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Coming to its making, it has full-size dreadnaught body for big sound. The top is made up of laminate spruce whereas sides and back are nicely finished with basswood. This Fender Guitar is the reason it lacks a little bit of sounding because solid wood guitars can provide high-end sounding. As far as handling is concerned, kids might find it difficult due to its full size. Teenagers with right heights will find it quite comfortable. Just make sure that your fingers go down to fretboard pretty easily.
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.
The material in the neck and fretboard also matters. Some guitars have both neck and fretboard in maple, and they will typically have a bright and open sound. Rosewood has traditionally been used for fretboards, usually combined with a maple neck, because it is a hardy and oily wood that can stand up to extensive human contact. Rosewood will give a darker tone than maple alone.

The “Studio” model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The intended market for this guitar was the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” were centered on optimal sound output. This model retained only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contributed to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omitted several stock Gibson ornamentations that did not affect sound quality, including the binding on the body and neck. The two notable exceptions to this are the Studio Standard and the Studio Custom. Both models were produced in the mid-1980s, and included body and neck binding, though with dot fingerboard inlays instead of more ornate trapezoids. The first Studios from 83 to 86, except for Studio Standard and Studio Custom, were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a chambered mahogany body and top and a satin finish and is the lowest priced Gibson USA Les Paul.
If you play with your guitar’s tone controls all the way up, your tone is going to be trebly and bright — possibly even painfully shrill at high volumes. To get a handle on their range, get a clean sound cooking out of your amp and play at every numeral stop on your instrument’s tone pot dial. And for multi-pickup models, do that for each individual pickup and all the blended settings. Find a few positions you like, and while playing a tune you know by heart, roll to different settings for verses, choruses and solos and see how tonally diverse and interesting things become. On stage this can be a very impressive way to create fresh sounds — subtle, but noticeable — without relying on pedals or amp channel switching.
You are right, we will have the whole guitar amplifiers section of out website completely revamped in the next few weeks! We made vast content improvements on all other sections of GuitarFella and now it is time to work on the amps. Thanks a lot for the remark and make sure you check us out in 2-3 weeks, I guarantee you that you will like the results!

Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!

Martin’s re-entry into electric manufacturing is related to the association of Richard (Dick) Boak with the C.F. Martin company. Dick Boak, with dreams of being a luthier and constantly working on guitar projects on his own, joined Martin in 1976 as a draftsman. In 1977 Boak was assigned to the project of designing an electric guitar for Martin. This resulted in the development of the E-18, EM-18 and EB-18 guitars and bass. The first prototypes of this new electric guitar series were produced in 1978, ten years after the demise of the GT-70/75, and production commenced in 1979 with guitar serial number 1000.
I have many Behringer pedals.Used them gigging.Have had many people ( lots of musicians ) asking me what I am using to get my tone and effects .They are all surprised when I tell them Behringer pedals.And almost all say the same thing."aren't they made of plastic"? Yes they are made of plastic.But being someone who has worked in the plastics industr.for 25 + years I know Plastic can be very strong .I have done hundreds of gigs with these pedals and never had a problem.You would really have to jump ontop of these hard to damage them.And if you did that with the non plastic pedals I am sure you would also have a problem .That said.I have 5 fx600 pedals because I found a site selling them for $14.A super bargin for so much effect.As far as battery power nowadays batteries cost more than pedals so anyone ... full review

At the top of the fingerboard, just below the headstock, is a slotted piece of material called the nut. The strings are routed through the slots in the nut and terminate at the bridge, located on the far end of the body. When the strings are plucked or strummed, they vibrate between the nut and the bridge. This vibration is where the sound of a guitar begins. How that vibration translates into sound depends on whether the guitar is acoustic or electric, as we’ll see in a moment.
What we're looking at here is a standard Les Paul body made of mahogany and finished with an attractive vintage sunburst pattern. There's also a gorgeous heritage cherry sunburst and a straight ebony finish option as well. It features a pair of 700T humbuckers, one at the bridge and one at the neck position. These are pretty basic in nature, but their performance is more than good enough even for more experienced players and important recordings.
If you’re a guitar lover, you might be out for a unique look as well as your own sound. You might also be interested to learn more about how guitars are put together and function. If you have moderate woodworking skills, you can build your own solid-body electric guitar. To make things easier, you can even purchase some parts pre-made. Use your creativity for the finishing touches, and you’ll have a unique guitar and a story to tell.
The Neal Schon Signature Les Paul model has a carved mahogany top, mahogany back, multi-ply black/white binding on top, chrome-plated hardware and a Floyd Rose tremolo. The one-piece mahogany neck has a scarfed heel joint a “Schon custom” slim-taper neck profile. The 22-fret ebony fingerboard features pearl split-diamond inlays and single-ply white binding. The pickups are a DiMarzio Fast Track/Fernandes Sustainer in the neck position and a Gibson BurstBucker Pro in the bridge position. In addition to the standard Les Paul electronics (individual pickup volume and tone controls, plus three-way selector switch), the Schon Signature features two mini-toggles – an on/off for the Sustainer and an octave effect – along with a push/pull pot for midrange cut. Only 60 of the guitars were made, and sold it out in days upon release.
Designed to restore Fender’s reputation after a group of employees led by William C. Schultz took over ownership from CBS in the early 1980s. The pickups used in early models were dual humbucking Red Lace Sensors in the bridge position and a single Blue Lace Sensor in the neck position. Later models (post 1995 or so) used three Gold Lace Sensors or a Red/Silver/Blue set in a Strat-like configuration, as well as low-friction roller nuts, locking synchronized vibrato bridge and tuners, and a bound contoured alder body with ash veneers. These instruments were discontinued in 1998 with the advent of the American Deluxe series. In 2011 Fender released the Modern Player Telecaster Plus as a part of the Modern Player series. The guitar has a humbucker in the bridge, a Strat pickup in the middle, and a Tele pickup in the neck positions.

A lot of people begin with a nylon string acoustic, often called a classical guitar. They’re reasonably priced at beginners level (don’t go too cheap), the design has a wide fret board to accommodate your inexperienced fingers and the nylon strings are easier on your aching fingertips. You have to agree, they can sound kind of dull unless that dream of yours is of becoming a famous, classical guitarist like John Williams — certainly not a bad thing. So nylon string acoustics are great to learn with, but there’s a risk you’ll want something more pretty quickly.
Choruses (Chori?) come in mono, stereo, and true stereo versions, and a good one will provide lots of control across the depth and speed of the modulation desired. In the case of a mono unit, the aggregate tone produced by the circuit is flattened and passed through a single jack, where as a stereo (sic) unit will pass wet and dry signals through different jacks. A true stereo chorus unit will produce a true stereo signal, where the effect is mixed properly into left and right channels.
John Scofield (b 1951) is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey DeFrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, John Mayer, and many other artists. Scofield had played a 1981 Ibanez AS-200 as his main guitar for over 20 years.[26]

Thunders had the riffs to match the glam-trash group’s mascara. He took rock guitar and cooked it down to its essence, playing open chords and switchblade riffs that laid bare the amphetamine urgency behind the Dolls’ concise, catchy tunes. The Dolls had split up by the time punk rock got underway in New York and London, but their influence was profoundly felt on both shores.
As for the nuts and bolts of digital delays, any thorough, from-the-ground-up explanation is more than can be entered into in this space (and most of you at least know the basic principle behind binary encoding by now anyway, right?). Simply think of the digital delay pedal as another form of sampler: it makes a small digital recording of your riff, and plays it back at a user-selectable time delay, with depth and number of repeats also more or less selectable. The higher the sample rate, the better the sound quality. Early affordable 8-bit models really did leave a lot to be desired sonically, but as 16, 20 and 24-bit designs emerged, the reproduction of the echoes increased dramatically in quality.
The Dobro Standard Guitar is not shown, but this is described as a “…conventional arch top body” with Dobro electric amplification. Like the first National Spanish, this had f-holes and was made by Regal. The Dobro Mandolin is also described as having a “conventional” body, probably a pear-shaped mando, again, by Regal. These were probably introduced slightly later than the Hawaiian.
Since we’re talking about acoustic-electric guitars that look as good as they sound, I’d be remiss to not add the Fender Tim Armstrong Hellcat to this list of top acoustic-electric guitars. Based on the infamous 1960’s acoustic played by the punk rock legend Tim Armstrong of Rancid, I could devote an entire article to the artful styling on this guitar, which is why it consistently ranks at the top of acoustic-electric guitar reviews by players of all levels.

By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
The phrase “guitar amplifier” in itself is almost a bit misleading. Sure, it “amplifies” your guitar — but guitar amps really do so much more. Arguably, even as much as your choice of guitar, your amplifier will have an immeasurable influence on your sound. Beyond the basics of volume, bass, midrange and treble, your amp can provide warmth or bite to your sound, or anything from a sparkling clean tone to a blazing distortion. Amplifiers are constructed utilizing different size (or even multiple) speakers and can derive their tone from tubes, transistors, or even digital modeling. They can be very basic with just one volume knob; or they can offer a variety of gain and EQ options along with built-in effects.
Though it’s a pretty sad end to what became a beloved brand and guitar, the Hi-Flier guitars and basses gained new life in the mid-‘90s, thanks to the aforementioned famous players. Today, they're again seeming to blossom in the vintage market. Only a few years ago, a Hi-Flier could be purchased on the cheap, but sales prices for these funky guitars have steadily been on the rise.
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.
Dorado instruments are of decent quality, but are often found at slightly inflated asking prices due to the attachment of the Gretsch name. Remember, these are 1970s Japanese guitars imported in by Gretsch during their phase of Baldwin ownership! Dorados are sometimes rightly priced between $125 to $175; but many times they are tagged at prices double that. Of course, what a guitar is tagged at and what it sells at (cash talks, baby!) are always two different animals.
Anyways, it sucks to not have a camera to show stuff or even a way to measure stuff I'm describing. I'll have to obtain a few small things to set it up. like a saddle and an allen wrench that doesn't suck. Probably whatever caliper or shim they use to do real setups as well. Maybe latter frames just have tilted bridges after a while. I don't really know. The bridge is rather thick. If you lower the bridge, do you just sand it?
Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.
Just start out small, when i first started playing guitar I wanted to learn every metallica song there is, and sure enough I did, it took me about 5 years to get there and a bunch of different gauges eventually with time you start to develop the feel for what gauge satisfies you the best. Now I mostly use hybrids ranging from 10-13's, but just like everyone I started out with softest strings that are out there in existence but I used to break them alot so there were many beers out there that I didn't get to drink because the will to play guitar was stronger hahaha. But in the end it was worth it cause now I get to have all the fun on the guitar, and all the chicks are digging it hahaha, no they're not. And one more thing never obey the rules it's just something that stuck up guitarist make up because they don't want to be outdone find out what pleases you the most and keep on doin that.
One half step down from standard Drop A. Used by bands such as Trivium on some songs from Silence in the Snow and The Sin and the Sentence, Destrophy, TesseracT, Brian "Head" Welch, After The Burial on some songs from their Rareform, In Dreams and Dig Deep albums, Within the Ruins, In Hearts Wake and Periphery. Jim Johnston used this tuning for the song "I Bring the Darkness (End of Days)".
In that same year, the Los Angeles-based Volu-Tone company also sold a pickup/amplifier set. Volu-Tone used "high voltage current" to sense the string vibration, a potentially dangerous approach that did not become popular. In 1934 Dobro released a guitar amp with a vacuum tube rectifier and two power tubes. By 1935, Dobro and National began selling combo amps for Hawaiian guitar. In 1934, Gibson had developed prototype combo amps, but never them. By 1935, Electro/Rickenbacher had sold more amps and electric guitars than all the amps and electrified or electric guitars that had been made from 1928 through the end of 1934.[1]
This Ibanez has a flamed sycamore top, and delivers a well balanced sound unplugged or plugged in. It has a great finish that is referred to as vintage violin. Owners of this guitar say it sounds great as the similarly priced Seagulls and Yamahas. The price has recently dropped on this guitar, which was a pain point for many owners. At $250 it’s a steal given the quality. The onboard pre amp contains a tuner, which is nice for beginners to always stay in tune. The slim neck will also make for great playability. Click here for more pictures and details.
Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.
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"The development of the modern tuning can be traced in stages. One of the tunings from the 16th century is C-F-A-D. This is equivalent to the top four strings of the modern guitar tuned a tone lower. However, the absolute pitch for these notes is not equivalent to modern "concert pitch". The tuning of the four-course guitar was moved up by a tone and toward the end of the 16th century, five-course instruments were in use with an added lower string tuned to A. This produced A-D-G-B-E, one of a wide number of variant tunings of the period. The low E string was added during the 18th century."[48]


Hello everyone. Today we’re going to do a setup on a Les-Paul-style guitar. For this post, I’ll be setting up a “Burny Super Grade” guitar, but the set up is the same for most Les-Paul-style guitars. I already have a general electric guitar setup post over here: http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-set-up-electric-guitar.html, but there are a few Les Paul specific areas I’d like to go into here.
Today, if you shop around, you can pick up the Martin D-200 Deluxe for a mere $119,999, but if that doesn't suit your style you can always go for the Martin D-15M which we announced as the highest rated acoustic guitar between $1000 and $2000 in October 2016, or the Martin DCPA4 Rosewood which we announced as the highest rated acoustic-electric guitar in the same price range at the same time.
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
Made famous by George Harrison in the ‘60s, the jangly Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string electric guitar has become perhaps one of the most iconic 12-string electrics. With a semi-hollow body and thru-body neck, the 360/12 is able to create a unique tone that is difficult to create with other 12-string guitars. Though this model has undergone many changes and seen many iterations through the years, the newer Rick 360/12 models have a slimmer neck and are still highly-sought instruments.

Six slot-headed Classics were offered. The 133/8″-wide GN50 Standard ($65) had a yellow spruce top and mahogany neck and body. The 141/4″ GN60 Concert ($79.50) featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian Imulawood body. The 143/4″ GN70 Grand Concert ($99.50) sported yellow spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood. The 15″ GN80 Auditorium (4109.50) was the same as the GN70 but with 4″ X 403/8″ dimensions. The 141/4″ GN90 Concert featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian rosewood body, with extra binding. The 14 1/2″ GN100 Grand Concert ($169.50) came in yellow spruce, Brazilian rosewood and ornate inlays. Cases were extra.


Open the case and you will find over 689MB of rich guitar tones ranging from 70 to 130BPM. These sensational loops are neatly arranged into 3 categories comprising of 50+ Ballad Hooks, 50+ Steady Riffs and 50+ Upbeat Jams, all applicable to a vast range of genres! From the clean, delay-drenched chime of Ballad Hook 'Serene' to the upbeat overdrive of Steady Riff 'Perpetual' and the crunchy swagger of Upbeat Jam 'Loose', STUDIO GUITARS redefines quality guitar samples and delivers them in stunning 24-bit high definition.
A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.
Chords are the heart and soul of playing guitar. Many guitar players seldom do anything else, other than strumming chords. The chord is the basic building block of guitar music. A chord is simply a combination of two of more notes played simultaneously. Different combinations give you different chords. There are different classes of chords, such as Major Chords, Minor Chords, Triads, Suspended Chords, Diminished Chords, etc...
There was a second single-cutaway version, also called the TRG-1, with a thick waist and vaguely tubby Tele shape. It had a different grill shape and a slightly more rounded version of the Bizarro Strat head, but otherwise it was the same. There was also a version of the double-cutaway guitar with a vibrato. This was a small, metal-covered tailpiece with three springs in the housing and a handle that screwed into a hole in the cover.
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Looking for a lifelong friend, something solid that will get better with age and can take a thrashing if needed. I plan on using drop tunings for heavy rock and will be dropping a set of alnico bare knuckle pickups into it and running it through a dual rectifier. Preferences but not important are, mahogany body, standard bridge, Les Paul style necks, most classic body shapes. Any model/brand suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I’m living in an isolated region so this will be a blind purchase. Really love my Schecter Diamond Series Tempest Classic but unfortunately it did not stand the test of time and will need a restoration on the neck.
For rehearsals, studio recording sessions, or small club performances, electric and upright bass players typically use a "combo" amplifier, which combines a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and a speaker (or multiple speakers) in a single cabinet. Combo amps come in a variety of speaker configurations, such as one speaker (e.g., often one 12" speaker or one 15" speaker, although there are some micro-amps with one 10" speaker) or two speakers (e.g., two 10" speakers) or four speakers (e.g., four 10" speakers). The dividing line between practice amps and combo amps that can be used for live venue shows is described in the power in watts section. The most powerful combo amps available deliver between 800 and 1000 watts to the internal speakers.
The Effect:To this day, there are 3 main delay pedal types coexist, Tape is usually the most expensive and sough-after (especially Vintage releases) type as they provide very natural sound reproduction. Analog were modernized in the 70’s and they worked on electronics, with a minor drawback according to some as they store up to 3 seconds of Delay time. Digital pedals is the type met with most frequency on today’s market, offering longer-than-usual Delay times and pristine sound reproduction, these are usually your best pick. A lot of players know that they want a delay effect but have no idea from where to start, if you are one of them, try the Boss DD-7 Digital Delay Pedal The most basic and often met controls on Delay pedals are Time, Level and Feedback, you’ll sometimes find them labeled differently but with the same function and purpose.
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And that’s about that. After ’93 Martin Stingers, like their previous Martin-brand cousins, started drifting off into solidbody byways of guitar history. The Stinger ST-2, basic fulcrum-vibrato Strats with pickguards and three single-coils, in black, red, and white, and the now ubiquitous droopy pointy headstock, was still listed in the 1996 Martin catalog, but these were pale reflections of the peak years.
There is traditionally a gap between how we enjoy the sound of our guitars and the way they’re represented plugged in. Enter Yamaha, a leader in stage-ready acoustic technology for decades - and in the A5R ARE, it may have just offered us a very desirable solution. The A5R''s rounded fretboard edges offer an enjoyable playing experience that mimics the feeling of guitars that have been played in to a degree and it has an ethereal quality in the high ranges, even though some treble resonance is traded with the lower action. The A5’s resonance and bright balance is a fine showcase for the clever SRT2 preamp - we actually couldn’t dial in a ‘bad’ sound on it because the treble and bass controls mirror the natural subtlety of the pickup/mic dynamic design. An electro experience that captures the sound of an unplugged acoustic? The SRT2 is one of the closest to get there yet. An update that marks the A Series out as an essential consideration for players who rely on a consistent and controllable stage sound.

A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:
Originality of an instrument is very important. Modifications (any modifications), are a bad thing in the eyes of a collector. This will greatly influence value. Modifications can often be determined by looking at the model specs for a particular year guitar in this web page, and compare to your instrument. On flat top martins, the most common modifications are a replaced bridge, replaced tuners, or replaced frets.

When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
Gibson thought it was a good idea to label the switches to make using them more intuitive, the problem is that they don't really correspond to their use in praxis. The Rhythm label was justified back in the rock 'n' roll era (that of Guitar Slim not Boyz II Men), but the times have changed and nothing stops you now from playing a rhythm guitar in Treble position (metalheads love it).

Modulation effects (like phaser and flanger) follow effects like wah and overdrive. This allows the modulation effect to process and modify the tone built by the effects before it. If you put a modulation effect before the overdrive, then you are overdriving the sound of the flanger. This is a lot more difficult to control so the ME-80 places it after these effects.
Epiphone's Les Paul series were originally designed to allow the budget crowd to experience this awesome guitar without investing thousands of dollars. That's something that hasn't changed to this day. The Epiphone Special II is among the most basic Les Paul designs on offer, making it perfect for beginners. We've chosen this particular guitar because of its neutral configuration which will keep up with you even after you've built plenty of skill.
Gretsch re-emerges with this awesome rex acoustic-like electric guitar that defines quality and perfection in terms of style and elegance. Te Jim Dandy Flat Top G9500 is one of the Gretsch best electric guitars which effectively brings back the quality and sound that characterize one of their most famous guitars throughout the 30’s, 40’s and the 50’s era.

A. Many professional musicians invest thousands of dollars in high-end guitars made from expensive and rare tonewoods. A $100 student guitar made from spruce is not going to produce that level of tonality regardless of the player’s skill level. As a beginner, your main focus should be on skills such as chord formation, fretting techniques, and basic scales. Improving tonality and performance are long-term goals.
The smallest bass amps, which typically have 10 to 20 watts of power and a small 6.5" or 8" speaker, are known as practice amps. They amplify the instrument enough for individual practice in a small room, such as a bedroom. Practice amps do not typically produce enough volume or low-frequency sound reproduction to be used in a band rehearsal or show. As such, they are mostly used by beginners or, when used by professionals, for warm-up or individual practice. They are more likely than full-size combo amp cabinets to have an open-back design, like an electric guitar combo amp. The use of an open back cabinet in small practice amps makes these models different from most bass combo amps and speaker cabs, which are closed-back (often with bass reflex ports or vents, or less commonly, with passive radiator speakers, both of which are designed to boost the low-frequency response). Some buskers playing on the street for tips may use battery-powered practice amps, a feature available on some models.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown
A lot of EBay sellers have been calling the Hagstrom solid-bodies of the time Hagstrom-Kent. They are not. If it says Hagstrom on the body, it’s a Hagstrom. If it is one of the Hagstrom guitars that was sold as a Kent, it’s a ‘Kent, made by Hagstrom’. I wonder if the sellers think they can get more for a guitar by associating the Kent name with it. I don’t see how. Perhaps the fact that there are so many Kents floating around, the sellers wanted a more familiar name to hang on the Hagstrom.
So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
When Electric Guitars first hit the music market way back in the early fifties, they weren’t easily accepted by the people. However, later electric guitars became an integral part of the music industry throughout the world. The following article describes this amazing music instrument, which unlike its conventional counter-part, works on the laws of electromagnetism.
In this range, you will find many premium options. Many guitars in this range will offer some of the best features available. Again, you will find many upgrades from less-expensive models. Often, these are considered the standard models. Of course, you certainly don’t have to spend $1000 to get a great guitar. However, most guitars of this caliber will satisfy even the most discerning player. Musician’s Friend’s Private Reserve collection includes instruments that cater to the most demanding professional guitarists’ requirements.
Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.
My fav...So fun...And I love the color duty Siri since the first one came out and this one definitely does not disappoint it is a great game and I have not stop playing and I love the color duty Siri since the first one came out and this one definitely does not disappoint it is a great game and I have not stop playing it Since I got it...I only viewed the trailer and sales figures as this is a very popular game before purchasing this game and it seemed like it had a lot of action but it's not really my taste for a military game as it has some fictional characters like zombies in it and there are no fighter jets.

Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future. From unique models to exclusive colors, features and options, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs are redefining the concept of what makes a Gibson so unique, taking things a step further. With limited availability and an incredible demand for these unique instruments, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs have become highly collectible, sought after instruments with features us unique as the players who own them. Wildwood Guitars is honored to present our selection of these prized instruments to our exceptional customers. We invite you to find your own unique treasure among our inventory, just don’t blink… you might miss it!
At the time of writing, the annual membership is $179.00. This makes it a very low $14.91 per month. If you prefer to pay monthly you can get started with $19.95. There is also a special deal, discount coupon code that will make it even cheaper for the first month. Check further below to find the 60% discount coupon code for the first month’s subscription.
Get a custom drawn guitar or bass wiring diagram designed to your specifications for any type of pickups, switching and controls and options. Just complete the guitar wiring diagram order form with your custom specifications and our designers will do the rest. Our custom diagrams are easy to read, affordable and delivered by email for FREE! To order a custom diagram, select the number of pickups on your instrument below and complete the diagram order form.

Leo Fender started Fender Guitars in 1946, and his first innovation was the production of solid body guitars. Up until then, electric guitars were made with hollow bodies, meaning that they were somewhat fragile and somewhat complicated in design. Leo Fender’s guitars offered a more straightforward design; the were bodies made from one solid block of wood and the bridges were simply attached to the body, removing the need for extra calibration of elevated bridges.


Lolol lame azz I knew if I kept reading your BS comment you would start nameing all your crapy azz guitars haha lol no one cares or gives a flying fuck what you have or own.... (What you must of sounded like when you were 12 and lame as today) Oohhh I'm sooooo cool I have jimi's guitar and eric's guitar cause I'm their nephiew ya there my uncles hmm mm both of them I own and play with there guitars all the time woooo hooooo...............

While most single-coil pickups are wired in parallel with each other, it is possible to wire two or more of them in series, producing a fuller and stronger sound not unlike that of a humbucker.[26] This is a popular modification for instruments with two single-coil pickups like the Fender Telecaster and the Fender Jazz Bass. For the former, special 4-way switches are available to replace the stock 3-way switch and provide a series wiring position.[27]
As someone else mentioned, it depends if this will just be a practice amp, or if it will be used to jam with others. Personally, I think a beginner should just get a small practice amp, but a good one. The reason is that you don't yet know what you will want tone-wise out of a gigging/jamming amp yet. So just get the best solid state modeling amp you can afford and worry about a bigger amp later.
Volume pedals are volume potientiometers set into a rocking foot treadle, so that the volume of the bass guitar can be changed by the foot. Compression pedals affect the dynamics (volume levels) of a bass signal by subtly increasing the volume of quiet notes and reducing the volume of loud notes, which smooths out or "compresses" the overall sound. Limiters, which are similar to compressors, prevent the upper volume levels (peaks) of notes from getting too loud, which can damage speakers. Noise gates remove hums and hisses that occur with distortion pedals, vintage pedals, and some electric basses.
Fender guitars are generally equipped with single coil pickups, resulting in a brighter tone compared to humbucker pickups, for instance. This is part of Fender’s charm, and contributes to the characteristic tone of their instruments. Single coils are designed to cut through the mix with their bright sound, but a drawback is that this can cause issues with humming (1).
You have to take into account that these are low budget guitars, so there will be compromises in terms of materials, pickups and hardware. The experienced guitar player might require a higher standard. That being said, if you have between a 100 and 300 dollars to spend and you do want to learn to play guitar than these guitars are really worth the investment.
There is traditionally a gap between how we enjoy the sound of our guitars and the way they’re represented plugged in. Enter Yamaha, a leader in stage-ready acoustic technology for decades - and in the A5R ARE, it may have just offered us a very desirable solution. The A5R''s rounded fretboard edges offer an enjoyable playing experience that mimics the feeling of guitars that have been played in to a degree and it has an ethereal quality in the high ranges, even though some treble resonance is traded with the lower action. The A5’s resonance and bright balance is a fine showcase for the clever SRT2 preamp - we actually couldn’t dial in a ‘bad’ sound on it because the treble and bass controls mirror the natural subtlety of the pickup/mic dynamic design. An electro experience that captures the sound of an unplugged acoustic? The SRT2 is one of the closest to get there yet. An update that marks the A Series out as an essential consideration for players who rely on a consistent and controllable stage sound.

Kings style fused the call and response element of gospel with a blues form and a hint of Jazz throw in for good measure.  He’d sing a line, then answer it by playing a phrase on the guitar. T-Bone’s influence was apparent in his playing too – the expressive style and long single note sustain played a big part in his sound. B.B King also went on to influence the other two ‘Kings’ of blues – Albert King and Freddie King.
If it helps, Schaller have very accurate drawings of all their hardware on their website. You can also get very good drawings of all Gotoh parts as well, but theirs are harder to find (hidden in the parent company's site and I can't recall the full details). It is worth having a look at those, and pay attention to the way the tuning posts are shaped. That radiused section turned into the post is important , it really helps lock the strings firmly.
Although it’s a minor issue when choosing your first guitar, the tone and sustain that the guitar can produce relies on the quality of the material it’s made from. The most used tonewoods in the budget range are basswood, poplar, alder, and paulownia, while more expensive guitars can be made from pine, mahogany, and swamp ash. This is just a rough rule though – these days you will find mahogany in budget guitars and basswood in premium models. They all have different tonal qualities – for example, mahogany typically offers a warmer sound, swamp ash is brighter, while basswood and alder are well-balanced.

Hollow-body guitars are best suited for classic jazz, but some musicians have used them in rock, country and blues. If you are a non-jazz guitarist interested in this kind of instrument I’m going to assume you know what you are doing. While these types of guitars can sound great with overdrive in the right hands, they’re probably not the best choice for most rock players.


Guyatone produced electric guitars for major guitar manufacturer Suzuki. The company also produced their house brand Guyatone. Badged guitars produced by Guyatone include Barclay, Broadway, Coronado, Crestwood, Futurama, Howard, Ibanez, Ideal, Imperial, Johnny Guitar, Kent, Kingston, Lafayette, Marco Polo (electrics only), Montclair, Omega, Orpheus, Prestige, Royalist, Saturn, Silhouette, Silvertone, Vernon, Winston and Zenta, an impressive amount of names produced by a single company. Other badges that may have been produced by Guyatone are Beeton (not to be confused by the Beeton Brass Guitar company founded in 1994), Bradford, Canora and Regent.

Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.


Gibson guitar are among the best in the world, but they can also be a little expensive. You can go with an Epiphone, but Gibson always has a few good options under the $1,000 mark as well. If you love the idea of owning a Gibson Les Paul but you’re struggling with the cash part of it, check out the Les Paul Faded. A little while back I grabbed the 2016 version and it’s been a fantastic guitar with the tone and feel of a Les Paul, minus the big price tag.
"The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World."
One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.

Quite often, power chords are played with only down-strums, and often with a technique called palm muting, which might make it less vital to mute the unused strings. But it is REALLY important to mute them because many songs do use up- and down-strums with power chords (‘Smells Like Teen Spirit' springs to mind). Also, if you don't mute them, and you play loud with distortion, the strings might ring out—even if you don't pick them—and which will make your chords sound messy. So make sure you get your string muting sorted now!
I’m starting at guitar too at sixty years old, my opinion is that it’s not the guitar, but the time put into practicing, you can dup any type of sound with the features from amps, and guitar processors. You can even make an electric guitar sound like an acoustic. I purchased a line 6 150 watt amp, and a processor from line six, and I can dup any type of guitar sound. I built my own guitar
Echo is a naturally occurring effect. Since the first days of recording, men have attempted to create an artificial method of duplicating this effect. The first attempt were echo chambers (or rooms) that created a “natural” echo. These rooms still exist at some recording studios. Tape echo effects came next, offering portability and variable rates of echo. These units were often noisy, but are still favored for their warm echo tone. Analog delays solved the problems inherent with tape (bad tubes, noisy tape, and misaligned or worn out tape heads) but had limitations in the length of their delay. Finally, digital delays appeared in the 1980s and offered more delay time and added features, but also came with a more sterile sounding tone. Many digital delays now simulate tape, analog, and digital delays
If you're getting your amp for the purposes of playing out with a band, it's very tempting to invest in a large amplifier, whether that means a big combo or a half-stack (don't even mention a full stack). I get it; it's what the pros use when they're rocking out at festivals. The reality there is that the vast majority of the time, whenever you see a guitarist with a wall of sound, it's comprised mainly of dummy cabs with no actual speakers. It's for the look.
An amplifier stack consists of an amplifier head atop a speaker cabinet—a head on top of one cabinet is commonly called a half stack, a head atop two cabinets a full stack. The cabinet that the head sits on often has an angled top in front, while the lower cabinet of a full stack has a straight front. The first version of the Marshall stack was an amp head on an 8×12 cabinet, meaning a single speaker cabinet containing eight 12" guitar speakers. After six of these cabinets were made, the cabinet arrangement was changed to an amp head on two 4×12 (four 12" speakers) cabinets to make the cabinets more transportable. Some touring metal and rock bands have used a large array of guitar speaker cabinets for their impressive appearance. Some of these arrangements include only the fronts of speaker cabinets mounted on a large frame.[25]
Above all, enjoy playing guitar and enjoy the journey! Look forward to 3, 4, 5 years down the line when, if you've been persistent with your practice time (and allowed plenty of time for noodling), you'll have accomplished so much. This is all about freeing up your creativity, bit by bit, so you can express yourself on guitar as naturally as you can with speech. Doors will open all throughout your progress. Each new door that opens is like a new outlet for your creativity.
Another technology that is used in Delay units is a feedback circuit, consisting of a tracking oscillator circuit to hold a note of the last interval, and after amplifying the signal, send it back to the input side of the delay. While it was first associated with Boss DF-2 Super Feedbacker & Distortion, currently, the signal feedback circuit is employed by Delay pedals, and if used under "hold" mode (As in Boss DD-3) it will provide a sustain effect instead of a simply delay effect.

Electric instruments have a big role to play in the world of music, but there's a catch: they need amplification to do it! For that matter, even acoustic instruments need to be boosted when they're playing big venues. And while an amp alone can handle those tasks, many of the sounds in modern music (the signature distortion of rock and metal, for instance) rely heavily on effects units to shape the basic tone into something even better. If you're new to your instrument, then consider this selection of amplifiers and effects the doorway to your future sound - and your instrument will be the key that opens it up, once you've got your hands on your brand new hardware!


The MG30 is a good place to start. A reliable and lightweight transistor amp, loud enough for jamming and with straight-forward features, it’s especially good for beginners to understand how amps work (e.g. figuring out what the “mids” are on the EQ). Along with a headphones output and aux input (to play along to songs) it also has a useful effects bank with a choice of chorus, phase, flanger or delay, plus two types of reverb!
I had gotten rid of all my effects pedals a long time ago because I wasn't using them. So when I saw this little processor and the price I thought I would give it a Try. I was amazed at all the sounds and tones this thing puts out. For the little money you spent it is deff. worth it. I have not yet messed around with the drum settings but I will. This will be loads of fun to play around with. A deff. 5 star rating.
The person who made up the Top Ten list of best guitars has it all wrong! Of all the guitar companies he lists, Carvin is the only company that still uses ebony as standard material for the fretboard. This is because most other companies refuse to take the time and expense of this type of production. The others all use rosewood because it is cheap, relatively soft and can be "slammed" together quickly by machine; an indication of how they make their guitars in general! No other company who makes guitars even comes close to using the hand selected grade of wood (start to finish) that Carvin does. Take a hint from someone who knows how great guitars made step by step; if you want a guitar made from the best materials you can get, with critical operations still done by hand, order one one from Carvin, try it for ten days, if you really don't like it just return it... No questions and no hassles... Really. If you are not the type of person who cares, or are not willing to do ...more
There are times when a single-coil just doesn’t have enough twang. I’ve encountered Strat neck pickups that are just too wooly to provide me with that saucy, SRV/Hendrix-style rhythm juice. Or, sometimes an anemic bridge pickup just needs an extra dose of snap to push it into Tele-like territory. If so, this simple mod could be just what you’re looking for.
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.
Most guitars out there usually feature a version of either one of many Gibson designs or Fender ones, but there are exceptions. Paul Reed Smith is a brand that took their own path in just about every aspect of guitar design. This made it popular with many famous guitar players, most notably Carlos Santana. The model we're looking at today is a basic version of one of their flagship guitars. The balance of performance and pure style it offers is nearly as impressive without forcing you to extend out of your monetary reach.
One of the oldest guitar effects, vibrato changes the pitch of the signal at a constant shifting rate. Vibrato adds motion to your tone, but without the “choppy” feel of a tremolo. Vibrato adds a more fluid movement. The slightly detuned, slightly chorus-ey modulation emphasizes bends and makes chords more interesting to the listener. Jimi Hendrix was a visionary user of the Uni-Vibe, which at its core is a vibrato pedal.

The really important player on the scene today in the low end and intermediate price bracket is Mainland China. Whereas Yamaha and other makers have produced guitars in Taiwan for quite some time, Mainland Chinese guitars were always noted as being of extremely low quality. In the past few years, however, that situation has changed dramatically. In the past ten years, China has moved rapidly toward entrepreneurial private ownership of business. The new leadership has pushed this process quickly. China now permits foreign ownership of factories and businesses as well as encouraging Chinese citizens both from Mainland China and Taiwan to set up their own ventures. Just as the Koreans were able to progress from very low-end student models with crude workmanship to remarkably sophisticated guitars more quickly than the Japanese had, the Chinese now have all the advantages of the prior experience of Americans, Japanese, Korean and Indonesian ventures. In addition it should be noted that while Chinese labor is remarkably inexpensive, with an average annual income in China today of under $1,000, Chinese labor is by no means unskilled. China has a very high literacy rate and its workers are skilled and motivated. In the past the world has had areas with cheap labor and other areas with skilled labor. China is a major force to reckon with because it offers cheap skilled labor. The Chinese today are producing instruments in many different settings, ranging from small workshops specializing in handcrafted instruments on up to huge industrial complexes with the latest automated technology. Only ten years ago Chinese-made violins were viewed as almost a joke. They were violin-shaped objects but certainly did not play or sound like one. Today we at Gruhn Guitars are selling beautifully crafted Chinese violins made with excellent wood and superb craftsmanship at very reasonable prices. Some of these instruments compare very favorably with European and American violins costing thousands of dollars. Gibson has set up a factory in China to produce Epiphone guitars and numerous American makers, both large and small, are having guitars, banjos and mandolins made there. Whereas it would be prohibitively expensive to make guitars or other instruments in Japan today using techniques similar to those employed by Martin and Gibson in the 1930s with assembly line production but still featuring a high degree of hand craftsmanship and human judgment, in China today it is economically emminently feasible to do so. The violins we import are beautifully crafted and even feature genuine varnish finish for a very small fraction of the cost that companies such as Gibson charge simply for the option of a varnish finish on one of their standard models. The Chinese are very rapidly taking over the student- and intermediate-grade markets. Not only do they produce fretted instruments, but they have taken over a large segment of the piano market as well as producing wind instruments. I have seen and played prototype acoustic Chinese instruments which rival American-made guitars by some of the same American manufacturers bringing in these imports. It will be most interesting to see how this develops.
This is where you want to go! Steve is kind, professional, and supremely competent. just brought my Taylor 614ce for a neck adjustment and electronics work. Steve told me that he was running with about a two to three week turnaround period but then did a couple of quick fixes -on the spot- that made my guitar really sing for my next gig. I'll bring it back to him for some more in- depth repair soon but for now I am a very happy camper. And he didn't even charge me a dime!! I will be visiting Steve for all my guitar and mandolin service needs in the future.
The Telecaster was important in the evolution of country, electric blues, funk, rock and roll, and other forms of popular music. Its solid construction let guitarists play loudly as a lead instrument, with long sustain if desired. It produced less of the uncontrolled, whistling, ‘hard’ feedback (‘microphonic feedback’) that hollowbodied instruments tend to produce at volume (different from the controllable feedback later explored by Pete Townshend and countless other players). Even though the Telecaster is more than half a century old, and more sophisticated designs have appeared since the early 1950s (including Fender’s own Stratocaster), the Telecaster remains in production. There have been numerous variations and modifications, but a model with something close to the original features has always been available.

If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
SOLD OUT Here we have a great 45 Year old Japanese Vintage 1971 Yamaha FG180 Red Label Nippon Gakki Martin like vintage tone for a fraction shes a Boomer low action plays easily WoW! ... Just in and AVAILABLE JVG- Fresh Release: I can tell you this is a real good one folks! No structural cracks or checking in finish, its a beautiful Solid Spruce Top and it is pretty flat with no noticeable bellying and its bridge is tight, action is excellent within Martin specs... This guitar received the JVGuitars SET -UP upgrade to bone nut and compensated martin saddle as well as the brifg pins upgraded to very nice Rosewood with abalone dot detail as well as a new set of Martin Marquis strings ( 12’s ) 80/20 Phosphorus bronze . The neck has a classic feel to it with an excellent vintage finish still shines like glass …excellent with a classic Martin like feel in a soft V Medium Profile and has the correct relief set to within M spec frets are still good - we leveled and dress them. We first took off the old strings and fully clean the fingerboard and re-hydrate the woods before polishing all surfaces and lubricating the excellent upgraded Ping Deluxe tuners, Not to be confused with the similar model made in Taiwan this the famous Nippon Gakki made in Japan one and this is a really good one at that folks. Never abused, well cared for, no cracks, great neck alignment to this day, action excellent, plastic tone robbing parts - GONE! Bone & Rosewood sustains better than ever…. these are know for great “ M” Like vintage tone and is in great vintage condition,
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This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.
The M5 is extremely portable and pedalboard-friendly, measuring about 6 inches wide and tall. The construction is absolutely first rate with a heavy-duty all-metal chassis and footswitches. Line 6 absolutely does not skimp on build quality with this one. It’s also found on lots of pedalboards of pro players that we’ll talk about shortly, which speaks to it’s durability and quality. In terms of interface, it’s actually quite a simple pedal, as you can see in closeup photos of it. The inputs and outputs are rather simple. ¼” stereo in, ¼” stereo out, an expression pedal input, and an input for a 9V power supply (which comes included with it). On top of the unit you have 2 main footswitches (which not only turn an effect on and off, they are also used to scroll up and down), a small screen in the upper left corner, and 6 knobs to control different parameters of whatever effect you have selected. It does not have USB capability, balanced XLR outputs, or any of the other fancy I/O from larger multi-effects units. But then again, for its purpose it doesn’t really need all that. The M5 is intuitive, nice, and simple.
Bold and brash, the chest-thumping sound of Fender's big-bodied California Series Redondo Player acoustic-electric was designed to inspire you from the moment you pick it up. The exclusive slope-shouldered Redondo body shape has a rich, commanding voice that fills any room. The gloss metallic top, back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-...  Click To Read More About This Product

i have an old Dorado solid-body electric serial # 0726454 on the neck plate it says STEEL ADJUSTABLE NECK, then the serial number, then made in japan. it has abalone fret markers, and dorado is in abalone in the headstock, blonde finish white-black-white-black pickguard, and a funky trem. i was told once that maybe guild had made this guitar... seems pretty unlikely... and that it retains it's original value, it all seems pretty unlikely... but i don't know... please help!!!
A little bit of history will make this clearer… The original Fender Stratocaster switches were 2-pole 3-way switches (that’s actually what I have on my schematic, I think you’ll see why in a bit) and were intended only to select either the neck, middle or bridge pickup. However these were “make before break” switches where, as the switch is moved across from one position to the next, the next contact is made before the previous contact is broken. People found that if you could get the switch to rest in between those three positions that you’d actually have both neck and middle or middle and bridge pickups connected at the same time and, most importantly, it sounded good! It became a common thing to rest the 3-way switch in between the positions, so common that in the 60’s people were filing notches in the detente mechanism of the 3-way switch. These became the “notch” positions. In the 70’s, Fender adopted this popular mod into their stock switch thus becoming what we now use and call a 5-way switch but is, in fact, a 3-way switch with 5 positions.
One notable exception is a pitch shifter or harmonizer, particularly if you plan on using a pitch shift and envelope follower together as the pitch shifter may have greater difficulty accurately tracking an envelope follower-processed signal. Similarly, a standard wah pedal generally sounds best in the very front of the signal chain, but once again I recommend placing pitch shifter/harmonizer effects in front of a wah if you plan on using both together. Also, many players prefer the sound of a wah with a distortion pedal placed in front of it as this configuration can produce a more dramatic or more refined sweep depending on the distortion pedal’s tonal character (See Example 1, below).
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Most seven-string guitars add a low B string below the low E. Both electric and classical guitars exist designed for this tuning. A high A string above the high E instead of the low B string is sometimes used. Another less common seven-string arrangement is a second G string situated beside the standard G string and tuned an octave higher, in the same manner as a twelve-stringed guitar (see below). Jazz guitarists using a seven-string include George Van Eps, Lenny Breau, Bucky Pizzarelli and his son John Pizzarelli.
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