
Aside from the superstrat ESP M-10 shown earlier. The ESP LTD EC-10 is also an affordable guitar but with a different body design derived from the Les Paul. The features of this LP inspired guitar that makes it different is the bevels on the body and belly cut at the back for comfort. Its major resemblance to a Les Paul is the humbuckers pick-ups equip on the guitar. Together with the bridge design for having a stopbar and tom bridge without a whammy bar.
I took the Gearank scores we have calculated for individual guitars for each brand and combined them using a weighted average to produce a rating for each brand. I can best explain this by saying if a hypothetical brand had 2 models and one of them had 99 rating sources and the other one only had a single rating source then the first model's ratings would contribute 99% of the final rating for the brand. An interesting statistic; we processed more than 17,000 sources for these calculations.

We’ll go through each type of guitar pedal from the likes of distortion to delay and everything in between, whilst keeping it super simple. We’ll leave out some of the more technical details as this is just a beginners guide to guitar effects pedals, but if you feel you’re ready for a complete guide on putting together a pedal board, then we have a more in-depth blog here for you to read: Read our how to build a pedal board blog.

This group contains two effects pedals, which are the noise gate and compressor (and most of the time a volume pedal). You don't want to change that ordering, because of the result of compression. It reduces the variance between the highest peaks of volume and the lowest. And if you haven't taken the noise out of your signal yet using the noise gate, your signal-to-noise ratio becomes lower, making it more difficult to take out the noise in a musical fashion (it'll have more abrupt and noticeable moments of silence).
Buying an electric guitar will also require less force to play, but obviously the sound and styles you will be playing will be very different. I am a guitar teacher and I often recommend people start on an electric guitar,because it doesnt require as much hand strength. As for type of electric guitar, anything with a low action (strings close to the neck) will work well, try some out and you will feel the difference. But getting overly technical with guitar specifications is unnecessary, its like shopping for a mountain bike by comparing the tires...silly, eh.
I still keep in touch with Mark and occasionally pose questions to him about various maintenance concerns. He's pretty busy and it may take a few days before he get's back to me. He has always been willing to help and actually encourages me to take on a lot more of the responsibility of maintaining my basses. Yeah, I spent a little on the front end but I really feel that it's going to payoff for me long term.
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There exist libraries that can do astoundingly realistic guitars, but they're expensive. There are a few guitarists hanging around the AF, I suggest you hook up with one of them. Even if you do buy a library, if you don't play the guitar there's a decent chance you won't be able to write for them well. No one wants clunky, awkward guitars! Team up with a fellow musician and have some fun.
Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.
If you’re old enough and like whacky guitars, like me, you probably remember the great Guitar Player “Off the Wall” columns by Teisco Del Rey, the nom de plume of journalist Dan Forte. His was the first, and sometimes the only, story I’d read for a long time. Dan was perhaps the first to celebrate guitars whose names didn’t begin with M, G, or F. Dan usually worked the humor angle, but for those of us with an aesthetic eye, the guitars he featured became Holy Grails. One of the holiest of those was the 1968 Teisco May Queen guitar, a rare red version of which you see here!

The first to go are the ultra-highs, and the lower the value of the pot, the greater the amount of signal that can escape to ground. This is why 500K pots keep your sound brighter than 250K: their higher resistance won't allow as much of the signal to bleed off. And a 1Meg-ohm pot has such high resistance that when wide open it sounds almost like having no control pot there at all.
Teisco's very FIRST solid body electric guitar, the 1954 Teisco, Model J-1. 1 single coil Pickup. Front plate says, "NIHON ONPA KOGYO CO. LTD TEISCO". Back plate says, "TEISCO ELECTRIC GUITER MODEL J1". Yes, Guitar is misspelled as "GUITER"!. Maple neck is a "ball bat" with very pronounce "V". Guitar is currently set up for slide with "flat-wounds". VERY ROUGH CONDITION and lots of "character". Where to start, hm....? Firstly it has termite, yes, termite damage to the back. Don't ask me how, I don't know. The top is veneered with a beautiful quilted maple, but is missing a big section on the front. The tailpiece is missing it's cover. The wood bridge is partially inverted and sagging, due to string tension. The pick guard is warped (normal to many vintage guitars). We're pretty sure the brown bakelite knobs, while cool, are not original. Some of the frets have been changed, mostly by removing from the last 6 slots and relocated. 95% of the veneer is missing from the back. The tuners are mostly original with a couple of replacement gears. A couple of the tuner button shafts are bent, but tuners still function. The great thing is the way it is currently set up, it makes a heck of a "slide guitar". The original pickup sounds incredible through both our shop Trace Elliot and Marshall JCM-800!!! No case included.
If you use amplifier overdrive, want to use delay and reverb but still crave simplicity—I’d suggest designing a “hybrid” pedalboard. Just run your gain and filter effects in front of the amp, and use a pedal like the TC Electronic Nova System in your amp effects loop for time-based effects. This will require more cabling between your pedalboard and amp, but will sound much better than running your delay and reverb effects into a distorted amp. Pedals like the Nova System or the Eventide units boast specs rivaling studio quality rack gear.
Firstly these are both 'mic-level' or 'instrument-level' inputs (they carry very quiet signals) but hi-Z signals are more prone to interference. The lo-Z signal consists of the instrument's mono signal (hot) and it's inverted waveform (cold), the cables are twisted around one another such that any interfering signal generated in one is negated by the other (much the same as the way a humbucking pickup works).
These are great choices, but if you want a great guitar for the price go used and get either esp ltd ec400vf or the ec401vf. They come w seymour duncan 59 neck and jb bridge or dimarzio pickups. Grover tuners jumbo frets set neck mahogany neck and body. You can find em used for $300-400 and need absolutely nothing but to be plugged in. The ec256 is a great option but for the same price get the 401 used. I have a 65 jaguar a newer mustang 2 epi's 1 paul 1 SG and when I picked up the ec401vf for $300 it was the best value to quality ratio I have ever had in a guitar. You won't be disappointed. The ec400 series were also made in s korea and the earlier 401s were made there also. The newer ones are made in China and Indonesia but the quality is still incredible. I got a s korea model ec401vf w seymour setup. It smokes my epi l.p. tradional pro and was $250 cheaper. By far best deal it there.
Most pickup selectors are either mounted to the top of the guitar through a cavity routed in the back of the body or mounted to a pickguard. For pickup selectors that are mounted to the top of the body, simply take a screwdriver and unscrew the pickup selector. You will have to remove the knob on the end of the level before you can slide the selector through the channel and out of the cavity. For pickguard mounted selector, like Fender Stratocasters, you will need to remove the entire pickguard to remove the selector. Simply unscrew the pickguard from the body, flip it over, and rest it on the top of the body. The pickguard will still be wired to the body, so you can’t go very far with it. Then, unscrew the selector. It is important that you take note of what wires are soldered to what lugs before you remove the selector. If you are not familiar with electric guitar wiring, I suggest that you draw a picture of the selector and label the soldered wires. Once you know where everything has be wired, you can cut the wires close to the lugs and remove the old selector.
One day I went over to hang out with a friend on Long Island’s prestigious, luxurious north shore. He was also an amateur, aspiring, guitarist, and perhaps slightly more advanced than me – after all, he wrote a solo, even if it didn’t belong to a song yet. But he was very excited when I arrived and wanted to show me something cool in the family room. When I stepped inside, what did I see strewn about the floor but a whole bunch of effects pedals surrounding his electric guitar like a battalion about to march on and conquer a fierce enemy.

The frets are the little metal pieces that are installed in the instrument's neck. Frets do not make a significant difference in the sound of the instrument. They come in various sizes and materials. If you're just starting out, we recommend choosing Medium size frets made of Nickel-Silver. For a more scalloped feel, we recommend Extra Jumbo size frets. For increased durability (wear-and-tear), we recommend Stainless Steel frets. Some customers have reported stainless steel frets to be very slippery and brighter sounding when compared to nickel-silver frets – this could be a good, or a bad thing depending on the player.
The chorus effect sounds like a lush underwater soundscape that is created by doubling your guitar signal and slightly shifting the second one out of time and pitch with the original.  This effect can be very subtle, which sounds as if you’re playing out of two different amps separated in space, or highly modulated to sound as if two different players are playing the same part at the same time.

Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.


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“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”
Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.

‘Power' Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana's Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.


Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.
Just knowing three chords will enable you to play all of these, albeit sometimes in a key that doesn't suit the song too well. As Rockin Cowboy illustrates, chords come in 'families', so if you understand that, songs become far more predictable. Sometimes I play with others, and when they try to explain that this new song 'has G, C and D in it', all I need to know is the key - in this case, G. The other two chords are virtually inevitable, but that fact seems to have escaped them!
With guitar companies continually coming up with new models or refreshed versions of their bestsellers, guitar players can feel both excited and overwhelmed to try out and buy the latest shredders and jazz boxes. Will these really be better than their vintage archtop or not? Are the new humbuckers any good? Will the new version of an old favorite be a good buy? – And the list goes on.
It goes to show…there is no “best” guitar players…it’s all a matter of perspective, taste, interpretation, etc….. Above all, much of it has to do with the players in question being at the right place , at the right time, playing what the audience wanted to hear from that performance at that point in time. It’s a big world full of talent undiscovered and sadly, it will remain just that: undiscovered.

I took a guitar to this great place to have new strings put on it. I explained to the owner that the guitar belonged to my son who had been killed in a car accident. I was donating the guitar to a pro...gram called SOAR. A program for veterans to learn to play. They are a therapy type program for any veterans. Thank you for the help I received to be able to give this guitar to this worthy program. They are great people in the guitar store. See More
Read Full Review The brand ESP that we all know today started its roots as a shop in Tokyo Japan selling custom replacement parts for guitars that quickly gained a good reputation for its high quality. Soon came after the brand manufactured fully assembled guitars that burst in the trash metal seen of the 80’s signing in big name bands to carry their guitars and basses.
WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.
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Effects and effects units—stompboxes in particular—have been celebrated by pop and rock musicians in album titles, songs and band names. The Big Muff, a fuzzbox manufactured by Electro-Harmonix,[49] is commemorated by the Depeche Mode song "Big Muff" and the Mudhoney EP Superfuzz Bigmuff. Nine Inch Nails, Pink Floyd, George Harrison, They Might Be Giants and Joy Division are among the many musicians who have referenced effects units in their music.[50]

This is a real nice D-18 it Booms quite nicely with Vintage Tone of that of a much more expensive Big Named guitar for a fraction of what you would pay..its Japanese crafted 29 years ago by the master craftsman in one of the finest Japanese builders factory.. the great Ibanez...the Label inside says... THE MARK OF QUALITY CIMAR Quality Produced under Strict Quality Control by IBANEZ "Made in Japan" Serial # 82110013k ... 1st 2 digits 82 that's the year...now not all Japanese Ibanez old guitars are so great not at all ..many were very low end guitars we saw in the 60's & 70's as a kid myself most were junk or we called them toys.. now that's not true for all of them though I can honestly say that... This is not a cheap guitar nor is it built cheaply ..this example was one of the good impressive one's they used beautiful grade woods on... This particular example it has a Strikingly beautiful straight grained Sitka Spruce Top ... it has ambered nicely now naturally with it's great patina created over the last 29 years . ya don't get that with a new Ibanez or even dare I say Martin with those white looking spruce top "yuck on thanks"... sorry back to this one ... The back sides & neck are all gorgeously grained AA higher grade Mahogany the fingerboard is dark Indian Rosewood with an ebony bridge..even the Original string Pins are aged beautifully amber tipped... I'm lookin pretty hard everywhere and I can not find a crack - separation or a defect to be found anywhere only the most minute microscopic its that clean.... JVG Condition RATED: @ better than average in Excellent used vintage condition wow!..This neck is arrow straight with a perfect medium slim taper neck feels great and action is EZ to play just about perfect...1-11/16ths at the nut very comfortable feel, frets are considered excellent vintage at lest 92%... Comes with a free Chip board case or an optional upgrade to a Hard shell case / ask... Just in.. no pics yet coming very soon stay tuned! Thanks for your interest.
Many great players (including Hendrix) placed the wah before distortion... though many of the modern rock guys place it after distortion to make the frequency sweep cleaner. Personally, I prefer the Wah before distortion, but it's personal taste really. Depends a bit on the pedal too - how wide the frequency notch is and what frequency range it covers. I have my Wah on a G-Lab True Bypass Wah Pad, which I think is a great product... I have a few Wahs that I like, the Keeley Mod Vox Wah and the RMC3 are probably my first choices to try out.
9. Boss Katana 50 1x12 Combo Amp ($199): The Boss Katana 50 is nothing to sneeze at. Perhaps one of the coolest functions is its immediate access to 15 awesome Boss pedal tones, supporting up to 55 of the BOSS family of effects. You can also customize your effects and amp settings via the Tone Studio Software or even download preamps from the Boss Tone Central website. You can also completely bypass the speaker by connecting the amps line output to a line input on your favorite device, which also comes in handy for connecting to a PA system.
Very disappointed! This was a gift from Santa this morning and the amp failed miserably. Would not work at all. Not with a battery or an adapter(which by the way is not included). Amp started to smell like it was burning/melting even though it showed no power at all. Son is very disappointed to say the least and so is mommy. Only thing he wanted was an electric guitar and he couldn't even enjoy it this morning. How do I explain returning it to Santa...
While close-miking can indeed be punchy and muscular, you’ll often find it doesn’t capture the full breadth of your electric guitar tone – that is, it simply doesn’t sound the way your amp sounds in the room. That’s because when you stand somewhere near the middle of any room and play an amp that’s placed a few feet away, several other elements affect the sonic picture. The distance between your ears and the speaker (the “air”), the shape and size of the room, materials used to make the walls, ceiling and floor and/or their coverings, the ways in which sound reflects from them, along with other factors all contribute to how your amp really sounds in the acoustic environment. Most engineers find, therefore, that they need to use some form of distant miking when the aim is capturing a realistic amp tone.
Telecasters are another guitar in Fender's lineup which include a single cutaway to get at those higher frets. These guitars feature two single coil pickups which can be used separately or with each other for producing large-scale sounds. Telecasters are well-known for producing a thin, biting sound which is common in country music, but nowadays they are popular amongst indie musicians as well. These aren't the ideal guitars for heavy metal or rock music. If you want to concentrate on country or indie music, a Telecaster can do the job for you.
It was also during this time that Perry Bechtel, a well-known banjo player and guitar teacher from Cable Piano in Atlanta, requested that Martin build a guitar with a 15-fret neck-to-body join[citation needed]. Most guitars of the day, with the exception of Gibson’s L-5 archtop jazz guitars, had necks joined at the 12th fret, half the scale length of the string. In keeping with Bechtel’s request, Martin modified the shape of their 12-fret 000-size instrument, lowering the waist and giving the upper bout more acute curves to cause the neck joint to fall at the 14th fret rather than the 12th. Fourteen-fret guitars were designed to be played with a pick and replace banjos in jazz orchestras. Thus, Martin named its first 14-fret, 000-shape guitar the Orchestra Model (OM). Martin applied this term to all 14-fret instruments in its catalogs by the mid- to late-1930s.
If you are recording the output of a bass amp, try to use a mic that will capture more of the low-end than a typical stage mic. An SM57/58 will work, but a mic with a more extended low-frequency response would be a better choice. The Sennheiser 421 is often used, as is the classic kick drum mic, the AKG D112, which has a bumped-up response tuned specifically for low-pitched instruments. I prefer the Electro-Voice RE-20 (you know, the “announcer’s mic”)—it’s more neutral, and it has an extended low-end response, so you’ll get not just boom, but real depth.
This open-C tuning gives the initial harmonic series when a C-string is struck.[4] The C-C-G-C-E-G tuning uses the harmonic sequence (overtones) of the note C. When an open-note C-string is struck, its harmonic sequence begins with the notes (C,C,G,C,E,G,B♭,C).[3][4] This overtone-series tuning was modified by Mick Ralphs, who used a high C rather than the high G for "Can't Get Enough" on Bad Company. Ralphs said, "It needs the open C to have that ring," and "it never really sounds right in standard tuning".[5]
In addition to guitars, Gibson offers consumer electronics through its subsidiaries Gibson Innovations (Philips brand), TEAC Corporation (TEAC and Esoteric brands), Onkyo Corporation (Onkyo and Pioneer brands), Cerwin Vega and Stanton,[6] as well as professional audio equipment from KRK Systems, pianos from their wholly owned subsidiary Baldwin Piano, and music software from Cakewalk. (See section #Instruments)

That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
If you want to access some resources that will help dealing with a specific tonal pursuit, piece of gear or other questions related to your rig, I’d recommend giving Guitar Tricks 14-day free trial a test run - there’s no obligations and you’ve got nothing to lose - except two free weeks of one of the most comprehensive and thorough guitar education websites in existence.
Ovation’s Lyracord backs weren’t the company’s only fling with synthetic materials. In the early ’70s Charles Kaman set his engineers, many of whom were not guitar players, to work on developing a new synthetic guitar, yielding the deep-bowl, acoustic-electric Adamas which went into production in 1976. The Adamas top, called a Fibronic Soundboard, was made of a laminate of carbon-graphite and birch about a third the thickness of a conventional spruce top. Instead of a regular round central soundhole, Kaman engineers positioned 22 smaller holes on the upper shoulders surrounded by epaulets of multicolored woods in a kind of leaf design. The bridges and headstock featured elaborate scroll carving. The neck was reinforced with a patented Kaman bar, a u-shaped cast aluminum insert designed to keep the neck stable even with dramatic changes in temperature and climate. The necks and fingerboards were made of walnut. The fingerboards had hollow triangular maple inlays, tapered beginning at the 18th fret on the bass side to the 24th fret on the treble. Hardware was gold. Until the advent of Ovation’s Collector Series in 1982, the Adamas was Ovation’s flagship, favored by the likes of Larry Coryell and others.
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This is a fantastic tool for acoustic solos artists, worship leaders, session players or an acoustic rig that lacks a lot of control or a preamp source. Moreover, the Venue provides the additional functionality of tuning, feedback control, an effects loop and a built in DI box. Its price is usually on the higher end, though you can check used pricing which often dips significantly below retail. However, buying a preamp, tuner, noise gate and DI box separately would run you a lot more than what the Venue costs.
I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy

In most cases, the neck will sit tightly in the neck cavity hard up against the edge of the body. But if the scale length isn’t correct from this position you may need to make minor adjustments to the neck position. If the bridge holes aren’t yet drilled, it’s better to adjust the bridge position than the neck. The saddles will also allow you approx. 10mm adjustment.
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That's a bit if an exaggeration but you're allowed. I would venture to claim that the snobs are those who proselytize Fender and Gibson as being the best (especially Gibson). It's been demonstrated a million times over that they are not. Which does not mean they don't make guitars many people want and like. Especially Fender (I have a GREAT Highway One Strat) who have managed to reach a wider audience with the pricing structure of the Fender brand than Gibson has with the Gibson name. The reason we see so many of them in the hands of pros (and their sheepish followers) is that these companies can afford to buy "stage presence". I would put PRS in that group too; however PRS makes better production guitars than both the above. And I'm not being a snob since I can't afford a PRS.
If you play an acoustic guitar but don’t own an amp and prefer not to (perhaps because you almost always play into a PA system) then this preamp is ideal for your situation. Not only does it give you the added control over your tone but, it also eliminates the need for an acoustic amplifier entirely, similar to the Venue DI. It’s also much cheaper than an amp.
10. Behringer Ultracoustic ACX450 45-watt ($229.99): Not to leave our acoustic-centric players out of the list entirely, the Behringer Ultracoustic not only looks amazing, but it has a ton of features to keep you inspired and sounding great. Two channels are utilized so while you plug your acoustic into channel one, channel two allows you to input a microphone or another source. The FBQ Feedback Indicators allow you to control the feedback coming out of your amp by monitoring the LEDs on the graphic EQ. Need your own guitar effects? The ACX450 allows for 16 different presets on each channel, including delay and reverb. A great bargain for those looking to take their acoustic playing to the next level!
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Justin actually has two YouTube channels, one for his guitar lessons and one for teaching particular songs. While his channels are excellent, you’re better off to access them from his website at www.justinguitar.com where you’ll find full, comprehensive menus and links to each video along with explanations of the content. You’ll have no problems of watching a full video, only to discover it doesn’t include what you wanted.

Agreed too that almost any guitar will benefit from a good setup, but there's no getting around plywood and cheap pickups. If I pick up a guitar and the action is so bad you need vice grips to play it, it can't speak well for the manufacturer. Yes, you can make plywood sing I suppose, but I can make mahogany, adler, korina, maple or just about any other wood sing a heck of a lot easier than plywood.
Hi - I am looking for a new amp for small to medium venues. I quite fancied the Marshall Mini Silver Jubilee combo, but then noticed several companies selling JVM 50 watt combos in the same price range. It seems that the JVM's are a Swiss Army knife whereas the MSJ seems to be capturing a small version of a classic amp and is more of a one trick pony . Any way you could help me make the right decision. On the other hand , how reliable are the JVM's considering their sophistication?
Echo is a naturally occurring effect. Since the first days of recording, men have attempted to create an artificial method of duplicating this effect. The first attempt were echo chambers (or rooms) that created a “natural” echo. These rooms still exist at some recording studios. Tape echo effects came next, offering portability and variable rates of echo. These units were often noisy, but are still favored for their warm echo tone. Analog delays solved the problems inherent with tape (bad tubes, noisy tape, and misaligned or worn out tape heads) but had limitations in the length of their delay. Finally, digital delays appeared in the 1980s and offered more delay time and added features, but also came with a more sterile sounding tone. Many digital delays now simulate tape, analog, and digital delays
The best acoustic electric guitars solve the inconveniences of playing a traditional acoustic in a very preferable way. No longer do we need to play a guitar size and shape we don't enjoy in order to project more volume. We don't have to strum and pick harder. We don't need the nuisance of setting up and staying positioned behind a mic to be heard through the loud speakers. Today we look at how this is achieved and share our top recommendations for every budget...
Valve Amp or Solid State Amp? There's no right or wrong here, but, for tone alone, valve amps are way better. If you can afford a valve amp, just go ahead and buy one! They're the amps all the great bands ever used - from Beatles and Rolling Stones to Arctic Monkeys and Radiohead, 99% of all professional musicians simply prefer valve amps, like the Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod Deluxe III. But there's nothing wrong with solid state amps - the audience at a gig wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
Tony Visconti is also into using ambient mics: "I'm very much a fan of the room sound, too. I always record it if it's a real heavy rock guitar with power chords and crunches and all. I'll go around the room and clap my hands and I say, 'Put the mics there, that's it.' Quite often, I'll turn the room mic towards the studio window, and you'll get a reflection of the guitar sound — not directly facing it, because you're looking for reflections." Although he states in the same interview that he'll try to use a pair of U87s for ambience if possible, he's also mentioned elsewhere using PZM mics as an alternative.

Two-handed tapping was the hoariest of heavy-metal clichés until Marnie Stern reclaimed the concept on behalf of indie-prog bedroom shredders everywhere. No one would ever confuse Stern’s chops with Eddie Van Halen’s, but that’s kind of the point: If Stern’s shredding exudes the agreeably skewed internal logic of the self-taught, it also allows her to utilize the two-handed technique far more creatively than the pseudo-classical chest-puffing that usually comes with Dokken territory.


The term piezo refers to the use of piezoelectric crystals that transfer vibrations into an electric current. Piezo pickups are inexpensive to produce, and as such are the most commonly found pickup in acoustic-electric guitars. Piezo pickups generally have a bright tone and strong mid-range response, thankfully they are bundled with preamps that help make the sound more like an unplugged acoustic guitar. While there's nothing better than a true miked acoustic tone, sound quality of piezo preamp system's have steadily been improving, which is good for both guitar players and manufacturers.
Players who wish to self-appraise their own instruments have a number of options for finding a guitar blue book online. A number of websites that perform the same function as Kelley Blue Book for cars exist for guitars. You may just be interested in knowing how much your prized ax is worth, or you may be looking to buy. Either way, the internet can help you determine the fair-market value of nearly any guitar.
If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.
I own several guitars ranging from 700 dollars to 2000 dollars so I knew not to get my expectations up when purchasing a 100 dollar. I bought this as a gift for someone to learn on but when it arrived, I could not believe the quality of guitar this is. The tuning keys are high quality, the neck and fret board are high quality. It holds its tune as good as my Ovation and Ibanez acoustics as well as my 2000 dollar PRS guitar. Very easy to press the strings. Surely I thought this would be the difference maker from my more expensive guitars but it's actually easier to play. The pickup is a little more brighter sounding than on more expensive guitars but it's nothing you can't fix with your settings.
Let's discard the keyboard idea. And the human hand idea. Let's isolate the guitar player from the instrument. The player can manipulate only three parameters - the tone, velocity and duration of sounds to be generated. We have that in MIDI. (Okay, the guitar player can dance and wear a costume, but for our purposes, that's not part of the equation.)
Most of the time, a chord diagram will not show you the finger numbers. They will leave that up to you, because different people sometimes play chords differently. Some people cannot play an A chord like this, because their fingers are too big, and this fingering is very cramped for them. Instead, they play an A with a mini-barre, using the same finger for more frets. For example, I could bar my 1st finger across the 4th, and 3rd strings at the second fret, then place my 2nd finger on the 2nd string, second fret (see image on the left). This gives me more room between the frets, and also frees up my 3rd and fourth fingers to pick out melody and bass notes. It’s just a preference, you can play the chord how you prefer.
Also joining the Univox amp line in ’71 (illustrated in a ’72 flyer) was the Univox U-4100 Minimax Amplifier, already showing a different style, with dark tolex covering but still the oval logo plate on the upper left of the grille, now covered in black with vertical “dotted” lines (surrounded by a white vinyl strip). The Minimax was designed for use with bass, organ, electric piano or guitar, but really was a bass combo amp. It packed 105 watts through a 15″ Special Design speaker with 27-ounce Alnico magnet and 21/2″ voice coil, powered by 11 transistors, no tubes. The back-mounted chassis had two channels with high and low inputs, plus volume, bass and treble controls for each channel. Recommended especially for keyboards was an optional UHF-2 High Frequency Horns unit with two horns for extra bite. The flyer for this amp was still in the 1980 Unicord book, but a ’79 price list no longer mentions it, and it was probably long gone, though some may still have been in stock.

Another Quality Ibanez Guitar ....This example is MODEL VINTAGE # V302 BS...And it IS A REAL GEM and it has a Premium German Sitka SOLID Spruce Top, WoW! what a nice original finish this one has...AAA Mahogany Sides-Neck & Back "see quality og the grain in the pics" . Lots of Full-and Wonderful rich tone from this baby. Its real ez to play & stays in tune well. It is a crafted in Japan guitar and it compairs favorably to Gibson, Guild or Martin! Please Note: If you prefer the guitar in Natural and not sunburst see our other listing for another V302 non sunburst we have in stock & available.. thank you for your interest, Joe .
Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
The best place to start is with a small tube amp. This kind of amp is far less forgiving, leaving you nowhere to hide. It sounds counter-intuitive, I know. You’re looking for the best choice and here I am telling you one that will make things more difficult. But think of it as tough love – forcing you to confront your technique and learn the right way to play a chord or scale progression.

Seagull Maritime The Seagull Maritime acoustic guitars are made of all-solid tonewoods, making them a great option for those looking for the best acoustic guitar with a full sound. The top is made from pressure-tested solid spruce while the sides are made of solid mahogany wood for a well-balanced tone. The craftsmanship is superb and it has the sound quality to match.
Recently had an Epiphone acoustic...irritating twangy sound and always falling out of tune. The body of the guitar is so large it's uncomfortable, even holding down the strings felt as though I would be drawing blood any minute. I hated to practice because of the sound & pain, traded it for the warm sound of the fender. Not only am I playing better, but holding down the strings doesn't hurt nearly as much (a little expected) and I can't wait to hear it. Now I understand how the phrase "it's music to my ears" came about. I'm in love with my Fender.

Effects such as chorus, phasing, flanging and pitch vibrato are created using pitch modulation and, except in the case of vibrato, the modulated sound is added back to the original to create the effect. The pitch modulation is generated by delaying the signal by just a few milliseconds, and then modulating the delay time, using a low frequency oscillator (or LFO). For vibrato, this is all that needs to be done and, because the delay time is actually very short, the effect is perceived as happening in real time. The other effects, however, generally rely on an equal balance of the dry and modulated signals to achieve the strongest effect, so it is easier when working with plug-ins to adjust the wet/dry balance using the plug-in controls, rather than adding the wet only signal via a send/return loop. As a rule, these effects aren't very processor-intensive so, if you're working with plug-ins, you can probably afford to insert as many as you need into track or bus insert points as required. Stereo versions of these plug-ins may generate different modulated delays for the left and right channels to create a more dramatic spatial effect.
I’m assuming rock guitar players so i’d say Jimi Hendrix, (I don’t personally like him but just about everyone else does) a good album of his would be “Are You Experienced?” or “Electric Ladyland”. Eric Clapton’s good stuff would be his records with Cream, mainly “Wheels Of Fire”. Van Halen’s first album (Just titled” Van Halen”.) Then Led Zeppelin 1, Led Zeppelin 2, and Led Zeppelin 4. A good Rush album would be nice too, either “Moving Pictures” or “Permanent Waves”. You might not see this but you should make sure he doesn’t have any of these yet and that he’ll like them.
Jackson is USA based guitar company founded by Grover Jackson. The company is the manufacturer of electric guitars or electric bass guitars. These electric guitars have a pointed headstock and are a typical rock style guitar popular amongst rock and metal band members. This is the style of electric and acoustic guitar that has a sleek layout and style. Not only do they provide great style but also deliver a higher sound quality. The starting price of a Jackson electric guitar is 12,500 INR approximately.
Now, before you buy a brand new electric guitar, it is a good idea to pause and think about the purpose that you are buying it for. Do you just want to learn from it? Maybe you will want to upgrade it after a year or two when you become a more skilled guitarist? If this is the case, go with the most basic or affordable guitar. You don’t need anything fancy yet.
Return authorization must be approved. Returns accepted based on R and B approval of unique circumstances that have been reviewed and agreed between R and B and buyer. Buyer must contact R and B Vintage Guitars with-in 7 days. Buyer is responsible for shipping charges back to R and B. Return payments will be made after successful undamaged return of the item.
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