A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.

Unlike a piano or the voices of a choir, the guitar (in standard tuning) has difficulty playing the chords as stacks of thirds, which would require the left hand to span too many frets,[40] particularly for dominant seventh chords, as explained below. If in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in closed position, then they often can be played in open position; similarly, if in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in root position, they can often be played in inverted positions. A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Additional chords can be generated with drop-2 (or drop-3) voicing, which are discussed for standard tuning's implementation of dominant seventh chords (below).
In a way, guitars are a lot like cars — spending more money can get you more performance through different specs and trims. The extra money usually goes into paying for better parts rather than more options; there aren’t a whole lot of places to add to a guitar (unless you want the ZZ Top spinner installed). Big bucks can get you better quality wood, a nicer finish, higher-end hardware, and fancier inlays. Some of these upgrades can alter the sound or simply make help playability. For example, the same guitar cut from poplar won’t sound as good as one cut from alder wood. Better tuners mean your axe will go out of tune less often. That said, some guitars will offer features that others don’t, such as tremolos and automatic tuning. Do your research and, as always, know what you need versus what you simply want.
Oh, did you say you like lots of switches and pickups and knobbies?  Hell, welcome to our club!  Yes, the Norma 421-4 was the proverbial “king” of the catalog from 1968 to around 1970.  Similar guitars were sold in Japan at this same time, mostly carrying the brand name Liberty.This model was sold alongside a 12 string (EG412-2T) with a tremolo(!!!!!), a bass (EG467-2B), and a two pickup version (EG450-2).  Reading the catalog from 1968 is a real trip!  Here’s the description of the 412-4:

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The war over an electric guitar's tonewood, like the Princess Bride sword fight, has ranged all over leaving a wake of havoc whenever it's brought into a conversation. It's brought a few too many guitarists to the brink of insanity certainly. Regardless, everyone has an opinion about it and when the Internet comes into play, the world weighs in too.
Whether you play classical folk or modern metal, it doesn't matter. There is an amplifier to suit the needs of your music and your bandmates. All you need to do is take a moment to determine which features you need and you'll have plenty of amazing options to choose from. If you're just having a browse or aren't entirely sure where to begin your search for an amplifier, you'll almost certainly be best served by checking out our top sellers. An option such as the Fender '68 Custom Deluxe Reverb 22W 1x12 Tube Guitar Combo Amp with Celestion G12V-70 Speaker, for example, might be just what Doctor Rock ordered. This amp is small, yet powerful, and absolutely loaded with tone. Both of its channels boast reverb and tremolo, and, best of all, the "custom" channel features a modified Bassman tone stack, allowing for even more flexibility when you plug in and play.
(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.
Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.

Black trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.


Reverb is still the most commonly installed effect in amps, but there are some amplifiers that go overboard, to the point that they outdo even multi-effects units. Unfortunately, even those with the most number of effects allow for limited simultaneous use, so no, you can't put 10 virtual pedals together in your practice amp. Also don't expect the quality of built-in effects to match that of boutique pedals, but they can be a great addition to an amp if used sparingly and for appropriate songs.
Phasers – Sometimes called “phase shifters,” these pedals take the “copy” of the guitar signal and put the waves out of phase with each other before mixing them back together. Since those sound waves are no longer in sync, they’ll interact in unique ways, creating futuristic whooshing and swooping sounds. Look back to late 1970s and early ’80s rock music, and you’ll see lots of examples of phasers in action.
Sometimes a guitar cab gets mic'd up differently night to night, plus every voice is unique, and every snare drum "speaks" differently (just ask a drummer). All of these minute changes and differences can and will affect the EQ decisions you'll have to make. This is why I'm such a strong believer in ear training and learning how certain parts of the frequency spectrum present themselves outside of their source-specific applications. That being said, these tips can be helpful as a place to start your search, but are not gospel by any means. So without further adieu, let's begin.
I lost a wonderful EMPRO les paul custom model In a plain top brown finish (it was at a friends house in Dallas Texas who died in 2002 and was auctioned off before I could get down there from Michigan). It was my first electric guitar, bought at a pawn shop in Sulphur Springs, TX in 1989. I loved that guitar and have only seen about three other Empros since then. I did not see the Empro badge on this site. Anybody know the maker?
List of electric guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Electric guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best electric guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.

You can think of these as distortion pedals turned up to 11. Usually, a fuzz pedal comes in as an accent for solos and intros, since its effect is so strong that it could overpower the rest of the band otherwise. You can hear an example of fuzz in the classic recording of Jimi Hendrix playing The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. This is a good type of pedal to try out as an introduction to more powerful effects.

Ovation guitars are produced in the U.S. as well as in Korea and China. Those models in general have a wooden top. Recently Ovation significantly reduced the production of U.S. made Ovation models. From 2010 on better models (e.g., Legend, Elite, Custom Legend, Custom Elite) used to be available, both, made in the U.S. and made in Korea. Before that, the mentioned models were U.S. made. In recent years many U.S. made guitars could be identified by the LX in the product name (e.g., Legend 2077LX), whereas the Korean-made version of the same guitar had AX in its model name (e.g., Legend 2077AX). Again, this name-system has not been used throughout the whole guitar model range (e.g., Ovation 1617ALE). Nowadays only a few U.S. made models are being produced, mostly signature and limited edition models (e.g., Custom Legend 1769-ADII Al DiMeola). Production of the standard model range of Ovation guitars in the U.S. has been seized.[24]
Two more guitars were introduced in 2008. Gibson USA issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Goldtop, modeled after a 1991 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop that was stolen from Slash’s collection in 1999 and never recovered.[37] It features a mahogany body and a hand-carved maple top with Gibson’s classic Bullion Gold finish. Production was limited to 1000.[38] Epiphone introduced a more affordable version of the Gibson model, featuring a traditional Les Paul body with a maple top, a mahogany neck with rosewood fingerboard, and Epiphone’s classic Goldtop finish. Production was limited to 2000.[39]
Since 1982, Dusty Strings Music Store has been a gathering place for instrument players and music lovers. Come explore new, used, rare, and vintage acoustic guitars, electric guitars and pedals, mandolins, ukuleles, banjos, harps, hammered dulcimers, and accessories -- all within reach and ready for you to play! We are an authorized warranty repair shop for both Martin Guitars and Taylor Guitars and carry such builders as Martin, Taylor, Collings, Goodall, Deering, OME, Weber, National, Fano, Nash, Silvertone, G&L, Tone King, Vox, and more. Our school offers private lessons, group lessons, concerts, and special events. Come play music!
POLISHING Once you have completed the wet sanding you wil have a pretty smooth surface that is almost a dull shine. You can either hand polish the finish or use a polising attachment to buff it out. Stew Mac has a polishing pad that attaches to you drill. Or you can get 6" foam bonnets from an auto parts store that will fit over the sanding disk attachment you may already have. It is best not to use any thing made from cotton because it will cut through the finish. Stew Mac also has polishing compounds that you will use in order working you way down to the swirl remover. It's on the expensive side so I use McGuires polish that you can get from the auto shop. If you use a buffing attachment make sure that you uae a different attachment for each grade of polish. Don't use the same pad for each one. Also remember to wait 10 minutes after buffing before you wipe off the surface. The lacquer gets hot and soft after buffing so give it time to cool. You will have to hand polish the cutaways, don't attempt to use the buffer on the edges of the guitar or cutaways because you will burn though the finish.

I have inherited a heater "H300N" acoustic guitar but I can't find any info on it. The most I could find is that it was from the L. D. Heater Music Company that was based out of Beaverton, Oregon. They were best known for being a distributer of Lyle Guitars. Can anyone else offer additional information or where to find it? It's a bueatiful guitar and I want to know more info before I give it to my nephew or sell it.
The electrified hollow body arch top was created so the guitar could compete with the volume of horns in the big bands of the 1930s. And they’ve evolved considerably since then, growing from fat jazz boxes with necks that meet the body at the 12th fret to nimble, thin-lined instruments with cutaways like the Gibson ES-125 and Epiphone Casino, which are experiencing a renaissance today. From the single blade pickup in Christian’s guitar, modern hollow bodies now sport all types of pickups as standard equipment: humbuckers, single-coils, piezo-electric and so on.
To make it simple, we chose a four-chord song: The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop." At first run-through, the game asked Andrew to play only one note every few seconds. As he successfully hit those, it added more and more until he was playing almost every note. On the next run through, the AI suddenly threw in two-note power chords. Once he mastered those, the game leveled up again, asking him to play every chord of the real guitar track that Johnny Ramone would have played. Finally, we unlocked Master Mode, which challenged us to play the song from memory. Only the measures appeared on the screen—no notes.
The tone controls compensate for and complement the somewhat lifeless and mostly midrange-y character of the average guitar pickup. The gain control, often designed with a pull-boost, basically excites and heats the preamp tubes, which along with judicious use of both the amp and the guitar’s tone controls will begin to produce much of the sonic seasoning and flavor that guitarists and their fans crave as it flows from the speakers.
Players perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the company was taken over by CBS in 1965. As a result, the late-1960s Stratocasters with the large “CBS” headstock and (from the mid 1970s) the 3-bolt necked models (instead of the conventional 4 bolts) with the “Bullet” truss-rod and the MicroTilt adjustment system fell out of fashion. However, many blues-influenced artists of the late 1960s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar’s popularity. Also, so-called ‘pre-CBS’ Stratocasters are, accordingly, quite sought-after and expensive due to the perceived difference in quality even compared with contemporary post-CBS models. In recent times, some Stratocasters manufactured from 1954 to 1958 have sold for more than US$175,000.

This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar recorded on the both pickups setting direct in and also through a valve driven Fender reverb unit. This can be used with software amplifiers such as the free fender and marshall vst plugins on this forum (there are lots of software guitar amplifier and pedal related things worth downloading on the Guitar Amp Modelling forum) or amplifier impulse response files with your convolution reverbs like Jconv on Linux or Freeverb on Windows. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them.
The GRX70 showcases how good Ibanez is at producing great value guitars, they sure know how to keeps other guitar manufacturers on their toes. It has all the makings of a mid-tier instrument, complete with dive bomb capable bridge and great looking aesthetics, but packed inside a super affordable entry-level instrument. The basswood body with quilted art grain top is gorgeous, and a trio of pickups gives you tons of tones. A standard tremolo handles divebombing and other whammy acrobatics. This axe is perfect for burgeoning rockers who want a versatile guitar for all occasions. All in all, the Ibanez GRX70 gives you a whole lotta guitar for the money!.

The biggest determining factor on how easy a guitar is to play is the 'action' - distance from the strings to the neck. When it is very low it is easy to press the strings down to touch the fret; when it is too low the strings will buzz when you play. If a guitar's action is too high it will be very hard to play, and for a beginner, this can be pretty disheartening.
This pedal has been a great start, it has been looked after very well and is in excellent condition. I am upgrading my sound which is the reason for the sale. “Great guitarists know it's all about nuance. With its built-in expression pedal, the Zoom G1Xon allows you to add subtlety and refinement to your performance. Add in 100 great-sounding guitar effects and amp models—with the ability to use ...
If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
’71 blue vinyl combo guitar amps included the Univox 1040 and 1240. The 1040 Guitar Amplifier ($480) was a combo sporting 10 tubes, 105 watts RMS, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle, treble controls for each channel, presence, reverb, tremolo, footswitch, and two 12″ Univox Heavy Duty speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets (possibly Jensens). The illustration shows a grille with two small circles on top and two large circles for the speakers. It’s possible this had a pair of tweeters in the small holes, but the description doesn’t say. The 1240 Guitar Amplifier ($399.50) featured eight tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1040, and four 10″ Univox Special Design speakers with 10-ounce ceramic magnets (again, sound like Jensens). The grille had four round cutouts.
Minor chords arise as the tonic notes of minor keys that share the same key signature with major keys. From the major key's I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio progression, the "secondary" (minor) triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key's corresponding chord progression as i-iv-v (or i-iv-V or i-iv-V7): For example, from C's vi-ii-iii progression Am-Dm-Em, the chord Em is often played as E or E7 in a minor chord progression.[24] Among basic chords, the minor chords (D,E,A) are the tonic chords of the relative minors of the three major-keys (F,G,C):
A little lighter than the On-stage but equally sturdy is the Gator GFW, at only 8 lb of weight. This doesn’t mean it won’t be able to offer proper support to the heftiest amplifiers, however, since it is rated to hold as much as 176 lb before showing any signs of stress. At this capacity, most people would be able to use it as a chair without any worries.
The original Overdrive pedals were created to mimic the sound of tube amps being cranked to 10. This will cause the tubes to be pushed to their limits, producing a crunchy and aggressive tone. The sound of overdriven tubes are certainly iconic as it gave birth to the sound of Rock ‘n’ Roll. However, the problem with bringing your volume up to 10 to overdrive your tubes is that it gets really, really loud--safety hazard loud.
Decide between an active and passive DI. The most obvious difference between the two is that an active DI requires a power supply for you to operate, while passive DIs do not. Beyond that, due to differences in design, each of these has strong suits that should be taken into consideration. For example, the transformers used in passive DIs are more resistant to the hum created by ground loops, making these ideal for on-stage performing.[8][9] Additionally:
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-
I want to talk about a session that I got hired for this week. On this particular session, I was asked to recreate a very early-to-mid 70’s guitar tone. Something in the vein of George Harrison. Maybe “All Things Must Pass” era.

So I want to talk about my method, and the process to get this sound. The first key element is guitar and amp. I always start here. I feel like this is the most important relationship in getting any era of sound.

Modulating Offset: The output of solid-state amplifiers is directly connected to 2 DC power supplies through the output transistors. The instantaneous non-symmetry within the music waveform (particularly from the bass notes) is averaged as a modulating DC offset. This modulating offset is small, but it varies the efficiency of the speaker, introducing inter-modulation distortion, amplitude modulating the music. This problem is mostly eliminated by the trend to use an active sub-bass. In valve amplifiers the output transformer isolates the speaker from the amplifier electronics. No modulating offset can be produced.

Fender Hot Rod Series Pro Junior III 15W 1x10 Combo - This tube-driven guitar combo with a 10” Eminence vintage-cone speaker reproduces the harmonically complex output and sensitivity to playing synamics that vintage Fender tone hounds love. Dual 12AX7 preamp and EL84 power amp tubes crank out the same celebrated midrange as vintage combos. Fender has updated the Pro Junior III with an external speaker jack, a more legible control panel, and internal tweaks.
My live rig for years has been a multi FX floor pedal (currently, and for the past seven years, using a BOSS GT-8) running the left and right outputs into the effects RETURN of a small amp on stage and through a speaker cab simulator (lately, a “CABTONE” by Digital music Corp, at other times a Hughes & Kettner “RED BOX”) We often play as a ten piece band, with trumpet, trombone, three saxes… and here am I with a 30 watt Behringer amp with an 8 inch speaker, my BOSS GT-8 and a CABTONE direct box/speaker simulator going to the PA. Sounds great. (I’ve substituted bigger amps at times… a Tech21 Power Station… but to my ears, the Behringer sounds better.) You’re probably thinking… a 30 watt Behringer? That’s a “toy,” right? It’s enough. Well, that and the fact that the other “direct” channel is in our monitors, making for a rich 3D stereo sound on stage between the amp and the monitors. I am looking to upgrade to a multi effect processor that allows different cab simulations per patch – maybe the Eleven Rack… (I would have a hard time justifying the expense of the Fractal system) but honestly, I’ve been very happy with the setup I just described. Been happy with it the past seven years, and before that, it was different amps (actually bypassing everything but the power amp and speaker) and different floor processors (Digitech, Rocktron, BOSS…) but the same idea… one output to the board, the other to a small amp.

When making solder joints to switches and pots, the lug and wire should be heated by the tip of the iron and the solder pressed (or flowed) onto the joint. In this manner you can avoid cold solder joints as both components are properly heated prior to the application of solder. Melting solder on the tip of the iron does not insure the actual components are being heated properly.
Up for auction is an approximately 1973 fender champ cabinet, grill, and Weber sig8 speaker. Chassis was removed and rehoused years ago and this cab has been collecting dust. Tolex was removed and the solid pine cabinet has a nice amber shellac finish. Good sounding cab With a great sounding Weber speaker perfect for a restoration or new build. Handle, Grill, and chassis mounting straps will also be included.

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SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.
The old Harmony and Kay guitars were notably inferior in playability and sound to professional-grade instruments by Martin, Gibson and Fender. Typically the necks on the student grade instruments were clumsy in contour compared to a professional-grade instrument, and generally the action was much higher. Neckset angles on student-grade acoustics were often quite poor on Day One such that they were physically hard to play when new. By the time they were ten years old, the neckset angles had often shifted so much that they were virtually unplayable. While today many craftsmen are very adept at resetting necks, in the mid 1960s no one I knew had mastered techniques for doing this. Even companies such as Martin and Gibson did not reset necks if guitars were sent back to them for warranty service. Martin's typical approach at that time was to plane the fingerboard, such that it was virtually paper thin by the nut and full thickness by the body joint, and then refret. Gibson would frequently tackle such a problem by sawing the neck off at the heel joint, chopping the remainder out from the dovetail with a chisel, and installing a new neck. Student-grade instruments with poor necksets frequently were simply thrown away. Truss rods in student grade guitars usually were little more than window dressing. Although many of these guitars bore labels reading "steel reinforced neck" or actually had a truss rod in the neck, these rods usually were not functional. Martin had a steel T-bar in the neck from late 1934 through the 1960s, and Gibson and Fender both had highly functional truss rods, but Harmony, Kay and other makers of student guitars usually installed rods so poorly that any attempt to adjust the rod was simply an exercise in frustration and futility. While Harmony and Kay as well as some other makers turned out many hundreds of thousands of guitars and greatly exceeded the number of instruments produced by Martin, Fender and Gibson combined in those days, a surprisingly small percentage of those instruments have survived over the years, such that good condition original examples are remarkably scarce today. Some of these instruments have become quite collectible and now bring prices exceeding $1,000. Kay hollowbody electrics with the so-called "Kelvinator" peghead, especially the early Barney Kessel models, are now considered to have a considerable "cool factor." Likewise, original Danelectro "longhorn" guitars and basses have a visual flare as well as a funky distinctive sound of their own.
Taylor Guitars was founded in 1974 by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug, and has grown into the leading global builder of premium acoustic guitars. Renowned for blending modern, innovative manufacturing techniques with a master craftsman's attention to detail, Taylor acoustic guitars are widely considered among the best-sounding and easiest to play in the world. The company is a pioneer in the use of computer mills, lasers and other high-tech tools and proprietary machinery, and today, Bob Taylor is widely recognized throughout the musical instrument industry as the visionary acoustic guitar manufacturer.
Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.
SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
There is a beauty to the guitar-cable-amp approach. It doesn’t get any easier, unless you take up playing the flute. And the lack of toys to mess with will certainly make you focus on playing more. By changing your pick attack, vibrato, or the volume and tone controls on your guitar—you’ll rely on your hands instead of stepping on a box to change tones. I believe it’s beneficial for all of us to just plug straight in at least once in awhile and rock out with unadulterated tone.
If you wanted to wire a 4 conductor Dimarzio or Seymour Duncan in this way, just look at the diagram. Solder the 2 "middle wires" together, tape the connection, then solder the outer wires to the output. Be very careful when working with 4 conductor wiring. The colors and polarity are very important. You could easily make a mistake and wire an "out-of-phase" arrangement which would have low output, a squawky, thin sound AND the humbucker would NOT be hum canceling.
Although most of us who participated in this article have years of experience with guitar amps, none of us was particularly familiar with all the latest beginner models. There are few reliable professional reviews of beginner amps, but I sorted through what we found, searched through music stores and websites, and sampled numerous models at the recent National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles. This experience gave me a good idea of what’s available now.
So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!
Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!
That's actually a good question. There were several people working on the electric guitar at the same time... so it depends on what you're looking for, and what constitutes a real electric guitar. And to compound the issue, tape recording was also in an experimental stage, back in the 1930s when the electric guitar arose. So live recordings of early performances pretty much don't exist.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai
Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
Another thing to bear in mind is pot taper. Two most commonly used tapers are linear and logarithmic. Linear taper, as name suggests, linearly increases resistance throughout it’s range. That’s ok for some applications, but not for volume pots. Our humanoid ears work in logarithmic fashion, so volume pots need to have logarithmic taper in order for us to hear smooth transition between quieter and louder settings. If volume jumps suddenly in the first 20%-30% of volume pot range and then does almost nothing in the rest of the range, it’s likely that you got a linear pot instead of logarithmic.

The Line 6 POD Farm program is famous for its amp simulation, however many users have realized that the quality of its modeled effects are equally superb. Some even use the POD Farm strictly for its effects! It has a huge collection of FX - up to 94 - and it modeled some of the most popular stompboxes including the MXR Phase 90, ProCo Rat, Uni-Vibe, Arbiter Fuzz Face and Big Muff Pi. It also includes modeled versions of old analog devices like the EP-1 Echoplex. Setting up is a breeze with its simple carousel-style interface, which lets you visualize your signal chain. Current Retail Price $49.00

If you haven’t heard Colin Hay’s acoustic version of “Overkill” from his solo album ‘Man @ Work’, you haven’t really heard this song. This has been my favorite acoustic guitar song for some time now. I like the mainstream version, but this one blows it away. For a taste, try listening to it as a sample on iTunes or amazon. BTW, if you decide to download it, DO NOT get the much shorter edited version off of the ‘Scrubs’ soundtrack.


I love the action of my El Dorado. I have no more “dead strings” because of the string height and because of the wide nut which allows more room between the strings and the frets. It has an action that provides playability which no other guitar gave me, that is, no: Fender, Gibson, Schecter, Epiphone, Squier, B.C. Rich, Urban, Yamaha, Reverend, Peavey, Ibanez, or ESP. There were others I tried but I don’t remember the names. It sounds great when I play Psychedelic Rock, R&B, Rock, Heartland Rock, Folk Rock, and old Country.
Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
Amps and effects don't have to be just for guitars and basses, either - nor do they have to play out loud. While the vast majority of amplifiers fit into the categories we've just been through, some exceptions would be amps made for keyboards and electronic drums, which can generally be used to amplify just about any instrument as long as you can attach a pickup or microphone. And if you want to practice the guitar or bass without waking up the neighbors, be sure to look into headphone amps as well: they'll push all the sound you love, but to your ears instead of a loudspeaker, so you can keep the sweetness to yourself... until you're ready to share, that is!
There was a second single-cutaway version, also called the TRG-1, with a thick waist and vaguely tubby Tele shape. It had a different grill shape and a slightly more rounded version of the Bizarro Strat head, but otherwise it was the same. There was also a version of the double-cutaway guitar with a vibrato. This was a small, metal-covered tailpiece with three springs in the housing and a handle that screwed into a hole in the cover.
The AEG10II combines laminated spruce top with mahogany back and sides, and packs both in a thin profile body. Thin bodied guitars, while more resistant to feedback than their larger counterparts, don’t have the breadth of tone or the volume of a full sized acoustic guitar. The cool thing about this guitar is that, it’s one of the cheapest ways for beginning musicians to get a solid gigging instrument.
Tube amp distortion is created when tubes are overdriven by receiving more juice than they can handle, thus causing the signal break up. Tube-driven amplifiers are still in demand by seasoned players because of the warm, musical tones they create, and some distortion-type effects use actual tubes to replicate that sound. But most distortion effects are produced either through analog solid-state circuitry or digitally.
Sometimes, your guitar may need more than a standard set-up. The frets need to be in reasonable shape in order to progress with the set-up. Often you will see that the frets are not level - this is crucial to the playability of the instrument. I have a precision technique for achieveing a perfectly true fret dress which I've been developing for 3 years.
Vacuum tube or "valve" distortion is achieved by "overdriving" the valves in an amplifier.[40] In layperson's terms, overdriving is pushing the tubes beyond their normal rated maximum. Valve amplifiers—particularly those using class-A triodes—tend to produce asymmetric soft clipping that creates both even and odd harmonics. The increase in even harmonics is considered to create "warm"-sounding overdrive effects.[37][41]
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet. In 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp that added metal corner protectors to keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
Tone woods only effect acoustic or hollowbodys. The more dense wood harder tighter grained woods along with steep pitched saddle to stop string angle increases sustain.research labs experimented with marble body's and had tremendous sustain.also effecting sustain is type of neck.ie. bolt on set or thru. A bolt on May have equal sustain to a set if the thickness of body at bolt joint is made thicker but thru are best all have give and takes. Thru are less adjustable and limit repairs. Bolt on offer more adjustment. Set necks can be replaced or reset but cost more to do so. Thick heavy gibson let Pauls are known for the sustain.but endurance limited by heavy weight. It's all matter of choice. Buy usa or if not available japan. Stay away from Chinese or Korean they are bottom feeders
Fuzz boxes and other heavy distortions can produce unwanted dissonances when playing chords. To get around this, guitar players (and keyboard players) using these effects may restrict their playing to single notes and simple "power chords" (root, fifth, and octave). Indeed, with the most extreme fuzz pedals, players may choose to play mostly single notes, because the fuzz can make even single notes sound very thick and heavy. Heavy distortion also tends to limit the player's control of dynamics (loudness and softness) - similar to the limitations imposed on a Hammond organ player (Hammond organ does not produce louder or softer sounds depending on how hard or soft the performer plays the keys; however, the performer can still control the volume with drawbars and the expression pedal). Heavy metal music has evolved around these restrictions, using complex rhythms and timing for expression and excitement. Lighter distortions and overdrives can be used with triadic chords and seventh chords; as well, lighter overdrive allows more control of dynamics.[citation needed]

What made him truly special was that, unlike other guitarists of his time who stuck to one style of playing, Jimi combined styles and used strumming alongside licks and other additions to create a fuller and more organic sound. Amazingly, he also used his thumb to do do a moving baseline whilst he was playing chords – he wanted to do what no other guitarists were doing, or were able to do and he succeeded. The way he dressed his chords with so many different sounds and rhythms just shows how naturally talented a guitarist Jimi Hendrix was. His guitar was like an extension of his body, a part of his left hand that had no boundaries.
MIDI connectivity has also been included, allowing you to take control of your existing synth or sampler with ease. In addition, the Helix features a 6.2 inch 800x480-pixel LCD display for easy editing, customisable scribble strips above the 12 capacitive-sensing footswitches and an expression pedal that can actually be used to edit parameters of a pedal so you don’t have to bend down and start twiddling knobs. Best of all, you can even integrate existing hardware and effects pedals in to your Helix and control them through the unit. We could talk about how this is one of the kings of the multi-effects world all day, but just watch the video below and see for yourself!
What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.
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The two common guitar amplifier configurations are: a combination ("combo") amplifier that includes an amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet, and a standalone amplifier (often called a "head" or "amp head"), which passes the amplified signal via a speaker cable to one or more external speaker cabinets. A wide range of speaker configurations are available in guitar cabinets—from cabinets with a single speaker (e.g., 1×10" or 1×12") or multiple speakers (e.g., 2×10", 4×10" or 8x10").
New from Stewart-MacDonald are guitar wiring kits with the premium brand pots, switches, jacks, capacitors and cloth wiring used in original Gibson Les Paul and SG guitars. The kits make it easy to order top-quality components for wiring or re-wiring a 4-control / 2-pickup guitar with a 3-way switch. The kit components include Switchcraft toggle […]

The Dolce is a cedar-top, with mahogany back and sides, and the usual set of Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings. At 9 lbs and 38” this is a slightly shorter and lighter-weight guitar, which will be more appropriate for a smaller person. This guitar does not come with a gig bag or other accessories, so if you choose this guitar, prepare to make a list of what your instructor of choice says you need.
Lastly, we have the M-100FM. This guitar features a body that is similar that Super Strat style Ibanez is known for, packed with a great set of pickups. This is a mid range guitar, but one that is very capable compared to its immediate competition. If you need an axe that looks good and plays good as well, ESP LTD M Series M-100FM is the ESP for you.
The Deluxe was among the “new” 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured “mini-humbuckers”, also known as “New York” humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson (actually just a cut-out P90 pickup cover) in order to use a supply ofEpiphone mini-humbuckers left over from when Gibson moved Epiphone production to Japan. The DeLuxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson’s US-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck in late 1968. The “pancake” body (thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) came later in 1969. In late 1969, a small “volute” was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the “i” in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the “i” had returned, plus a “Made In USA” stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be special ordered with full-size Humbucker T-Top pickups, these full size versions of the Deluxe were “Standard” spec. They were also available with “Gibson” embossed pickups in 1972 only and considered rare, as only 9 were produced. David Bowie Can be seen playing one of the 1972 “Standards” in his 1972 release Jean Genie video. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977. Inte reintroduced rest in this particular Les Paul model was so low that in 1985, Gibson canceled the line. However, in 2005, the Deluxe was with more popularity due to its association with Pete Townshend [1] and Thin Lizzy.
While the combination of guitar, amp, effects and technique all play a crucial role in achieving the desired tone, it’s important to choose the right guitar for the job in the first place. There’s a reason why Stratocasters, Teles, Les Pauls and ES-335s have featured on so many classic recordings over the years; it’s because they are as reliable as they are versatile. That said, don’t be afraid to try guitars fitted with more esoteric pickups, such as Gold Foils, for a less generic sound.   P-90s are another great studio weapon; less dense than humbuckers, they can provide plenty of rhythm raunch without crowding the mix.
ESP Guitars makes seven types, the Eclipse series, James Hetfield Truckster, and Kirk Hammett KH-3 from ESP, the LTD EC series and Truckster, the Edwards E-LP series, and the Navigator N-LP series, which are based on the Les Paul design. Certain EC models have 24-fret necks and active electronics using EMG pickups instead of the standard passive pickups and 22 frets found in the traditional Les Paul. The Edwards and Navigator lines are made in Japan, and available only on the Japanese market; they come standard with Gotoh hardware and Seymour Duncan pickups (EMG pickups in a few models), and unlike the EC and Eclipse series guitars, which are updated variants on the Les Paul, these are made to be as close to the Gibson 1959 Les Paul design as possible, in the vein of the late 1970s and 1980s “lawsuit” model guitars from Tokai, Burny, and Greco, complete with Gibson style headstocks.

Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Roseville, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.

For those students who want a simple path to good sound and don’t want to confront a wide range of tone and effects options, we recommend the Orange Crush 12. It’s a fairly traditional amp with controls for Bass, Midrange, Treble, Volume, Gain, and Overdrive (distortion). There’s nothing on the Crush 12 that can’t be sorted out with a few twists of a knob and strums of the strings.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai

For most applications, all you really need is a guitar input, and an output that you can plug to an amplifier or PA system. Still, it doesn't hurt to have extra input/output options, like a mic XLR input (for vocalists who play guitar), an aux input (for practicing with your favorite tracks), headphones out (for quiet practice and tweaking), stereo output, and many more.
If we've learned anything from this experience, it's that Rocksmith 2014 will do everything it can to try and teach you how to play the guitar, and it's got an amazing array of tools and lessons to do just that. But just like taking lessons from an actual instructor, you have to be willing to put in the time and practice, Practice, PRACTICE, even if it's boring—there are no shortcuts to properly learning your craft. And no matter how many zombies I kill in Rocksmith 2014's Return to Castle Chordead, I'm not really learning chords; instead, I've just learned how to play a video game with a real guitar as the controller.
Typically, guitar amplifiers have two amplifying circuit stages and in addition frequently have tone-shaping electric circuits, which usually include at least bass and treble controls, which function similarly to the equivalent controls on a home hi-fi system. More expensive amplifiers typically have more controls for other frequency ranges, such as one or two "midrange" controls and a "presence" control for high frequencies. Some guitar amplifiers have a graphic equalizer, which uses vertical faders to control multiple frequency bands. Some more expensive bass amps have a parametric equalizer, which enables precise control of tone.
There are many varieties of speaker combinations used in guitar speaker cabinets, including one 12" speaker, one 15" speaker (this is more common for bass amplifiers than for electric guitar cabinets), two 10" speakers, four 10" speakers, four 12" speakers, or eight 10" speakers. Less commonly, guitar cabinets may contain different sizes of speaker in the same cabinet. Cabinets with eight 10" speakers are large and heavy, and they are often equipped with wheels and a "towel bar"-style handle for transport. Some cabinets use mixed speaker types, such as one 15" speaker and two 10" speakers.
In 1959, with sales under pressure from the more powerful Fender Twin and from The Shadows, who requested amplifiers with more power, Vox produced what was essentially a double-powered AC15 and named it the AC30. The AC30, fitted with alnico magnet-equipped Celestion "blue" loudspeakers and later Vox's special "Top Boost" circuitry, and like the AC15 using valves (known in the US as tubes), helped to produce the sound of the British Invasion, being used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and the Yardbirds, among others. AC30s were later used by Brian May of Queen (who is known for having a wall of AC30s on stage), Paul Weller of The Jam (who also assembled a wall of AC30s), Rory Gallagher, The Edge of U2 and Radiohead guitarists Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien. The Vox AC30 has been used by many other artists including Mark Knopfler, Hank Marvin who was instrumental in getting the AC30 made, Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, John Scofield, Snowy White, Will Sergeant, Tom Petty, The Echoes, Mike Campbell, Peter Buck, Justin Hayward, Tom DeLonge, Mike Nesmith, Peter Tork, Noel Gallagher, Matthew Bellamy, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Dustin Kensrue, Tame Impala, and many others.
Which is what you’ll be doing with the Omen-6: laying down heavy riffs and unleashing screaming solos. Two overwound Diamond Plus humbuckers are responsible for the guitar’s hot and thick output, while a thin “C”-shaped neck, 14-inch fretboard radius and extra jumbo frets keep things fast and comfy. Although this doesn’t have a tremolo for those dive bombs, a Tune-o-matic bridge and string-through body ensure your sustain will sing for days.
A 6 stringed guitar, black satin in color. It is gloss finish and comes without a case. The body is made from Mahogany and the neck from the Flamed maple. The guitar consists of tone,volume and 3 way pickup switch. It was introduced alomost 20 years ago and includes all the charm present in its cousins from USA . The device can be acquired with as little as INR 19,755  and more details can be found at:
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Johnny Marr is an iconic and influential guitarist best known for his work in the Smiths, which broke up in 1987. His guitar phrases and his genius for crafting textured and tonally rich rhythmic leads has influenced countless rock guitarists of the last quarter-century. Since leaving the Smiths, Marr hasn't exactly been idle or resting on his laurels.
With the neck profile and nut slots correct, approximate the positions of the string saddles for correct intonation. Low E and G string will set back about 3-4/32nds of an inch longer than the exact scale length. The A and B strings will set back 2-3/32nds , The D and high E about 1 32nd. Scale length equals the distance from the fretboard edge of the nut (where the strings bear off) to the middle of the twelfth fret, times 2. If the measurement from the front of the nut to the middle of the 12th fret is 12.75", then you have a 25.5 inch scale length (12.75 x 2= 25.5) Final positioning is done once saddle height is determined, but you need to be close to this final location when determining the saddle height.
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Washburn was founded in 1883 in Chicago. The company was founded by George Washburn Lyon and Patrick J. Healy. Lyon and Healy were sheet music publishers who expanded to musical instruments. The current Washburn guitar company was formed in 1964 when Rudy Schlacher began importing guitars under the Washburn name. Washburn guitars are no longer made in the USA. Lyon & Healy is still in existence as a manufacturer of harps in Chicago.

In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.
The interface does get the job done well, it’s just that I’ve seen better looking free VSTs. But for me, this is completely fine because while flashy interfaces are nice, problems like software issues and hard to see text occur.  None of that is here, and within a few hours, most users will feel fairly comfortable creating moderately difficult, but realistic sounding guitar parts.
Another way of creating a huge sound is to split the signal from the guitar – most easily achieved via a stompbox with stereo outputs – and send it to two or more amps. All sorts of combinations of sound can be achieved, especially when panning techniques are employed. Of course, each amp can also be multi-mic’d if desired, and some truly three-dimensional results can be obtained. Different effects can be applied to the various amps, while using combinations of clean and dirty amp sounds can be really effective for delivering overdrive with definition, or grit and
This is an amazing acoustic guitar for the new generation of guitarists that is quite presentable, especially in stage performances. It comes with a black border and has a free gig cover. The fret board is made from rosewood, which makes it quite easy to handle. It has incredible rigidity, with truss rods on both sides. It produces a considerably high quality of sound and is cost effective with prices ranging from about INR 4,999. This may sometimes be accompanied by free packing and shipping. Find more information on the site link below:
Every generation there's one guitar master whose touch can make a guitar purr; whose grasp of his skill is so complete that just by looking at the guitar, he knows her problem; and whose ears can pinpoint what your tone is lacking. They are legends. And the mystique that surrounds these guys is hard to penetrate. Swank is one of those guitar masters. "I think part of my mystique now is that I'm just flaky and don't return phone calls," he says. "It's not that I'm some kind of badass." Swank was first introduced to the business of guitar repairing when he saw another master's work. "I just thought it was a pretty noble pursuit."
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
Setting up an electric guitar will bring out the true potential of that specific instrument. A poorly setup guitar will be harder to play due to high strings and neck bending, and will sound subpar with improper intonation. Electric guitar setup cost will cover all of these adjustments and more. For a price close to $50, your guitar will also have its neck adjusted so that the playability is as good as possible over the entire fret board. In the ideal setup scenario, the string height will be optimized so that playing is easy. The height of the strings should also provide for the best sound as they are able to ring free of the frets, allowing for the cleanest and strongest possible signal for the pickups to capture.
FWIW: I have the same guitar, and it is around the same vintage as yours, with a 4 digit serial number and the headstock truss-rod adjustment. As you can see from the response from SLM, the headstock truss-rod adjustment was on the earliest Alvarez guitars. I have another Alvarez from 1981-2, that adjusts in the sound-hole. You'll see a lot of people claiming that they have, or are selling, 70's vintage Alvarez guitars, but have sound-hole truss-rod setup. To me, that's the first indicator that a guitar might be post 1980'ish. And actually, due to the neck attachment issues, I gravitate towards the 80's vintage, as they have had less time to have their neck angle change from string tension.
The guitarist and composer Francisco Tárrega (b. Vilareal, Spain in November 29, 1852-d. December 15, 1909) was one of the great guitar virtuosos and teachers and is considered the father of modern classical guitar playing. As professor of guitar at the conservatories of Madrid and Barcelona, he defined many elements of the modern classical technique and elevated the importance of the guitar in the classical music tradition.
This Gibson Skylark Tweed has recently been totally overhauled. I will send the repair ticket dated 10/9/2018 with the amp. It states: Replaced transformer wired to spec. Tested tubes - good to new. Replaced all dead filter caps, installed terminal strips. Replaced power chord w/3 prong grounded plug. Replaced leaking coupling caps and bypass cap. Replaced cathode resistor. Cleaned and deoxidized jacks and pot. Replaced fuse. The speaker is not original but sounds fantastic. Don’t pass up this vintage jewel.
If you want to spring for a pedalboard and processor combo that offers multiple effects in one unit, you might want to check out something like the HeadRush Pedalboard with Guitar Amplifier and Effects Modeling Processor. It offers 33 amplifier models, 15 cabinet models, 10 microphone models, 42 effects, and includes an expression pedal, 7" touchscreen, 12 foot switches with OLED Screens, and more.
Martin also periodically offers special models. Many of these have a limited production run, or begin as a limited-production guitar that sells well enough to become regularly produced. Many of these special models are designed with, endorsed by, and named after well-known guitarists such as Eric Clapton,Clarence White, Merle Haggard, Stephen Stills, Paul Simon, Arlo Guthrie andJohnny Cash. In 1997, Martin launched its “Women in Music” series, which was followed in 1998 by the Joan Baez Signature guitar, a replica of the 0-45 Baez began her career with.
PRS S2 Vela comes as one of the more extraordinary models in this company’s lineup. This is made apparent by the body shape that stands out from their usual designs. When I had some one-on-one time with this axe, it left a good impression. One thing that really stuck with me was just how light it was. That usually means a thinner tone, but not with this PRS. It plays great, and is pretty smooth.

Loose frets are especially problematic in certain old guitars, but are generally very easy to fix. You'll be amazed at the difference you can make with just a few tools, a bit of knowledge, and a little time. Fixing loose frets can eliminate fret buzz, remove sharp fret ends, and greatly improve the tone of any guitar. If your luthier bill will be greater than the value of your guitar, definitely time to have a go yourself!
The headstock does not come pre-carved, which is good for those who want to personalize its shape, and bad for those who can't do wood work. All needed parts are included, along with hex wrenches for the truss rod and saddle adjustment, it even comes with some solder, so you'll just need a soldering iron and a Philips head screwdriver to complete the assembly.
Bold and brash, the chest-thumping sound of Fender's big-bodied California Series Redondo Player acoustic-electric was designed to inspire you from the moment you pick it up. The exclusive slope-shouldered Redondo body shape has a rich, commanding voice that fills any room. The gloss metallic top, back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and creme binding, give it a shot of electrifying attitude. Dynamic, unique and unconventional—like today’s guitarists—the Redondo Player refuses to be bound by the past.
Epiphone offers one for every guitarist out there and has a product lineage featuring electric, acoustic and other options. One of its famed options among the acoustic line is the Les Paul Ukulele, a true vintage piece. The guitar has been termed as the market leader in the acoustic guitar field. It comes with mahogany body facilitated by top laminated, rosewood fingerboard and maple top. The tone of the same is truly resonating.
Travis adapted the syncopated rhythms of Ragtime Piano music to the guitar – (the term syncopation refers to deliberately playing off the regular beat). Travis would pick the strings alternating the bass note on the low E and A strings. This style of finger picking was given the name ‘Travis picking’ and went on to influence Chet Atkins and Scott Moore’s ‘Rockabilly’ sound.
Because bass amps have to reproduce lower frequencies than an electric guitar amp, and it takes more amplifier power to reproduce bass frequencies, a bass player will typically need three or four times the wattage of the electric guitarist.[16] For example, if an electric guitarist has a 100 watt amp, the bassist in the band should have a 300 to 400 watt bass amp. For electric guitar amps with 50 watts or less of power, a bass player may need an even higher multiple. While an electric guitarist will often find that a 50 watt amp will be adequate for rehearsals and mid-size performance venues, a bass player performing alongside this electric guitarist will typically need at least a 300 watt bass amp, six times the power of the electric guitar amp, to get a good bass volume. "More advanced players who regularly gig in small to medium sized venues...typically [use amps that] produce 300-700 watts of output."[17] Bass players using bass stacks in very large venues (e.g., stadiums, outdoor festivals) may use amp heads that put out 750 to 2000 watts of power. British rock bassist Mo Foster tours with a 1,500 watt bass rig.[18] Somewhat controversially, as there is no clear engineering support, many think that a tube bass amp will sound louder than a solid state bass amp of the same wattage.[19]
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Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.


Make sure it feels comfortable, especially the fretboard and body. Make sure there are no buzzing notes and that the frets are flat and even. Avoid electric guitars with whammy bars as they may be too difficult to tune for beginner guitar players and make the guitar more expensive (maybe one on the next electric guitar you buy). The tuning heads should be easy to tune and stay in place, and try playing the guitar through an amplifier to check for a good sound quality (hopefully no humming or buzzing).
Because bass amps have to reproduce lower frequencies than an electric guitar amp, and it takes more amplifier power to reproduce bass frequencies, a bass player will typically need three or four times the wattage of the electric guitarist.[16] For example, if an electric guitarist has a 100 watt amp, the bassist in the band should have a 300 to 400 watt bass amp. For electric guitar amps with 50 watts or less of power, a bass player may need an even higher multiple. While an electric guitarist will often find that a 50 watt amp will be adequate for rehearsals and mid-size performance venues, a bass player performing alongside this electric guitarist will typically need at least a 300 watt bass amp, six times the power of the electric guitar amp, to get a good bass volume. "More advanced players who regularly gig in small to medium sized venues...typically [use amps that] produce 300-700 watts of output."[17] Bass players using bass stacks in very large venues (e.g., stadiums, outdoor festivals) may use amp heads that put out 750 to 2000 watts of power. British rock bassist Mo Foster tours with a 1,500 watt bass rig.[18] Somewhat controversially, as there is no clear engineering support, many think that a tube bass amp will sound louder than a solid state bass amp of the same wattage.[19]
The Firebird did have some other unique features such as its banjo style tuners and mini humbuckers that produced a different sound than the full humbucker pickups Gibson typically offered.  Many notable players preferred the Firebird: Mick Taylor from the Rolling Stones used it on the album Exile on Main St.  Allen Collins would also use this axe on stage with Skynyrd alongside his Explorers.  The great Texan blues guitarist Johnny Winter was known for playing slide on his 1963 Firebird to great effect.  Dave Grohl, of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame, used his white Firebird to create a modern rock sound.
The downside of going electric is that now you have to think about a soundboard, or at least an amp. And no self-respecting guitarist can live without a few pedals to tweak the sound. I mean you only need a volume pedal to control the level, a tuner might be nice, chorus is always appreciate, a nice delay pedal wouldn’t be bad, and you might need a clean boost for those solos. Then again, you might just want to plug straight into the soundboard and just enjoy that amplified acoustic sound.
It can get a bit difficult trying to properly depict certain aspects of effects pedals to our newer musicians out there since much of music tends to be described in an intangible sort of manner which relies heavily the assumption of prior knowledge and personal tastes which is why we try our best to not get the pros out there the meat of the information they are looking for, but describe it in a way that players of even entry levels can comprehend. So with that in mind, one of the more complex aspects of effects pedals for newer musicians is their implementation of a signal chain.
Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy
IN STOCK:,Vintage well built!...Premium build quality by Lyle crsfted in Japan, solid spruce top, high grade quality Mahogany neck see pics. Neck profile is medium profile very comfortable..NEAR MINT JAPANESE VINTAGE GUITAR ...this guitar is like having a new 38 year old guitar it looks so newish... its finish is still very glass like and has been well taken care of over the years well preserved for YOU. The neck angle is PERFECT , frets still are like new still. The action is VERY nice & low and it plays with ease you will be very pleased indeed with its overall condition this is exactly what we look for at JVGuitars to bring you the best near mint vintage. The back and sides are also not your average run of the mill grain but very beautiful vividly wavy grain looking like some exotic woods for sure stained cherry like they would do with mahogany... very nice detail & binding and perfling work overall..this guitar is a real pleasure to play too and sounds wonderful. Anyone would be very pleased and proud to own this nearly 40 year old beauty..
His first solo album, Texas Flood, was released in 1983 and featured blistering renditions of “Testify” and “Texas Flood” as well as now-classic originals like “Pride and Joy” and “Lenny.” Several other successful solo albums followed. On August 27, 190, Vaughan perished in a helicopter crash while returning form a gig he shared with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray.
Adolph Rickenbacher was born in Switzerland in 1886 and emigrated to the United States with relatives after the death of his parents. Sometime after moving to Los Angeles in 1918, he changed his surname to “Rickenbacker”. This was done probably in order to avoid German connotations in light of the recently concluded First World War as well as to capitalize on Adolph’s distant relation to World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker. In 1925, Adolph Rickenbacker and two partners formed the Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company and incorporated it in 1927. By the time he met George Beauchamp and began manufacturing metal bodies for the “Nationals” being produced by the National String Instruments Corporation, Rickenbacker was a highly skilled production engineer and machinist. Adolph soon became a shareholder in National and, with the assistance of his Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company, National was able to boost production to as many as fifty guitars a day.[4]
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The key elements of mic positioning are distance from the source and orientation to it. Moving the mic closer to the amp provides more definition, increased highs and lows, and less room sound. As you pull the mic back, the sound becomes less detailed, more "midrangey," and more blended with the ambience. Depending on the room you're in, a distant-miked amp may gain a natural presence and unique character in the mix, despite an apparent decrease in definition. On the other hand, placing the mic too far back will result in a washed-out, murky, or hard-to-control tone.
Think Eddie Van Halen in Eruption. Phaser effects create a swirling tone by splitting the signal and then moving each part in and out of phase with each other. Like chorus, it can sound dated, but it is great for adding a little bit of craziness to any riff or solo. Some pedals such as the famous MXR Phase 90 only have one control for the speed of the effect, while more modern designs also have controls for the depth and level of the phasing.
Are you a seasoned player looking to upgrade you instrument or a beginner starting to learn the ropes and tricks of playing a guitar? Well, in this article we have prepared a comprehensive guide on how to select the best electric guitar as per you needs and the list of the best electric guitars available in India. The guitar is a complex musical instrument with some basic components, a wide range of features and different constructions, so it is important to have some basic idea about these features so that you can make an informed choice.
Used Instrument Buyer - [New Window] - When it's time to sell your used instruments, nobody makes it easier than UIB. We make our best offer up front, right out of the gate, so you know you're getting top-dollar for your used musical equipment. Since 2006, we've helped everyone from professional musicians to weekend guitar warriors get the most value out of their used instruments. We offer free no-obligation quotes for your used equipment. upon your approval, simply pack your equipment, ship it to us free, and we'll promptly mail you a payment.
Ibanez, a guitar and bass manufacturer, came to prominence as a result of music legends like Steve Vai and Joe Satriani using this brand. These guitars provide an exceptionally uniform neck action, a highly versatile tone, and top of the range pick up configuration. One of the main reasons that this brand gained popularity was the effective tone from cheap and mass-produced instruments. Heavy music is what they excel in, and metal enthusiasts have been loving Ibanez for decades now. They manufacture guitars for every style and genre. The most iconic model is the RG, but S series is also loved by all. They are also the makers of the 7-string guitar, with the first model Universe being made in the year 1990.

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The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.
Patti Smith famously described Tom Verlaine's guitar sound as "a thousand bluebirds screaming." Television's leader soaked up the flavor of favorite records by John Coltrane, the Stones and the Dead – then synthesized them into something entirely new on the band's 1977 debut, Marquee Moon, spinning out endless fluid solos in concert with fellow guitar aesthete Richard Lloyd. Verlaine has kept a low profile in recent decades, but he remains a model for generations of guitarists with a taste for both punk violence and melodic flight.
O.K. These are my first impressions of this guitar kit, my first, right out of the box. About me: I own about a dozen guitars, both acoustic and electric, including 6 string and basses. I know a little about construction, as I have been studying, and have been wanting to build my own guitar for some time now. Building from scratch seemed a little optimistic so I elected to go with this kit after studying the Internet for days. I wanted a chance for a great result with my mediocre woodworking skills. Kit arrived quickly and undamaged, good packaging and the components were bagged nicely.
If the Complete Technique book is good for quick starts, this would be the bullet train. Another Hal Leonard selection, this is a trim 48 pages for teaching you how to hold a guitar for the first time. Tuning up, easy chords, and strumming. If you got a guitar on Friday, use this to put together your first three-chord jam by Monday. Will it sound good? No, no, it will not. But you’ll have started, which is key. Some of the other books on this list are dense with both concepts and pages, which might delay your starting. Don’t let that happen.
I borrowed the above quote from an article on effects pedals by Robert Keeley (a maker of seriously fine effects pedals) which can help you remember the order to place your pedals. I have a few slight modifications and additions to this that I use, but this is a great way to remember the rough order quickly, and it comes from one of the great pedal masters.
Mijn first guitar was a Epiphone by gibson sg, it was all right, then I got my gibson sg special(Around 550e), really good guitar, huge difference with the Epiphone. My next was, believe it or not another Epiphone, a Casino limited edition with bigsby, best price/quiality guitar ever(I paid 430e), beautiful guitar, and next week I’m getting a Fender Telecaster American vintage 58′(1755e), I’m very excited about it. I also own a Fender jazz bass classic 70s, it’s a mexican which plays like an american, very proud of this bass. First rate guitars are normally the best, you pay for the quality of the materials and the workmanship and experience, but there are exceptions with second range guitars, you can get very good ones, just good models or plainly good guitars, it’s nice to own both kind of guitars.

Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.
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Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.
Without a doubt, dont even entertain the idea of getting one, I was given one by an unfortunate friend who bought one, to try and get it to at be semi playable.. the necks are not even straight, in fact , you could ski off them.....the frets stick out from the side of the neck, the strings are so far off the neck you cannot even fret them down.... There must be no quality control whatsoever in the factory..
EQ (Equalizer) – A frequency-based effect that allows you to boost or cut frequencies along the audio spectrum. Graphic EQ pedals such as the GE-7 and GEB-7 have faders for each frequency band that you can move up or down to boost or cut the frequency. EQ pedals can be used to tackle problem frequencies such as mid-range honk or to give a bass boost or add some high end sparkle. Alternatively you can use EQ to create interesting tones such as emulating a small radio by rolling off the bottom end and boosting the high mids.

Before deciding on how to go about mic’ing the amp, listen to the sound in the room. If the guitar is being recorded as part of a rhythm track in the same room as drums and other instruments, the only option may be to use a close-mic’ing technique, unless you don’t mind dealing with the other instruments bleeding into the guitar track. Recording guitars in isolation, as an overdub, presents more options for ambient room mic’ing. Experiment with mic positioning to achieve the right amount of room sound and the desired bass and treble response. Distance-mic’ing in a very live-sounding room can create an appealing slapback echo-type sound, while close mic’ing gives you absolute flexibility in the mix.   
Why would that be “magical thinking”? Unless you play a sine wave with a synth, the timbre of every instrument is made of a set of freuquencies, a dominant frequency plus a ton of harmonics (which is, I take it, the overtones people talk about). Woods, like every other material, resonate at particular frequencies, and consequently might emphasize a particular subset of these frequencies rather than another subset. Hardly magical thinking.
Lyle guitars were some of the best COPY CAT guitars made during the LAWSUIT years - years where Lyle (made in Japan) attempted to COPY higher end American made Gibson and Fender guitars - hence 'lawsuit' guitars. There are some other companies that attempted to 'copy' American instruments but many of those were made in Korea or other countries and were not of the quality that the Japanese 'Lyle' copies of American instruments. They would have done well to make their own branded guitars - they're very well made. Another 'copy' company from that era is Ibanez - they made excellent instruments, too, and they paid quality guitarists to help them market their marque - George Benson, for example. Enjoy your guitar.
I don’t mean to be unfair to the effect (and theoretically, this should be an article devoid of opinion). Flanging is impressive stuff. It’s just that, used heavily—where it best shows off its massive harmonics-plinking capabilities—it can become too imposing a sound for a guitarist to easily play with, which relinquishes it to the realm of background effects and early-’80s electro-pop. Still, plug in and send your brain to space and back.
There's no wrong answer to which neck will work best for you. When people speak of rounder vs. flatter being better for chording/bending, they are referring to the radius of the fretboard, not necessarily overall neck shape. The fretboard on all guitars has a curvature across is, from the the treble to the bass side. Generally speaking, most people would agree that rounder fretboards facilitate better chording, while flatter ones facilitate better bending, but even that's not hard and fast.
Cort Guitars is known as a South Korean centered guitar manufacturing brand, which provide almost all kinds of guitars for the better music melodies and tunes. They are regarded as among the largest manufacturer of guitars in the world. The company was founded in 1973. Bass, electric and acoustic guitars are produced by this brand. The best models of guitar includes Classic Rock, Aero Series, Hollowbody series, VL, Performer, G series etc. Available price is Rs. 10,449/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit www.cortguitars.com.
We've had a thread here in the last couple months about Squires, with some pretty discerning forum members praising their quality and tone. You don't need to spend a lot of money these days for a good guitar. The one the OP bought was years ago. The fierce competition in the guitar market since the economy went bad, has forced manufacturers to up their game, and recent production is of a much higher standard.

Flanging can be a subtle effect, thickening the sound and imparting a spacey feeling. Or it can be extremely dramatic when cranked up, to the point of making the original signal unrecognizable. This broad range makes a flanger a fun stomp box to experiment with. Jimmy Page used a flanger to good effect on Led Zeppelin’s “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” and “Kashmir, ” as did Jimi Hendrix on “Bold as Love.”
Now I’ve heard people say they can’t tell the difference between the two when they’ve played both. From a strictly tone perspective, that may or may not be true. And maybe for me it’s just the placebo effect (I know its a Gibson - or not - therefore I feel an ethereal change in quality), yet it seems awfully subjective to base a $2600 difference on a report that lacks concrete research.
This guitar is based on Loar's U. S. Pat. 2,020,557 (filed 1934, awarded 1935), in which electric amplification is combined with an acoustic guitar body. The design offered a player the option of switching between electric and acoustic amplification, or combining both, with metal posts through the bridge that transfers vibrations from the strings to the bar-armature. With the posts raised, the bridge comes in contact with the soundboard for exclusively acoustic amplification; with the posts lowered to contact the metal bar-armature, both acoustic and electric amplification is engaged, and with the posts lowered completely, the bridge is lifted off of the soundboard and supported only by the bar-armature for exclusively electric amplification. The back of the guitar, made from arched spruce, with two f-shaped soundholes, incorporates another of Loar's ideas, covered more extensively in U. S. Pat. 2,046,331 (filed in 1934 but awarded in 1936), to use the back of the instrument as a second soundboard by transferring bridge pressure from the top.
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When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.
In 1967 Vox introduced a series of guitars which featured built in effects such as Distortion (fuzz tone), Repeat Percussion (percussive tremolo), Treble/Bass Booster and a wah-wah operated by the heel of the picking hand pushing on a spring-loaded lever over the bridge. The Delta phantom style guitar and bass, the Starstream teardrop 6-string, and Constellation teardrop bass had such effects.
I have a Gemtone guitar tube amp that was made in Canada in early 70's I think. This is the only Gemtone I have ever seen and the only information I could find out about it (but not verify) is that it was a sub-company of Regal Instruments. I would love to find some more info about this amp but have nearly given up after several years of searching. Sorry its not really an answer but my hope is to fire up the thread again so someone with more concrete info can chime in.

Here at Dave’s Guitar Shop we are proud to have a staff of world class Guitar and Amp technicians. Be it simple guitar setups, restrings, grafting on broken headstocks or restoring timeless classics our techs work at the highest quality. With a shared experience of over 50 years and access to one of the largest collections of historic guitars for reference you can rest assured that your repair or restoration will be completed accurately and with great care and precision.
All electric guitar strings are made using steel, nickel, or other magnetically conductive metal alloys since they’re essential for transmitting string vibrations to the magnetic pickups. The type of plating or coating applied to the steel alloy has a significant impact on the strings’ sound. Here are some general tonal characteristics of the most common types of strings:

These guitars also appeal to adults who played in their youth and would like to pick up the instrument again. Fortunately, they’ll find that high-efficiency, low-cost overseas manufacturing has created a new generation of inexpensive guitars that play and sound very much like more expensive models—something that wasn’t true 20 years ago, when few cheap guitars were worth playing. We also discovered in our Best Electric Guitar Amp for Beginners article that there are several very nice amps available for less than $100, so an adult can get back into the game for well under $300.
The role of a pickup is simple. They pick up the sound produced by the guitar and create an electric signal which then travels via an amplifier. For instance, pickups do not relate to getting a partner with your music, but they are actually a characteristic of the electric guitar. They serve the same purpose that frets do on an acoustic instrument, but the pickups will determine the vibrations before sending them to an amplifier.
Originally the Stratocaster was offered in a 2-color sunburst finish on a solid, deeply contoured ash body, a 21-fret one-piece maple neck with black dot inlays and Kluson tuning heads. In 1956 Fender began issuing solid Stratocasters with alder bodies.[4] In 1960 the available custom colors were standardized, many of which were automobile lacquer colors from DuPont available at an additional 5% cost. The unique single-ply, 8-screw hole white pickguard held all electronic components except the recessed jack plate—facilitating easy assembly. Despite many subsequent Stratocaster models (including copies and the Superstrat), vintage Fender models are highly valued by collectors for their investment potential and players who prefer the timbre of older models.
With parallel effects loops, half the the signal from the amplifier’s preset section is sent through the Effects Sent OUTPUT to pass through effects, while the other half passes directly on to the amplifier’s power amp section to always be heard unaffected.  With this type of effects loop, there is typically an effect level control that allows you to dial in the amount of the effect you want heard along with your unaffected signal.  We recommend setting the MIX control on any of your effects to 100% when placed within a parallel effects loop.  Our TimeLine and BigSky pedals have a Kill Dry feature (DRYSIG parameter in the GLOBLS menu) that mutes your dry signal for use in parallel effects loops—however we do not recommend using this setting when using more than one pedal within the effects loop.

The Champion 40 is light, affordable, and easy to use. Besides, the brand should give you a clue as to whether or not it’s a good idea to invest your hard-earned money into this alternative. The 12” speaker that it comes with is perfectly capable of rendering both bass and treble, and most guitarists who’ve reviewed it say it works great for blues and country.
This guitar comes with a 25.5-inch scale, 20 frets, and a 1.68-inch nut. The rosewood bridge features a compensated saddle for a smoother tone and warmer sound. The mahogany SlimTaper D profile neck makes it easy to play even if you’re a beginner, while the Grover machine heads will ensure your guitar stays well-tuned for an accurate musical performance.
No guitar recommendation list is ever complete without a Fender product in the mix. Squier is Fender’s more affordable instrument range, and this set is a great place to start. The affinity series Stratocaster is available in sunburst, classic black, or candy apple red. A 10 watt Fender amp and corresponding cable are also included alongside a strap, 3 picks, snap on the tuner, tremolo bar, replacement parts and tools, strings, gig bag, and an instructional DVD to help you get off on the right foot with your playing.

This is a rare bird. Its a early ibanez maxitone 994. It has a huge neck but plays pretty great! It has that classic MIJ tone. I can include a new Gator case for $50 extra! The neck and frets are good! The electronics are a little dirty. Ill clean them the best i can, but i thoughtit worth mentioning. It is functioning as it should be just a little dirty!
Blanket’s richly interwoven cinematic ambient rock has rapidly evolved since last year’s debut EP Our Brief Encounters. We have had a sneak preview of their new material and can confirm it is a sizeable slab of Big Rock that will induce palm-sweat from fans of Lonely The Brave, Nordic Giants and This Will Destroy You. Guitarists Bobby and Simon - the duo at the heart of this sound - are masters of catharsis, bonding warm, cascading lines into structures of true grandeur.
Where can you find one? My guess is that FIDELITY was a housebrand (like Holiday or Silvertone), and these might be Valcos or some other maker. But I have since seen 2 or 3 of them on Ebay, not going for too much money. Also, there are several other brands (and no-brands) that look much like these, so keep your eyes peeled, don’t pay too much, and score a little gem that will have other guitar players saying “what the hell is that” and have your significant other shaking his or her head when the UPS/Fedex people come knocking.
I always respond to these enquiries as I have played some in UK shops and like them a lot .Well designed and made though I am sure the odd duffer gets through like most imports .Trev Wilkinson did the designing ,though it should really read ,modifying ,as most are other makers basic designs,.The Les Paul lemon drop is superb judging by reviews and I loved their S types ..Worth the money it seems .I would prefer a Vintage Strat , 335 or Les Paul to the other cloned alternatives .I did buy an Epiphone Dot but after playing a Vintage 335 ,wish I had bought it instead .The ones I played were Chinese

Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.


Dimebag Darrell first discovered this guitar master while he was working in a club in Colleen, Texas. King was 17 and Darrell was 15. "They played and blew me away," King says. So he asked if the aspiring guitar legend needed help breaking down his guitar. It was the beginning of a working friendship that lasted until Dime's untimely death in 2004. Learning from another guitar master, Walt Treichler of Rotting Corpse, is what put this guy at the top of the extended family's list for repair answers. He also studied with Floyd Rose at a guitar show, learning everything there is to know about the Floyd Rose tremolo. "There's nothing better than the original thing Floyd came up with," he says. King is the kind of guitar doctor who makes house calls; but he's not accepting any new clients unless you're part of his extended family of musicians. "If I know 'em, and they need work on their guitar, I'll help 'em out."
Because bass amps have to reproduce lower frequencies than an electric guitar amp, and it takes more amplifier power to reproduce bass frequencies, a bass player will typically need three or four times the wattage of the electric guitarist.[16] For example, if an electric guitarist has a 100 watt amp, the bassist in the band should have a 300 to 400 watt bass amp. For electric guitar amps with 50 watts or less of power, a bass player may need an even higher multiple. While an electric guitarist will often find that a 50 watt amp will be adequate for rehearsals and mid-size performance venues, a bass player performing alongside this electric guitarist will typically need at least a 300 watt bass amp, six times the power of the electric guitar amp, to get a good bass volume. "More advanced players who regularly gig in small to medium sized venues...typically [use amps that] produce 300-700 watts of output."[17] Bass players using bass stacks in very large venues (e.g., stadiums, outdoor festivals) may use amp heads that put out 750 to 2000 watts of power. British rock bassist Mo Foster tours with a 1,500 watt bass rig.[18] Somewhat controversially, as there is no clear engineering support, many think that a tube bass amp will sound louder than a solid state bass amp of the same wattage.[19]
Some professional-grade amp heads, such as Ampeg's SVT400-PRO, have an audio crossover, an electronic filter that enables a bassist to split their bass signal into a low-pitched signal (which could be routed to a cabinet suited for low-pitched sounds, such as a 1x15" or 2x15" cabinet), and then send the middle and high-frequencies to a different cabinet suited to this register (e.g., a 2x10" or 4x10" cabinet with a horn-loaded tweeter). Amps with a crossover can either have a single crossover point pre-set at the factory (e.g., 100 Hz) or a knob is provided to enable the bassist to select the frequency where the bass signal is split into low and higher-pitched signal. The SVT400-PRO has a user-adjustable crossover knob. Amps with an adjustable crossover point can enable bassists to fine tune the sound of their bass sound. For example, in some halls, a bassist's usual crossover point may sound too "boomy" or rumbly; turning the crossover knob to send more of the low-pitched bass signal through the 2x10" cab may reduce this problem.
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Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.

A final tip: not a lot of people know this, but Antares Auto-Tune works rather well with electric guitar. Of course Auto-Tune is monophonic, so it will dutifully ignore chords and double notes, but it will come into play when it detects a single note. You might reasonably ask whether a guitar tuner might not be a wise investment, but the reason I suggest Auto-Tune is not to compensate for a badly tuned guitar, but rather to pull imprecisely bent guitar stings into pitch.


Here at Dave’s Guitar Shop we are proud to have a staff of world class Guitar and Amp technicians. Be it simple guitar setups, restrings, grafting on broken headstocks or restoring timeless classics our techs work at the highest quality. With a shared experience of over 50 years and access to one of the largest collections of historic guitars for reference you can rest assured that your repair or restoration will be completed accurately and with great care and precision.
Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.

Anyone who commented that this was a good list needs to reconsider what makes up a great guitar player. It’s about being multi-faceted musician. Creativity, technicality and musicality all come in to play when your talking about the highest quality players. When I listen to a “shredder” like Steve Vai, I think..yes he is fast but his music makes me feel absolutley nothing emotionally. Truth be told…SRV and David Gilmour are probably the only players on this list that deserve to be there.

“Guitar has always been an extension of my thoughts without having to put it into words,” says Marcus. “It’s a form of meditation allowing my mind to cut off and to speak through the instrument.” Players often say this sort of thing and it’s often nonsense, but before you scoff, listen to the live medley on 2017’s Due North EP and you’ll hear the truth in this statement. A new King is born? We think so.
The bridge (or “tailpiece”) is the piece near the back of the guitar that anchors the strings and helps transfer their vibration to the guitar’s body. There are really only two main types: vibrato and non-vibrato. Non-vibrato bridges are exceedingly common and provide the best sound transfer. Vibrato tailpieces feature a tremolo arm or “whammy bar” that alters the string tension when pushed and pulled, resulting in a change in pitch that sounds really cool. Vibrato tailpieces don’t transfer sound as well as non-vibratos because they have reduced contact with the body of the guitar. This can result in loss of sustain. Furthermore, the constant changes in string tension can send the tuning out of whack. Don’t say you weren’t warned.
We currently recommend the very popular Seagull S6 Original Cedar Slim as one of the leading beginner guitars and we named the Seagull Maritime SWS SG as the equal second highest rated acoustic guitar between $500 and $1,000 in October 2016. And in August of 2017 we named the Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QIT as the highest rated acoustic-electric guitar under $500.
Steve's a great technician. He's done a great job on every single guitar I've brought to him. Helpful, easy going, friendly, and extremely good at what he does. After the first setup he did for me I stopped looking for other repair shops in town. He's just too good and is a pleasure to do business with. I hesitate giving 5 star reviews, but anyone who can turn a nigh-unplayable Dano baritone into a gigging instrument deserves it. Highly recommended.

This tonewood isn’t a very common wood used. But, when it is used on a solid-body guitar, you’re definitely going to have access to deeper, richer, and woodier tones. However, pair it with a Cedar top and you can have bright and warm overtones. Paired with a Spruce top, you can play to get an aggressive bite on the trebles with a definite presence on the low end.


Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.

It doesn't even seem to matter which kind of Guitar amp you have or when plugged into any PA system. This guitar is a keeper. it comes with Godin Nickel Strings which is why unplugged it may sound too tinny to some ears, but after changing to Elixer Acoustic Strings, it sounds much better unplugged and really shows off plugged in. It now can give my Acoustic six strings a real run for my attention. At gigs and open mics, people come up and ask,,,what the Heck is this Bruce? Looks and sounds amazing. My only wish is that it had the same Pick-up system as on my A6 Ultra, two separate Pick Ups and Controls and two 1/4 in outputs.


PRS S2 Vela comes as one of the more extraordinary models in this company’s lineup. This is made apparent by the body shape that stands out from their usual designs. When I had some one-on-one time with this axe, it left a good impression. One thing that really stuck with me was just how light it was. That usually means a thinner tone, but not with this PRS. It plays great, and is pretty smooth.
You’ll need to get yourself setup with an account on some of the web stores selling components such as effects pedal specialty stores listed above, and some general component stores such as Mouser and Digikey. AMZ provides a list of the components required for each project. Make sure you check carefully the component requirements such as type of capacitors. Many components may have suitable electrical values but different physical layouts, so use the datasheets for your chosen component. Measure the spaces and holes on your PCB to make sure the components will fit. Remember that you’ll also need an enclosure in which to install the finished circuit and don’t forget things such as knobs, battery holders etc.
Tube or solid-state? One has the nice warm vintage tone, but the other is just so much simpler and free of hassle. Vox make one of the best hybrid amps, which heats up your guitar signal with a proper 12AX7 tube in the preamp before it becomes amplified by conventional transistors to deliver up to 30 Watts. A warm tone with smooth overdrive, but without the aggravation.
The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.

A volume pedal does the same thing a volume knob on a guitar, but it allows you to control the volume with your foot. It is not a boost, it just allows you to sweep between zero output and the full output capacity of your instrument. Many guitarists use a volume pedal, also sometimes referred to as an expression pedal, to create pedal steel-like swells, where a note or chord is played, then the volume is slowly and smoothly raised. Volume pedals can also be used as a boost effect, by simply playing at less than full volume, then stepping on the pedal to go to full volume momentarily when you need the extra boost. Volume pedals can make a standard electric guitar sound like a pedal steel when used with a well-practiced foot technique.They can also be an important pedal to have in your toolbox when playing in a band with multiple guitars.

Playing Electric Slide is great. I use the neck pick up mostly or the bridge pick up with the tone turned down as not to blow out peoples ear drums, but you can adjust to the tone you prefer. Most people adjust the strings a little further from the neck. I prefer not so I can bend and play normal too. Great slide players. Jimmy Page, Joe Bonnamassa, Joe Perry hope this was helpful
Many experiments at electrically amplifying the vibrations of a string instrument were made dating back to the early part of the 20th century. Patents from the 1910s show telephone transmitters were adapted and placed inside violins and banjos to amplify the sound. Hobbyists in the 1920s used carbon button microphones attached to the bridge; however, these detected vibration from the bridge on top of the instrument, resulting in a weak signal.[2] With numerous people experimenting with electrical instruments in the 1920s and early 1930s, there are many claimants to have been the first to invent an electric guitar.
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