Kansas guitars has been around since 1927. They made some very nice guitars. Some expensive and some inexpensive. But the real question is whom makes the guitar for Kansas? And that is non other then Cort. Yes Cort makes guitars for just about everybody and you dont even know. the big secret is cort guitars themselves are very well made but cheaper then most brands, but same or better quality then highline guitars. Cort bailed out fender and also built Fenders for many years. So in short Kansas is a well made guitar and there set neck models are awesome and run about $400 to $600. You cant get a set neck today for under $800. And if you want to see how many guitar brands have cort making there guitars do some research on Cort and you will be surprized. They have been around for ever and are the elite company in the business.

Yes, he wears a KFC bucket on his head and a Michael Myers mask on his face, but he's a genius. Buckethead (real name Brian Carroll) plays every style, from country to death metal. Albums like 'Monsters and Robots' and 'Population Override' are must-haves for any aspiring guitarists, and instrumentals like 'Nottingham Lace' and 'Too Many Humans' take some beating. - Floods
For example, if you plug into a .7V power amp and you get good sound – great! However, if you plug into a 1.25V power amp and find the signals are weak, it’s not the tonal lack of the power amp that’s the problem. The preamp signals are too weak to be driven to the powerful 1.25V power amp. The issue is the sensitivity input of the power amp is too high for the preamp to be driven well.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
Gibson 2012 SG Special '70s Tribute Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$649.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 SG Faded Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$659.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar, Left Handed (with Case)   New from$2,299.00In Stockor 12 payments of $191.59 Free Ground Shipping Gibson 2019 LP Junior Tribute DC Electric Guitar, Left Handed, (with Gig Bag)   New from$799.00In Stockor 12 payments of $66.59 Free Ground Shipping See All Left-Handed Electric Guitars
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
Following the lead of Electro, which was having some success with their cast aluminum alloy bodies, Dobro – still a separate company – introduced its first cast aluminum Dobro Hawaiian electric lap steel guitar, probably in late 1934. Along with the aluminum lap, Dobro also debuted the Standard Guitar, and the Mandolin. Accompanying these was the Dobro Amplifier. All four listed for $67.50. These are all shown in the ’35 Tonk Brothers catalog.
With a neck made of mahogany and a body of maple, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is one of the best hollow body electric guitars included on this list. Due to its hollow body design, this guitar has the ability to play well in all genres, ranging from country to hard rock, and is known for its high-quality tone and ability to maintain tune through long periods of playing. This is possible in part due to the pickups at the neck and bridge, reducing excess humming for clarity in tone and pitch.  The knobs at the base of the body have a super-grip design, making it easy to change the volume and tone between the neck and the bridge and utilize the three pickup selector. A pearl block inlay is included on the rosewood fretboard, making this 20 fret electric guitar a strong option to conclude this list.

Parallel coils: coil tap connection needs to be broken for this kind of wiring, so three lead pickups cannot be wired this way. The idea is to join start of each coil with finish of the other coil. One on those connections will be hot, the other ground. Parallel coils will sound more like a single coil sound, noticeably quieter and shallower than a series connection.
The electric bass was invented in the 1930s, but the instrument did not sell well until Leo Fender developed the Precision Bass in the 1950s. As such, the type of bass players who first began trying methods to make their instruments louder with amplifiers and speakers were upright bass players. While the upright bass is a large instrument, standing about six feet tall (with its endpin extended), due to its low register, it is not a loud instrument when played acoustically. This is largely a result of the decreased sensitivity of human hearing, which is most sensitive to mid-range tones; equal perceived loudness for a mid-range sound and a low frequency sound requires much more acoustic power in the low-frequency sound. In the 1890s and early 1900s, upright bass players performing in bars and brothels in an era before amplifiers and speakers were available, particularly those who performed in bands with louder instruments such as trumpet, often found it hard to be heard. About the only solution available in the pre-amplifiers era was playing slap bass, a style of slapping the strings against the fingerboard to make a relatively loud percussive sound. Beginning in the 1920s, the first amplifiers and speakers designed for gigging musicians became available.
And when you shop with Guitar Center, you can search through our entire chainwide inventory and have any item shipped to your local store for free, or directly to your home. Whether you’re a devoted collector, a player looking to get back that one instrument that got away, or an audiophile trying to capture the true vintage sound you’ve always wanted, the Guitar Center Vintage Collection has everything you need. Start searching today.
More recently, many boutique pedal manufacturers, such as the Z.Vex and Death by Audio series, have attempted to revive the analog strangeness of germanium transistors and diodes. Not bound by imitation, they continue to innovate with analog materials as if the technical innovations of the 70s and 80s had never happened. The mid-90s Z.Vex Fuzz Factory is notable for establishing internal feedback loops that are inadvertently tied to the logic of circuit bending. This means that the pedal self-oscillates, producing an absurd yet controllable noise, akin to an air-raid siren.

The EB-28 bass was very similar to the guitar in appointments and controls. It had a 22-fret ebony fingerboard, 33.825″ scale, a DiMarzio P-style neck pickup and a DiMarzio J-style pickup at the bridge. It, too, carried a Schaller bridge and Schaller M-4 tuners. Around 4,854 each of these 28 Series guitars and basses were built between January 1981 and February 1982.
Their LP models have a "mahogany" body, and the binding is very thin so I think the maple top is just vaneer. I also noticed the headstocks were not the usual LP angle. In my opinion, Epiphone wins hand down. The Strat types don't look much better in my opinion, again, sharp fret ends and awful looking headstock and logo. If you see any of their relic jobs, you'll notice that they range from passable from a distance to hideous from any range.

Little data is to be had on Teiscos from the late ’50s, but it’s probably safe to assume the line continued on roughly as before. In 1958 the EP-61 joined the line. This was obviously not numbered for the year of introduction! It’s not known what this guitar was, but shortly thereafter the high-number EPs were fancy full-bodied archtops, so that may have been it.

I have played all sorts of guitars, Guild, Gibson, Epi, Lowden, Fender etc etc. Walden for a beginner/intermediate are far beyond anything you can get for the same money. Exceptional sounding and great build quality, and because no-one has heard of them you can pick them up for half the price or any of the "named" brands if you get a good used one. I have had my hands on 3 in recent years, I got them for less than £100 each - one for £50 and it held its own with anything else I had that cost nearly £1k new. I would recommend them absolutely.


Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.
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Sound also factors into this, though I'd argue equipment is less critical than playing technique. But a muffled high-impedance humbucker makes it much harder to bring out the right notes than a twangy Tele singlecoil. And in particular, distortion can quickly make an utter mess out of an only slightly muddy clean signal. So, keep the gain down when playing more chordal stuff, and treble up especially when doing delicate arpeggios etc..
One of the all-time classic gigging and recording amps, in this new incarnation the Deluxe Reverb is arguably more practical than ever, thanks to the extra versatility offered by being able to utilise the tremolo and reverb on both channels.  Where original Deluxe Reverbs of the period would have had a Normal channel, sans tremolo or reverb, the new '68s have a Custom channel with access to those global effects and a new voicing, courtesy of a "modified Bassman tone stack" that's billed as being more pedal-friendly. Where you would have found a Vibrato channel, there's now a 'Vintage' channel with a more traditional voicing. There's a magic sweet spot between 4.5 and 6 on the volume control (depending on your choice of guitar), where the amp delivers a wonderful, dynamic dirty-clean rhythm sound at stage level that works as a brilliant core guitar sound for all manner of rock 'n' roll, Americana, blues and classic pop applications. Just add picking-hand dynamics and your guitar's volume control; there's so much range here. The onboard reverb and tremolo are wonderful, classic-sounding musical tools that push and inspire you to play in a certain way. Far more than a means of merely amplifying your guitar sound, this is a musical instrument in itself.
An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:

Launch price: $1,427 / £999 | Body: Mahogany with maple cap | Neck: 3-piece mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, Seymour Duncan Jazz humbucker (EMG 81/60 reviewed) | Controls: 2x volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: EverTune bridge, Grover tuners | Left-handed: Yes (without EverTune) | Finish: See Thru Black, Dark Brown Sunburst


The HX removes the amp modelling and condenses the rock-solid build, intuitive user interface and neat form-factor of the Helix series into a svelte multi-effects box that will fit on a Pedaltrain JR with room to spare. As on the larger units, editing is highly intuitive. Lightly touching a footswitch opens the edit menu for that patch, with the large rotary and left-right buttons used to switch patch and parameters. More complex functionality like editing signal flow isn’t far away from the user - a couple of clicks through the menu gets you there, and makes creating banks of your own a breeze. In terms of sounds, the same high-quality effects from the flagship units are present and correct, with a number of additional effects that have been developed in the meantime. The drives on offer are excellent, and into a small tube amp we also found the boosts allowed us to drive the amp into saturation, or up the ante for soloing. With a real drive in front, the unit was able to keep up, and the interaction between external drive, HX and amp was close to indistinguishable from stacking two real drive pedals.

Call of Duty: Black Ops III is the ultimate 3-games-in-1 experience. In Campaign mode, you must navigate the hot spots of a new Cold War to find your missing brothers. Players can play the campaign cooperatively or solo and are now always connected to the intelligence grid and their fellow operatives during battle. Multiplayer features a new momentum-based chained movement system, allowing players to fluidly move through the environment with finesse, using controlled thrust jumps, slides, and mantling. Black Ops III multiplayer also introduces the new Specialist character system, which allows players to master 9 characters' battle-hardened weapons and abilities through a challenge-based unlock progression system. No Treyarch title would be complete without its signature Zombies offering. "Shadows of Evil" has its own distinct storyline right out of the box, set in the fictional 1940s Morg City, where four particularly troubled individuals — the femme fatale, the magician, the detective, and the boxer — star in this film-noir inspired horror story.


When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
I wish I had a cool story to attach to this guitar, but really this one is a history lesson regarding the development of Japanese guitar manufacturing.  Plus, it’s an example of some rare component combinations (like the pickups) that make guitars like these worth buying.  THEY’RE SO CHEAP!!  Hell, buy one of these for $200, send it to Dano and sink another $100 into it, and you’ll have yourself one hell of a player!  It’s like recycling, dude.

This beast features a classic Sitka spruce top with a rosewood back and sides combo. We have already mentioned a few guitars that feature these types of tonewood. However, the difference here is that the Martin DCPA4R is a handmade instrument that brings you the craftsmanship of Martin's top luthiers. If you appreciate craftsmanship, you'll love this instrument.
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I dont know but im looking for a good bass guitar too. Depends on your price range. Personally I realy like Ibanez basses and think they do really good low to mid price range basses. If you are looking at a professional quality basses you should look at Rickenbacker, Musicman (stingray), Fender, Lakland and Shadowsky as they are the main brands for professional basses.

Ten is not enough. If you are not here for the first time and you already checked our article on the top acoustic guitars and the recommended electric guitars you know how we roll.And if we are going to review a lot more than just 10, why not split them into proper categories that will help you choose what is working best for you. As it will take a lot of time to write all these for you, please be easy on us. For the people that do not want to waste that much time thought and just want a quick list with some great effects we prepared the comparison charted listed below:
Eight-string electric guitars are rare but not unused. One is played by Charlie Hunter, which was manufactured by Novax Guitars. The largest manufacturer of eight- to 14-string instruments is Warr Guitars. Their models are used by Trey Gunn (ex King Crimson), who has his own signature line from the company. Similarly, Mårten Hagström and Fredrik Thordendal of Meshuggah used 8-string guitars made by Nevborn Guitars and now guitars by Ibanez. Munky of the nu metal band KoRn is also known to use seven-string Ibanez guitars, and it is rumored that he is planning to release a K8 eight-string guitar similar to his K7 seven-string guitar. Another Ibanez player is Tosin Abasi, lead guitarist of the progressive metal band Animals as Leaders, who uses an Ibanez RG2228 to mix bright chords with very heavy low riffs on the seventh and eighth strings. Stephen Carpenter of Deftones also switched from a seven-string to an eight-string in 2008 and released his signature STEF B-8 with ESP Guitars. In 2008, Ibanez released the Ibanez RG2228-GK, which is the first mass-produced eight-string guitar. Jethro Tull's first album uses a nine-string guitar. Bill Kelliher, guitarist for the heavy metal group Mastodon, worked with First Act on a custom mass-produced nine-string guitar.
The guitar is hand-made by Martin's top luthiers, using exotic cocobolo wood for the back and sides, mixed with a more conventional solid sitka spruce top. As expected from a high-end instrument, this guitar features impressive visual appointments, most notable of which is its ivoroid binding, beautiful rosette and fretboard inlays. While its price tag and looks may push you to just hide this guitar in the closet, know that this instrument is built to make music in the road or in the studio. Martin employed modern bracing and construction techniques to ensure the guitar stays reliable, beautiful and great sounding for a long time. Those that are lucky enough to own this guitar have themselves a treasure that they can pass down to the next generation of players.

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I thin Yamaha LL16 is one of the best acoustic guitar on the market . Yamaha is known for making affordable, quality guitars, and this is one is no different. It features a solid spruce top, solid rosewood back and sides, and an ebony fretboard. It is smaller than the dreadnought guitars – a fact that is neither good nor bad but that does affect the way the instrument sounds and feels.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.
While Epiphone doesn’t quite stack up to Gibson’s deep tone and crystal clear sound, there’s still plenty for guitarists to love about the brand’s offerings. Considering the difference in price, Epiphone delivers a pretty solid approximation of the Gibson tone, which will likely be enough to win over players who just can’t bring themselves to shell out for a true Les Paul. Between the sound quality and their near indistinguishability to the real thing, it’s no surprise Epiphone is ranked so highly among fans of the guitar.
If you think not using any pedals makes you more “real” or “natural” of a player, you’ve got to be kidding me. Let’s think about what is physically happening when we play electric guitar. The sound is created when a guitar string is plucked by a pick, likely made from some polymer (oh wait, the “real” guys use their thumb, okay) causing it to vibrate. This vibration also creates a corresponding vibration through a magnetic field above your pickups. The pickup converts this into electric current, which passes through a simple low-pass filter tone circuit and a passive volume attenuator (we presume you’re not using an active pickup, being that you’re keeping it “real”) that does some equalization before it even gets to the cable. The standard cable consists of stranded, >99% oxygen free copper wire usually measuring between 18-24 gauge thickness, creating another filter in conjunction with the guitar circuitry based on cable capacitance.
Say that three times fast.  Don't even bother yourself about halfround strings.  They aren't that popular for a reason, but it is good to know they exist.  The roundwound strings feature a textured surface created by winding a round wire around the core metal.  Flatwound strings are far more flat along their length because the core is surrounded by a smooth wire, as pictured below:

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