Judging by many of my last few years guitar purchases (on Ebay and elsewhere), I’m the kind of a person who seems to think he’s the kind of a person who likes guitars with a lot of knobs and switches. I’ve bought several multi-pickup guitars. Old ones, new ones, new ones made to look like old ones (not those stupid “relic-ed” ones, though…I’m an idiot, but I’m not stupid). Yet, as I look at the keepers in my collection, I’ve only kept one guitar with more than four knobs, and none with more than two pickups. Odd.
The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.
Sounds cool! You’re right that flats are a key to the ’50s Nashville sound. But a lot of guitarists forget that almost EVERYONE used flats until the latter part of the ’60s. Early Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Motown and other R&B, surf, and of course anything jazz-related — it’s all flatwound guitar work till ’66, ’67 or so. Also, the main reason we migrated away from nickel is because the material became markedly more expensive at the end of the decade. (Though yes, some did prefer the brighter tones of replacement materials.)
Not only is Mick funny, but the book is extremely useful for learning theory, efficiency, technique, playing over chords and more. Similar to Creative Guitar (recommended below), Mick is all about having you put in the work to learn what he's laying out. While you'll spend more time learning this way, it'll pay off and at the same time, teach you a great way of learning.
Then, in the late ‘60s, two things happened. First, Unicord was purchased by conglomerate Gulf+Western around 1967. Then, Unicord was merged with a company called Merson, which housed brands like Tempo, Giannini and Hagstrom. It’s not certain what the exact timeline of these events were, but once the merger occurred, Univox up and moved its production from New York City to Westbury, NY. However, that didn’t stay static for long.
Before we go into the parts of an electric guitar, it’s worth noting that there are three different body types: solid body, hollow body, and semi-hollow body. The main difference between them is the way the bodies are constructed, and the amount of resonance they produce. If you’re into punk, rock, metal, or any style of fast or heavy music, then it should be solid body all the way. It allows for louder sounds and more sustain, while avoiding the feedback issues that affect some hollow bodied instruments at higher volumes. The hollow and semi-hollow bodied guitars on the market will appeal to players who prefer softer styles, such as jazz, country and blues, as well as soft rock and pop, as they offer a full, rich and more resonant sound with lots of bass. Beginners will be best off sticking to a solid bodied guitar, as they are easier to handle in most scenarios. For the rest of this anatomical breakdown we’ll focus on solid body guitars.
I am struggling with the same issues trying to wrap my head around the benifits of constructing my neck through in this fashion . It would appear most of the big dog builders subscribe to this theory though I don't really know why. I read in a post in this forum that it started with a mistake by luthier Carl Thompson when he cut the channel too deep for the neck and was later copied by Ken Smith ,and then Fodera.
I have the Epi SG400. It is very playable, and I think the stock PUP's are fine. It is a very versatile guitar. The only thing about the SG is it has a heavy neck. I mean strap one on, and that long neck just tugs down on my left shoulder. I actually tried to sell mine a while back just because of the heavy neck. I added a strap bolt to the top of the horn thing, or whatever you call it, and that helped. Some like the SG310 which is cheaper, but it has a bolt neck, and I think that will translate into an even heavier neck. Rhonda makes some SG clones as well. My only advice would be try straping one around your neck before you buy if you can.
One of the best and most affordable gigging amps I have ever played. Blackstar accommodates all styles and budgets and should be in place of line 6. Too many people want traditional tone, but Blackstar brings a new edge to the table and builds extremely reliable tough as nails amps with new ideas like the ID series amps, I own an ht40 and am extremely impressed. Get one.
 How to Order Custom Guitar: THIS IS A PRE-BUILD PRICING. You will receive the custom guitar exactly as pictured. Please make sure to choose the required options marked with the RED ( * ) asterisks and it will compute automatically the options you choose. We also offer Optional Upgrades but they are not required. And then once you hit on Buy Now button, go to the top most portion of the website and you can see a cart image logo and click on that then you can see VIEW CART and CHECKOUT to determine the total cost of the guitar including the shipping and the discount.
Treble is really a form of gain boost that must be considered while gain-staging our signal path. With good tone, a note should ring like a bell, not slaughter like a machete, and that is accomplished by shaving some attack off the waveform and rounding off the frequency response. A bit off rollback on the tone knob takes you into the ballpark, along with your amp settings (I have a dedicated treble-cut on my AC30 that is necessary to tame my telecaster). Once I am in the ballpark, I use the volume knob to fine tune, and personally I tend to let it be from there, relying on a gain-boost pedal to lift my sound when necessary without altering the tone.
I took a Mesa Boogie to England and used a voltage regulator. The power out on the Boogie converted the power to the correct US one for the digital delay I took. There is an issue with Hertz - not the car rental company. In the US it's 60, in most countries it's 50. Don't know what that does but I'm sure there are savvy electrical guys on Q who do.

Great post a lot of useful information here I found this old acoustic guitar made by lotus I have never heard of this brand and have been trying to research it for about a month now and haven't gotten any closer to finding out the history of it if anyone know anything about them I'm all ears it has a tag on the inside model no. LW 65 or g5 lotus made in japan thanks in advance for any information I can get
This. There's genuinely nothing good about it. It makes a Squier Starter Pack and a Daisy Rock look like a PRS Private Stock. Pretty sure the description isn't even true. An old roommate of mine had one and it was the worst guitar I have ever played in my life and I'm not just saying that. Very seldom do I say that a guitar is just plain terrible. Even with other guitar brands that I hate (like Squier) I'll say, "well, everyone has their own preference," but this guitar is just inexcusable. http://www.indianaguitar.com/products/Scout-acoustic-electric-967.html#.VZNeJ1L3bCQ

The latest in a grand lineage of guitar-based Kings, Marcus [pictured, top] has - without exaggeration - the chops to bear that weighty association. Mentored by ‘Uncle’ Warren Haynes, he was personally tipped to us by Kenny Wayne Shepherd and leads a band of formidable players that seem able to turn on a dime from Miles Davis jazz jam to blues and searing Southern rock. 
Polishing the frets is a whole instructable by itself, but I definitely recommend that you do it at least once a year. It makes the guitar look nice, and it gets some of the oxides off the frets(not sure if it really helps anything, but it sounds helpful, right?). Also, the tape pulls out some of the junk in the open pores of the wood(if your fretboard is rosewood).

Fuzz pedals provide guitarists, bass players and even keyboard players with a hefty amount of distortion that sounds VERY different to regular distortion sounds. Fuzz pedals make your guitar sound like its pushing your amplifier to the point of blowing up. A fuzz pedal completely changes the sound of your guitar signal into a heavy, fizzy, and extremely noisy sound that, depending on which pedal you choose, can provide a bass heavy noise, to a spitting ‘broken’ amp sound. Think Velcro being ripped apart and you’re somewhere pretty close.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
Early valve amplifiers used unregulated power supplies. This was due to the high cost associated with high-quality high-voltage power supplies. The typical anode (plate) supply was simply a rectifier, an inductor and a capacitor. When the valve amplifier was operated at high volume, the power supply voltage would dip, reducing power output and causing signal attenuation and compression. This dipping effect is known as "sag", and is sought-after by some electric guitarists.[46] Sag only occurs in class-AB amplifiers. This is because, technically, sag results from more current being drawn from the power supply, causing a greater voltage drop over the rectifier valve. In a class-A amplifier, current draw is constant, so sag does not occur.
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
The Deluxe was among the “new” 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured “mini-humbuckers”, also known as “New York” humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson (actually just a cut-out P90 pickup cover) in order to use a supply ofEpiphone mini-humbuckers left over from when Gibson moved Epiphone production to Japan. The DeLuxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson’s US-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck in late 1968. The “pancake” body (thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) came later in 1969. In late 1969, a small “volute” was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the “i” in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the “i” had returned, plus a “Made In USA” stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be special ordered with full-size Humbucker T-Top pickups, these full size versions of the Deluxe were “Standard” spec. They were also available with “Gibson” embossed pickups in 1972 only and considered rare, as only 9 were produced. David Bowie Can be seen playing one of the 1972 “Standards” in his 1972 release Jean Genie video. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977. Inte reintroduced rest in this particular Les Paul model was so low that in 1985, Gibson canceled the line. However, in 2005, the Deluxe was with more popularity due to its association with Pete Townshend [1] and Thin Lizzy.
Nothing says rock and roll quite like an electric guitar—and whether you're just learning to play or you've been practicing for years, the right instrument can make you feel like a rock star. Selecting the right match for you is a matter of personal taste and playing style, but the broad selection available at Amazon.com can help you find the guitar and the accessories you're looking for.
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-44? Electric Guitar. 4 single coil Pickups. Great, original Black / Green burst finish. '57 Chevy style aluminum pick guard. "Shark-Fin" headstock. Rosewood fingerboard. Original 4+2 tuners with cast cover. 4-bolt neck joint with an adjustable truss rod. Bridge adjustable for height, intonation and string spacing. 4-Square pole pickups, 4 pots, 4 pickup selectors and a 3 position rotary wafer switch. Some of the pots do things and some don't either by modification or design. The rotary switch simply acts as an On / Off switch. Guitar works great the way it is, or could be configured other ways as well. We have not modified it since we acquired it 8 years ago. It's spent most of it's time in the box, until I decided to get around to listing it. Missing whammy bar as are most every Teisco we have ever owned. The bridge pickup has had one of it's mounting screws changed. The finish is in exceptional shape for a 40 year old guitar (while the photos make the guitar look black the finish is actually a dark green to black burst). Plays and sounds great. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in near new shape with virtually no wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, oiling the fingerboard, nut checked for correct height, neck angle checked, pickup heights checked and adjusted, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .008 when fretted at the first and the body (super low)) adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!) and cleaning and polishing entire instrument. This is our old shops standard $75 tune-up. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings. No case included.
For those who like that 1950s style Gretsch sound, you’ll appreciate the Gretsch Dual-Coil humbuckers which can go from glass like cleans to smooth low growls to all out riff worthy dirt when you add some distortion to your amp. The single cutaway design and maple neck with gloss polyester finish make it extremely comfortable to play too. A guitar beginners and professional musicians alike, can enjoy.
Anyways, it sucks to not have a camera to show stuff or even a way to measure stuff I'm describing. I'll have to obtain a few small things to set it up. like a saddle and an allen wrench that doesn't suck. Probably whatever caliper or shim they use to do real setups as well. Maybe latter frames just have tilted bridges after a while. I don't really know. The bridge is rather thick. If you lower the bridge, do you just sand it?
The company’s reputation and output continued to grow. Forays into mandolinmaking in the late 1890s and ukulele making in the 1920s greatly contributed to their expansion, and by 1928 they were making over 5000 instruments per year. The company remained family-owned and employed a relatively small number of highly trained craftsmen making instruments primarily by hand. By the early 1960s Martin guitars were back-ordered by as much as three years due to limited production capacity. In 1964, Martin opened a new plant that is still the primary Martin production facility.
The strongest thing I did for Joni as a producer on Song to a Seagull, from 1968, was keep everybody else off of that record. She was a folkie who had learned to play what they call an indicated arrangement, where you are like a band in the way you approach a chord and string the melody along. She was so new and fresh with how she approached it. It's the reason I fell in love with her music. She was a fantastic rhythm player and growing so fast. She had mastered the idea that she could tune the guitar any way she wanted, to get other inversions of the chords. I was doing that too, but she went further. I understood her joy in using bigger tools later – jazz bands, orchestra. But the stuff she did that was basically her, like 1971's Blue, was her strongest stuff. Match her and Bob Dylan up as poets, and they are in the same ballpark. But she was a much more sophisticated musician.  By David Crosby
It’s interesting to note that luthier Steve Klein introduced a guitar that got a lot of press in the early ’80s with a body virtually identical to the Ovation Breadwinner. According to Charles’ son (and future president of Kaman Corporation), Bill Kaman, Jr., Ovation considered “pointing this out” (i.e., legal action), but given its bad track record with solidbodies, figured it wasn’t worth the effort.
Hand built with the same precision as our larger guitars, just 25% smaller.  Great for travel, ideal for children struggling to get their arms around full size guitars, fantastic second guitar for the office.  Because it has a smaller box design our Travel will have a smaller sound (like any smaller guitar) but our Travel Electric with built in auto tuner allows you to plug into any amplifier or PA system giving you the same power as our full size guitars.
Good point Gary. The T5 is in a separate category. I found it to be useless as a true acoustic. Thin, weak tone due to its shallow body. Plugged in as an amped acoustic just so-so, and as an electric for rock with overdrive or distortion, pretty good. The Ovations with deep contour bowls, like my Elite 2078, while not so easy to hold, are better at everything, especially unplugged tone, and cost half as much.
It also includes a -6dB/oct low-pass filter that’s built into the plugin’s tube/valve modeling equation, and can imitate a lower-quality tube triode.  There’s a switchable output saturation stage, which can be used to overdrive the output signal and all the standard Voxengo plugin features, such as full multi-channel operation, channel routing and built-in oversampling. It’s great for guitars and for dirtying up sounds such as vocals, drums or synths.
From the standpoint of theoretical perfection, the Baxendall tone control is the opposite of the Fender tone stack. With bass and treble variations that are mostly independent, the frequency response is quite flat when both controls are set to the middle of their range using linear pots. Using the opamp/feedback form of the controls means that there is no signal loss that needs be made up elsewhere. This is virtually the standard for hi-fi tone controls. However, there are some guitar amps which use this form of control, tweaked a bit to match the guitar frequencies. 

Unintentional phase cancellation can also occur if a guitar's pickups are wired incorrectly, or if a new pickup installed in the guitar has different magnetic or electric polarity from the one it replaced. To fix this, the pickup's magnetic or electric polarity needs to be reversed (which one exactly depends on the respective polarities of the other pickup(s) and whether or not hum-cancelling combinations are desired). While the latter is usually a small matter of reversing the pickup's hot and ground wires,[24] the former may be more difficult, especially if it requires the magnet(s) to be removed and reinstalled in a different orientation, a process which can damage the pickup and render it unusable if not done carefully.[25] This is the case with most humbuckers. On the other hand, single-coil pickups with magnetic polepieces can simply be repolarised by applying a strong enough external magnetic field.
Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
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Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
A little bit of history will make this clearer… The original Fender Stratocaster switches were 2-pole 3-way switches (that’s actually what I have on my schematic, I think you’ll see why in a bit) and were intended only to select either the neck, middle or bridge pickup. However these were “make before break” switches where, as the switch is moved across from one position to the next, the next contact is made before the previous contact is broken. People found that if you could get the switch to rest in between those three positions that you’d actually have both neck and middle or middle and bridge pickups connected at the same time and, most importantly, it sounded good! It became a common thing to rest the 3-way switch in between the positions, so common that in the 60’s people were filing notches in the detente mechanism of the 3-way switch. These became the “notch” positions. In the 70’s, Fender adopted this popular mod into their stock switch thus becoming what we now use and call a 5-way switch but is, in fact, a 3-way switch with 5 positions.

Your budget – When it comes to the best electric guitars or really any real instrument in general, you’re going to have to pay a decent amount of money if you want a quality investment. Although we did find a few budget-friendly guitars to take a look at below, a lot of these will near the half-a-thousand mark and beyond. It all depends on you, of course. Do you want a beginner and starter electric guitar to begin those shredding adventures? Or perhaps the best of the best that the most famous artists use? Perhaps you’ll end up saving more than you already have as you’re reading this — it may be worth it to wait a bit longer.
The following songs have been selected to highlight some of the best electric guitar songs from the 1980s. Each song includes links to tab, and wherever possible links to free audio versions of the song. A guideline for the difficulty of each song has been included. The assumption with these guidelines is beginner guitarists can play the ​basic essential open chords, F major, plus basic power chords. Difficulty assessments do not include the guitar solos.
Nice-Keys-CompletePlus-JNv2.0  A large set with three different piano types plus all the nice instruments.  All in a package of 943mb.  Pianos have different brightness and resonance settings available and all the nice instruments from EPs, Pads, Organs, Strings, Orchestra and Synths are included.  A printable link to the list of available instruments is here  Nice-Keys-CompletePlus-Instrument List
A guitar amplifier (or amp) is an electronic device or system that strengthens the weak electrical signal from a pickup on an electric guitar, bass guitar, or acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through one or more loudspeakers, which are typically housed in a wooden cabinet. A guitar amplifier may be a standalone wood or metal cabinet that contains only the power amplifier (and preamplifier) circuits, requiring the use of a separate speaker cabinet–or it may be a "combo" amplifier, which contains both the amplifier and one or more speakers in a wooden cabinet. There is a wide range of sizes and power ratings for guitar amplifiers, from small, lightweight "practice amplifiers" with a single 6" speaker and a 10 watt amp to heavy combo amps with four 10” or four 12" speakers and a powerful 100 watt amplifier, which are loud enough to use in a nightclub or bar performance.
The paper presents the results of the modal analysis of six types of structures made from plates. Firstly, was done geometrical modeling of structures, after which they were numerical modeled using shell and solid finite elements. The next step consisted in simulating the structures behavior to free vibration for different thicknesses and materials. The results were processed and compared in... [Show full abstract]
Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.

Bill Collings dropped out of medical school in the early 1970s[3] and instead worked in a machine shop for five years.[4] At the same time he built his first guitar. In 1975 he moved to Houston, Texas, where he worked as an engineer with a pipeline and oil field equipment company by day and a guitar builder by night. Three years later he met renowned musician Lyle Lovett and built him a guitar.


:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.
Stay tuned for the second part of our series/parallel discussion next month. We’ll pick up the soldering iron and explore some sweet parallel/ series switching options for our Strats. This will also close out our run of Stratocaster mod columns. When we finish the series/parallel discussion, we’ll switch over to Telecaster and Esquire mods. Until next time, keep on modding!
Reverb is a sound effect used both in music and audio engineering, which adds a spatial dimension to the original track. To put it into more simple terms, a reverb gives you an impression that the sound is originating in a large room. You are hearing the source sound but also its numerous iterations as it bounces off different surfaces. Reverb guitar effects pedals offer a simulation of this phenomenon.
Fender "Squire / Bullet" Strat. Great, low priced project guitar. Black, laminated body, maple neck with Indian Rosewood fingerboard. 4-bolt neck plate. Original, "covered" tuning machines and nut installed. Frets in NEW condition. Neck adjusted well with slight "back-bow" under no tension and does have adjustable truss rod. Body and neck finish in excellent shape. Headstock finish has wear to the word "Bullet" see photos. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Ready for your custom hardware parts. Would make a great project / player or second "don't care if it gets stolen off the stage" guitar.
Modeling pedals use a host of methods to make your guitar sound like it’s coming from a specific sound source. For example, there are many pedals out there that are designed to model the sound of classic amps. This allows you to plug your amp and pedal straight into a PA system or even a pair of headphones, while maintaining the characteristics of the amp the pedal is modeled after. This also helps you avoid having to carry your amp with you everywhere you go.
With a neck made of mahogany and a body of maple, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is one of the best hollow body electric guitars included on this list. Due to its hollow body design, this guitar has the ability to play well in all genres, ranging from country to hard rock, and is known for its high-quality tone and ability to maintain tune through long periods of playing. This is possible in part due to the pickups at the neck and bridge, reducing excess humming for clarity in tone and pitch.  The knobs at the base of the body have a super-grip design, making it easy to change the volume and tone between the neck and the bridge and utilize the three pickup selector. A pearl block inlay is included on the rosewood fretboard, making this 20 fret electric guitar a strong option to conclude this list.
Guitar-Sunbeam : Precisely transmits the eternal electric guitar, ideally suited for modern production. It combines an extensive library of strum patterns, brute force, arpeggios and real riffs with real-time performance monitoring. An innovative playback engine allows you to create an almost infinite number of variations of chords and you get convincing, musical results.
Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.
Hey man this is a really great instructable and i am in sort of the same situation that you were in. I have 2 guitars,a Yamaha CG-101 classical, and a Fender Squier Strat. I want to save up for a warlock or Eipiphone les paul or SG or something, but my income is very low and i am going to get a drum set instead. My parents could care less of music, but they are in it for me. Anyways, my strat has three single coils and what I really want to do is replace them all with EMG's.Would that be possible? But those are like $200 a peice. Maybe i should just wait until i get some more money after my drum set. Thanks and shoot me a PM or something.
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.
I can't have them above Guild. Their usa made stuff and vintage acoustics are gems no doubt, but they set 7 or 8th for me. I just wish they still made American made acoustics. Like guild they are a hallmark name in the acoustic guitar world. Unlike guild they aren't being made in america. Guild and their supporters really lucked out with the Cordoba purchase. They're bringing Guild back where they belong. On top. Now if someone would do the same for Washburn. I really thought the usa made stuff would get back to greatness with that solo deluxe warren haynes model, but they stopped American made guitars all together which is a shame.
When Bob Dylan described the Band's "wild mercury sound," he was really talking about Robbie Robertson's guitar, as exemplified by his torrid, squawking solo on "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" from their 1966 tour. But by the time the Band were making their own LPs, Robertson had pared down his approach, evolving into a consummate ensemble player. "I wanted to go in the opposite direction," said Robertson, "to do things that were so tasteful and discreet and subtle, like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper… where it was all about the song."
Playability and tone are two of its most commended traits. Many describe its neck as very easy on the hands, while others describe the overall playing experience to be better than their other acoustic guitars. The TK-40D preamp gets a lot of nod from users who want to fine tune their amplified sound, while there are also many who are satisfied with its acoustic sound.
Rackmounts are most commonly used in recording studios and "front of house" live sound mixing situations, though professional musicians who play electric bass, electric guitar, or synthesizers may use them in place of stompboxes, to create a rackmounted head unit for their speaker cabinet(s). Rackmounts are controlled by knobs, switches or buttons on their front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface. During live performances, a musician can operate rackmounted effects using a "foot controller".[14] By setting up effects in a rack-mounted road case, this speeds up set-up and tear-down, because all of the effects can be connected together with patch cords (which can be left connected permanently) and all of the units can be plugged into a power bar. This means that a musician only needs to plug in the main power bar into AC Mains power and plug their instrument into the rack, and the last effect unit's output into their instrument amplifier and/or the PA system.
It is a standard dreadnought with 26 frets. There are no electronics, no cutaway, and no fancy upgrades. It has a book matched sitka spruce top, rosewood fingerboard, adjustable rosewood bridge, cream colored plastic binding, rosewood back and sides, and a black inlaid headstock. The neck is not one piece and is made from presumably African mahogany. It has closed gold tone tuners, black beveled pick guard and some plain black line art for a rosette. This guitar is void of polyurethane and has a lacquer finish, so much the better.
"Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired

The weapon of choice for today’s modern recording musician, the Axe-Fx is as good as it gets in terms of modeling amps. Used by countless musician both live and in the studio, this machine has proven to deliver for just about every musical style under the sun. Notable users of the Axe Fx include Alex Lifeson, Steve Vai, Misha Mansoor, and many others famous musicians. The Axe-Fx II features a high resolution speaker simulator with 150+ “Factory” models and room for 512 “User” cab locations.  It contains a vast virtual inventory of hundreds of vintage and modern guitar amps, speaker cabinets, guitar stompbox and studio effects, and more. The options are pretty much endless.
This is an interesting one - by fitting a MIDI pickup to your guitar you can record your performances as a MIDI track as well as live audio. This can then be assigned to any software or hardware MIDI-triggered instrument to double up or even replace the guitar part. Some DAWs now also allow the extraction of audio to MIDI data from a recorded audio part, but the MIDI pickup route is more accurate where electric guitar is concerned.

Most players don’t use more than one modulation effect at once, so it doesn’t matter all that much if you place the phaser before the chorus or the flanger in front of the phaser. However, the one exception is tremolo, which should be placed behind other modulation pedals, as this placement will produce the most dramatic and desirable rhythmic on/off effects. Placing a tremolo pedal in an effects loop is also closer to the signal path of an amp with built-in tremolo, but my personal preference is to plug a tremolo pedal into an amp’s front end and save the effects loop for other effects.
SHAPING THE BODY This is totaly up to you. You can carve down the body however you want. For my project I chose to carve down the body as close to the way the guitar I was modeling it after was. I used a verity of different sanders. I used a belt sander for the arm contour on the top back of the guitar, a dremmel tool with a sanding attachment for the small carve down under the neck, a 6" sanding disk attachment on my drill for the body contour on the back of the guitar, and a Black and Decker mouse sander for the neck area and smoothe down of all the other areas that had previously been carved. One rule of thumb is to only sand with a 220 grit when carving the body down. This will prevent any deep scratches any lower grit will cause. Don't use any electric sander on the falt parts of the guitar either, like the top or the back. Use a 220 grit paper with a sanding block to smooth out those areas. You can also run a slightly dampened cloth along the surface of the body and let dry before the final hand sanding. This will raise the small grains in the wood so they can be cut by the paper easier. Sand in the direction of the grain.
Whether you're picking up a guitar for the first in your life or have been rocking the stage for years, there is a left-handed instrument out there that's just right for you. Electric guitar design and construction varies depending on the size of the body and shape of the neck, tonewood, bridge and pickup. Different woods produce different tones. Higher end guitars are usually made of hardwood like alder, maple or mahogany while a plywood or pine option gives exceptional durability perfectly suited to a beginner or student musician. The guitar's body typically comes in solid body, hollow body or semi-hollow body. Harder rock musicians often favor a solid body for louder, more vibrant pickups and feedback, while an acoustic performance would benefit from an acoustic guitar. The neck of a guitar is another consideration. A shorter neck would generally be seen on a smaller guitar; a musician who does not have large hands would appreciate the easier handling of a smaller guitar. The majority of electric guitars have six strings; however there are seven, eight and 12 string options for those who have mastered their left-handed guitar and are looking for ways to boost their performance. Left handed guitarists have made a rich and impressive mark on the history of popular music. No matter if you plan to rock the stage in front of an adoring crowd or just want to riff with your buddies at home, there is a sensational left-handed guitar out there waiting for you.
The tone controls compensate for and complement the somewhat lifeless and mostly midrange-y character of the average guitar pickup. The gain control, often designed with a pull-boost, basically excites and heats the preamp tubes, which along with judicious use of both the amp and the guitar’s tone controls will begin to produce much of the sonic seasoning and flavor that guitarists and their fans crave as it flows from the speakers.
PRS SE Standard 24 Electric Guitar The PRS SE Standard 24 is a great first or backup electric guitar. This is a reliable workhorse that more than delivers in design, build, playing comfort and overall sonic performance. It can also be your only electric guitar, but chances are you’ll want another one along the way and give in to another model - or another SE Standard 24.
Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Casino Coupe™ Ltd. Ed. AJ-100 Acoustic Guitar PRO-1 Spanish Classic PRO-1 Classic 3/4-Size Epiphone Masterbilt® Olympic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith Classic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Classic Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Ltd. Ed. EL-00 PRO Mahogany Epiphone Les Paul SL™ Electric Guitar PRO-1 Acoustic PRO-1 Classic Acoustic Epiphone SG-Special VE™ Electric Guitar PR-150 Ltd. Ed. DR-100 Wine Red DR-100 Les Paul Express Les Paul Ukulele Outfit PRO-1 Plus Acoustic Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Special-II Wine Red Epiphone Les Paul Special VE™ electric guitar Les Paul Studio LT™ Electric Guitar Les Paul Special II Epiphone AJ-210CE Acoustic/Electric Outfit SG Special AJ-220S PRO-1 Ultra Acoustic/Electric AJ-100CE MM-30S Ltd. Ed. 1963 J-45 Ltd. 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"Of course using effects pedals isn't cheating. I personally would define cheating as using corrective technology of some sort to falsify an artist's performance/musical ability, and I don't think that's what using pedals do. They're used for creative purposes, to manipulate sounds for artistic effect and suit personal tastes/whatever suits the mood of a song. They expand the range of timbres you can get from only using one instrument.
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
Wah pedals can sound eerily similar to a human voice, and they were actually a favorite of Jimi Hendrix, who many have said possessed the most expressive guitar playing amongst all the great guitarists. Wah pedals are great to activate right when you’re about to take a solo and when you really want to make it sound like you’re speaking with the guitar.
Epiphone, coolest brand ever. More songs have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other. Sure! Gibson bought & attempted to hijack the Epiphone kudos, but failed, as all that happened was Epiphone became the affordable brand of the people. Gibson & Taylor are by far…so far…the least cool brands ever. I’m telling you, more songs (filled with passion & desperation & anger) have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other, by folk who can’t afford or don’t have a mummy to buy them a Fender strat or Gibson.

The foot pedal is usually the only control on a wah pedal (especially on famous models like the Vox V487 and Dunlop Crybaby), but some come with controls to change the Q, or how wide the sweep of the wah is and how prominent it sounds. They are great for adding extra attitude to your bends and giving funky riffs some extra punch. The intro to “Voodoo Child” is probably the most recognisable use of a wah pedal. These are great fun and we’d recommend them to anyone – if lead guitar or funky rhythm is your thing you can’t do without it!
PRS Guitars was founded in 1985 by Paul Reed Smith in Maryland, USA. They build high-end guitars, even if they also have a more affordable Asian range (the SE series). The most popular PRS endorser is Carlos Santana, but we could also count Dave Navarro and Al Di Meola among them. Santana's guitar is equipped with dual-coil pickups and a mahogany body with maple top. It looks a bit like a Les Paul with two cutaways. And the sound is closer to a Les Paul than to a Fender.
So, here’s the deal: the M5 is NOT an amplifier modeler (no Marshall or Vox recreations here), nor is it meant to replace your entire pedalboard. This is ONLY an effect modeling pedal, and contains over 100 effects, of which you can have active one at a time. In terms of “extras” it has a tuner and tap tempo. The Line 6 M5 is a perfect first pedal to buy, since with 100+ built-in effects you can play with all of them and find out what types of effects you really like. It’s also a perfect pedal to simply just have on your pedalboard, for situations where you need a certain effect and don’t have a pedal for it. Need a reverb in a pinch? It’s a reverb. Need a compressor? You got it. Need a phaser? Yep, it’s that too. It’s also really inexpensive for what it is, making it a great starting point that you can build upon.
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Played by Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend—among countless other electric guitar innovators—the 1959 Super Lead helped shape rock and roll as we know it. Introduced in 1965 (1959 has nothing to do with its year of release), the amplifier included four inputs, two channels, 100 watts of searing power and a Plexiglas faceplate (hence “Plexi”). Matched with 4x12 cabinets, the 1959 Super Lead helped to popularize the “Marshall stack.” The amplifier can be famously seen being played by Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock. It’s been highly sought after ever since.
The Boss MS-3 is a multi-effects pedal that is not meant to replace your favorite pedals, rather it is meant to help you make better use of them. It has more than enough effects (112) for most musical applications, but what makes it special is its old school approach that lets you incorporate pedals and amps into your rig, along with its built-in effects.

Fender Hot Rod Series Pro Junior III 15W 1x10 Combo - This tube-driven guitar combo with a 10” Eminence vintage-cone speaker reproduces the harmonically complex output and sensitivity to playing synamics that vintage Fender tone hounds love. Dual 12AX7 preamp and EL84 power amp tubes crank out the same celebrated midrange as vintage combos. Fender has updated the Pro Junior III with an external speaker jack, a more legible control panel, and internal tweaks.


The more pedals you collect, the more you should consider investing in a pedal board as well. Some pedal boards are simply that – boards – to which you can stick your stompboxes to keep them organized. But you can also get powered pedal boards, which have built-in DC power supplies. That means no need for batteries or individual adapters connected to each pedal: just tether them to the central source, and you can power them all up by plugging the pedal board into a single outlet.


I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!
The Kay Musical Instrument Company grew from the Groeschel Mandolin Company (or Groeshl Instrument Company[8]) in Chicago, established in 1890.[9] In 1921, the company was renamed to Stromberg-Voisinet. In 1923, later president Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer joined the company, and in 1928, with the help of an investor,[9] he bought the company and started producing electric guitars and amplifiers.[10]
Les Paul DID NOT design the guitar that bears his name! Ted McCarty and his team at Gibson came up with it and took it to Les at Delaware Water Gap where he was living and recording (no planes flying over). Ted showed it to Les and he said, "They're getting too close to us, Mary, we better join 'em." The only contribution that Les made to the original guitar was that lousy wrap around the bottom trapeze tailpiece that was quickly dumped...

Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.

PLUG THE PORES What you use to prep the body for paint depends on the chosen finish that you will go with. For a solid color finish you will want to fill any of the pores with a wood filler or Bondo glazing putty. I prefer Bondo because it dries quickly and sands smooth. Use one of those plastic speaders that you can get for mud at a paint or hardware store and press the filler firmly into the pores and gaps in the wood. Cut diagonaly accross and against the grain to fill the pores and gaps better. Use a sanding block and a 220 grit paper and after the filler dries to ensure an even flat surface. Only use your hands to lightly sand on the rounded edges or hard to reah areas of the guitar. The roundness of your fingertips can cause depressions in the woods surface so stick with the sanding block on the flat areas. Inspect the surface to see if any pores or gaps remain and repeat the steps if needed. Then clean the surface with a tack cloth to remove any dust.


Coming to its making, it has full-size dreadnaught body for big sound. The top is made up of laminate spruce whereas sides and back are nicely finished with basswood. This Fender Guitar is the reason it lacks a little bit of sounding because solid wood guitars can provide high-end sounding. As far as handling is concerned, kids might find it difficult due to its full size. Teenagers with right heights will find it quite comfortable. Just make sure that your fingers go down to fretboard pretty easily.
Instrument amplifiers are available in a wide range of price, quality, and performance levels. Some are designed for beginners, such as small, low-wattage practice amps, which typically have a single 8" speaker and about 10 watts, or smaller "combo" amps with relatively low wattage (15 to 20 watts) and a single 10" speaker. Mid- to large-size "combo" amps with 30 to 50 watts and one 12" speaker or four 10" speakers are best for high-volume situations, such as band rehearsals and onstage performances. For large venues, such as outdoor music festivals, guitarists may use one or more 100 watt (or several hundred watt) heads with one or more 8x10” cabinets. Some guitar amps are strongly associated with specific instruments or genres, such as the Marshall amps, which are widely used in heavy metal music.
Again, if a Martin guitar needs a neck set, don't try and solve the problem of high string action any other way! Take the guitar to a *good* repair person, pay the money, and have a proper neck set done. A good neck set will make the guitar play and sound the best it can. With the correct neck set and bridge and saddle height, the guitar strings will drive the top of the guitar best, giving the best sound possible, and at the ideal playing action. And after all, isn't that what it's all about?
The guitar features hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top supported by Martin's incredibly reliable mahogany HPL (high pressure laminate) back and sides, essentially similar to the configuration found on many of Martin's mid-priced acoustics. If you're looking for an affordable starting instrument that has big-brand backing, or you are looking to get into the parlor-style guitar trend, check out the LX1E Little Martin.

What makes the THR100HD special is its clever digital power amp, which faithfully mimics the operation of real valves. Then there's the fact that you get two of everything: two preamps, both with a built-in booster function that behaves as a stompbox; two effects loops; two power amps; two XLR line outs. What you see is very much what you get, with a five-position amp voice selector, which packs three overdrives - crunch, lead and modern - and two cleans: solid, and er, clean. There's also a channel volume control, because the master volume control works inside Yamaha's Virtual Circuit Modelling environment, adding more drive to the THR's digital power amp simulation, which in turn has five different valve choices, as well as Class A or Class A/B operation. Lurking on the rear panel are two speaker-simulated balanced XLR line-outs, with a ground lift switch that uses the latest Impulse Response cabinet simulation. There are superb Fender-influenced cleans, bluesy touch-sensitive crunches and a choice of classic or modern lead tones, all footswitchable for your convenience. The tones are so convincing it's really hard to believe there are no valves. The interaction of the clever digital power stage with the loudspeaker is just like that of a good valve amp, and the virtual valve choices are uncannily authentic.

Yes and he lost the finger tips on his left hand and attached makeshift fingers out of thimbles but managed to play some of the greatest evil licks ever. I love Eddie but he screwed up Van Halen terribly by getting rid of Dave and turning it into a girl band. Duane was awesome and highly skilled and a sought after studio musician. Clapton is the master.


This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
You will see numerous inputs and outputs for sound, depending on your computer. You will want to enable the main one (in which all of the sub­devices are listed) and two others: one for input, and one for output. For input, look for something similar to “Line in”. If you only have a microphone jack, enable that instead. For output, look for “Stereo out” or something similar.
When it comes to acoustics, you can’t beat Taylor’s eco-sourced Tone Woods. The 114e features a solid Sitka Spruce top and layered Sapele back and sides, giving the Taylor a rich and full-bodied sound that is hard to tell apart from solid wood bodies more than twice the price. The electrics and built-in preamp are top notch and you can’t beat that Taylor neck for finger-friendliness if you’re just starting out with chords.​
In the mid-1960s, as the sound of electric 12-string guitars became popular, Vox introduced the Phantom XII, which has been used by Tony Hicks of The Hollies, Captain Sensible of early English punk band The Damned and Greg Kihn, and Mark XII electric 12-string guitars as well as the Tempest XII, also made in Italy, which featured a more conventional body style. The Phantom XII and Mark XII both featured a unique Bigsby style 12-string vibrato tailpiece, which made them, along with Semie Moseley's "Ventures" model 12-string Mosrite, the only 12 string electric guitars to feature such a vibrato. The Stereo Phantom XII had split pick-ups resembling the Fender precision bass, each half of which could be sent to a separate amplifier using an onboard mix control. Vox produced a number of other models of 6 and 12 string electric guitars in both England and Italy.
As I tried to point out, what is high action is based on personal taste for the most part. Also, Martins traditionally have higher action than many other manufacturers. But unless it is a true defect in the particular guitar, from wood swelling or shrinking, etc. action is easily adjustable, but it is recommended that you have a certified Martin warranty repair person do that, unless you are comfortable with such adjustments.
Beyond effects, some processors offer dozens of other capabilities including recording tools, rhythm track generators, plus sound models based on vintage amps, speaker cabinets, microphones, mic preamps, and much more. Many also have MIDI and USB connectors in addition to XLR and ¼” inputs and outputs, and are designed to work seamlessly with computer and iOS-based recording software and apps.
On entering a studio, some guitarists ask if they should leave off the effects they normally use and add them in later. Of course, this can be done; however, if the effects are integral to the desired sound and you are ‘playing’ the effect as much as you are the instrument – fuzzboxes, heavy spring reverb, long delays and so on – it might be difficult to create the right feel during the take without them. If there is uncertainty as to whether the effects are spot-on, split the signal to retain the option of reworking the sound during the mixing process.
Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.
The Kay guitar company's origins date back to the 1890's, starting with the Groeschel Mandolin Company of Chicago, Illinois. The company's name was changed to "Stromberg-Voisinet" in 1921, and shortlyafterwards, in 1923, Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer (the origin of the name "Kay") joined the company and quickly worked his way up to the top. By 1928, Kuhrmeyer had bought the company and that same year the company started producing electric guitars and amps.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.

Before we begin, it should be pointed out that some time ago Guitar Player presented the history of Teisco, based on information painstakingly translated from a Japanese article penned by Mr. Hiroyuki Noguchi of Japan’s Rittor Music, editor of the Guitar Graphic book series. Unfortunately, the article used for reference was an older piece which has subsequently been totally revised and corrected by Mr. Noguchi based on later interviews with principals in the Teisco company. Some of the chronology in the GP story is inaccurate. What follows here is the latest and most accurate information on Teisco (in regards to company history), confirmed in repeated direct communications with Mr. Noguchi in Japan. This information also supersedes some incorrect facts in my own essay on Teisco Del Rey Spectrum 5 guitars in the first issue of Vintage Guitar Classics.


“It had ‘Walking the Dog,’ ‘Route 66,’ and others on it,” Millard says. “That has tone. The reason it has tone is that it was made in the worst damn studio possible. Everyone who worked there said this was a shithole. There was no sound separation, they used lousy mics, they never cleaned it. Andrew Loog Oldham, who was the manager at that point, said that was the key to the sound.”
Minor chords arise as the tonic notes of minor keys that share the same key signature with major keys. From the major key's I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio progression, the "secondary" (minor) triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key's corresponding chord progression as i-iv-v (or i-iv-V or i-iv-V7): For example, from C's vi-ii-iii progression Am-Dm-Em, the chord Em is often played as E or E7 in a minor chord progression.[24] Among basic chords, the minor chords (D,E,A) are the tonic chords of the relative minors of the three major-keys (F,G,C):
James Williamson was the man who facilitated Iggy Pop’s transition from self-lacerating Stooges frontman to solo artist, icon and all-around elder statesman of punk. In a way, Williamson was the only man for the job. He shared Iggy and the Stooges’ Detroit garage rock roots and was a friend of Stooges founding guitarist Ron Asheton during the mid Sixties.
Years ago companies used to manufacture rotating speaker cabinets (the most famous being the Leslie Rotary Speaker) – as they rotated the sound would change and develop, creating interesting modulation effects. Nowadays such things are considered too large and inconvenient to transport and use, so we have stomp boxes to help us emulate the sound. The most famous of these is the Dunlop Uni-Vibe, and although it doesn’t sound as close as other pedals to the real thing, it has become a famous sound in its own right. Rotary speaker effects often have controls for the speed of the effect, and can sometimes (such as in the case of the Uni-Vibe) be connected to expression pedals to control the speed on the fly. If you’re into 60’s psychedelic rock like Jimi Hendrix, this one’s a must.
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
WARTUNG Herzlichen Glückwunsch und vielen Dank dafür, dass Sie sich für ein Produkt von Ibanez entschieden haben. Ibanez legt bei seinen Produkten die höchsten Standards an. Alle Ibanez- Instrumente werden vor der Auslieferung unserer strengen Qualitätskontrolle unterzogen. In dieser Anleitung wollen wir beschreiben, wie Sie das Äußere Ihres Instruments pflegen und Ihre Gitarre in dem Zustand halten, wie sie bei Auslieferung ab Werk war.
What a Beauty! This is a beautiful example of a RARE Vintage Japanese Alvarez 5053 made on 1/11/74. This one is Rare folks with its Old style script logo in mother of pearl inlay check that out...The first thing you can't help but notice on this guitar is how beautiful this guitar looks amazing fit & finish apperance is top shelf..its as good or pretter then others including the Martin ... its not just pretty guitar to look at and admire either it is really well build to play built using some very EXOTIC and beautiful looking tone WOODS as well very high end feel to this one ...as seen in the pics ( new better pics soon to come )It was built using a beautiful grained Sitka spruce top and the gorgeous Back is vivid book matched Brazilian Rosewood as is the sides BR and this examle overall is truly a stunning example, along with the backs center flamed maple section in contrast of the Brazilian Rosewood side sections WoW!, and the beautiful vintage hexagonal cellulloid inlays. modeled after the Martin D41, this guitar is in excellent used vintage collectible condition with only a few finish checks to this guitars glass like finish that one has that warm natural patina only a real 37 year old guitar can earn. Overall very good - excellent vintage condition! It's bound body is masterfully ornately - multi bound, as is the Honduran Mahogany neck & headstock is bound. Action is excellentt and can be easily adjusted up or down to meet your preference by way of an easily adjustable bridge . Truly is a great playing & sounding highly collectible Japanese vintage guitar in its own right. Its Very rare and it has old Alvarez Script Logo! Who cool is that....This is a super rare guitar that tend to go quickly that is getting harder and harder to find! in any condition let alone like this baby it both plays beautifully but it sounds fantastic! Let me know if interested Thanks for looking! Joe.
Bass effects that condition the sound, rather than changing its character are called "sound conditioners." Gain booster effects pedals and bass preamplifier pedals increase the gain (or volume) of the bass guitar signal. Bass preamplifiers for double basses are designed to match the impedance of piezoelectric pickups with the input impedance of bass amplifiers. Some double bass preamplifiers may also provide phantom power for powering condenser microphones and anti-feedback features such as a notch filter (see "Filter-based effects" section below).
Acurious phenomenon that ac-companies certain guitar compa-nies is an inability to translate success from one medium to another. For instance, Martin has never been able to transfer its reputation for high-quality acoustics to electric guitars. And Fender has never been able, on its own, to really succeed in marketing acoustic guitars. Instead, it purchased Guild.

Why We Liked It - Whether you want to find an electric guitar to play sweet country tunes or something completely different, this is a great guitar! It’s extremely versatile and is therefore one of the best ones we’ve tried for beginners so far. That doesn’t mean it can suit more advanced musicians and many other skill levels as well, but especially for beginners, versatility is key.
When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading
An American company that makes some amazing acoustic and electric guitars, Taylor guitars are considered as one of the best in the world. Like Martin, they can be expensive, but surely worth every penny. Taylor and Martin have the upper hand when it comes to acoustic guitar brands in America. One of the popular series is the 200 series and is of great value. For beginners, Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini are perfect choices as they are small-bodied.
Unfortunately, no reference materials were available for this early period, so we’ll make some educated guesses. Based on the evidence of the logo on the 1968 amplifier, we suspect Univox guitars with the plastic logo debuted at about the same time. By 1970, Univox was employing decal logos on some models, further corroborating this conclusion. If this assumption is correct, it would suggest that among the first Univox guitar was the Mosrite copy known later as the Hi Flyer, debuting in around 1968. This would be consistent with the evolution of “copies” in Japan. As the ’60s progressed, the Japanese were getting closer and closer to the idea of copying, producing guitars similar to their competitors, such as Italian EKOs and Burns Bisons, etc., finally imitating American Mosrite guitars in around ’68. The Japanese affection for Mosrites was no surprise, since the band most associated with Semi Moseley’s guitars was the Ventures, who were enormously popular in Japan.
The Quebec-based Robert Godin decided to create his own music instrument company in 1972. Today, the manufacturer sells its products under different brand names: Norman (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), Art & Lutherie (entry-level guitars), Simon and Patrick (mid-range and high-end guitars), La Patrie (classical guitars), Seagull (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), and Godin for electric guitars. Some models are equipped with a piezo and/or "synth" pickups. The body shape is pretty classic, somewhere between a Les Paul and a Telecaster. Among the most famous Godin players we have John McLaughlin and Leonard Cohen. The brand catalog is sorted in different series: Performance Series, Signature Series, Multiac (acoustic/electric hybrid), Passion Series (high-end instruments), 5th Avenue Series, plus some very original single models like the Glissentar, an acoustic/electric 11-string nylon-string fretless guitar!

Integrated MIDI Learn and automation tools streamline your workflow, while the dedicated Live View makes GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER the perfect companion when performing. A range of versatile built-in tools assist you in the studio and on stage: A Metronome with different syncing options, two Tapedecks for easy recording and play-along, a Tuner and a Preset Volume tool with Dry/Wet settings are all at your disposal.
Quartal and quintal harmonies also appear in alternate tunings. It is easier to finger the chords that are based on perfect fifths in new standard tuning than in standard tuning. New standard tuning was invented by Robert Fripp, a guitarist for King Crimson. Preferring to base chords on perfect intervals—especially octaves, fifths, and fourths—Fripp often avoids minor thirds and especially major thirds,[102] which are sharp in equal temperament tuning (in comparison to thirds in just intonation).

Why We Liked It - Even if this isn’t the cheapest guitar on our list, we think the Schecter Hellraiser is the best bargain! To get this much guitar for so little money is almost incomprehensible and we feel like a million bucks when we play it! It not only looks good, it sounds fantastic, and you can be sure to impress everyone who hears you play with this wonderful instrument!
Very difficult guitar to put down. I was browsing local guitar shops, looking for a deal on a used MIM Stratocaster, just to have, I'm an SG man. This guitar caught my eye and the store owner was kind enough to allow me a little play time with this visually stunning guitar. I think I was expecting another copy of Fender's Stratocaster, given the shape and three single coil pickups. From the first strum I knew this was something different, tonally like a cross between a Strat and a "Rick". That's a very big deal. Finish was excellent and setup close to ideal for me, so I wound up with a new guitar for roughly what I expected to pay for a used model. Getting home I immediately ran through my amps, trying to find something to complain about. I'm lucky to have a few tube amps known for excellent clean channels. This is my preference, and this guitar does not disappoint. Think 60s Ventures, dripping with reverb. Yeah! Overall this guitar gives a great range of tone, is comfortable though just this side of heavy and seems to be very well made. Moderate use of Leo Fender's brilliant trem doesn't seem to effect tune. The guitar came strung with 9s, though I've since moved to 10s, my personal preference. And it fits a Strat hardcase perfectly. To be crystal clear, this guitar doesn't replace any of the legends, such as my beloved SG's or Strats. Instead, it provides a beautiful and unique enhancement for guitarists that favor those instruments.
For under £400 you get a set of Paul Gagon-Designed Alnico Pickups which provide a massive sound ranging from smooth and cool surf rock to all out grunge distortion. The AW4470B humbucker in the bridge position is complemented by an AP4285B P-90 neck pickup which ensures you have an array of tones at your fingertips – ideal for clean and distorted amplifiers. The addition of a push/pull coil tap allows you to split the humbucker so you can enjoy the classic sounds of a single coil. A mahogany body and maple neck provide the resonance, depth and snap you need for a wide range of tones and the G&L Saddle Lock Bridge with its six individual saddles offer incredible intonation as the saddles actually lock onto the strings.
Synonymous in the electric guitar industry, the Gibson brand continues to produce some of the best electric guitars on the market, including the Les Paul Studio. Designed with a classic look that maintains the appearance of a vintage quality, this electric guitar comes with a neck that is slimmer than most traditional models, allowing for ease and smooth transitions when switching between notes. The guitar utilizes an upgraded version of humbucker PAF to cancel out any outside interference that detracts from the quality of the sound, while maple and mahogany wood are combined to deliver both definition and sustainability. Other features include traditional tuners that can be manually altered, a Graph Tech Nut for precise spacing between strings, and a neck heel with the class Les Paul design. Well reviewed and great for the price, the Les Paul Studio is one of the best electric guitars available if your cash flow allows.
Jacob - it really depends on several factors: how much money you have to spend, type of music you like to play, electric or acoustic. You can get started with a $100 acoustic of various branding with decent quality or a basic Squier Strat for $100-150 if you want electric for many styles. Epiphone makes Les Paul and SG models for $100 and up for a little more rock and roll edge - its all a choice of your style.
SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.

the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….


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