A tung oil-finished rock maple neck, and a slightly more curved fretboard radius of 13.75 inches are the other small modifications to the ‘speed’ features on the MD200. However, it has a thinner bolt-on neck as compared to the MD400’s wider mahogany set neck. That said, both neck profiles remain a shallow “C” shape, and the guitars’ dramatically beveled cutaways give you ample room to reach the high notes.
This is one of the most popular guitar brands bought by the beginner and advanced learners in India. This brand is also one of the top-rated electro-acoustic guitars for beginners. This is the Japanese brand of guitar that is available in acoustic, bass, electric, and classical guitars styles. It flourishes a full-size frigate shape with a laminated select dapper top, and mahogany back and sides. It sports a mahogany neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets, withal an Ibanez-branded headstock with pretty good closed chrome die-cast tuners. The price of this brand of guitar starts from 13,000 approximately.
The Axe-Fx II is also the world’s most powerful hardware multi-effects. To use it with an amp, just create presets with no AMP or CAB blocks. Some people run separate chains of effects —some before the amp and others in its loop. This is called the “four cable method.” Or better still: match the sound of your amp and send THAT to front of house while you use your amp on stage in all its glory.
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12W1W1x101x61x8amp for beginnersAmpsbest amp for beginnersbest electric guitar amp for beginnersbest guitar amp for beginnersBlackstar Ampsblackstar ht-1blackstar ht-1 comboblackstar ht-1 reviewblackstar ht-1 tube ampblackstar ht-1r ampsCrush PiXguitar amp for beginnersOrange Amplifiersorange crush pix cr12lorange crush pix series cr12lPeavey Ampspeavey solopeavey solo amppeavey solo guitar amppeavey solo reviewPractice AmpsSolid State Ampstube amp for beginnersTube Ampsvox ac4tvvox ac4tv 10vox ac4tv 4w 1x10vox ac4tv reviewVox Ampswhat is a good guitar amp for beginners
It’s a good idea to make a template for your wiring on any guitar where the controls aren’t mounted to a pickguard (like a Strat) or a control plate (like a Tele). To make the template, put a piece of non-corrugated cardboard over the guitar, use finger pressure to find where the control holes are, and very carefully poke through the cardboard with a punch or a nail to make a hole for your template. You can enlarge the holes with a pencil or a round file until they are big enough for the controls to be mounted snugly. It’s also a good idea to write what is supposed to go where on the template with a marker.
This is another really nice 12" 16 ohm guitar speaker from 1973, and is a matched pair with the one listed earlier, it has its original Pulsonic H1777 cone, and is in excellent condition, there it also has a tiny repair on the edge of the cone but this doesn't affect the sound in any way.Cash on collection preferred but carriage can be arrange if required.
A partial PA is harder to define, but it's essentially any PA system that doesn't have the capacity to mic your whole band. More often than not, in these situations, mics end up on the kick drum and snare drum for the reasons outlined above. In this case, it does help to have a little extra juice in your amplifier, but try to keep it tamed, nonetheless.
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On round hole martin guitars, the serial and model numbers are stamped on the neck block inside the instrument. The number can be seen by looking inside the sound hole. Look at an angle towards the neck. All f-hole Martin archtops have their serial and model numbers stamped on the inside center of the backstripe, roughly under the shadow of the bridge (and best seen from the bass side "f" hole).
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Acoustic guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major acoustic guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new acoustic guitar.
Martin opened its “Custom Shop” division in 1979.[7] Martin built its 500,000th guitar in 1990, and in 2004 they built their millionth guitar. This guitar is entirely hand-crafted and features more than 40 inlaid rubies and diamonds. It is worth an estimated $1,000,000.[8] As of 2007, Martin employs 600 people. Thirteen workers are devoted to quality assurance[citation needed]. In October, 2009, Martin purchased at auction a D-28 that was played by Elvis Presley in his last concert for $106,200.[9]
Simple answer is, if you have money for the higher end of Taylor, buy a Collings. I've been working as a repair tech in a store that stocks Taylor for around 5 years. Went to lutherie school under one of the best guitar builders in the country. I've played dozens of examples from nearly every model range Taylor has to offer, as well as a few of the more limited edition high $$$$ range. I will give credit where it is due, on the USA made models fit and finish is above many other brands.
by pedalhaven Black & white board from  @alexjacob_ ! Here’s the signal chain: Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner EarthQuaker Devices Palisades Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Hotone Nano Legacy BritWind (Effects Loop) Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Joyo D-SEED Digital Delay TC Electronic Arena Reverb Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 

Many pedalboards on the market are powered. They feed DC power directly from the board to your pedals, eliminating the need for battery changes or external power adapters. This simplifies your setup and minimizes your need for power outlets. Some pedalboards even have a small built-in combo amplifier, making them a great practice and jamming solution.
Like the Strat above, the Fender Telecaster shares the title of being one of the most legendary electric guitars ever produced, and owes a lot of its authentic vintage sound to its unique pickups – which are both fantastic and frustrating at times. A Tele will usually feature two single-coils: a smaller one at the neck and a larger, slanted pickup at the bridge. They both deliver a twangy sound, with the bridge offering great treble tone and the neck a little more balanced. The neck pickup’s main complaint is that it is often muffled in output – unless you find a good set such as the Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele Pickup Set, which keeps things crisp and clear.
FYI, Dave might be backed up due to demand if he is still working, so I'd call those places up and ask them in advance. Twin Town isn't too bad a drive if you've got a car, maybe 15 minutes from Bloomington, but the place up in Fridley is about a 20-25 minute drive. They might be the best at working on short notice though as they're a smaller place. Definitely give them all calls.
The two ’71 piggyback bass amps included the 1060 Bass Amplifier System ($530), featuring seven tubes, 105 watts, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle and treble controls on each channel, presence, variable impedance, and a cabinet with one Univox 15″ speaker with 22-ounce dual diameter Alnico magnet and 2″ voice coil, plus a fully loaded reflex cabinet with true folded horn principle (you ampheads may know what the heck that means!). The grille had two large square cutouts with rounded corners. The 1245 Bass Amplifier System ($385) offered five tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1060, and two 12″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets and 2″ voice coil.

Brand new in ’64 was Teisco’s first double-cutaway, the Model EP-9, a small-bodied thinline hollowbody archtop. The EP-9 had a pair of pickups, mainly the oval kind with center poles. This had the old center-humped three-and-three head (no open-book dip), and the rectangular edge inlays. Controls were placed on the lower treble bout on a triangular plastic plate, with one volume and one tone, and two on/off rocker switches.
Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
The version of the instrument that is best known today is the solid body electric guitar. Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker, did, however, offer a cast aluminum electric steel guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1931. This guitar is reported to have sounded quite modern. Audiovox built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as the mid-1930s.

With sharp double-cutaways and the recognizable Rickenbacker body shape made from maple, the semi-hollow Rickenbacker 330-12 12-string electric guitar has proven to be one of the brand's most popular models since the 1960s. The 330-12 has been used for its jangly sound, perfect for pop and various other genres, by the likes of Tom Petty, Johnny Marr, and Peter Buck, to name a few.


Fender guitars are the most popular and are considered as one of the best brands in the world. Fender guitar is manufactured by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation of Scottsdale, Arizona. They are specialized in making stringed instruments and are best in making the solid body electric bass guitars. Fender Musical Instruments Corporation was incorporated in the year 1946 and is a relatively new company, but with the quality of products they make and the success they achieved, Fender is easily the best guitar manufacturer in the world.
TAB uses a series of hyphens to represent the strings. Each string is identified on the far left by the name of the note produced when played open. The high-e (string 1) is at the top; low-E (string 6) is at the bottom. There is no restriction for how long a line of TAB can be, but for readability it should be kept short enough to prevent wrapping on a web-site or printed page.
I would have never finished my project without this, 20 feet sounds like alot, but it can go very fast. I used this to rewire up an Epiphone hollow body,and I needed the length to reach from toggle to jack. The gauge is a perfect feel and doesnt have me worried about accidentally breaking it from movement. Also the cloth is great as it takes much more heat than the standard rubber coverings.
Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.

The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.
Washburn is known for producing great value guitars, and they take their reputation seriously. While other guitar builders tend to compromise cosmetics, this company does not hold back on visual details even in the entry-level market. The WD7S shows the company's design philosophy in action, featuring elegant body binding and custom wood inlaid rosette that makes the guitar look far more expensive than its actual price.

James Valentine of Maroon 5 has a strong idea of what he wants in a guitar and so, along with the craftsmen at Music Man, has created his dream machine. Valentine's desire was for a guitar that blends innovation and a modern vibe, with a reassuringly classic appeal - a bit Gibson semi, a bit Fender Tele perhaps. So, with that in mind, an ash body - in this instance finished in what Valentine calls 'Trans Buttermilk' ('Trans Maroon' is, of course, available, too) - has been mated to a nutty-looking roasted maple neck. This is delightfully figured and comes with Music Man's proprietary wax and oil finish for a tactile but drag-free experience. Build and finish are, as always, dead on. Pickups and controls are interesting: while both pickups are standard humbucking size, the bridge unit is actually single coil, its pole pieces slanted like a Tele or Strat across the chrome cover. Controls are simple, but with a couple of neat twists in the form of push-push pots on both controls - an active boost of up to 20dB on the volume, and a coil-split for the neck humbucker on the tone. We like the 'hidden' nature of these sonic extras, because it adds genuine usability but keeps things uncluttered and intuitive. The Valentine looks familiar but just different enough, feels great sitting or standing, boasts a real player's neck, and its palette of tones - delivered in a fuss-free manner by a clever control and switching setup - is simply superb. Of the hundreds of models that have sought to blend humbucking and single coil tones, this has to be one of the best electric guitars.
This is one of the best guitars according to many guitarists and there are many reasons for that! It has a nice weight, not too heavy, not too light, and it’s comfortable to play. If you want to find a good guitar but don’t really know what to look for this is a safe choice, you will most likely love this guitar, especially if you like vintage-looking things! Go wireless on stage with this guitar, with one of these awesome wireless guitar systems.
At first this may seem trivial, but a little experimentation reveals that each effect reacts very differently depending on how the original signal has been altered by previous effects in the signal chain. Initially, this can seem rather frustrating; a pedal that sounds awesome on its own can turn your sound into a real mess when combined thoughtlessly with other effects. I’m going to go into the basics of signal flow and cover the fundamentals of setting up a great sounding pedal board. As you would expect, there isn’t any one “correct” way of doing things. You may find that changing the order gives you a completely unique sound, and that’s great. However, if you’re sorting it all out for the first time, this is a good way to start ordering your pedalboard.
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
"NEW-DEMO" means that we are an authorized dealer of the item and acquired it directly from the manufacturer. We consider the item to be new because it has not been sold to or owned by another customer. NEW-DEMO items, however, have been on display in an active retail music store for some length of time. As a result, these items may have been tried out by other customers. They may be dusty, have fingerprints, stick marks, pick swirl, etc. Please refer to the item's description for more detailed information. All NEW-DEMO items come with a manufacturer's warranty (where applicable), but some may not have original manufacturer's packaging. Please refer to our Appearance and Technical Condition scales below for more information about the item’s appearance and condition. 
No matter what style of music you are into, you won’t have to look far to find a like-minded guitar builder. The electric guitar can trace its roots back to the big-band days, and there are several companies that excel at creating excellent guitars for jazz. Likewise, there are those companies that have grabbed on to the heavy metal genre and make guitars built for extreme mayhem.
The noise out of my chain drives me nuts. I want it when I want it, not when all is shut off. I am running a Clapton Signature Strat with humless pickups into my Blues Deluxe. No effects and it is quiet as the dead of night. Plug in the effects (All Boss BTW) and it just starts humming. I have been playing with it and cant seem to isolate the culprit (s)… Frustrating.
Guitar amplifier design uses a different approach than sound reinforcement system power amplifiers and home "hi-fi" stereo systems. Audio amplifiers generally are intended to accurately reproduce the source signal without adding unwanted tonal coloration (i.e., they have a flat frequency response) or unwanted distortion. In contrast, most guitar amplifiers provide tonal coloration and overdrive or distortion of various types. A common tonal coloration sought by guitarists is rolling off some of the high frequencies.
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
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This body and headstock shape are identical to my Nivico Balladeer, and both guitars are real keepers.  This truss rod cover would become the standard curved plastic type seen on many Matsumoku-made guitars for the next 10 years.  Of course the Palmer badge is missing, but the Palmer name (as it pertains to Japanese imports) was being used as early as 1964.  I’ve seen Kawai S80s badged with the Palmer name.  If you do a search for vintage Palmer guitars, you’ll come up with all sorts of hits but you probably won’t see too many guitars like this one.  These were probably made for one or two years, and I’d bet the pickups were sourced from local Matsumoto.
Considering that the setup on a factory-fresh guitar might be good or bad (and few music stores bother to do setup on inexpensive guitars), we strongly recommend that you have a new guitar professionally set up, which will likely cost about $50. You can also learn to do it yourself; there are plenty of online tutorials, and even at age 15 I managed to figure out how to set up my first electric guitar with a little guidance from my guitar teacher. It’s a good idea for every electric guitarist to at least learn how to set action (string) height because you will want to adjust this to suit your style and skills as they evolve.
Packing almost the entire tonal essence of 80's arena rock n' roll into one bar-shaped unit, with a glassy and transparent, BBD-style chorus, a crushing hot rod Marshall-stack crunch distortion, a natural-sounding delay, and a spacious reverb. Turn on every module on the bar, with a little tweaking, you've got yourself THE EPIC lead tone, which is dynamic, responsive to your hands, with long sustain, and cuts through the mix like a knife through butter. A built-in cab simulator for getting a real guitar cabinet sound straight from the PA system; Max delay time: 500ms It is the ultimate tool for road touring gigs. Aluminum-alloy, metal casing, stable and strong; compact size. Grab it! Plug it! Tweak it! Rock it! LED indicator shows the working state; Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center negative,.
Before you begin, it’s important to understand that a book can’t teach you guitar. They’re great as references and serve as a fine starting point, but soon enough, you need to take what you’ve learned and try to integrate it into a performative craft alongside other musicians. If you find yourself getting stuck, take the exercise you’re on to a jam with like-minded musicians who can help you work practically with the material. At the very least, set a backing track and learn how to time those new skills. So much of playing is about feel, which is a magical combination of timing and groove that only exists in the moment.
If this were a list of the best electric guitar brands for metal it is very likely Jackson would be near the top. This is a company practically synonymous with metal, and for decades the most extreme players on the planet have looked to Jackson to get the job done. But Jackson also has a strong presence in the rock and hard rock genres, and if that’s your bag you’d be smart to give them a good look.
Just like in a conventional guitar, an electric guitar also has 6 strings with tuning knobs and frets. However, unlike the hollow body and cavity of an acoustic guitar, a solid body usually forms the lower part of an electric guitar. The long neck of the electric guitar consists of magnetic pickups, parts which produce the magnetic field and which are located just below the metal strings. The magnetic pickups are connected to the amplifier with an internal electrical circuit. The long neck of an electric guitar also consists of knobs for adjusting the elasticity of metal strings.
The list is leaving off some HUGE names. You absolutely cannot leave out Clapton and Van Halen. However, you apparent uninformed people saying that John Mayer shouldn't be on the list should wake up and get in your music. He is on track to waxing this whole list by the end of his career. Clapton is practically handing him the torch. But then again, I guess that Tiger Woods will never be as good as Jack to some.
I got the idea for this column while reviewing Universal Audio's Ox Amp Top Box for the May 2018 issue. Ox is an ingenious hybrid of speaker load box/power attenuator and cabinet/mic/room/effects modeler. You use your regular amp, but instead of miking it, you send a direct signal to the DAW or mixing board. You record the sound of your amp, while Ox simulates speakers, mics, and effects.

Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.
I bought mine used in 1989 in a mom and pop music store in the North GA mountains in Cumming GA and have loved it everysence I Know very little about it except that I would not trade it for a new one. The sustain in the body of the overtone note is fantastic and rare to find.I use d'Addario phosphorus bronze strings 11 - 52 and would not change anything about this guitar,fantastic!!! Thanks Victor
This beautiful wood is not a very common tonewood for the construction of a guitar body, but you may see it more commonly in neck construction. However, it has been done to build a guitar body, and it was done well on the famous Gibson J-200 that the Epiphone EJ-200SCE also imitated. It’s a very solid, hard, and dense wood that has amazing sound punch and bright tones.
Eddie's Guitars specializes in the finest electric guitars available today. We have spent many years seeking out the best builders, brands and models available from yesterday and today. From classics like Fender Custom Shop and Gibson Custom Shop to boutique builders like Collings, PRS, Tom Anderson, Grosh and John Suhr we have every avenue of the sonic world of guitar covered.
The Estimated Values shown on each web page are out-of-date in many cases. One person cannot possibly keep every page up-to-date, so that is why we created a Wiki system to allow anyone to help maintain the database. We invite anyone who sees a problem with any Estimated Value to report it to us by clicking the Report A Problem icon at the top of each page (it looks like this ).
By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.

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A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
What is the best acoustic guitar brand? That's subjective, and often based on a consumer's past experiences with a specific brand. This list includes a vast majority of the most recognizable good acoustic guitar brand names that are currently on the market. This list includes those acoustic guitar brands that consumers might wish to learn more about.

I have been using it since 3 years. It is not even costly. Its good looking and I think its even better than gibson. It even very easy to tune for it has a very good sound quality. More over it has a beautiful look like a guitar. Even a beginner should be advised to buy this guitar for it cost a minimum of 3000 rs. So as it is less costly and more quality it's the best for me. I even like lakewood but its cost is just my dream.
By far the most common way to sort out this tablature selection is by artist. Some best-selling highlights include the Hal Leonard Jimi Hendrix Complete Guitar Tab Library, Alfred Led Zeppelin Box Set I-V Guitar Tab Platinum Edition and Hal Leonard Eric Clapton Complete Clapton Guitar Tab Songbook. And those are just a few examples from a library packed with hundreds of books. No matter what sort of music you want to play, there's tablature ready to teach it to you.

The most musically satisfying types of distortion tend to be progressive, where the audio waveform becomes more 'squashed' as the level increases. Hard clipping, by contrast, tends to sound harsh. All these types of distortion introduce additional harmonics into the signal, but it is the level and proportion of the added harmonics that creates the character of the sound. Harmonically related distortion can be added at much higher levels than non-harmonically related distortion before the human hearing system recognises it as such, so there is no way to define a percentage of distortion below which audio is acceptable or above which it is unacceptable. The reason that digital distortion has its own character, which most people find less musically pleasant, is because it is not usually harmonically related to the input signal. For example, quantisation distortion, which results from sampling at too low a bit depth, sounds quite ugly, though many dance and industrial music producers have found a use for it, and some plug-ins deliberately introduce it.


As an example of pre-distortion EQ, Eddie Van Halen places a 6-band MXR EQ pedal before the Marshall amplifier head (pre-distortion EQ). Slash places a Boss GE-7, a 7-band EQ pedal, before his Marshall amp. This technique is similar to placing a Wah pedal before the amp's preamp distortion and leaving the Wah pedal positioned part-way down, sometimes mentioned as "fixed wah," (pre-distortion EQ), along with adjusting the amp's tone controls (post-distortion EQ).
It comes in arctic white, fiesta red, black and vintage sunburst, so there’s a healthy level of customization available. Finally, there are three classic Strat single coils, two volume knobs and a tone knob. Accompanying that is a five-way selector switch, so you can dial in your tone and fine tune it with the knobs. It all comes in a really nice package that will feel really good right out of the box. You really can’t go wrong with a classic like this. 
Does anyone have one of either of these that they can comment on? I dig the looks of the silverburst (though I also dig the cream/ivory colored ones), and kinda want to have an SG in my posession (thanks to Zappa!). I have read all the positive reviews of Agiles on here, but few mention the Valkyrie...I'm a little worried that it is in the lower end of their price range, so I'm wondering how the hardware/electronics/fit and finish are....I'm aware it's not going to be crazy high end, but I'd like it to be useable (even though I may swap out some parts). Any opinions? Also, what parts would you recommend swapping out? Would an Epiphone be a better deal in terms of fit and finish and stock parts?
Our Most Recommended electric guitar is Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC012 Electric Guitar. Yamaha has been a power player in the music industry for many decades. The Pacific Yamaha Series is one of the best series for the last decade for its high quality tone and amazing play experience. The Yamaha Pacifica Series was designed for the focus of one thing: Yamaha’s customers.
The steel guitar is unusual in that it is played horizontally across the player's lap. The steel guitar originates from Hawaii where local musicians, newly introduced to the European guitar, developed a style of playing involving alternative tunings and the use of a slide. The Hawaiian guitarists found that by laying the guitar flat across the lap they could better control the slide. In response to this new playing style some Hawaiian steel guitars were constructed with a small rectangular body which made them more suitable for laying across the lap.There are two types of steel guitar played with a steel, the solid metal bar from which the guitar takes its name, namely the lap steel guitar and the pedal steel guitar with its extra necks. The pedal steel guitar comes on its own stand with a mechanical approach similar to the harp. Pedals and knee-levers are used to alter the pitch of the strings whilst playing thereby extending the fluency of the glissandi technique.
The neck is also crafted from mahogany, topped by a 20-fret rosewood fingerboard with a standard scale length of 25.5" and a nut width of 1.75". In contrast to its vintage looks, the neck follows a slim "C" profile that is as easy on the hands as it is on the ears. Finally, this guitar is wrapped in a nice gloss cherry red finish that stands out easily on any stage. Check this one out if you're looking for a quality mahogany body acoustic guitar with an old school vibe.

This is the brand of guitars manufactured by a Japanese company and are available in India. The company creates incredible custom – shop instruments and high-quality original designs, liked by some of the best professionals on the planet. They produce electric guitars that provide high performance and are long-lasting in terms of duration and quality. E-10 is one of the most popular guitars of this brand. The starting price of ESP electric guitar is 16,000 INR approximately.
The Rolls-Royce of multi-effects pedals is the Line 6 POD HD500X. As far as the top 5 pedals in this guide, the HD500X is the most full-featured, most complex, and also the priciest. Despite carrying a higher price tag than the others, it comes very highly recommended and landed a solid second place on our list, and this is mostly due to two things:
While the number of effects may not be as many compared to recent releases, others don't have the same deep control and sound quality that the GT-100 provides. Speaking of control, instead of merely choosing your preferred amp, this processor lets you custom build your virtual amp and cabinet, an interesting feature that allows for even more freedom in crafting your own tones. Another feature that users are fond of is the ability to assign effects into its many footswitches, making the unit behave much like a regular pedalboard. Other notable features include polyphonic tuning and USB recording.
Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.
You can knock the price down of the S670 down with the S520, which is from the same series as the S670, but without the middle Quantum Alnico pickup (Alnico simply refers to the type of magnet material used - it’s fancy way to say “stock” pickups). Otherwise this guitar is tough to distinguish from most of the S670. You get the same Edge Zero tremolo system and locking tuners, along with a similarly thin body and neck design.
In 1883, a german immigrant named Frederic Gretsch started a small instrument manufacturing company in Brooklyn, New York. On a trip to visit home in 1895, he died unexpectedly, leaving the company in the hands of his 15-year-old son, Fred. The company flourished for generations, especially due to the popularity of their hollow body guitars with rockabilly, blues, and jazz musicians. In 1967, however, the brand began to falter after the Gretsch family sold to then music industry giant Baldwin. In 1985, Fred W. Gretsch bought the company back from Baldwin and began restoring it to its former glory – coinciding with the rise of one of their most prolific artists, Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats. Today, their guitars, like the USA Custom Shop White Falcon pictured above, are used by a wide array of musicians from all walks of life, including Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Tim Armstrong of Rancid, Band of Skulls, and Portugal. the Man.
Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.

Some people just need to play loud. It’s all they know and it’s all they want to know. If that’s the case, you might want to invest in some acoustic foam, and begin to soundproof your practice space. This will not only keep the sound level to a minimum for people in the other rooms, it will also represent the first step in transforming your space into a legitimate in-home studio.
Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.
The roots of effects pedal usage can be traced back to early into the history of the electric guitar, but two people immediately come to mind who really pushed its usage out there:  Roger Mayer and Jimi Hendrix.  We’ve come a long way since those early days and it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the insane amount of options out there.  From good old standbys to newer boutique options, it can be a chore to know what effects pedals could be right for you.
We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.
Sound images are very similar to visual images. If you're in a large auditorium, but standing on stage right next to an actor's face, you will see every nuance of his face, pimples, pores and all. You will not see his whole body though, and you won't see him in the context of the rest of the stage or the room. If you move back to the tenth row, you will lose some of the facial detail, but you will gain perspective. If you move to the rear of the auditorium you'll lose all the detail of the actor's face, but you see the whole enchilada in perspective.
As the market for iOS devices and apps has grown, so has the availability of affordable stompboxes and processors that can store downloaded effects. Being able to sample, purchase, and download effects through an iOS app or digital download gives you access to a whole new palette of sounds. Though relatively new, in years to come this may well become the way in which most players will assemble their effects libraries.
Phase Shifter pedals found their way into the guitar community in the 70’s with pedals like the MXR Phase 90, Mutron Phase Shifter, EH Small Stone, Foxx and others. The sweeping sound it produces is unmistakable and a legendary trademark of many guitarists sound. The MXR Phase 90 can be heard all over Van Halen 1 and II. Brian May used the Foxx phase on “Sheer Heart Attack,” The Eagles “Life In The Fast Lane”, and Led Zeppelin’s “The Rover” to name but a few.
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Sometimes, your guitar may need more than a standard set-up. The frets need to be in reasonable shape in order to progress with the set-up. Often you will see that the frets are not level - this is crucial to the playability of the instrument. I have a precision technique for achieveing a perfectly true fret dress which I've been developing for 3 years.
Two full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by bands such as A Day to Remember (on Mr Highway's Thinking About The End, Welcome To The Family, Violence (Enough is Enough), Life Lessons Learned the Hard Way and Sticks and Bricks), In Flames, Hostility, Issues, Static-X, Bring Me the Horizon (since Suicide Season), Hellyeah, Amaranthe, Breaking Benjamin (since Phobia), Parkway Drive, Otep, Spineshank, RED, Bury Your Dead, Eye Empire, Dirge Within, Remembering Never, and occasionally Chevelle, Darkest Hour, Evanescence, 9oz. of Nothing, and For the Fallen Dreams.
Eric Johnson: highly contoured two-piece select alder body finished in a “Thinskin Nitro” lacquer, one-piece quarter-sawn maple neck with a V-shaped profile, 12″ fingerboard radius and 21 polished frets, Fender/Gotoh staggered vintage-style machine heads eliminating the need for a string tree and three special-design custom-wound single-coil pickups with countersunk mounting screws. Other features include a parchment ’57-style pickguard, five-spring vintage tremolo, silver-painted block and ’57-style string recess with no paint between the base plate and the block. Colors include White Blonde, 2-Color Sunburst, Black and Candy Apple Red. Also available as a rosewood neck version with a bound round-laminated 12″-radius rosewood fretboard, a three-ply parchment pickguard, staggered vintage-style tuners, a custom tremolo block and four brand-new finish options (including Dakota Red), three of which (Lucerne Aqua Firemist, Tropical Turquoise and Medium Palomino Metallic) are exclusive to this model.

The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.
One thing to point out here. When you take the strings off a Les Paul, there is (usually) nothing holding the bridge or the tailpiece on, so be careful with this. That said, I do want to mention that while the strings were off this guitar, I took the opportunity to lower the tailpiece. I prefer the tailpiece to be lowered all the way to the body if possible. Many believe that this will give you better tone/sustain, although it's hard to prove such a thing scientifically. That said, there is very little reason for the tailpiece to be anywhere other than as low as possible anyway.
Every new 2008 Les Paul Standard will benefit from Gibson’s proven chambering technique, which leaves each guitar with perfect tone, balance, and weight. Prior to gluing the maple cap on top of the mahogany body, the expert craftsmen at Gibson USA carve out carefully mapped-out chambers in the body using a Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) router. The positioning of the routes was established after careful examination of the resonant characteristics of the Les Paul. Gibson approached this process with the awareness that every change to the formula would have repercussions on the instrument’s sound. So, in addition to relieving the stress on a player’s back and shoulder, these lighter Gibson guitars also enhance the tone palette in a manner unique only to these guitars. The results are comfortable, lightweight guitars that are acoustically louder, with increased sustain and resonance.
This is an amazing 6 stringed electric guitar from Ibanez that is right handed and comes in a beautiful white color. The body is made from basswood  and kneck of rosewood. It is perfect for anyone to be his/her first guitar regardless of the music. Prices range from around INR 12,124  depending on the prevalent market factors such as whether there are offers or discounts available. You can find more details regarding this model by clicking on the link below:
Whether you’re looking for the best acoustic electric guitar for beginners or a more advanced model, there are so many options that it might be tough to make the right call. If you want to learn more about some of the most popular guitars but don’t have the time to do your own research, then you can count on us to help you out. We’ve scoured the market and compared countless acoustic-electric guitars so we can recommend the best. Our top choice is the Epiphone Hummingbird Pro.
The three notes of a major triad have been introduced as an ordered triplet, namely (root, third, fifth), where the major third is four semitones above the root and where the perfect fifth is seven semitones above the root. This type of triad is in closed position. Triads are quite commonly played in open position: For example, the C-major triad is often played with the third (E) and fifth (G) an octave higher, respectively sixteen and nineteen semitones above the root. Another variation of the major triad changes the order of the notes: For example, the C-major triad is often played as (C,G,E), where (C,G) is a perfect fifth and E is raised an octave above the perfect third (C,E). Alternative orderings of the notes in a triad are discussed below (in the discussions of chord inversions and drop-2 chords).
The most common way that bass players connect their instrument to their bass amp is by using a 1/4" patch cord, a standard signal cable used in music and audio applications. Some bassists plug their bass into a small wireless transmitter about the size of a pack of cards, which can be clipped to the strap or to their belt. The transmitter transmits the bass signal to a receiver that is plugged into the amp. Bassists playing in large venues with complex stage set-ups, or a stage design where there is a large distance between performers, or players who like to dance or go out into the audience during the performance, may use wireless transmitters to avoid the risk of having their cable become disconnected while they move about on stage and give themselves more freedom. Another reason that some bassists use wireless transmitters is if their stage setup requires a long cable run between their bass and their amp. Long cable runs can weaken the strength of the signal and can adversely affect tone and sound quality.

This is a real nice D-18 it Booms quite nicely with Vintage Tone of that of a much more expensive Big Named guitar for a fraction of what you would pay..its Japanese crafted 29 years ago by the master craftsman in one of the finest Japanese builders factory.. the great Ibanez...the Label inside says... THE MARK OF QUALITY CIMAR Quality Produced under Strict Quality Control by IBANEZ "Made in Japan" Serial # 82110013k ... 1st 2 digits 82 that's the year...now not all Japanese Ibanez old guitars are so great not at all ..many were very low end guitars we saw in the 60's & 70's as a kid myself most were junk or we called them toys.. now that's not true for all of them though I can honestly say that... This is not a cheap guitar nor is it built cheaply ..this example was one of the good impressive one's they used beautiful grade woods on... This particular example it has a Strikingly beautiful straight grained Sitka Spruce Top ... it has ambered nicely now naturally with it's great patina created over the last 29 years . ya don't get that with a new Ibanez or even dare I say Martin with those white looking spruce top "yuck on thanks"... sorry back to this one ... The back sides & neck are all gorgeously grained AA higher grade Mahogany the fingerboard is dark Indian Rosewood with an ebony bridge..even the Original string Pins are aged beautifully amber tipped... I'm lookin pretty hard everywhere and I can not find a crack - separation or a defect to be found anywhere only the most minute microscopic its that clean.... JVG Condition RATED: @ better than average in Excellent used vintage condition wow!..This neck is arrow straight with a perfect medium slim taper neck feels great and action is EZ to play just about perfect...1-11/16ths at the nut very comfortable feel, frets are considered excellent vintage at lest 92%... Comes with a free Chip board case or an optional upgrade to a Hard shell case / ask... Just in.. no pics yet coming very soon stay tuned! Thanks for your interest.
Steve is the best! He does great work and loves talking about all kinds of guitars. I brought my Squier Affinity Stratocaster to him for a setup and a pickup replacement job, and I learned more about Stratocasters from him than I ever would have expected. I will definitely be a repeat customer! From what I've seen, he treats all of his customers' guitars, from my Squier to an Eric Clapton signature Strat, with the same level of respect and quality of work.
We think the reason this book is so good is because of its readability. That is, it starts very slowly in theory, and Tom does an excellent job of explaining the constructs of music theory in simple and understandable terms. From there, the concepts are set up in such a way that is easy to follow and very thorough. Mr. Kolb did a great job of laying out the sequence of the topics to make them understandable to someone picking up a guide to music theory for the first time.
A noise gate allows a signal to pass through only when the signal's intensity is above a set threshold, which opens the gate. If the signal falls below the threshold, the gate closes, and no signal is allowed to pass. A noise gate can be used to control noise. When the level of the 'signal' is above the level of the 'noise', the threshold is set above the level of the 'noise' so that the gate is closed when there is no 'signal'. A noise gate does not remove noise from the signal: when the gate is open, both the signal and the noise will pass through.
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
For visual clarity, I’ve indicated ground connections with a down-facing triangle. As you probably know, all ground wires must be electronically connected to each other. (One convenient method is to solder all pickup ground wires, the output jack ground, the pickup selector ground, and the bridge’s ground wire to the back of the volume pot, and then run a jumper wire to ground the treble control. In conventional wiring, all pots must be grounded, but here, it’s not necessary to ground the bass pot.)
I suspect this has been done by someone but I can't find any such tests in my quick internet search. Seems to me this is the only way to really settle the debate; the differences may be too small to hear, but regardless if there is differences then the tone is being affected by the instrument. In that case the wood and body design is making the string vibrate differently, which is what the pickup...picks up.
In this guitar lesson you’re going to learn 7 of the most basic guitar chords for beginners. These beginning guitar chords are the first ones every guitar player should learn. They are sometimes referred to as open position chords, because they are played in the first few frets of the guitar and all contain at least one open string. If you are looking for easy guitar chords for beginners, these are the ones to start with.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.
The Marshall CODE412 - 4x12 Speaker Cabinet is a powerful monster designed as a companion to your CODE 100 head. A classic angled cabinet that is packed with four 12” speakers, each with a 30-watt output. This extremely affordable 4x12 amplifier cab is perfect for those in need of a high-quality option for their set up, whether you have a CODE or not. A single input makes it easy to plug and play and the 24kg weight ensures you won’t break your back carrying it to practice. It’s also Marshall’s most affordable friendly speaker cabinet, making it a great choice for those on a budget.
The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.

For someone who’s been playing for a while, your options are a little different. Perhaps they’ve got a certain guitar in mind. If so, get them what they want! Chances are they’ve already done their homework and have their eye on their next guitar. If they’re not sure, you can still make an educated purchase. There are many popular options that should satisfy most experienced players. And there are many lesser-known models that can be the right fit for someone with more specific tastes.
With 24 amp models including a digital chromatic tuner, 9 stomps boxes, 4 amps, 5 cabs, 3 mics, and 2 rack effects; AmpliTube Custom Shop is a great way to get your hands on IK Multimedia's great guitar simulation software. As the name suggests, in addition to the free units you can purchase more effects units from right inside the plugin to build your own custom guitar shop.
There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.
Semi-acoustic guitars have hollow bodies which give them a warmer and more dynamic range of sounds. They are vulnerable to unwanted feedback as the distorted sound increases the chances of feedback. That’s why we don’t see rock and metal musicians playing a semi-acoustic guitar. Many guitars have solid blocks inside for decreasing the feedback factor. Check out our list of semi-acoustic electric guitars here.
Many users describe it by phrases like "great value for the money", "great beginner guitar", and "great quality for the price". And while most of the raves are from beginners, there were experienced guitarists who shared their positive sentiments, specifically pointing to its build quality and playability. And while many cheap guitars are plagued with mass production setup inconsistencies, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II gets a lot of kudos from users who found that it plays nicely right out of the box.
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I was at a friends house and he had a couple of his guitar playing buddies over. We got to talking about guitar repair and setups and such. Then one the guys said “the guy I use is the be...st ever...”, and I was all like, “yeah I’m sure the guy you use is great, but the guy I know is better”. This went on, back and forth for a few minutes, when he blurted out, “I use the Cigainero brothers...”. I said “cool, me too” See More
Every working guitarists knows that if he doesn't have a good guitar doctor, his dreams of being a master shredder who destroys the crowd with rakes from his pick as he slides it up the string are dead. From a broken headstock to a cracked neck, a guitar technician is a master of skills. He's an electrician, a plumber, a physician and a surgeon. But if a guitarist wants to shoot fireballs out of his guitar, he'll need more than just a technician; he'll need a guitar master.
Pickguards were white pearloid, or sometimes tortoiseshell, the neck used a string tree, and the all-around makeup of the guitar was bigger than later iterations — thicker necks, bigger and heavier bodies, larger fret markers. One obvious differentiator is the logo on the headstock; the earlier models, and even a few released as they moved into Phase Two, had a raised plastic “Univox” logo on the headstock.
Play your guitar a while like this, and notice how much more ring, richness, and sustain you get out of it. The strings should now vibrate for close to the full potential of the instrument (which, of course, also depends upon factors such as nut and bridge type and condition, body style, neck and body woods, and so forth). Put simply, your tone is likely to sound bigger and fuller, and to bloom with a broader voice and a longer note decay than previously. If this as-high-as-you-can-hack-it setting is a little too much for every-day playing, try backing the strings down a hair at a time, and hopefully you can find a height that offers a healthy compromise. Sure, it’s also possible you preferred it the way it was before you adjusted it at all, and if your playing style involves a lot of speed riffing, hammer-ons and pull-offs, or extreme bending, you might simply require that as-low-as-it-goes actions (and will very likely mask its drawbacks with some judicious high-gain tone). With any luck, though, you’ll have discovered an easy means of achieving a fatter tone, without purchasing or modifying a single thing.
The acoustic guitar lends itself to a variety of tasks and roles. Its portability and ease of use make it the ideal songwriter's tool. Its gentle harp-like arpeggios and rhythmic chordal strumming has always found favor in an ensemble. The acoustic guitar has a personal and intimate quality that is suited to small halls, churches and private spaces. For larger venues some form of amplification is required. An acoustic guitar can be amplified by placing a microphone in front of the sound hole or by installing a pickup. There are many entry-level acoustic guitar models that are manufactured to a high standard and these are entirely suitable as a first guitar for a beginner.
Essentially the 28s looked very similar to the E/EM/EB-18s. They had the same offset double cutaway body outline and the modified Viennese three-and-three headstock. Instead of maple laminate bodies with glued-in necks, the 28s had mahogany bodies and necks in a neck-through-body design. The basically slab bodies of the E-18 had gained a carved top, with a deep contour in the upper waist. The brass nut had become a Micarta nut. Fingerboards were now ebony. Finishes were sunburst.

Besides the recognizable brand, there’s the sound quality, that earned it good appreciation even from experienced guitarists who are used to more expensive units. It has a standard 12” speaker that allows it to render treble and bass equally well, for a good range of sound which should make it suitable for country, blues, and jazz, as well as softer rock.
When you’re just starting out you generally play in less than ideal conditions and your soundman, if one is present at all, isn’t going to be as well versed in his/her craft as someone who works in larger venues. Because the guitar is resistant to feedback and gives you the option to sculpt your tone without having to rely on a console, it will prove to be a valuable asset.
Lastly, we have guitars which combine the two systems and have both the piezoelectric pickup as well as a microphone in the sound box. Both of these sources are fed into a preamp, which often allows you to choose the source of the sound. Not only that, but you can also blend the two together to average out the benefits of both types while minimizing the negatives.
Guitar chords are usually represented by the name of the root note, and the scale it is based on, such as A Major, written as simply A. An A chord built on a minor scale is called A Minor, and written as Am. An A chord built with a 7th is called A7, and so on... Diagrams are used to show how the chord is actually to be played on the guitar, with finger positions mapped out. For a complete overview about chord structure, check this guitar chords formula chart.

Here we have a Faithful Recreation of the classic Martin D-18 that was well crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This is an excellent vintage Japanese guitar as it has been well taken care of all these years And has spent its years in California in the perfect climate to preserve the guitars original structural and cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still JVG rated at very good to excellent with no cracks or finish checking none – clean and still shines like glass….. its 1-11/16ths at the nut neck is a nice comfortable medium slim profile, neck is straight with correct amount of slight relief, action is good medium low and plays with ease and sound is clear and volume is good, tone is vintage sweet from its Aged tone woods. This is a true Lawsuit model as it has the direct image shape & size of the vintage Martin it copies is is a very cool D-18 guitar, its 33 years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. .
Starting from the body, we see the standard Les Paul shape. The tonewood of choice is mahogany, as expected, but this time it comes with a maple top. The top of the guitar arches slightly just like the original Les Paul does. In terms of details, we see a white binding around the top section that really stands out on the dark matte finish.  It's something to behold.
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Read Full Review Here is another superstrat design electric guitar on the list that is well recommended for a budding guitarist. While for veteran player’s out there who is on a hunt of buying an all around electric guitar on a minimum prescribe budget. The ESP LTD M-10 could be that affordable gem of a guitar you’ve been looking for and always wanted.

GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is based on the powerful GUITAR RIG 5 PRO, providing you a straightforward and easy user interface with professional components. The advanced tag-based preset browser makes it easy to find and organize your effect settings. Drag and drop components to the rack to create custom effect chains, and adjust all settings to your needs in no time.
Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.
"The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World."
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a pickup and amplifier set for musicians to use with existing guitars.
Martin opened its “Custom Shop” division in 1979.[7] Martin built its 500,000th guitar in 1990, and in 2004 they built their millionth guitar. This guitar is entirely hand-crafted and features more than 40 inlaid rubies and diamonds. It is worth an estimated $1,000,000.[8] As of 2007, Martin employs 600 people. Thirteen workers are devoted to quality assurance[citation needed]. In October, 2009, Martin purchased at auction a D-28 that was played by Elvis Presley in his last concert for $106,200.[9]
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The Zoom G3X features a built-in wah-wah expression pedal that controls the sound parameters in real time. It has over 100 effects and 22-amp models that bring out the amazing sounds of your guitar. This distortion pedal also features a stompbox with over 100 stage-ready effects. For computer recording, this pedal has a USB audio interface for Mac and PC. In addition, it has a balanced line-level output, an onboard chromatic tuner, and an integrated drum machine. Its 40-second looper gives it overdubbing capabilities.
The majority of favoured mic pairs seem to include the trusty SM57, but its most popular partner appears to be the larger-diaphragm MD421 — users include Bob Rock, Bruce Fairbairn, Alan Winstanley, Joe Barresi, Simon Dawson, Stephen Street and The Matrix. Also high on the list is the pairing of the SM57 with a large-diaphragm condenser of some type, and Steve Churchyard, Toni Visconti, Jim Scott, Stephen Street, and John Leckie all name-check the U87 in this role.
Which tonewood works the best for you will depend on your personal preference as well as the genre of music you're playing. Electric guitar bodies come in a whole range of styles. You have classics such as the Stratocaster and the Les Paul shape, but there's much more out there to explore. Granted, a vast majority of these were heavily inspired by the aforementioned models and you probably don't want to go too far off into the realm of the strange.
Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
When Leo and the boys at the big “F” ranch developed the Tele, they put a big slab of steel under the bridge-pickup coil. This reflected the magnetic field up and toward the strings. In the words of Seymour Duncan’s Evan Skopp, this gives it more “crack”—which, if you’re addicted to twang, is a good thing. The better news is that you can attach a plate (sometimes called an elevator plate, because of how it elevates the magnetic field toward the strings) to any single coil whose pole-piece magnets are exposed at the back.
Carrying on the tradition of his hero, Derek Trucks has taken Duane Allman’s sound and technique and forged ahead with one of the most soulful slide sounds ever to be heard.  His uncle, Butch Trucks, was the drummer for the ABB, and Trucks began to play with the band at a very young age before becoming a full time member and keeping Duane Allman’s heritage alive for a new generation of listeners.
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]
A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!

Hi Learmonth! I always recommend Yamaha acoustics for beginners. The FG and FS Series both offer affordable, quality instruments. The question is what size you need to get. Some smaller kids do better on small-bodied guitars like the Yamaha JR2. Of course he would outgrow this by the time he is a teenager, though it would still be a cool guitar to have around. If you feel he can handle a full-size guitar look at something like the FG700S. It's a great starter guitar that will last him a long time, as long as he takes care of it. Good luck and let me know if you have any more questions.

Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.
The guitar itself is decent, both my 8-year boy and his guitar teacher like it. But the mini amplifier is a BIG JOKE, seriously - it only uses a 9V battery and so small in size and so low in volume, you can barely hear it. There is a 9V DC power plug port. However, when I plugged in a 9V DC power plug (it is not included, but I found one in my toolbox), it only gave me white noise without any sound (the 9V battery can still give out a little bit volume). Initially, I thought the guitar was broken until I tested it on my home theater, then I realized it was the problem of the useless mini amplifier. I ended up buying a Fender amplifier for my son so that he can play some loud music.
By 1968 (and probably with the union of Unicord), Merson and Gulf + Western, Univox amps had begun to employ a Japanese-made chassis in Westbury-made cabinets, still with the high-quality Jensen speakers. These combined tube output with transistorized components. They were covered with a black Rhinohide vinyl and sported a silver plastic logo with stylized block letters – initial cap with a little tail off the left followed by lower case letters – typical of the earliest imported Univox guitars, on the black grillcloth.
The body is clearly a tweaked vintage shape, meant to evoke — and depart from — a more-typical Strat-type. It’s an exceptionally comfortable guitar and the H-S-S pickup layout allows for wide-ranging tones. They’re definitely on the airy side, as can be expected at this price, but the guitar itself is good enough to withstand future upgrades, if you should desire them.
Another name that is usually associated with PRS is Carlos Santana. He has a number of guitars that bear his name, and this one is probably the most popular one. It’s affordable, sounds great and plays like a dream. After mere hours playing it, I’ve realized just how expressive you can be with it. It impressed me enough to take a high place on my list of guitars that I have to get. Needless to say, it didn’t take me long to make one a part of my collection.
This list kind of blows. There are no greatest guitarists. And I hate how people think guitar is sickly limited to rock guys who in the whole scheme of things are pretty amateur. How about Eric clapton? Heck if Charlie Christian or django rhinehardt had never started playing solos guitar would still be a strict rhythm instrument playing crotchets to emphasise the beat. He had 2 fingers and did more for the guitar than anyone on this list? Especially Tom Morello? How about pat methany, wes Montgomery, pat martino, tal farlow, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, george benson? Listen to any of those guys and it will completely redefine your thoughts on the guitar. It can so easily be intelligent and soulful simultaneously…
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Edge III - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Devil's Shadow
Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.
The amps have a simple control set on the front panel: all versions have Gain, Tone and Volume controls except for MV50 Clean, which has Treble, Bass, and Volume. Also on the front panel is a small "VU" meter, and a 1/4" input jack. On the rear panel are a 1/4" speaker output jack, and a 1/4" headphones/line out jack. The amp includes cabinet simulation at the line out jack, and can thus be used as a DI to go straight into a mixer or recorder. There is also an EQ switch to select between "Deep" and "Flat." The Deep setting is intended for use with smaller cabinets where mids and highs tend to overwhelm the low frequencies, and Flat is designed to allow the amp to work with larger cabinets where the lower frequencies are more naturally present. Also present on the rear panel is the DC19V in jack, and the ECO on-off, standby-on, and Impedance switches with the following two exceptions: MV50 Clean has no Impedance Switch but instead has an Attenuator switch allowing the choice of either full power out, 1/10th power out, or 1/100th power out, and MV50 High Gain, which has no Impedance Switch but instead has a Mid Ctrl "minus/Norm/plus" switch allowing boost or cut of the amp's mid range.
Clapton is good… not gonna argue that he is an amazing guitarist… but no where near the best guitarist of all time…. Satriani can play ANY clapton riff, solo, song, chord progression, whatever.. Clapton can’t come close to playing any of Joe’s stuff. And most of Claptons best songs are JJ Cale tunes. Cocaine, Layla, After Midnight, etc,…. etc…. Oh and Clapton put out a whole album dedicated to Robert Johnson and admitted that most of the songs are redone and reworked because “the man” Clapton couldn’t play em anywhere near as well as Mr. Johnson.

What about Trey Anatasio? I cannot stand the hippie commune nonsense that follows Phish but that guy is amazing. That man can play anything; literally anything. He has been playing stuff like Peaches En Regalia to perfection live for literally decades. Go out to Grooveshark and find this song and list to it. He is playing sax and xylophone solos to perfection on the guitar. And that is just one example. There are literally hundreds of examples that you can find if you willing to look. Listen to the solo on Chalk Dust Torture off of A Live One. There is no better example of building tension in a solo then that right there.
One of these was the 14-fret neck, which allowed easier access to higher notes. Martin intended it to appeal to plectrum banjo players interested in switching to guitar for increased work opportunities[citation needed]. Martin altered the shape of its 0-size guitar body to allow a 14-frets-clear tenor neck. This was in response to specific requests from tenor players including Al Esposito, the manager of the Carl Fischer store in New York City. The “Carl Fischer Model” tenors were soon renamed 0-18T[citation needed]. This was the first time Martin altered one of their original body shapes to accommodate a longer neck with more frets clear of the body. A 1955 version of the 0-15 is the favorite guitar of artist Leroy Powell. He tells American Songwriter “It’s my main axe that I play with around the house…I even took it out when I toured with Kid Rock … it’s held up pretty good for how old it is.”[4]
At the end of the day your personal preferences will prevail. The brands listed above are going to include just about every style of guitar you can wish for. This goes both for aesthetics and tone. I can safely say that sticking to my personal picks won’t leave you disappointed. Hopefully you have found this guide helpful. Do you like my choices? If so, leave a comment bellow and give me your two cents.
Its the type of clipping you would expect to hear from a tube amp that been naturally gained up by cranking the volume levels really high.  Some players refer to this sound as Crunch.  These Overdrive pedals, such as the famous Ibanez Tube Screamer, can also be doubled up to give two gain stages:  Slight Crunch and Creamy Velvet Lead.  They sound as good as they might taste, if they were flavors of cereal or ice cream.  Many players found their tone by using two overdrive pedals back to back.

Scott Baxendale has been building custom hand made guitars since 1974. Recently he settled in Athens Georgia where he is currently building custom guitars, restoring vintage guitars and teaching the art of lutherie to aspiring craftsman. Scott Baxendale’s legacy of building custom instruments began in 1974, when he arrived in Winfield, Kansas to work for […]
Music enthusiasts can find a wide range of new and used guitar amplifiers on eBay, often for deep discounts.  Buyers who want to explore a wide range of possibilities should simply enter the keywords "guitar amplifier" into the eBay search bar, while those with more particular needs can refine their search by adding keywords associated with the make and model of the amplifier, as well as its color or condition.  The "ask the seller a question" feature will enable the buyer to ask additional questions pertaining to style, sound, and condition (if the guitar amplifier is used).

While the modifications described above have all been passive (i.e. they don't require an external power source), active electronics considerably increase the number of possible wiring options. These can range from simple preamps that offer a volume boost and buffer the instrument's signal (to prevent loss of higher frequencies in longer cable runs), to multi-band equalisers and more.[30][31] Enterprising guitarists have even built entire effects processors into guitars, such as the Korg Kaoss Pad.[32]
1953 "magic" spruce? Luthier Dana Bourgeois did an interview with C. F. Martin III in 1984. The interview was in preparation for an article by Eric Schoenberg and Bob Green on the history of the OM model and was published in the March 1985 issue of Guitar Player. Bourgeois was asked to sit in on the interview, and in the last two paragraphs of his recollections especially interesting: "One footnote that I do remember distinctly is that Mr. Martin said that in '52 or '53 the Martin Co. bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce in the form of government surplus of building material. Though he preferred Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-40s because all of the large stands had been decimated. Mr. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Red Adirondack Spruce than Sitka was. He could not, however, find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka." This nugget of information caught my attention because for many years I Of course, aside from the color of the tops, the anecdote does not in itself prove anything. But it at least suggests how the story might have gotten started.
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There are two main types of electric guitar bridges. There is the "Tune-O-Matic"/"Roller" type, which is found on Gibson, Gretsch and Epiphone guitars. This is usually a removable long oval part sitting on adjustable posts. These posts determine the height of the strings. Another is the "Vibrato"/"Hardtail" type, which is common to Fender and Paul Reed Smith guitars. In this case, bridge and tailpiece are one; there is usually a large, rectangular plate bolted directly onto the guitar with a raised heel which holds the strings and individual string saddles acting as the bridge. These saddles determine the height of the string and can be adjusted individually to create either a flat or arched effect, depending on the type of neck your electric guitar has. According to Chicago Luthiers, "Some just have adjusters that raise and lower the whole bridge, but not the individual strings, and some have both. This applies to guitars with tremolo bars as well as those without."
Theoretically, there is an unlimited number of possible chords. In actual play, you can get along just fine for quite a while with only around 30 chords in your repertoire, and maybe even less depending on what type of music you want to play. There are bluegrass guitar players that have gone through entire careers never playing more than a dozen or so chords.

Unfortunately, a few years prior, we were playing in a festival where there were many bands. THAT soundman flat out refused to use a direct signal and insisted on mic’ing my cabinet. I had spend MONTHS designing and programming my TWO preamps, one for the stage and the other for the board… certain effects were sent to one and not the other… My whole sound was based on two pre-amps running at the same time. This is about as close as I’ve come to physically punching anyone. I told him to plug in to the XLR output right “there.” He wouldn’t… made excuses as to not knowing which channel on the snake ithe other end was plugged into. (That made no sense at all… wouldn’t he know which channel the MIC was in? All he had to do is remove the mic, plug that end of the cable into the output of my unit.) Weeks later, people in the audience commented to me that they remembered that I played and sang the gig “fuming” over something. Half of my sound wasn’t there AT ALL.


You'd mentioned that the bridge pickup is substantially louder on Telecasters than the neck. I have an American Standard so the relationship between the two might not be identical but I was able to make the volume levels comparable by raising my neck pickup substantially so that only about a half inch of space remained between the string and the pickup. They're now about equal volume and if anything the front pickup sounds better and more defined as a result.
GuitarFella reviewed the Bullet Strat, and despite a few minor complaints concluded, “It was supposed to be the ultimate beginner guitar. Seeing what kind of impact it has now, it’s fair to say that Squier succeeded.” AudioRumble said it “pretty much sets the standard for all other budget guitars.” The last time we checked, its Amazon average rating was only 4.0 out of 5 stars in 14 reviews, but the only specific complaints were about apparent damage in shipping.
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A thermally engineered centre block and bracing make this 335 acoustically louder, open and with more clarity. The 'burst top and back also look more modern than vintage, while the translucent dark brown/ almost-black sides and neck-back finish add contrast that creates a classy appearance, along with the nickel hardware. We also get a lightweight aluminium stop tailpiece with locking studs, but this is all-very-classic ES-335 fare, such as the small block inlays and the small fleur head logo. Again, Gibson's build specs tell us we have MHS 'buckers and here the 'Memphis Tone Circuit' includes matched pots with a tight five per cent tolerance, with the same 'orange drop' tone caps as the ES-275.  Plugged in, it's like all our Christmases have come at once. There's a more solidbody response here, as you'd expect, and it really pushes out the sound. It's expensive, but as an investment, this is one of the best electric guitars on the market.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Ash - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Natural Blue
Buying an electric guitar will also require less force to play, but obviously the sound and styles you will be playing will be very different. I am a guitar teacher and I often recommend people start on an electric guitar,because it doesnt require as much hand strength. As for type of electric guitar, anything with a low action (strings close to the neck) will work well, try some out and you will feel the difference. But getting overly technical with guitar specifications is unnecessary, its like shopping for a mountain bike by comparing the tires...silly, eh.

THE NECK POCKET The next step is to rout the neck pocket and body cavities. For the neck pocket I like to use a 1/4" bit and leave the scrap wood edge around the body to give the router the extra support it needs when routing the neck area. To find out how deep you will have to rout the pocket measure the total thickness of the heal of the neck. Then measure the hieght of the bridge from the bottom to the top of the groove the string will sit in on the saddle and add about 1/8" to it. That allows for the string clearence over the frets. The subtract that from the overall thickness that you came up with when you measured the heal of the neck. That will give you a pretty accurate depth that you will need to carve the pocket down to. Be very careful when you rout the neck pocket! You don't want to make it too big otherwise you end up with gaps between the neck and the body and you don't want to go too deep because it can be impossible to fix. Rout a little bit at a time, and set the neck in each time to make sure you get the proper fit. It shouldn't fit to tight and the pocket should be slightly lager than the heal of the neck because you will have paint accumulation in it which will shrink it a little.


If you can afford to start on an amp in the sub-$200 segment, you will see an instant upgrade in the amount of power as well as additional features. In this category you are looking at very good practice rigs, although as power is still pretty low they may not be suitable for more than small casual performances. This is the first category where you will find both amp heads and tube amps, although the choice of these is very, very limited. One of the best amps you can grab for under $200 is the Marshall Code 25W. This combo provides a solid tone, 25 watts of power and plenty of amp voices and effects to play around with.
Good questions. Firstly, swapping the saddle around has the effect of moving the tapered top edge of the saddle closer to, or farther from (depending on which way it was to start with) the front of the bridge. If you're wanting the string to be as long as possible, for example, you'd need to make sure the saddle is oriented in such a way that the tapered edge is at the tail end (farther from the pickups). If you look at my pictures above, you'll see that my D-string saddle is originally oriented in this way, but in my case I need to SHORTEN the string, so I rotate it and this gives me more forward adjustment. Since you need to do the opposite of me, you'd therefore need to make sure your saddle has the same orientation as what mine had BEFORE I changed it. I really hope that makes sense.
In 2003 Fender offered Telecasters with a humbucking/single coil pickup arrangement or two humbucking pickups featuring Enforcer humbucking pickups, and S-1 switching. These models were discontinued in 2007. As of 2008, all American Standard Telecasters came with a redesigned Tele bridge with vintage-style bent steel saddles. In March 2012 the American Standard Telecaster was been updated with Custom Shop pickups (Broadcaster in the bridge, Twisted in the neck); the body is now contoured for reduced weight and more comfort.
The way Kristin Hersh rubs major and minor notes next to each other in her intricately plotted songs is truly haunting; a ghostly approach that didn’t even require selling her soul at the Crossroads. Blending plucky arpeggios and bluesy slides with punishing strumming, Hersh’s playing has actually gotten more aggressive as she’s eased into her 40s with 50 Foot Wave.
Compressors – The role of these pedals is to lift up quiet sounds and rein in loud sounds, compressing the dynamic range of your signal – that is, the difference between the quietest and loudest sounds. They work wonders for songs with a blend of quiet and loud parts, since they let you play hard without busting eardrums, and the soft sections won’t be drowned out by ringing ears. Compressors also have the nice side effect of increasing sustain, letting your notes sound out longer before dropping off.

Possibly the most famous of all guitar effects, the talk box has its indelible place in history.  The guitar signal is pushed thru a speaker into a tube that the player holds in their mouth.  This tube is usually run up a mic stand, so that the player can use the embouchure of the mouth cavity to control vowel sounds that are then picked up by the microphone and pushed back through the PA system.
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.

But alongside Davy Graham and Jim Hall, the other musician I really wanted to remind you about was Martin Taylor. Astonishing technique – enough to make the shredders weep with envy, coupled with an exquisite feel for melodic line. Martin is one of the few guys (or gals) whose playing brings tears to my eyes regularly. When one of his albums gets into my CD player it stays there for weeks. In many ways, a natural successor to Django Reinhardt, truly a master of music as well as the guitar art and DR’s principal competitor for a top ten place in my list.
Even working on the assumption that you're only using one mic, the professionals have an awful lot to say about where you might put it. For a start, it seems to be fairly common practice to audition the different speaker cones of your guitar amp. "They're supposed to sound the same," says Roy Thomas Baker, "but if you're using a 4x12 cabinet, each of these four speakers may sound different."
"We strive to offer our clients the highest level of service in guitar sales, repair and consulting. We will, as keys to attaining this objective, conduct our business according to a high standard of excellence. We are dedicated to earning our clients' trust through our professional conduct, our many years of experience, and our extensive preparation for their needs."
Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
This is a really cool program. It let's you fiddle with a lot of cool effects, without having to spend a lot of money. The program works really well, after a bit of fiddling with the Jack server, and it far exceeds some of the commercial programs I have tried. I hope that this project gets some attention :) If I wasn't a "coding dyslexic", I'd be the first to sign up.
While the modifications described above have all been passive (i.e. they don't require an external power source), active electronics considerably increase the number of possible wiring options. These can range from simple preamps that offer a volume boost and buffer the instrument's signal (to prevent loss of higher frequencies in longer cable runs), to multi-band equalisers and more.[30][31] Enterprising guitarists have even built entire effects processors into guitars, such as the Korg Kaoss Pad.[32]
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-02 is based on the iconic Telecaster electric guitar. It comes with a single-cutaway body that's crafted from paulownia, a China native wood that's known for being light. The pickguard is already set into the body when you get the package, but you'll need to solder the input jack, the volume and tone knobs, the bridge pickup and the selector switch before you start using it.
As a side note, many guitarists refer to the vibrato as “tremolo” or, worse yet, “whammy bar”. (I sometimes do, too, when my mouth is moving unaccompanied by my brain) Vibrato refers to varying the pitch while tremolo is varying the volume. Leo Fender himself is largely responsible for the misuse of the words. He called the bar on his guitars the “tremolo” and even had the tremolo effect on his amplifiers labeled as “Vibrato”.
1953 "magic" spruce? Luthier Dana Bourgeois did an interview with C. F. Martin III in 1984. The interview was in preparation for an article by Eric Schoenberg and Bob Green on the history of the OM model and was published in the March 1985 issue of Guitar Player. Bourgeois was asked to sit in on the interview, and in the last two paragraphs of his recollections especially interesting: "One footnote that I do remember distinctly is that Mr. Martin said that in '52 or '53 the Martin Co. bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce in the form of government surplus of building material. Though he preferred Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-40s because all of the large stands had been decimated. Mr. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Red Adirondack Spruce than Sitka was. He could not, however, find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka." This nugget of information caught my attention because for many years I Of course, aside from the color of the tops, the anecdote does not in itself prove anything. But it at least suggests how the story might have gotten started.

4) SPAM AND SELF-ADVERTISING ARE NOT ALLOWED. NO ADVERTISING YOUR NEW SUB. NO LINKS TO SOCIAL MEDIA, BLOGS, OR OTHER PERSONAL SITES. This includes the comment area of youtube videos as well as anything that's embedded into the video itself. Your content will be removed!!! NO ADVERTISING EVEN BY PROXY Ask yourself if you're here to post a video of yourself playing guitar or to gain subscribers/fans. If it's the later, you are in the wrong place. We are not here to make you more popular. This means no linking to anything that is commerce related, your blog, web site, bandcamp, facebook, instagram, snapchat, twitter, etc. You can link to your youtube channel, but do NOT have channel plugs/ads in your video, subscription requests, or links to any of the aforementioned, unless you are on our whitelist. If you would like to be considered for our whitelist, message the mods!

Located on the corner of Menaul Boulevard and San Pedro Drive NE, Guitar Center Albuquerque is just a short drive from the Lousiana Blvd. exit off the I-40. Since opening our doors in March of 2004, we've been making the dreams of musicians become realities. We take pride in our dedication to customer service and our in-depth knowledge of the latest and greatest musical trends. We invite you to come check out all we have to offer at Guitar Center Albuquerque. First and foremost in Guitar Center Albuquerque, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs, our staff in each department is well-trained to cater to music-lovers from all over Albuquerque. Our store is open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”
Greg's Vintage Guitars Atlanta ,"we sell keepers",The Vintage Guitar News and Views.....vintage guitars for sale ,Atlanta georgia.Vintage guitars ,players guitars cool affordable,rare,vintage and collectible guitar and gear sales,the obscure and under appreciated guitars.Vintage fender guitars,vintage Gibson guitars,Vintage Ibanez guitars,Guild guitars,Valley arts guitars,Gretsch guitars,Taylor guitars,Martin guitars,Takamine guitars,Stratocasters ,Telecasters,guitar cases,and guitar parts. Both vintage electric guitars and vintage acoustic guitars for sale . Vintage Grammer guitars, Martin guitars. Also included are Fender amps,Guild amps,Magnatone amps,tweed,blackface,silverface amps,amp parts and repair..Electric guitars sales,acoustic guitars for sale ,vintage electric guitars ,vintage acoustic guitars,vintage bass guitars ,vintage fender guitars,vintage Gibson guitars,vintage Ibanez guitars,vintage guild guitars,vintage fender amps.vintage amps,fender,fender telecasters,Gibson Les Paul,,vintage guitars for sale ,guitars for trade ,buying guitars, sell guitars, vintage fender stratocaster,fender esquire,fender P- bass, fender jazz bass,  amps,the vintage guitar news and views, vintage guitar trader,vintage guitar parts ,vintage guitar tuning keys,So whether you are in the market to purchase a vintage or collectible guitar,consign a vintage guitar or place a collectible or vintage guitar on layaway contact Greg's Vintage Guitars Atlanta. vintage guitar pickups, vintage and collectible  guitar sales.
The Pocket Pal is a recent addition to the Hohner standard line of harmonicas. It is somewhat unusual because it is slightly shorter in length than most harmonicas, leading to its namesake of being pocket handy. It is Chinese made, which is unfavorable to most harmonica players, but the Pocket Pal has caught on as an inexpensive, yet quality harp. Like the Old Standby, the Pocket Pal is designed for use in country music.[26]
ACTION DEL BRACCIO È possibile regolare l'action del braccio del tremolo utilizzando una chiave a brugola da 3,0 mm sulla vite (B) del tremolo. ACCORDATURA DI PRECISIONE Dopo aver fissato il bloccacorde, utilizzare gli accordatori di precisione per eseguire le regolazioni di precisione dell'accordatura di ogni corda. Regolare tutti gli accordatori (C) al centro della rispettiva corsa prima di fissare il bloccacorde.
Major-chord progressions are constructed in the harmonization of major scales in triads.[21] For example, stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression, which is traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio; its sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is used in popular music,[22] as already discussed. Further chords are constructed by stacking additional thirds. Stacking the dominant major-triad with a minor third creates the dominant seventh chord, which shall be discussed after minor chords.
Nice-Keys-Extreme-2.0  Still a big SoundFont set at 1gb or 1000mb (645mb dedicated to 3 pianos with 6 velocity layers). Similar to the top set but the main piano is a little less detailed so it leaves room for an extra piano (Steinways).  PC users should not have any problems or if running on iOS this set runs perfectly well on iPhone 6s or iPad Air 2. It is still possible to load this set within the bs-16i app and run Sweet Midi Player app using GM set one at the same time for midi backing if required. This set has everything described below plus the addition of guitars.
Randall deserves to be up here in this list. Don't get me wrong, they've got a lot to contend with, in Orange and Mesa Boogie in particular, but Randall have always crafted excellent amps. Rugged build and vast tonal opportunities make this brand a mighty force, I mean they were good enough for Dimebag Darrell and countless others, enough said really...

The Dobro Standard Guitar is not shown, but this is described as a “…conventional arch top body” with Dobro electric amplification. Like the first National Spanish, this had f-holes and was made by Regal. The Dobro Mandolin is also described as having a “conventional” body, probably a pear-shaped mando, again, by Regal. These were probably introduced slightly later than the Hawaiian.


There seems to be a lot of confusion about the origins of Palmer guitars. I know a few people have said they are made in America but I cant find anything about that site. However there is a guitar maker and restorer called James Arthur Palmer in Stoke on Trent, England. If you simply google his name then nothing will come up but if you enter J.A.P. guitars it will lead you to his site. Hope this helps.
A friend owns a music store and looked up the "Norma" brand. It said- Norma guitars were manufactured in Japan between 1966 and 1972 by the Japanese to compete with the Gibson HummingBird. The look is almost identical (Check out the Gibson Hummingbird played by Jonathan "BuggieMan" Long from Baton Rouge La. His looks exactly like my Norma. I too was curious for thirty years about my good sounding guitar. Looks aint everything!
It has been said that Barney never played his signature Kays. On the contrary... Barney Kessel has been photographed in concert with the Kay K8700 Jazz Special on multiple occasions, has made appearances at Waldo's Jazz Club on the television classic "Johnny Staccato - Television's Jazz Detective" and has been confirmed by son Dan (who also recorded with the Artist on several famous recordings) to have used the Artist to record countless rock, pop, r&b and blues hits with the most popular performers of the early '60s.
The AEG10II combines laminated spruce top with mahogany back and sides, and packs both in a thin profile body. Thin bodied guitars, while more resistant to feedback than their larger counterparts, don’t have the breadth of tone or the volume of a full sized acoustic guitar. The cool thing about this guitar is that, it’s one of the cheapest ways for beginning musicians to get a solid gigging instrument.

We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
In a very basic sense, your pickups create a magnetic field that is disturbed when guitar strings are vibrated above it. This, in turn, converts the vibration of the guitar strings into a current. The current is then sent through to your output jack where the signal then passes through your lead into your amplifier, where it is amplified. Different gauge strings vibrate at different rates e.g. an A string will typically vibrate at 440 cycles per second (440 hertz) which creates a current of 440 hertz in the pickup.
In other words, it will slather the tone with raw dirt without affecting the core of the signal. A lot of people mistake fuzz pedals for distortions due to their more aggressive nature, but these beasts of old are definitely unique. One of the best examples of what a fuzz box sounds like is the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi – a fuzz pedal whose circuitry gave birth to countless other models.
Without a doubt, dont even entertain the idea of getting one, I was given one by an unfortunate friend who bought one, to try and get it to at be semi playable.. the necks are not even straight, in fact , you could ski off them.....the frets stick out from the side of the neck, the strings are so far off the neck you cannot even fret them down.... There must be no quality control whatsoever in the factory..

Midlands trio The Bad Flowers make a concise, bruising power-blues that will appeal to fans of the likes of Jared James Nichols and Blues Pills, both of whom have offered TBF support slots. September single Thunder Child is the first shot fired from their forthcoming debut Starting Gun and packs an uproarious solo that leaves TG reaching for our wah pedal. Think Rory Gallagher through AC/DC’s amp stack and you’re near Tom’s bar-fight-scrapping lead sound.
SolidBody (2008) – Taylor’s take on a traditional solid electric guitar. Made from a solid slab of wood with cavities only for the pickguard or direct mounted pickups, and the bridge. Designed from the ground up, each SolidBody model features solderless pickups or a solderless pickguard which permit for musicians to effortlessly change the sound of their guitar. The SolidBody line is fully customizable with a wide combination of wood, colors and electronic configurations, and single or double cutaway options which enables anyone purchasing a SolidBody to get the sound and look that they want. All options are available for customization through Taylor’s SolidBody Configurator on the Taylor website.
I still keep in touch with Mark and occasionally pose questions to him about various maintenance concerns. He's pretty busy and it may take a few days before he get's back to me. He has always been willing to help and actually encourages me to take on a lot more of the responsibility of maintaining my basses. Yeah, I spent a little on the front end but I really feel that it's going to payoff for me long term.
Generally, a band sounds the best to the audience when you have an attentive, knowledgeable sound person who is paid well by the band or venue. He also needs the right tools to balance the sound for the room. If all of the instruments onstage are blasting at full volume, the poor PA can’t keep up- and the people in the first few rows have their heads torn off by whatever instrument amplifier they are unlucky enough to be standing in front of. This results in an unbalanced mix that the sound person can’t fix. It might sound awesome onstage, but you want the audience to have a great experience too, right? With monitors, side fills, several amps/cabs, and a fort full of cymbals onstage, things get loud quickly, and everything competes for the same sonic space. It is easy for band members to get into ‘volume wars’ while the sound dude/dudette takes everyone out of the mix but the vocals right before they throw up their hands and shake their heads. The audience might not know what sonic problems are occurring, but they definitely will hear it. An audience member describing a gig like this to a friend might say, “I saw this band, but they sounded terrible.” No one wants that kind of review. We spend a lot of money on guitars, pedals, amps, and microphones. But many  musicians at the gig just set everything up and hope for the best. 
Unassigned maker badge names are AGS, Alex, Andre, Aquila, Asco, Avon, Axiom, Bradley, CG Winner, Clear Sound, CMI, Columbia, Commodore, Cortley, Crestline, Crown, D. Lewis (?), Danelectro, Dynelectron (some), Diplomat, Dixon, Dorado, Eagle, El Degas, Exceltro, Exper, Encore, Fandel, Garzia, Goya, Grant, Grenn, Laguna, LTD, Magnum (?), Maier, Monroe, Marchis, Mark II, Masaaki (?), Matador, Norwood, Palmer, Prairie, President, Rodeo, Sanox, S.G.C., Splender, Stella, Targa, Taro, Voxton by Vox, and Yoshi. Some of these badges are attributed to the importer as the 'maker', which is untrue. It's possible that some of these badges were made by smaller Japanese manufacturers that have faded into history.

A classic Western guitar from the Far East, this Vintage Global guitar was made in Japan sometime in the 1960s and imported for Sears and Montgomery Ward department stores. It's got a swell pick guard with a honeysuckle blossom and a hummingbird and an ominously undecorated fretboard that has absolutely no dots or markings whatsoever. Other features of the Vintage Global guitar include a snazzy sunburst finish, classic imitation wood inlay decorative sound hole decal, and cheap white plastic tuning knobs. This classical acoustic guitar has absolutely nothing in the way of "warm tones" or any other term typically used to describe finely crafted stringed instruments. Instead, it has a distinctive sharp and rumbly quality that is great for recording or live applications where a "lo-fi" sound is desired. This Global guitar has decent action and is easy to play. Speaking from experience, it really cuts through the other tracks in recording and adds a humble trashy sound while staying in tune and functioning like a normal, decent quality guitar. The Vintage Global guitar showed signs of moderate use and had a number of nicks and scratches around the edges. The hummingbird pick guard had some scratches / wear in the black glossy surface near the very top corner, but otherwise was in excellent condition. The neck was straight and the guitar had no cracks or other serious bodily damage. Body measures 17 /2 inches x 14 inches x 3 1/2 inches. Neck measures 16 1/4 inches in length from nut to end (minus headstock) and is 2 3/8 inches at widest point. This Global Hummingbird Guitar sold and is probably making beautiful music on the other side of the country, but lots or really cool-looking vintage Global guitars can be found on eBay.


The word distortion refers to any modification of wave form of a signal, but in music it is used to refer to nonlinear distortion (excluding filters) and particularly to the introduction of new frequencies by memoryless nonlinearities.[32] In music the different forms of linear distortion have specific names describing them. The simplest of these is a distortion process known as "volume adjustment", which involves distorting the amplitude of a sound wave in a proportional (or ‘linear’) way in order to increase or decrease the volume of the sound without affecting the tone quality. In the context of music, the most common source of (nonlinear) distortion is clipping in amplifier circuits and is most commonly known as overdrive.[33]
“This is a very complicated mix of economy versus market, demand versus what products are they putting out, versus are their products as good as they used to be, versus what’s going on with the Internet, versus how are the big-box stores dealing with what’s going on,” Smith says. “But I’ll tell you this: You put a magic guitar in a case and ship it to a dealer, it will sell.”
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Harmony pedals are often used to generate vocal harmonies, but can also do wonders for bass and guitar sounds. Some vocal harmony processors use the signal from your guitar to create two- or three-part vocal harmonies. Most harmony effects let you specify precisely how much higher or lower you want the accompanying note to be. Modern artists such as Steve Vai and Robert Fripp have created interesting music using a purely pitch-shifted signal with none of the original signal mixed in.
Eddie's Guitars specializes in the finest electric guitars available today. We have spent many years seeking out the best builders, brands and models available from yesterday and today. From classics like Fender Custom Shop and Gibson Custom Shop to boutique builders like Collings, PRS, Tom Anderson, Grosh and John Suhr we have every avenue of the sonic world of guitar covered.
By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.
The 2008 Les Paul Standard is one of the first models from Gibson USA to utilize the revolutionary Plek machine in setting up the guitar. The Plek is a German-made, computer controlled machine that carefully measures each fret, along with the fingerboard height under each string, and then automatically dresses each fret, virtually eliminating string buzz and greatly improving the overall playability of the guitar. This pioneering process does in minutes what it takes a luthier several hours—sometimes even days—to accomplish. Every fret is accurately aligned, and the guitar is properly intonated, leaving the instrument “Plek’d” and amazingly playable.

Note that much of information and pictures are courtesy of Paul Bechtoldt and D. Tulloch's book, Guitars From Neptune", 1995. Much of this book is catalog reprints, but from it and American Guitars by T. Wheeler, I was able to construct this information. Personally I've never really actively looked for these guitars, so my knowledge base is somewhat limited. But a lot of people buy these at garage sales, flea markets, etc, and ask me about them. There doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there. This is probably because Danelectros and Silvertones are considered "low end" vintage guitars at best, and don't sell for a lot of money. So I hope this page will be of some help in their identification.


What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.

By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.
This is sort of a corollary to the DI+Amp suggestion. While effects on bass aren’t as common as with guitar parts, some bassists will come in with these big rigs of effect boxes, and want to record “their sound”, which often is clearly overprocessed for the song. Rather than argue the point, let the player hear the sound he’s used to during tracking, but be sure to also grab a nice clean signal, prior to all the effects, usually straight off the bass via a DI. That way, if your concerns prove all too true come mixdown, you can turn to the dry track, and recreate those favored effects to a more appropriate degree, with studio tools. Even if the effected bass sounds good to you, many pedals and MI effect boxes are noisy, and you might have to recreate the sound anyway, to avoid problematic buzz or hiss from the player’s cool-but-dirty toys.
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SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.

Out of all the hopped-up Caucasians who turbocharged the blues in the late Sixties, Texas albino Johnny Winter was both the whitest and the fastest. Songs like his 1969 cover of "Highway 61 Revisited" are astonishing showpieces of his lightningfast thumb-picked electric slide playing. Jimi Hendrix sought him out as a sideman, and Muddy Waters recognized his talent at first glance, becoming a friend and collaborator: "That guy up there onstage – I got to see him up close," Waters later said. "He plays eight notes to my one!"
In the 2000s, new developments in bass amplifier technology include the use of lightweight neodymium magnets in some higher-priced cabinets and the use of lightweight, powerful Class D amplifiers in some combo amps and amp heads; both of these innovations have made transporting amps and cabinets easier. As well, some 2010s-era bass amps and heads have digital effects units and modelling amplifier features which enable the recreation or simulation of the sound of numerous well-known bass amps, including vintage tube amplifiers by famous brands (e.g., Ampeg SVT-Pro amp heads) and a range of speaker cabinets (e.g., 8x10" cabs). Digital amp and cabinet modelling also makes transporting bass amps and cabinets to gigs and recording sessions easier, because a bassist can emulate the sound of many different brands of very large, heavy vintage gear without having to bring the actual amps and cabs. Another trend for higher-priced and higher-wattage amps and cabinets aimed at professionals is providing Speakon speaker jacks in addition to, or in place of traditional 1/4" speaker jacks. Speakon jacks are considered safer for high wattage amps, since the bassist cannot accidentally touch the "live" parts of the cable end and they lock in, so there is less risk of accidental disconnection. As of 2017, a few digital amp and cabinet modelling amplifiers have a USB input or other computer input, to enable users to download new sounds and presets.
The demand for amplified guitars began during the big band era; as orchestras increased in size, guitar players soon realized the necessity in guitar amplification & electrification.[14] The first electric guitars used in jazz were hollow archtop acoustic guitar bodies with electromagnetic transducers. Early electric guitar manufacturers include Rickenbacker in 1932; Dobro in 1933; National, AudioVox and Volu-tone in 1934; Vega, Epiphone (Electrophone and Electar), and Gibson in 1935 and many others by 1936.
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