Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.

The modern classical guitar is usually played in a seated position, with the instrument resting on the left lap - and the left foot placed on a footstool. Alternatively - if a footstool is not used - a guitar support can be placed between the guitar and the left lap (the support usually attaches to the instrument's side with suction cups). (There are of course exceptions, with some performers choosing to hold the instrument another way.)
So, if you’d like to emulate some of the guitar greats like Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin) or Slash, this Epiphone package again with all the extras you’ll need—but with an Epiphone guitar—is a great way to start. Also, it’s worth mentioning that Gibson/Epiphone Les Paul designs usually have a slightly rounded, more narrow fret board and, in my opinion, are a little easier to play compared to the flatter, wider Fender fret boards. But I strongly recommend you don’t take my word for that. Get into a music shop and try the two types of guitar for yourself.
Next up, Tolerances. The tolerance refers to the accurate rating of the pots ohm, so if it's a 250k pot, then it will be accurately rated at a tight tolerance of around +/-5% to 250k, a true rating. Some low quality pots can creep wildly away from the ratings, you'd be surprised. I've removed CTS pots from US and MIM Fender guitars for example, that were incredibly inacurate. 250k stamped pots that were not even 200k, and also in other cases past 300k. So, why does that matter? Well if for example we're referring to a single coil equipped guitar like a Stratocaster, they recommended a pot ohm value of 250k in both volume and tone positions. If a lower quality pot states 250k but actually reads much lower, perhaps 200k, or even substantially higher, it could result it a darker or brighter tone respectively, than what would bring out the best in the guitars pickups. Quality pots like the CTS 450 series or TVT I have come to trust, have super tight tolerances, +/- 7% and most cases even tighter +/-5%. This accuracy is worth it, a pickup manufacturer sets out to design a certain model of pickup that will sound it's 'best' (obviously this is subjective), optimal is probably a better word, for a certain pot rating. If you're fitting a harness with tight tolerance, accurately rated pots then chances are you're going to be getting the best from your pickup set. That's the important bit for me.
However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
Early Teisco instruments were primarily electric Hawaiian guitars and accompanying amps, although the company quickly got into electric Spanish guitars, too. Little information is available on these earliest Japanese Teiscos. Teisco guitars from most of the ’50s were clearly inspired by Gibson; presumably this was true from the very beginning. We’d welcome any information on these early Teisco guitars and amps, including photos and photocopies of catalogs or ads, from our Japanese readers, if they can provide them.

American guitar manufacture was at its peak in the 1960s, with numerous highly-respected guitar companies making instruments at all levels; from the likes of Kay, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Fender and Gibson. But Harmony was one of the very biggest producers, at one point the biggest, selling guitars branded both as Harmony, and rebadged for numerous other distributors. In fact, in the mid/late 1960s, Harmony was said to produce more guitars than all other American guitar manufacturers combined. Most were entry or intermediate level instruments though, and although examples of most models are easy to find, examples in really good condition are rare.
There's more to being a musician than what you do on the stage: while that's the perfect place to turn it up loud with a standard guitar amplifier, sometimes you don't want anybody but yourself to be listening in on the tunes. That's when headphone guitar amps come in handy. There's a solid variety of these little amps to choose from, so you can get yours with as few or as many features as you like. Then, all you need is your favorite set of 'phones and you're ready to rock.
The conservative way to tell if a Martin is built for steel strings is the bridge. If it's a style 18 or higher and has a belly bridge (and does not have 'banjo' tuners like early OM models), it's pretty much built for steel strings (can't use this indicator on style 17 and lower as these models never used a belly brige until the 1950s). Why? Since Martin didn't implement the belly bridge until late 1929, it's a very conservative indicator that the guitar is built for steel. The belly bridge was the last thing they did to make steel strings usable on their guitars (though certainly many models with rectangle bridges can handle steel strings too.) They started to implement the belly bridge in 1929, and all style 18 models and higher had the belly bridge by 1930. Therefore using the belly bridge as a steel string indicator is a very safe idea (assuming the bridge is original and it's not an OM). Now can steel strings be used on pre-1930 models with a pyramid or rectangle bridge? Maybe, but it's just not as definative and caution should be heeded ("silk and steel" strings would be a good and safe compromise). Note early OM models with banjo style tuners generally should be strung up 'lightly'.
Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.
When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading
In 2008, Gibson USA released the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, an authentic replica of one of two Les Pauls Slash received from Gibson in 1988. It has an Antique Vintage Sunburst finish over a solid mahogany body with a maple top. Production was limited to 1600.[35] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Inspired By” Les Paul Standard. This guitar is a replica of the 1988 Les Paul Standard and it features a carved three-piece maple top, one-piece mahogany back, and rosewood fingerboard, with a Heritage Cherry Sunburst finish. Two versions were made available—the “Aged by Tom Murphy,” aged to resemble the original guitar (a limited number of these were signed by Slash in gold marker on the back of the headstock), and the “Vintage Original Spec,” created to resemble the guitar as it was when Slash first received it.[32][36]
Half a step up from standard tuning. Used in most of Johnny Cash's music, for "Love Buzz" on Nirvana's Bleach album - apparently by mistake (according to Come As You Are - Michael Azerrad), 3 Doors Down on "Here Without You" (a capo was probably used), Vektor, Soundgarden's "Black Hole Sun" (The low E string was tuned to Eb/D# for a drop Eb/D# tuning), Nickelback on their song "When We Stand Together", Burzum on his first 3 albums, John Fedowitz in his solo project "Ceremony", and Joe Jackson on "Got the Time".

As a conservative approach to using steel string, one thing is pretty much for sure; if a Martin came from the factory with a Belly bridge, it is braced for steel strings. If it has a rectangle bridge (and was made before 1929), the bracing needs to be checked by a qualified repair person to determine if the guitar's bracing can handle steel strings. My personal opinion is if it's a style 18 or higher and has a rectangle bridge and was made before 1930, it's not really made for steel strings. Though 1927 is generally thought of as the year when most models were braced for steel strings, 1927-1929 models could be braced for either steel or gut strings. So before putting on steel strings on a 1927-1929 Martin, have it check out by a good repair person. They will check the top's firmness, bracing dimensions, and bridge plate thickness.
We spent 45 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. One of the best things about an electric guitar is its portability. Most times, however, you can't say that about the amps you need to go along with them. Fortunately, these mini amplifiers have come along, developed by the top names in full-size models, and offer incredible sound quality in an exceedingly portable package. We've ranked these micro monsters by tonal character, power, and control. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best mini guitar amplifier on Amazon.
Gibson has issued two Signature Les Paul guitars for Joe Perry of Aerosmith. The first was developed in the 1990s and was customized with an active mid-boost control, black chrome hardware, and a translucent black finish. It was replaced in 2004 by a second, more visually distinctive Les Paul, the Joe Perry Boneyard Les Paul. This guitar is characterized by Perry’s custom “Boneyard” logo on the headstock and a figured maple top with a green tiger finish, and is available with either a stopbar tailpiece or a Bigsby tailpiece; Perry typically uses a Bigsby-equipped Boneyard model in Aerosmith and solo live shows.
Note that the competition for our pick in this “simple beginner’s amp” category was much more hotly contested than our other picks in this guide. The Crush 12 just barely edged out two other amps that our panelists liked. One is the Stage Right 611800, a very loud, 40-watt amp with built-in reverb that’s a great choice for those who need a powerful amp on the cheap (although that person probably isn’t a beginner). The other is the Vox Pathfinder 10, an amp with a simple control setup that our panelists loved, but a rather bright and blaring sound that some liked and some didn’t. Both are mentioned in the competition section below.

As you will note in the earliest catalogs, Ibanez guitars were first "copies" or "reproductions" of guitar models originated by several American guitar manufacturers and manufacturers from other countries. They were not forgeries, as they were never sold with misleading logos or with the intent to deceive. Ibanez models replicated such styles as the Gibson Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, Rickkenbacker styles, and others. Due to their high quality, Ibanez guitars and those made under other brands, such as Greco and Aria, quickly earned a reputation around the world as quality instruments at a great value. There is a form of urban legend that circulates in the guitar community that has many variations, but usually involves either Gibson or Fender suing Ibanez, Aria, or some other Japanese manufacturer, with the intent to stop that company from manufacturing superior copies. The truth is less glamourous. Only one company ever sued another, and it was Norlin (the owner of the Gibson brand at the time) suing Hoshino (owner of the Ibanez brand) and the suit was focused only on the "open book" headstock shape common to Gibson guitars and replicated on the Ibanez guitars. The suit was brought in 1977, but by then Ibanez had already changed the headstock shape on its copy models, so the suit was settled out of court. No other company was ever sued by any other company. However, this episode has given rise to the term "lawsuit" guitar, which is used to describe any Japanese copy guitar made in the shape of an American manufacturer's model.
This diagram shows 3 single coils wired in parallel, allowing seven tone choices. The typical 3 single coil guitar contains a 5 way rotary switch which allows you to get 5 sounds - each single coil; neck and middle in parallel and middle and bridge in parallel. This modification will give you 2 more sounds - all 3 pickups in parallel and Neck and Bridge in parallel.
The flanging effect is created by mixing two identical signals together while delaying the second signal by a small and gradually changing period of time. This delay is often no longer than 20 milliseconds. A simple way of thinking about the differences between phasers and flangers is that phasers work by affecting the frequencies with a filter, while a flanger affects frequencies with a time-delay.

Get a Luthier (or do it yourself if you have the knowledge) to change the tuners to the ones I specified, take the sharp edges off the neck, throw some extra light strings on, and do a set up and this guitar becomes a dream guitar for kids or adults for a lifetime. So while the Yamaha APXT2 may not be the best guitar for your purpose, in this price range you WILL NOT find the perfect guitar, period. At least Yamaha gave us a foundation off which to build (which you can't say for other brands) and with a little modification here and there, you will have the perfect little guitar. I bought this for my child and I find myself picking it up and playing it more than my more expensive full size guitars. It's just a pleasure having it around the house, but not so much so before I modified it. There's nothing worse than having a guitar that's just about not a toy as compared to a professional guitar. You want to make your guitar easy to tune and enjoyable to play so spend the extra bucks to make it perfect and you will have no regrets.


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Until his death in August 2009, Les Paul himself played his personal Les Paul Guitar onstage, weekly, in New York City. Paul preferred his 1971 Gibson “Recording” model guitar, with different electronics and a one-piece mahogany body, and which, as an inveterate tinkerer and bona fide inventor, he had modified heavily to his liking over the years. A Bigsby-style vibrato was of late the most visible change although his guitars were formerly fitted with his “Les Paulverizer” effects.

There have been a series of the Boss RV pedals, some of which have included delay as part of the package. The RV-6 doesn't brand as a reverb/delay pedal, but it does have a "+Delay" mode that incorporates it into the reverb's decay trail. While it doesn't quite meet the same decorated feature list as the HOF (no true bypass, no analog signal, less modes) the RV-6 does add an expression pedal option, which gives you some added flexibility that might be more helpful in performance situations.
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While musicians intentionally create or add distortion to electric instrument signals or vocals to create a musical effect, there are some musical styles and musical applications where as little distortion as possible is sought. When DJs are playing recorded music in a nightclub, they typically seek to reproduce the recordings with little or no distortion. In many musical styles, including pop music, country music and even genres where the electric guitars are almost always distorted, such as metal and hard rock, sound engineers usually take a number of steps to ensure that the vocals sounding through the sound reinforcement system are undistorted (the exception is the rare cases where distortion is purposely added to vocals in a song as a special effect).
“Tone that emulates the human voice is always more accessible,” Waara continues. “Otherwise, purely electronic music would have taken over, and we wouldn’t be making guitars anymore. There are some absolutes in human DNA about wanting to feel connection and that’s probably a fuller frequency tone, that’s tone that is more reminiscent of the human voice. Or, for instance, a violin or organic instruments that have been around for hundreds of years. When we talk about guitars having an organic quality, it’s because that’s rooted in what human beings know. Which is air moving, wood vibrating, people speaking.”

Silk strings and Steel strings are described as a mixture of classical and steel strings, and are also called “compound strings.”  They have a mellow sound and lower tension that provide the feeling of a classical guitar, while still providing the brightness of the metal of a steel stringed acoustic.  The term silk is referring to the nylon used to make classical guitar strings, which we will learn about next.
If you want to get really technical, the electronics “on board” a basic non-battery-powered guitar form an “RLC” circuit, the letters standing for resistance (R), inductance (L, since I is used for current) and capacitance (C), three key values in an AC circuit that determine the relative “impedance” of various frequencies. The inductor is the magnetic pickup (which “induces” voltage/current based on the vibrating metal string), the resistor is the tone knob (a potentiometer or variable resistor), and the capacitor is a tone cap, in this example 0.05 uF (about right for a humbucking pickup like in a Gibson Les Paul).
I've been playing guitar actively for 40 years. I was looking for a dreadnought cutaway with pre-amp. At this price point there isn't a better made guitar. I would have to spend 2-3 times as much for rosewood back, sides, fret board and saddle for a Taylor or Martin.My first guitar was a Yamaha, so I was happy to find another that took me back. It is aesthetically flawless. I think the Fishman in my Martin Custom X is a tad stronger but I can EQ that; and I love the tuner. If it matters to you, it is made in China. (I thought Yamahas were Japanese).Sounds amazing un-plugged with great bottom end. Very pleased.

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Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
^ Jump up to: a b Peterson (2002, pp. 36–37):Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA: The Guild of American Luthiers. Number 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011.
Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
I am a guitar player, teacher and composer. I started playing piano at the age of seven. Five years later I had my first guitar performance with a local band. My style was inspired by guitarists like Nuno Bettencourt, Joe Satriani, Jerry Cantrell, Marty Friedman, Zakk Wylde, Steve Vai and Dimebag Darrell. During my career I had many bands and music project, going through different styles of original music and sometimes cover bands. In 2012 co-founded the band Vulgar Bulgar (Pantera tribute band). In 2013 started teaching guitar at Rockschool.bg. Currently freelance guitar teacher, session musician and solo performing artist.
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Thanks for this explanation. I have built a few electric guitars, but they have been in the Gibson style with two humbuckers. I am now working on a guitar with an HSH configuration, so for starters, I needed to understand the basic 5 way switch, which if you just looked at it, it makes no sense. Now I see that the wipers of each pole are on the opposite end of each side.
This brand is originally from Japan and  Hoshino Gakki owns it. Ibanez activates in U.S.A, Japan, China and Indonesia, and it is one of the largest, recognized names out there. This manufacturer has developed over 300 models of electric guitars and has collaborated with many musicians that have lent their imagination to the making of customized units.
A small number of bass amps designed for the upright bass have both a 1/4" input for a piezoelectric pickup and an XLR input for a condenser microphone mounted on the bass, with a simple mixer for combining the two signals, as described below. Some Acoustic Image amps have a dual input design. A rare feature on expensive amplifiers (e.g., the EBS TD660) is the provision of phantom power to supply electrical power over the patch cable to bass pickups, effects, a condenser mic (for an upright bass player) or other uses. A small number of 2010-era amps that have digital modelling features may have an input for a computer (e.g., USB), so that new digital effects and presets can be loaded onto the amp.
On August 21, 1965, during a Beatles concert tour, Randy Resnick of B-Sharp, aMinnesota music store, presented Harrison with a second model 360/12 FG “New Style” 12-string electric guitar, distinguishable from Harrison’s first 12-string by its rounded cutaways and edges. There was a television documentary produced by KSTP TV in Minneapolis documenting this event.
I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!
They may not always be the first thing you reach for, but the MIDI effects plug-ins that come with most DAW applications like Logic and Cubase often offer something very different from most audio plug-ins. For example, arpeggiators and step sequencers can be great for use in the composition process, and you can use MIDI note to controller data (CC) plug-ins to generate automation data for the parameters of other plug-ins. As they process only MIDI data, and not audio, MIDI plug-ins put very little strain on your computer. Matt Houghton

First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
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Let's discard the keyboard idea. And the human hand idea. Let's isolate the guitar player from the instrument. The player can manipulate only three parameters - the tone, velocity and duration of sounds to be generated. We have that in MIDI. (Okay, the guitar player can dance and wear a costume, but for our purposes, that's not part of the equation.)
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.
This is a nice improvement on the ME-70, which I owned previously, except for one thing: plastic expression pedal. That's why it got 4 stars from me. The ME-70 had a metal pedal, and it was substantially larger. This plastic pedal does not have the same feel. Feels chintzy. I was expecting similar quality but in that one regard the quality is inferior to the previous version.
Eric Johnson: highly contoured two-piece select alder body finished in a “Thinskin Nitro” lacquer, one-piece quarter-sawn maple neck with a V-shaped profile, 12″ fingerboard radius and 21 polished frets, Fender/Gotoh staggered vintage-style machine heads eliminating the need for a string tree and three special-design custom-wound single-coil pickups with countersunk mounting screws. Other features include a parchment ’57-style pickguard, five-spring vintage tremolo, silver-painted block and ’57-style string recess with no paint between the base plate and the block. Colors include White Blonde, 2-Color Sunburst, Black and Candy Apple Red. Also available as a rosewood neck version with a bound round-laminated 12″-radius rosewood fretboard, a three-ply parchment pickguard, staggered vintage-style tuners, a custom tremolo block and four brand-new finish options (including Dakota Red), three of which (Lucerne Aqua Firemist, Tropical Turquoise and Medium Palomino Metallic) are exclusive to this model.

One of more commonly known effects for musicians is distortion. It falls into the family of effects sometimes referred to as "dirt" boxes: Distortion, Overdrive, and Fuzz. In simple terms, it is cutting the top and bottom of the sound wave off using a technique known as "hard" clipping to create a more square shaped wave instead of the more natural sine wave formation. A solid explanation on the techniques and methods of creating different types of distortion can be found on Wikipedia.


Guitar FX BOX does REALLY real-time DSP. Signal is sampled from sound card input, processed and then sent to the output with VERY LOW LATENCY. Unlike many other "real-time" audio programs, I/O delay with Guitar FX BOX is extremely low, virtually undetectable! This is achieved using DirectSound (or WDM streaming) for fast access to the hardware (sound card) and fast DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Through DirectSound, latency is about 20ms with most sound cards, or even less. When WDM streaming driver is used, latency can go as low as 5ms! Nevertheless, exact total i/o latency still depends on hardware/drivers.
If you know what you are doing setting them up, it might not be your main guitar, but if you've ever had a guitar fail on you in front of a large crowd and you need to pick another real fast (Before the solo) for the money they beat any other guit, I've had that is not top of the line and they can really take a beating and stay in tune and super easy to work on.
An electric guitar works on the principle of electromagnetic induction. This means that an electric guitar has electromagnets in its system which generate magnetic fields. Apart from this, an electric guitar has an amplification system which amplifies the sound waves generated by the guitar’s string. It is this combination of electromagnetic induction and amplification system that makes an electric guitar run.
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Started shopping here when I was just getting my feet wet with the music career, bought a Mexican Humbucker strat and went on from there. Over the next 3 years, after many pedals, amps, and other major gears, I've become a solid local musician. This place has the best service hands down to take care of your gear needs in your career, they find out what you need, let you demo the gear for as long as you want, and never forces you to make a purchase decision. I'm glad I can go to this place for all my gear needs and support, so I can spend most of my time on actual music. The employees are super chill, and you eventually get to know them and the bands they play in after a while. It's a really supportive community for local musicians.

The wah-wah pedal is one of the most identifiable of all guitar effects, yet is one of the most simple as well.  An easy way to think of it is that you have a tone knob under your foot.  It is literally just that.  A rocker foot pedal allows you to accentuate high frequencies when your toes are down.  When you put your heel down, you accentuate the bass frequencies.


Specs for combos were as follows: Checkmate 10 (6 watts, 6″ speaker, two inputs, striped grillcloth); Checkmate 12 (9 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs); Checkmate 14 (14 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs, tremolo); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, tremolo, reverb); Checkmate 16 bass amp (20 watts, 10″ speaker, volume, tone); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 18 (30 watts, two 10″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and Checkmate 20 (40 watts, 12″ speaker, reverb, tremolo). Piggyback amps included the Checkmate 25 (50 watts, 15″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 50 (two-channels, 100 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo, “E tuner”); Checkmate 100C (two channels, voice input, 200 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and the big hugger-mugger Checkmate Infinite (200 watts, two 15″ speakers, stereo/mono preamp section, reverb, tremolo and a bunch of other switches). The one shown in the catalog actually has a block Teisco logo and carried the Japanese-marketed name – King – in the lower corner.
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.

Gibson thought it was a good idea to label the switches to make using them more intuitive, the problem is that they don't really correspond to their use in praxis. The Rhythm label was justified back in the rock 'n' roll era (that of Guitar Slim not Boyz II Men), but the times have changed and nothing stops you now from playing a rhythm guitar in Treble position (metalheads love it).
If you play with your guitar’s tone controls all the way up, your tone is going to be trebly and bright — possibly even painfully shrill at high volumes. To get a handle on their range, get a clean sound cooking out of your amp and play at every numeral stop on your instrument’s tone pot dial. And for multi-pickup models, do that for each individual pickup and all the blended settings. Find a few positions you like, and while playing a tune you know by heart, roll to different settings for verses, choruses and solos and see how tonally diverse and interesting things become. On stage this can be a very impressive way to create fresh sounds — subtle, but noticeable — without relying on pedals or amp channel switching.

E-B-E-G#-B-E (use light gauge strings because three strings must be raised) Open E is used by: Brian Jones on "No Expectations", "I Wanna Be Your Man"; Keith Richards on "Salt of the Earth", "Prodigal Son", "Gimme Shelter", "Jigsaw Puzzle", "Jumpin' Jack Flash", "You Can't Always Get What You Want" and by Bob Dylan on his 1975 album Blood on the Tracks. By Hoobastank on their first and second albums, and by Junior Campbell on The Marmalade recordings Reflections of My Life and I See The Rain Used by Johnny Marr of the Smiths on "The Headmaster Ritual".
Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, CBS, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Ibanez, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, Winston
Kingston guitars (regardless of the model) are generally worth between $50 and $200 today, and your instrument falls within that range. There are some extremely clean examples of these for sale at around $250, but they’ve also been for sale for a while. Getting a complete player pack for $20 is a no-brainer, but don’t expect this to be anything more than, well, a beginner guitar. Also, don’t worry about decreasing the value by opening up the guitar to clean it or shimming the neck to try to correct the action. For something like this, it’s all about playability—not collectability.
There was a lot of tinkering with the Spanish-style electric guitar in the 1930s and 1940s since the electronics in a hollow-body instrument caused distortion, overtone, and feedback—especially problematic for recording sessions. Historians and guitar enthusiasts enjoy debating over who really developed the first solid-body Spanish-style guitar to resolve these sound issues. The National Museum of American History owns a rare Slingerland Songster made in or before 1939. This model is possibly the earliest commercially marketed solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar.
Don’t worry about getting the strumming patterns down perfect. You will develop your own strumming style in time. Just try to stay in time. If you have to strum open strings in-between chords, while you switch from one to the other, that’s OK, too. In fact, sometimes, it’s even desirable. It’s what we call ‘style’. You’re main objective right now is learning the chord fingerings, and getting your changes smooth.
This list would have been incomplete without us mentioning the Shure SM57-X2U. Because it is a plug and play device, as it uses USB connectivity, this microphone enables its user to record itself/herself while jamming to his/her favorite songs.  As its manufacturer claims this unit is capable of offering a frequency response that is tailored for vocals. What is more, the model also has brightened midrange as well as bass roll off.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
As players such as Bobby Broom, Peter Bernstein, Howard Alden, Russell Malone, and Mark Whitfield revived the sounds of traditional jazz guitar, there was also a resurgence of archtop luthierie (guitar-making). By the early 1990s many small independent luthiers began making archtop guitars. In the 2000s, jazz guitar playing continues to change. Some guitarists incorporate a Latin jazz influence, acid jazz-style dance club music uses samples from Wes Montgomery, and guitarists such as Bill Frisell continue to defy categorization.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.
The display borrows a lot of its design cues from Guitar Hero—which is probably a good thing, since so many players are already familiar with that system. Like GH, Rocksmith has vertical columns to show you which frets to hold, and the notes move toward you until they reach a line that represents the moment you're supposed to play them. However, GH's display didn't need to move since there were only five buttons. Because it has to span the entirety of an actual guitar neck, Rocksmith's display floats up and down. If you're playing primarily notes between the fourth and seventh frets, for example, it will show you just those frets on the screen, then slide up to the 10th or 11th when it's time for you to play those.
Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.
There are no frills: a single channel controlled with a Volume, Tone and Gain knob. You can switch between 15 and 7 watts, and don’t forget that for an all-tube amp, that is a lot of volume! While not having effects may sound like a bummer, the stripped-down circuitry helps your guitar signal to maintain its purest tone. Simple, raw and with attitude, cool looks and a mere 5.5kg; be prepared to rattle your brain with an authentic “British” sound.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica for 60 years. I started when I was ten-years-old. I have taught guitar and banjo for a number of years. My guitar of choice is a Martin D-41, an affordable guitar that is much like the D-45. The woods and construction are famous. There are other makes but none surpass Martin. My harmonicas are Hohners given to me by my father when he passed-on. Anyone can learn. I learned the fiddle after I reached my 70's. Just listen, play, and learn. Don't give-up. There are many good guitars, and banjos. Martin makes the best, and Stelling makes the best banjos. I started-out with a japanese banjo in the 1970's. A white Eagle, distributed by Alvarez.
Also joining the Univox amp line in ’71 (illustrated in a ’72 flyer) was the Univox U-4100 Minimax Amplifier, already showing a different style, with dark tolex covering but still the oval logo plate on the upper left of the grille, now covered in black with vertical “dotted” lines (surrounded by a white vinyl strip). The Minimax was designed for use with bass, organ, electric piano or guitar, but really was a bass combo amp. It packed 105 watts through a 15″ Special Design speaker with 27-ounce Alnico magnet and 21/2″ voice coil, powered by 11 transistors, no tubes. The back-mounted chassis had two channels with high and low inputs, plus volume, bass and treble controls for each channel. Recommended especially for keyboards was an optional UHF-2 High Frequency Horns unit with two horns for extra bite. The flyer for this amp was still in the 1980 Unicord book, but a ’79 price list no longer mentions it, and it was probably long gone, though some may still have been in stock.
Better known simply as an acoustic guitar, the “steel” strings (they come in all kinds of construction, not just steel) are louder and brighter, and a much more versatile instrument to play. Folk, rock, jazz — acoustic guitars have it all covered. Those steel strings also chew the ends off your fingers until eventually you develop hard calluses on the tips — very handy for plucking boiled eggs out of the saucepan.
The Hi Flyer guitar and bass would be offered pretty much until the end, in ’77. At some point after, probably around ’73 or ’74, the plastic logo was changed to an outline decal logo. Also, at some point the pickups were changed to the distinctive twin-coil humbuckers with metal sides and a see-through pink insert on top. These changes most certainly occurred by the ’76 catalog, when the Hi Flyers were available in four finishes – sunburst (U1815, U1815B), white (U1816, U1816B), black (U1817, U1817B) and a cool natural with maple fingerboard and black dots (U1818, U1818B).
If the LR Baggs Venue is a little too expensive for your taste, the Acoustimax Sonic Maximizer preamp from BBE gives you a lot of the same controls at less than half the price. Like the Venue, the Acoustimax is ideally designed for the gigging or studio acoustic guitar player who wants to have more control over their tone and be able to adjust for different rooms and environments. BBE delivers this control with a five-band EQ, as well as feedback and frequency dials.
Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.
To celebrate the new generation of shredders profiled in our May/June “Loud Issue,” the SPIN staff decided to find some wheedle in a haystack, taking on the impossible task of ranking our favorite guitar players of all time. Traditionally, the “greatest guitarist” timeline begins with Robert Johnson magically conjuring the blues, nears perfection with Eric Clapton mutating it beatifically, and then ultimately reaches a boomer-baiting Rock and Roll Hall of Fame apotheosis with the free-spirited Jimi Hendrix shooting it into space like feedback-laden fireworks. For this list, we veer toward the alternative canon that kicks in with the Velvet Underground trying to erase that form entirely, making guitar solos gauche and using instruments as sadomasochistic tools for hammering out sheets of white heat.
Amazing unit! I loved using my POD XT Live for years and wanted to upgrade. This unit totally exceeded my expectations. Sounds amazing and it's incredibly flexible for routing processing and effects chains. They built the hardware better and it's got a better set of pedal buttons too. Absolutely recommend! (Plus, they announced at NAMM that there will be more model packs, so that's great too!)
The Kent 800-series hollow bodied guitars all had asymmetrical bodies and the pickup closest to the neck was tilted. There are several Kents that had symmetrical hollow bodies and no tilted pickups. The pickups are either humbuckers or wide single coils with covers. They resemble Gibson ES-style guitars. The necks and headstocks are very similar to the Kent 800s. They're probably newer than the 700s and 800s. I won’t be covering those here.
The role of a pickup is simple. They pick up the sound produced by the guitar and create an electric signal which then travels via an amplifier. For instance, pickups do not relate to getting a partner with your music, but they are actually a characteristic of the electric guitar. They serve the same purpose that frets do on an acoustic instrument, but the pickups will determine the vibrations before sending them to an amplifier.
In preparation for making these electric guitar pickups, I carefully studied the qualities of both vintage and modern guitar tone. All of my pickups feature grounded shielding to reduce noise from external electric fields and are potted under vacuum to eliminate microphonic feedback. The result of years of building and testing is a family of pickups for guitar, bass, lap steel and other instruments that will help you achieve the tone you desire. All V V G pickups are hand-made in the USA. Several of the new designs offer the user the capability to shape the tone by changing the magnet assembly and reversing the effective winding direction. We're here to help you find your tone!

Orion Blue Book Online (at UsedPrice.com): The Orion Blue Book Online will help you determine how much nearly anything that you own is worth, including guitars. This includes electric and acoustic guitars, as well as bass guitars, amplifiers, and other guitar peripherals. The company behind Used Price works in conjunction with Orion Bluebook, which makes this the largest website dedicated to pricing used musical instruments. The website is browsable by the first letter of your instrument's manufacturer or make. It has every major guitar manufacturer and most obscure ones.


I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.

With that in mind, the quality of said effect is satisfactory, to say the least. You maybe won’t see the same level of refinement as you would in some stand-alone models, however its reverb comes across as fairly organic. On top of that, you are presented with several decent options. All of that aside, the real value of this Zoom comes from its ability to combine up to 6 effects at any given time.


It was late 1969 early 1970. I was 13 years old and had been learning guitar for about a year when I was given what I considered to be the key to a world of freedom. Mum & Dad said it was ok for me to setup my room in a shed inside Dad’s garage. The shed was the size of a small bedroom, about eight by ten in the old measurements. It was originally built from scraps of recycled building material from a 100 year old house and was initially used as a tool shed.

Mundt Music of Longview, LLC is your one stop guitar shop. Located at 2312 Judson Road, we have everything that you need whether you’re buying your first guitar or adding to your growing collection. Make sure to join us in store on October 10, 2016 at 6:30pm, for our “Taylor Road Show” event. Guests will enjoy an evening of guitar talk and demos with Taylor factory staff and guitar makers from El Cajon, CA. It’s an event that any guitar enthusiast won’t want to miss.
With the bridge in a locked position, bring the strings to your preferred tuning and check the neck curvature. If you don't intend to keep the instrument in standard concert pitch, tune it as you intend to normally tune it- half a step down, three steps down, whatever. Also, you should have the gauge of strings you intend to use on the guitar at this point, if you did not already. Both the string gauge and the tuning of the strings dictate the amount of tension that is going to be pulling on the neck, and everything about the adjustments you are about to make is affected by the tension on the neck.
I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.
As for necks, the majority of guitars will have either a maple or mahogany neck, with a rosewood, maple or ebony fretboard. Again, there’s no right or wrong, and a neck wood is never going to sway your decision. But you should choose something that feels smooth and comfortable to play. There are a variety of shapes and profiles, and what you go for will depend on personal preference and playing style. For example, a modern C-shaped neck is always a safe choice as the majority of guitarists will feel comfortable using it, while a thin U-shape is great for faster players (think punk rock and metal).
For many years, Martin has used a model-labeling system featuring an initial letter, number, or series of zeros specifying the body size and type; traditionally 5- is the smallest (and technically a terz, tuned a minor third higher than a guitar, at GCFA#DG), advancing in size through 4-, 3-, 2-, 1-, 0-, 00- and 000- (though these are commonly referred to as “Oh”, “triple-oh”, etc. they are, in fact, denoted by zeros, keeping the numerical-size theme constant. These instruments originally had in common a neck that joined the body at the 12th fret. In 1916 Martin contracted with Ditson’s music store to produce a much larger store-badged guitar to compete sonically in ensembles; this boxy thunderer was named the Dreadnought in honor of the most horrific weapons system of the day, a British Navy battleship so large it could fear nothing, or “dread nought”. Indeed, HMS Dreadnought was its name, and it proved an apt product tie-in between the huge ship and the huge guitar. In 1931, Martin introduced D-bodied guitars under their own name, and a new standard was set. Around the same time, to meet the needs of banjo players wanting to cash in the guitar’s new popularity, Martin unveiled a second line of letter-named guitars, the OMs. Taking the body of the 000-, squaring its shoulder to meet the body at the 14th fret, and lengthening the scale, they created a truly legendary line of instruments (OM- wood-and-trim packages ranged from the plain -18 (mahagony back and sides) and -21 (with rosewood) to the full-on pimpmobile OM-45. The 14-fret body of the OMs proved so popular that it quickly became the standard for 00-, 000-, and D- models as well. There things stayed for about 45 years; then, in 1976, Martin debuted the M-36 and M-38. Keeping the narrow-waisted shape and moderate depth of the 000-, and combining it with a width slightly more than even that of a D-, the M-s (sometimes called 0000-) were phenomononally well-balanced in their tone. These have lately been joined by the Gibson-Jumboesque J, and the even larger SJ. The numbers/letters denoting body size and shape are generally followed by a number that designates the guitar’s ornamentation and style, including the species of wood from which the guitar is constructed. Generally, the higher the number, the higher the level of ornamentation. Additional letters or numbers added to this basic system are used to designate special features (such as a built-in pickup or a cutaway).
This Yamaha Pacifica features a Strat sound that is very good, especially since the humbucker can be tuned into a single pickup by lifting up on the tone control. Like with every other strat, it has a five-way switch which allows the player to select the bridge pickup, the bridge+middle pickups, the middle pickup, the middle+neck pickups, or just the neck alone. In the event that you are tired of the strat sound and you would like to return to Led Zeppelin, simply flip to the humbucker and get set to go!
Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.
This tonewood is nearly always seen in the material used for a fretboard on the neck. The various species of Rosewood add their own harmonic overtones with Indian Rosewood being the most warm. In general, Rosewood provides incredible harmonic complexity, personality, and resonance that’s worthy of stage and studio recording as can be seen on the solid Rosewood body of the Yamaha A3R A-Series Guitar.

Some effects, such as flanger, wah-wah, and delay, are obvious to the ear. But others, such as compression, reverb, and even distortion, are core elements of your tone, so you might not always notice these as “effects.” But used artfully, or sometimes even just correctly, they can take you to tonal utopia. Even if your personal style doesn’t call for mind-altering sound, you can still improve your sound by using effects.
Some large combo amps and large speaker cabinets have ball-bearing-mounted caster wheels to make it easier to move them. All combo amplifiers and speaker cabinets have some types of carry handles, either a folding handle on the top or recessed handles on the sides. There are two types of recessed handles: some equipment has folding, spring-loaded metal handles, with the spring holding the handle flush against the chassis until it is pulled out for use; the second type is handles that are non-moving, and which are flush with the surface of the amp/cab, but with a hollow area behind the handle for the hand to go. In both cases, the handle does not project out beyond the amp/cab, preventing the handle from catching on items during transportation and/or being damaged.
Dont buy too cheap. The cheaper the guitar, the harder to play and the less quality the sound. You want a rewarding feel and sound or you will get discouraged. Buy a better guitar used than a new one cheap. Are you going to learn chords or fingerpicking ? Some guitars are better sounding for one than the other. Some like Taylors are versatile and provide good sound for both. Be smart. Good luck.
The switches and jack sockets are important in a reliability sense first and foremost I feel. In a play-ability sense, you want a firm feeling, accurate switch and one that lasts well with regular use. You want a jack socket that doesn't fall apart or get too crackly over the years of years, they take a lot of abuse! So here there's no 'magic vintage tone' secret, I would just recommend quality switches from the brands renowned for their years of producing reliable items. I trust and use those from Switchcraft, Pure Tone, Oak Grigsby & CRL. All very solid, well made items that last really well. In particular, I've been predominantly using a multi contact jack socket made by a company called 'Pure Tone'. Please forgive their brand name, as this isn't some tone transforming jack socket, but it is a common sense improvement of an old design which is great. It features 4 points of contact for the jack connector, two for the hot, two for ground. 100% greater surface area, giving it a firmer seat on the jack connector and a sturdier, more reliable connection which is a no brainer upgrade in my opinion.
The Fender Stratocaster is one of the most iconic electric guitars in music history, and its equally distinctive sound is down to its selection of pickups. Although you’ll occasionally find a humbucker, traditionally a Strat will feature three single-coils – one each at the bridge, middle, and neck positions. They offer that sweet, bright, chiming single-coil sound that’s perfect for all styles of soulful music – from blues and country, to classic rock – and are perfect for lead guitarists, as they slice through even the densest mix. There are some excellent Stratocaster pickup sets around, although be sure to check out the Lace Sensor Blue-Silver-Red set on our chart for something with a little extra edge.
Since Jackson is currently owned by Fender, they have the facilities, resources and more importantly, the legal right to use Strat bodies in their designs. The result are legitimate super strats from the brand that helped jumpstart the entire hot-rodded guitar market. The Adrian Smith SDX is a great example, co-designed by renowned Iron Maiden guitarist to be a road and gig-worthy metal guitar while retaining an accessible price point.

Gibson guitars are the produce of the Gibson Guitar Corporation which produces guitars and other musical instruments which sell under a variety of brand names. Gibson Guitar Corporation was founded in the year 1890 by Orville Gibson in USA. It is a mass producer of the Guitars and is the most widely used guitars in the world. Gibson guitars are exported all over the world and are considered as one of the best guitar brands in the world. Gibson Guitars actually are the giant guitar company which also owns other brands of guitars. Some of the popular brands which are owned by Gibson are Baldwin, Epiphone, Kramer, Maestro, Slingerlands etc.


Totally disappointed in the workmanship.. No quality control.. the fret bars raised off the neck are so sharp that they almost cause lacarations in your fingers, they Pickups are the Cheapest you can get and I am very disappointed in the quality control and what product exactly they are trying to put out the door... maybe revamp your product and put out least worth getting a good review over...
If you’re a beginner you might not feel like you know enough to be able to test play different guitars, but play whatever you know and see if you notice any difference. If you only know a few chords, or even “Smoke on the Water”, then play that, it’s better than nothing! Don’t care about the staff hearing you play, they’re used to it and are probably just happy to have a potential customer.
This is a good list although after owning most of these brands or at least having played all of them, I would re-rearrange the order. Gibsons although a good guitar are simply no longer the quality of Taylor or Martin. They are lagging behind these guys. Yamaha and Epiphone despite online "reviews" are also not near a Taylor or Martin for that matter. So I would drop Gibson, Yamaha, and Epiphone down the list, and although Seagull makes a decent guitar, they are no better than Blueridge, so I would drop them down and bring Blueridge up. Of course this is all subjective, but here is my list re-ordered for what its worth.
The dark underbelly is Lou Reed’s comfort zone. Despair and degradation are his muses. Emerging in the mid Sixties at the helm of the Velvet Underground, he offered up a gritty black-and-white alternative to the rainbow-colored pyschedelia of the prevailing rock culture. He brought us along, albeit reluctantly, to meet junkies and hustlers, S&M bondage goddesses and suicidal transvestites. He was one of the first rock guitarists to embrace chaos truly and wholeheartedly.
For several years now Godin have been producing some of the most sonically versatile guitars available with their combination of regular pickups, piezo pickups and synth pickups built into their higher end guitars. Note that the synth pickups are 13-Pin and compatible with the Roland GR series guitar synths - if you want MIDI you have to first plug into a Roland synth then take the MIDI out from the synth.
New too was “the popular Supro” Baton Guitar, sold with a matching Baton amp as the Supro Baton Guitar Outfit No. 200. This was basically the same shape as the old Avalon, but a short-scale (21″) student version now finished in a grained walnut finish. The silkscreened fingerboard sported diamond inlays. The Supro logo plate was on the slightly flared head. This had the new exposed-staggered-pole pickup with a rectangular handrest bolted on over the pickup, all mounted in the middle of a large square plate. The strings attached to a pyramidal tailpiece. Controls now included bakelite volume and tone knobs on either side of the end of the fingerboard. The back was covered in no-slip suede. It came with a natty alligator soft case. Based on the use of the description “popular,” which Supro almost always used to describe previously available models, the transition from the Avalon to the Baton may indeed have begun in 1940.
Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Roseville, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
I have many acoustic guitars in the collection including Gibson, Taylor, Fender and Washburn. That said none of these guitars come close to the richness in sound of a Maton. I'm assuming this is due to the quality of the Australian timbers and workmanship. Although a little expensive I highly recommend you at least play one in a shop as a treat and hope a dead relative leaves you some money to give you an opportunity of taking one home.
Jackson is yet another brand among the best electric guitar brands satisfying the needs of metal players. In fact, around three decades ago, back in the ’80s, Jackson guitars were the favorite ones for all metal and hard rock players in the world. Even today, the legacy continues as we see these guitars trending among the fans. Notably, the models like Kelly, King V, Soloist, Dinky, and Rhoads still rule the realm of guitars for their outstanding performance and tone.
Here we have a real vintage Rare IBANEZ CONCORD beauty from the Golden Era of the Best Japanese Martin D41 style guitars period... This example is Ibanez Model #679 and is the Top of the Line and is an exact Martin copy and is a great " Law Suit " model from the era where Ibanez set out to make the best guitars worldwide period...Fit and finish even after 30 years it is simply superior it appears to be thin old school Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish, this guitar was constructed using the best woods very ornate intricate triple bindings with lots of beautiful inlaid abalone on the Brazilian Rosewood fretboard and the spruce top body WoW...please do have a very good look ...This example has employed the best exotic woods in its construction, The top looks to be solid no seam edge showing at sound hole some pick wear and looks solid, the sides & back also look the same on the inside and outside grain matches so again it looks to be solid?.... A high grade mahogany neck, Sitka spruce top, Choice Indian Rosewood sides & back, and what seems to be a beautiful Rich Chocolate brown Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard with gorgeous abalone, frets show some wear lower several yet plays excellently all the way up with very good action and fast & plays easily...Neck width is a nice slim-med super comfortable 1-3/4" at the nut with no buzzing all the way up action is good set at 5/32nds @ 12th fret. This guitar has been well played and well taken care of and is a good professional grade instrument ready to record tonight. Cosmetically this is a 8.5 out of 10, A real vintage player that has not been abused at all yet has been lovingly well played its tone has richly mellowed with the years and only improved with its age and now after 30 years it shows this wonderful patina that can not be replicated that only comes with age, vintage is not for everyone some like it new we understand that this vintage Martin Copy Japanese Guitar however is not new or is it in mint condition yet it is very beautiful in vintage terms of mellowing with age and patina Wow this is for the TRUE VINTAGE LOVER... also you Ibanez Collectors of Japanese vintage. Its Sound is second to none it has nicely articulate lows with nicely contrasting bright highs and the mid-range has a good punch and ring when finger picked, full on sweet big tone when strumming open cords. This one is a real pleasure to play and is EZ on the eyes too. These are really great old classic guitars and are getting very difficult to find now in anywhere near this kind of vintage condition...its all original and the original tuners work very well with no need to change them out they are keeping the guitar tuned well...no cracks or repairs non needed , excellent original neck set and angle, intonation is good. This Rare beauty is conservatively JVG condition rated at very good - excellent in a 30 year old Vintage guitar...amazing looks and tone & playability in a real vintage collectible that your not going to want to put down.. Every bit as good as the much more expensive Martin for a fraction of that. Any questions ask? gr8bids@comcast.net .

Amongst the best guitar brands in India for acoustic guitars, Martin is one that stands out. Martin is one of the best known brands for its steel-string guitars. It is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars which produce top notch sound quality. However, the company is best known for their signature dreadnought acoustic guitar with X-bracing. It is truly one of the best guitar brands for some of the best quality guitars in the market.
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It’s best to perform pickup adjustments while playing through a clean amp. You can more accurately hear the true tone and volume of each pickup when the signal isn’t being compressed or overdriven by a cranked amp or pedal. Listen to the tone of each pickup position, and try to balance the height of each pickup until the volume remains relatively the same when changing pickup settings.


Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).
Whatever budget you’re on, you will always be able to find a suitable guitar. Even in the $100 price range you can find some models that play nicely. However, in that super-budget market there is a lot of garbage, so be careful. There’s a difference between ‘affordable’ and ‘cheap’, so do your research before buying something that may offer no value.

Materials for necks are selected for dimensional stability and rigidity, and some allege that they influence tone. Hardwoods are preferred, with maple, mahogany, and ash topping the list. The neck and fingerboard can be made from different materials; for example, a guitar may have a maple neck with a rosewood or ebony fingerboard. In the 1970s, designers began to use exotic man-made materials such as aircraft-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and ebonol. Makers known for these unusual materials include John Veleno, Travis Bean, Geoff Gould, and Alembic.
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