Maple is the most common wood used to make guitar necks. It is very hard and dense, and often has attractively detailed grain patterns referred to as figuring. Maple also has a very bright overall tone. Due to it’s figuring and its tonal characteristics maple is often used for a veneer or top laminate on more expensive solid body guitars. It is also used as a top wood in some archtop guitars, where it is usually laminated. Its hardness brings out the trebles in a guitar's sound. It is also often used for the fretboard where it adds definition to the sound. 
The early rock bands of the 1960s used the PA system only for vocals. The electric guitarist and electric bassist had to produce their sound for the hall, club or other venue with their own amplifiers and speaker cabinets. As a result, bass players from the 1960s often used large, powerful amplifiers and large speaker cabinets. Some bass players would even use multiple bass amplifiers, with the signal from one bass amp being sent to one or more "slave" amps. In the mid-1960s John Entwistle, the bassist for The Who, was one of the first major players to make use of Marshall stacks. At a time when most bands used 50 to 100-watt amplifiers with single cabinets, Entwistle used twin stacks with new experimental prototype 200-watt amplifiers. This, in turn, also had a strong influence on the band's contemporaries at the time, with Jack Bruce of Cream and Noel Redding of the Jimi Hendrix Experience both following suit.
8. Fender Champion 40-watt 1x12 ($179.99): If you are looking for a great introduction into the world of Fender tone, you need to look no further than the Fender Champion 40. This solid state amp with Fender classic styling allows you access to a variety of on-board effects like Vibratone, tremolo, delay and many more. The two amp channels allow you to switch between Fender Blackface clean or a variety of different amp voicings, accessing the sounds of other Fender amp greats. The ability to add a footswitch pedal allows you to switch channels and effects with great ease at the tap of a button. There’s a reason why Fender is the go-to company for many of those in the music community.
What can you expect from a shop whose exterior is painted in Eddie Van Halen stripes? Everything! Their selection of pedals was astounding. One of the largest selections I've come across in any store. I left having bought about a dozen things. Dangerous place! They are obviously a big dealer in PRS guitars because they had a nice selection of the USA made guitars. The Guitar Store represents Seattle right with an awesome staff and a vast selection of great guitars. With an ongoing series of in-store events and appearances by notable musicians, there is always a reason to stop in. Last year the shop hosted a monthly "build your own pedal" workshop--how cool is that?
Augustino Lo Prinzi Guitars - Augustine Lo Prinzi has made more than 10,000 guitars and just started his 49th year as a guitar maker! Renowned throughout the instrument making field, Augustino LoPrinzi's first instruments were classic guitars. As his career progressed he constructed many types of string instruments, numbering in the thousands : mandolins, lutes, violins, and steel string guitars, to list but a few. Now he is applying these years of wisdom to his first love, the classic guitar, which began his journey into instrument making. 

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: Values? Well, with the prices of 1960s American and British guitars through the roof, collectors and musicians turn to the next-best-thing, and that would be European and Japanese guitars. In general, any made-in-Japan solid-body electric guitar in good cosmetic shape, that's complete and playable, is worth at least $100, and any acoustic-electric, at least twice that. The more pickups it has, the more elaborate the controls, and the more flashy the pickguard, the more it's worth. Same goes for the body and headstock shape. The standard shapes that copy Fender and other manufacturers aren't as desirable as some of the weirder shapes. A Decca solidbody with an unusual body shape, with 3 pickups and an unusual original finish would probably be in the $250-350 range to the right person. An acoustic-electric with the same specs would probably be worth $100 more than that. I've seen some of the exceptional Teisco solidbodies go for $500-600, but that's uncommon. In about 2006, I saw a Teisco (one of their Mosrite copies) from about 1967 that was in flawless condition for sale in an instrument shop in Tokyo for 200,000 Yen (about $1,900). I wouldn't be surprised if it sold for that.
Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.
Mr. Bojangles,Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver, City of New Orleans,Steve Goodman, Alice’s Restaurant & Motorcycle song, Arlo Guthrie, Bobby McGee, Janis Joplin, Taxi, Harry Chapin, Please Come To Boston, Dave Loggins, Lady, Little River Band, Sailing, Christopher Cross, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Credence Clear Water Revival.
Along with the Dobro name, OMI was acquired by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1993. They renamed the company Original Acoustic Instruments and moved production to Nashville. Gibson now uses the name Dobro only for models with the inverted-cone design used originally by the Dobro Manufacturing Company. Gibson also manufactures biscuit-style single-resonator guitars, but it sells them under names such as Hound Dog andEpiphone. The Dobro was first introduced to country music by Roy Acuff.

Basicly it is a HD digital sound interface plus with a MIDI controller and footswitch. It is has unique design with different HOST mode and switching MODE to work with the host softwares. We are proud of that it is now maybe the best thing you can find to use on stage with software FX. The special designed analog signal chain mixing with the digital codec give the best dynamic response and sound quality. We did AB with lots of other interface and be so confident on its performance.
Today's use of Torres and post-Torres type guitars for repertoire of all periods is sometimes critically viewed: Torres and post-Torres style modern guitars (with their fan-bracing and design) have a thick and strong tone, very suitable for modern-era repertoire. However, they are considered to emphasize the fundamental too heavily (at the expense of overtone partials) for earlier repertoire (Classical/Romantic: Carulli, Sor, Giuliani, Mertz, ...; Baroque: de Visee, ...; etc.). "Andrés Segovia presented the Spanish guitar as a versatile model for all playing styles"[5] to the extent, that still today, "many guitarists have tunnel-vision of the world of the guitar, coming from the modern Segovia tradition".[6]
The American Deluxe Telecaster (introduced in 1998; upgraded in 2004, 2008, and 2010) features a pair of Samarium Cobalt Noiseless pickups and the S-1 switching system. Models made prior to 2004 featured two Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele single-coils, Fender/Fishman Powerbridge piezo system and 4-bolt neck fixing. Other refinements include a bound contoured alder or ash body and an abalone dot-inlaid maple neck with rosewood or maple fingerboard, 22 medium-jumbo frets, rolled fingerboard edges, and highly detailed nut and fret work. The HH model sported an ebony fingerboard, quilted or flamed maple top and a pair of Enforcer humbuckers with S-1 switching (discontinued as of 2008). As of March 23, 2010, Fender updated the American Deluxe Telecaster with a compound radius maple neck, N3 Noiseless Tele pickups and a reconfigured S-1 switching system for wider sonic possibilities. The new model now sports staggered, locking tuning machines, which provide better break angle over the nut for increased sustain and improved tuning stability.
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In 1978 the Les Paul Pro Deluxe was introduced. This guitar featured P-90 pickups instead of the “mini-humbuckers” of the Deluxe model, an ebony fingerboard, maple neck, mahogany body and chrome hardware. It came in Ebony, Cherry Sunburst, Tobacco Sunburst or Gold finishes. Interestingly, it was first launched in Europe, rather than the US. It was discontinued in 1983.
Harmony Hollywood H38- OK, here's the one we will sell. She's about the same as above but with opposite color combo. This one has a nice vintage DeArmond Gold Foil Pickup. Action is medium, but if you would like a lower action, we will be happy to cut that bridge a bit down. Guitar is in  nice vintage condition. All original except the period style Rosewood Bridge and reproduction Harmony Pick Guard. SOLD

Then, in the late ‘60s, two things happened. First, Unicord was purchased by conglomerate Gulf+Western around 1967. Then, Unicord was merged with a company called Merson, which housed brands like Tempo, Giannini and Hagstrom. It’s not certain what the exact timeline of these events were, but once the merger occurred, Univox up and moved its production from New York City to Westbury, NY. However, that didn’t stay static for long.
We don’t know about other early guitars, but Univox probably augmented its offerings with other offerings from the Arai catalog, similar to what Epiphone would do with its first imports slightly later, in around 1970. Evidence this might have been so is seen in the book Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (American Music Publishers, out of print) which shows a Univox 12-string solidbody with a suitably whacky late-’60s Japanese shape, with two equal cutaway stubby/pointy horns. The head was a strange, long thing with a concave scoop on top, and the plastic logo. This is the only example of this shape I’ve encountered, but it had two of the black-and-white plastic-covered pickups used on Aria guitars of the period, and the majority of later Univox guitars were indeed manufactured by Arai and Company, makers of Aria, Aria Diamond, Diamond and Arai guitars. These pickups have white outsides with a black trapezoidal insert and are sometimes called “Art Deco” pickups. Perhaps the coolest feature of this strange guitar is a 12-string version of the square vibrato system employed on Aria guitars of this era. You can pretty much assume that if there was a strange-shaped solidbody 12-string Univox, it was not the only model! These would not have lasted long, probably for only until 1970 at the latest, and are not seen in the ’71 catalog.
According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck.
SOLD OUT: Here we had a beautiful vintage 1972 Harmony Monterey Mandolin it's an A style and is totally near mint! Beautiful classic Teaburst sunburst on a AA figured solid spruce TOP its in top condition and has really great vintage patina look to it. It's burst color is perfect match to a 60s Gibson it's very Cool US vintage It's Top is nicely figured and has lots of 3-D Birdseye figured back sides & neck all it's bindings are clean with patina and it plays perfectly and has excellent volume and a nice woodsy tone everything is like new includes a hard shell case it's just $449.00 this is a real bargain for US vintage piece of history and is in such all round fantastic shape. It Plays as beautifully as she looks! ,,, Let me know if you may have an interest in it it's super nice..
This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo’s PTB™ (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What’s more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy’s hard-rock maple neck features an easy-playing satin finish, while its 12” radius lets you bend notes deeply and its Plek-dressed medium-jumbo nickel frets deliver silky playability. The moment you open the luxurious deluxe Tolex hardshell case, you’ll be greeted with a stunning instrument and delicious aroma that’ll have your pulse racing.
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Blue
King V has got to be one of Jackson’s most iconic guitar families. The one we are looking at here is a but underpowered compared to the original King V, however it also comes at a much lower price. The whole package is well made and quality control is top notch. It takes some time to get used to the Flying V body shape, but once you do you’ll refuse to go back. Aside from looking good, this thing also brings a mighty sound.
With so many guitar manufacturers hot rodding the Stratocaster, it is refreshing to see brands like ESP going after the other popular guitar shape, resulting in the "Super LP" guitar like the ESPT LTD EC-1000FM. This souped up version of the classic single cutaway body combines traditional looks with modern tones and playability, resulting in a fast playing axe that's easy on the eyes, and not too edgy.
If you just want to send that current through to the amplifier unchanged, that would mean keeping all volume- and tone knobs turned all the way up. But the knobs can be useful. Underneath the volume knobs, the electrical signal is hooked up to two places; one line goes out towards the amplifier, and the other is effectively contained without being sent to the amplifier. The more you turn down the volume knob, the more of the signal you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier.
The earliest sound effects were strictly studio productions. In the mid to late 1940s, recording engineers and experimental musicians such as Les Paul began manipulating reel-to-reel recording tape to create echo effects and unusual, futuristic sounds. Microphone placement ("miking") techniques were used in spaces with specially designed acoustic properties to simulate echo chambers.[22][23][24] In 1948 DeArmond released the Trem-Trol, the first commercially available stand-alone effects unit. This device produced a tremolo by passing an instrument's electrical signal through a water-based electrolytic fluid.[25] Most stand-alone effects of the 1950s and early 60s such as the Gibson GA-VI vibrato unit and the Fender reverb box, were expensive and impractical, requiring bulky transformers and high voltages. The original stand-alone units were not especially in-demand as many effects came built into amplifiers. The first popular stand-alone was the 1958 Watkins Copicat, a relatively portable tape echo effect made famous by the British band, The Shadows.[26][27]

Well, we are not part of the study! The study has been conducted, and he’s just giving you the results, it was written nowhere that you had to guess which wood was which or anything of the sort. This doesn’t imply that his little kid (cause this is his son’s science project, remember) performed any form of double-blind test, but still your remark is completely inapplicable and actually turns back on you, that make a big fuss about this article’s sloppyiness, only to attack it with wrong logical reasoning.
This full-sized, 22-fret, single cutaway electric guitar features two single-coil pickups and is capable of producing a wide range of tones. With the bridge pickup, you can get that bright, rich, cutting tone known as the country "twang" made famous by artists such as Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings. With the neck pickup you get a warmer, mellow, bluesy tone, such as that of Albert Collins or Muddy Waters. Additionally, rock musicians as diverse as Syd Barrett, Chrissy Hynde, and Keith Richards have found a way to make their own distinctive sound using this style of guitar.
This mod revolves around the concept that adding mass to the headstock lowers its resonant frequency, while reducing mass will raise that frequency. The theory at work here is that vibration is absorbed or reflected back into the strings and body based upon this frequency. Depending upon the harmonic makeup of your particular instrument, changing this can enhance or degrade sustain and accentuate or attenuate certain harmonics. All of this is dependent not only on your guitar’s construction, but also on how large your headstock is to begin with. If all of this seems a bit hazy, that’s because it is. I don’t have a handy-dandy answer like “more mass equals more sustain” because it isn’t always true. Suffice it to say that you can make a difference in a guitar’s character by following this path. I usually go through this exercise with my builds because I have the luxury of time and the resources at hand. It’s like fine tuning a race car’s suspension settings to your liking.
What I really want is a pelham blue or mostly-bluish-but-a-little-teal gibson sg with an ebony fretboard. the fretboard is absolutely a deal breaker. i'll probably change the pickups to WRC's so stock pickups are unimportant. Could get a used Elliot Easton, but I'd have to buy it used, sight unseen, and the trem isn't really ideal for how I tend to play, so I was hoping there was someone out there who does this. I am kinda surprised that no one does. It's one of the most iconic designs in history, why no interest in BTOs?
Over the past three years, Gibson’s annual revenue has fallen from $2.1 billion to $1.7 billion, according to data gathered by Music Trades magazine. The company’s 2014 purchase of Philips’s audio division for $135 million led to debt — how much, the company won’t say — and a Moody’s downgrading last year. Fender, which had to abandon a public offering in 2012, has fallen from $675 million in revenue to $545 million. It has cut its debt in recent years, but it remains at $100 million.
Epiphone does a great job of making instruments for all levels of guitar players, especially those looking for affordable acoustic and electric instruments. Epiphone is owned by Gibson, and therefore can make official copies of Gibson guitars like the Les Paul, SG and Hummingbird. Many are good enough for pro players to use in the studio or onstage.
The PRS McCarty 594 features a double cutaway body style. It has an African mahogany body with a figured maple 10-Top and gloss nitrocellulose finish. The neck is mahogany and is topped with a bound dark rosewood fretboard with a 10-inch radius and iconic bird inlays. The neck sports a new Pattern Vintage neck shape, which is as wide as the standard Pattern neck profile but with just a little extra thickness and a slightly asymmetric carve.

On my guitar, the bridge plate is held on by five screws. Three on the back of the plate, two towards the neck on the front. You may need to remove the intonation block things.One or all. If you decide to take any off, use your calipers and measure from the front of them to the back of the bridge plate, so that you don't lose your intonation. Mark each saddle like in the picture.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
I have a 12-string Lyle in really good shape. Bought as a b-day present from me back in late 1970's from a pawn shop. I need to take it to a luthier to have it set up better, but it sounds really good. Just right now the action is a little high, but not that much wear. For a long time, I put it away, finding it hard to chord as a relative newbie back then. But now, I am more than ready. It does say it was made in Korea ~ which makes it seem a little more rare. The sound is still great or maybe even better! Wish I knew what it was worth, but I hope the guy I find to set it up will know more.
That’s not all modeling processors can do. In addition to offering guitar and amp models, most guitar modeling processors have libraries of the kinds of effects you would get from individual pedals—reverb, echo, chorus, overdrive, distortion, fuzz, etc., as well as integrated drum machines with scores of preset rhythm patterns to help your practice. You can run several effects simultaneously, combining them to create your own unique tonal palette. Most modeling processors now have USB connectivity, some even with two-way audio streaming, for use as interfaces in direct computer recording.
A. Most electric guitars have several control knobs on the body. The amount of knobs and what they do can vary, so it's worth experimenting, but we'll go over the most common configuration. The majority of electric guitars have three control knobs and one switch. One control knob is for volume and the other two are for tone, with one controlling the neck pickup, and the other controlling the bridge pickup. The switch is to change between using the neck or bridge pickup.
Gibson announced a new interactive computerized Les Paul that produces more sounds, named the Dark Fire. It was released on December 15, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body and controlled by the “Master Control Knob” (MCK). The MCK allows players to change the pickups and coils, adjust each tone and tunings automatically and simultaneously, even during a song being played. Like the Robot, the Dark Fire features the ability to tune the guitar; however, in an improvement over the Robot, the player can tune it up to 500 times per battery charge, allowing the tuning pegs to adjust themselves to different tuning styles. Using the “Chameleon Tone Technology” Gibson claims this guitar will produce every imaginable guitar sound. In addition to the improved and advanced tuning features, the guitar has three types of pickups which include Burstbucker (humbucker), a P-90 single-coil and a bridge-mounted piezo acoustic, all of which contribute to organic blends of original sounds.
The offset waist guitar was a later development in guitar history.  Getting away from the straight-laced and semi-symmetrical “T” and “S,” the Jazz Style was a whole new animal. A complicated electrical circuit provides much more variance and tone that its straight-waisted brethren.  This style of guitar is one of the most unique and complex guitar designs out there and has graced the shoulders of artists such as Elvis Costello, J. Mascis, Thurston Moore, and many more.
The fuzz pedal is one of the earliest stomp boxes on the market. A very simple circuit the fuzz box altered the guitar’s signal by transforming it into a square wave. The first widely available fuzz was the Maestro Fuzz Tone by Gibson. The Fuzz Tone pedal was released in 1962 and didn’t really catch on until Keith Richards used one on the opening riff of “Satisfaction” and the floodgates opened. Another definitive fuzz pedal of the late 1960’s was the Sola Sound Tone Bender made famous by Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page.
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA32 guitar equipped with Metal Works Brushed EMG 57/66 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 3-Piece maple Wizard II neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard bridge Pearl dot inlay
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One of the most important things when choosing your guitar is of course the sound - read the study on electric guitar sounds. It’s best if you’re able to try different guitars out in a music shop, and the staff there will most likely be happy to present you with different options that are good for beginners. There you will also have the chance to see how the different guitars feel to play, and have the opportunity to ask the staff if you have any questions or need any advice.

Have you ever looked at a hollow or semi-hollow guitar on the wall at your local music store and wondered how the heck they get the electronics in there? The short answer: it’s do-able, but not easy. In fact, it’s widely considered to be one of the most difficult jobs in the wide world of guitar maintenance. My tech charges extra for doing electronics work in a hollow-body, and he’s definitely not the only one.


Ovation are relative newcomers to the world of vintage guitars, only launching their range at the 1967 NAMM show in Chicago. Ovation started as an off-shoot of founder Charles Kamen's work in the aviation field, studying vibration and resonances in helicopter blades. Whilst other respected American manufacturers relied heavily of quality nautral products and the artistry of their master luthiers, Ovation came very much from a science and engineering perspective: they used oscillographs to test existing instruments, and came up with the famous Ovation rounded back design, and suggested the use of a synthetic material, Lyrachord, claiming it to be more resonant that any wood.

INTONATIONSEINSTELLUNG (FAT20) Um sicherzustellen, dass keine Bewegung auftreten kann, hat jeder Sattel eine Stellschraube, die den Sattel verriegelt. Beim Einstellen der Intonation lösen Sie die Sattelverriegelungsschraube mit einem 2 mm großen Inbusschlüssel. (D) Zum Einstellen der Intonation setzen Sie einen 2,5 mm großen Inbusschlüssel in die Sattelschraube an der Rückseite des Tremolo ein.

This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
This is normally when I tell you about a crowdfunding campaign, but there isn't one currently running for this device, so if you're interested in getting a ToneWood-Amp when it's launched, sign up at their website to register for pre-ordering. There is no commitment to buy one for signing up, but if you sign up now, you can then order one at half-price ($90) when the pre-order campaign goes live (mid-October).
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.

Although there’s no clear delineation for when Phase Two officially began, the Hi-Flier began to develop new features. While it maintained the P90-style pickups, other aspects of the guitar were changed. The fret markers shrunk and were made uniform in size, the rocker switches were replaced by three-way toggles and a plain white pickguard was made standard.
Certainly low action makes a guitar easier to play, and for some styles it really is a necessity. What I would like to address here, though, are the high incidences of guitarists who perpetually chase “the perfect tone”, while continually focusing on string height purely as a function of playing feel, rather than as a factor of tone, which it most certainly is. The old set-up rule that you “get your strings as low as you can without buzzing” seems to make perfect sense. Set up to that criteria, however, while your strings might not buzz noticeably, their vibrational arc is more than likely still inhibited by the proximity of the frets. Also, play harder than usual — which, if you’re like me, you will often find yourself doing in live situations, even if you’re not aware of it — and that set up does also lead to a little unwanted buzzing, though your amp settings, the energy of the live gig, and any effects in the chain might help to mask it.
Because driving the power valves this hard also means maximum volume, which can be difficult to manage in a small recording or rehearsal space, many solutions have emerged that in some way divert some of this power valve output from the speakers, and allow the player to generate power valve distortion without excessive volume. These include built-in or separate power attenuators and power-supply-based power attenuation, such as a VVR, or Variable Voltage Regulator to drop the voltage on the valves' plates, to increase distortion whilst lowering volume. Guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen have been known to use variacs before VVR technology was invented.[specify] Lower-power valve amps (such as a quarter-watt or less)[citation needed], speaker isolation cabinets, and low-efficiency guitar speakers are also used to tame the volume.
A common issue for playing on larger stages or in studios is the distance between a guitarist’s pedals and their amp. Guitar cables that are longer than eight or nine meters (25 or 30 feet) not only degrade the quality of the signal, but also become incredibly susceptible to noises like hiss and hum. To allow guitarists to drive their signal over 100 meters (300 feet), Radial created the SGI-TX/RX™. The SGI changes the unbalanced guitar signal to a balanced line-level signal, altering the impedance for longer XLR cable runs; guitarists are able to use their amps offstage or in an entirely separate room when trying to craft the perfect tone.

James Burton, another famous Twin user, put it best: “If you can plug your guitar into an amp and make it sound good, that’s what it’s all about. The amp I really enjoy playing, especially when I’m traveling, is the Fender ’65 Twin Reverb. It’s got everything you need for live playing and it has great tone. That amp just works for me and it’s real trustworthy. When I travel on the road, I do use a little digital delay and maybe a little chorus, but I just like the sound of the guitar and playing something that I think people will appreciate and understand.”
As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
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The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.

It's impossible to ignore the British brand, which has been linked to the most famous names in rock history for several decades. Who hasn't seen "Marshall walls" stacked on the stage behind their favorite bands? Unlike Fender, their typical sound is not clean but rather "crunchy" and a bit sandy, like you can hear on some albums by The Who and AC/DC. Their first prototypes were Fender Bassman replicas that slowly found their own personality. For instance, Marshall decided to split the amp from the speaker cabinet (4 x 12" Celestion) to create the famous "stack". The use of tubes to provide more gain is also noteworthy, and it translates into more overdrive than the Bassman can offer. And so the JTM 45 was born, followed by many legendary models like the JCM 800 and 900, as well as the Plexis series.
So, to make a successful guitar company, you need to beat the best brands out there. But how would you do that? Brands like Fender and Gibson advertise themselves as the original inventors of the two most popular electric guitar models, the Stratocaster and the Les Paul. This is one of their biggest selling points. Unfortunately, you can’t reinvent something that’s already been invented, hence you can’t really beat them at brand name, especially when you’re starting a guitar company. You have to try to beat them at quality, price and novelty (i.e., introducing something new that improves a guitarists experience). Eventually, you’ll have to get some artists to try out your models and sign deals with them. If you get all of this right, I think you should be able to make it big.

At the core of this pedal is the Line 6 HX technology, which emulates the behavior of actual amp and stompbox components. This means that instead of merely copying the sound, it recreates the entire pedal or amplifier in digital format, allowing the models to respond to guitar tone and adjustments much like the real thing. While it originally had 70 effects, firmware updates have raised this number to 104, which is more than enough to keep you busy for months, if not years. Amp, cab and mic models were also increased to 115. Since Line 6 is well known for providing updates, it is reasonable to expect more expansions in the future. It does everything that the Helix LT can, with some extras, most notable of which is the LED scribble strips for labeling each footswitch. The Helix Floor also comes with expanded input/output options to work with mics and other instruments.
Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.
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Launched in the late 1990s the SE models are manufactured in South Korea by a third-party company (World Musical Instruments) then shipped to re-sellers and dealers in the United States. This is a major part of the cost-cutting technique, in addition to a more flat (as opposed to carved) body shape and cheaper pickups/electronics. So be advised, I’m not telling you that you’re getting a $2000 guitar for $600.
In fact, it’s the same hand-fabricated bobbin, Alnico II bar magnets and plain enamel mag wire that featured on the original. And with a similar construction comes a similar vintage P-90 tone, with plenty of brightness and bite. Available in both bridge and neck models, the Antiquities look the part too, with authentic-looking aged black plastic dog-ear covers.

To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
The Rolls-Royce of multi-effects pedals is the Line 6 POD HD500X. As far as the top 5 pedals in this guide, the HD500X is the most full-featured, most complex, and also the priciest. Despite carrying a higher price tag than the others, it comes very highly recommended and landed a solid second place on our list, and this is mostly due to two things:
When buying any instrument don't buy cheap. I've been playing 5 string for 36 yrs. The most important thing in a 5 string is the tone ring with a resonator. many good brands on banjo's. I have a alverez denver belle flat top tone ring, white eagle arch top tone ring but my favorite is a honher Artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a Good acustic guitar my favorite is a martin D-35 ease of play and tone are awesome. The tone is what you are after.
Unfortunately, it appears it is no longer possible to grab a Standard MIM Telecaster for under $500. Still, the Standard Telecaster remains a solid option when it comes to reasonably priced guitars, and it is a great alternative to the American Tele. However, if this increase doesn't set well with you, and you aren't digging the Modern Player Telecaster Plus, I suggest checking out what Squier has to offer.
Soundwise, it still packs the same AudioDNA2 processor but somehow sounds 'better', I think John Johnson (founder of Digitech before it was sold to Harman re-hired to work on this RP) had a lot to do with the improvements. I think they have made this with it being used/abused in mind, from the rigid metal chasis, to the USB connectivity, line-in jack to play along backing tracks, headphone input, stereo out, built-in looper (40 seconds) and the awesome Stompbox and SoundCheck features.
PRS Guitars was founded in 1985 by Paul Reed Smith in Maryland, USA. They build high-end guitars, even if they also have a more affordable Asian range (the SE series). The most popular PRS endorser is Carlos Santana, but we could also count Dave Navarro and Al Di Meola among them. Santana's guitar is equipped with dual-coil pickups and a mahogany body with maple top. It looks a bit like a Les Paul with two cutaways. And the sound is closer to a Les Paul than to a Fender.
Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black
Now, let’s consider the tone knobs. Eric Clapton was one of the first guitarists to realize the power within those unassuming plastic spinners. His famed “woman tone” sound during Cream relied on rolling the pots on his Gibson Les Paul Standard, SG or ES-335 all the way off and turning the treble and midrange of his superbly overdriven Marshall amps high. Similarly, jazz guitar players who are looking for a classic tone roll their pots back until they get in the Wes-Benson-Burrell-Pass-etc. zone.
Next up is another electric guitar from Fender Standard, namely the American Special Telecaster. This one has two Texas Special Tele pickups and it’s perfect for great American genres like country, rock and blues. This American Special Telecaster has a lovely alder body and the neck is maple. Just like number one on our list, the 50’s Stratocaster, it’s vintage-looking, but the Vintage Blonde model we’re reviewing looks vintage in a cooler, less sentimental way.
^ Jump up to: a b Peterson (2002, pp. 36–37):Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA: The Guild of American Luthiers. Number 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.

Ah yes, the 808. It's often used and referred to as a kick, but it tends to act more as a very low tom, as it has a pitch. This thing is the Loch Ness Monster – there tends to be more under the water. The best way to deal with a true, clean 808 sample is to work around it. It's usually best to let the 808 do its thing and to get the bottom end around it the hell out of the way. If it's a fuzzy sample or has been driven and squashed, you may need to play with things above 250 Hz, but usually live and let live is the best approach.
Epiphone's passion has always been about more than just making guitars. It has been about making music. It has been about understanding what is inside every musican that makes them want to, have to, express themselves. And understanding the myriad musical styles, where they are going and how they might develop. For over one hundred and twenty-five years they have continually looked for new and better ways to help players take their music farther.
1. Intonation: I have a brand-new Epiphone LP that will not completely intonate on the G, A, and Low E. Fretted notes remain sharp. I have replaced the factory strings with new Ernie Balls and tried every trick in the book to move the saddles as far away from the neck as possible. Many LP owners have this problem. Other than returning the guitar to Guitar World, my only other option is swap out the factory bridge with a wider one. You mention the latter option in one of your early comments, and I've decided to try it. I just bought a Gotoh one online. Hopefully, that will solve the problem.
I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
At the end of 1931, Beauchamp, Barth, Rickenbacker and with several other individuals banded together and formed the Ro-Pat-In Corporation(elektRO–PATent-INstruments) in order to manufacture and distribute electrically amplified musical instruments, with an emphasis upon their newly developed A-25 Hawaiian Guitar, often referred to as the “Frying Pan” lap-steel electric guitar as well as an Electric Spanish (standard) model and companion amplifiers. In the summer of 1932, Ro-Pat-In began to manufacture cast aluminum production versions of the Frying Pan as well as a lesser number of standard Spanish Electrics built from wooden bodies similar to those made in Chicago for the National Company. These instruments constitute the origin of the electric guitar we know and use today by virtue of their string-driven electro-magnetic pick-ups. Not only that, but Ro-Pat-In was the first company in the world specifically created to manufacture electric instruments. In 1933 the Ro-Pat-In company’s name was changed to Electro String Instrument Corporation and its instruments labeled simply as “Electro”. In 1934 the name of Rickenbacher” was added in honor of the company’s principal partner, Adolph Rickenbacker. In 1935 the company introduced several new models including the Model “B” Electric Spanish guitar which is considered the first solid body electric guitar. Because the original aluminum Frying Pans were susceptible to tuning problems from the expansion of the metal under hot performing lights, many of the new models were manufactured from cast Bakelite, an early synthetic plastic from which bowling balls are made.[2]
Treadle-based volume pedals are used by electric instrument players (guitar, bass, keyboards) to adjust the volume of their instrument with one foot while their hands are being used to play their instrument. Treadle-style volume pedals are often also used to create swelling effects by removing the attack of a note or chord, as popularised by pedal steel guitar players. This enables electric guitar and pedal steel players to imitate the soft swelling sound that an orchestra string section can produce, in which a note or chord starts very softly and then grows in volume. Treadle-based volume pedals do not usually have batteries or require external power. Volume effects: Electro-Harmonix LPB-1, Fender Volume Pedal, MXR Micro Amp, Ernie Ball Volume Pedal.
Vibrato should definitely be #1. All of those shred heads are choosing sweeps and tapping. I like sweeps and taps, but the vibrato and bends are the best and most important techniques in guitar because not only you can play good, but you can also add soul to your playing. You don't have to tap or sweep to be a better player than the other who doesn't use taps.
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It’s curious to note that also tauted in the ’39 Grossman catalog was the National Res-O-Lectric Pick-up Unit, designed to be added to National and Dobro amplifying guitars. This was not sold as an accessory, but had to be factory-installed for $25. On single-cone guitars, the bridge assembly/cover was replaced with the pickup assembly, faced in gloss black Ebonoid. On tricone guitars the pickup would be built in to the silver cover. It’s not clear if these were also mid-’37 developments or if they appeared closer to the ’39 Grossman catalog publication date.

Plug an electric guitar into the input. Adjust the input drive level as high as it will go without causing the input clipping light to activate. Adjust the drive level control to a level below where the drive clipping light activates. Different reverb sounds can be achieved by lowering and raising the reverb drive level. Adjust the reverb level for a nice sounding balance between the dry and reverb sounds. Adjust the output level for the optimum volume level. Now go play some surf music.


2. Do your saddles have notches cut into them? If not, then I suspect they could do with some (or if they have, but they're extremely shallow, perhaps they need deepened a little). Just note, however, that this is very easy to screw up and should probably be done by a tech if you're in any way unsure about doing it yourself. Also, you can't just cut a notch in one saddle. You would have to do all of them to the same depth, then raise the bridge a little to make up for the depth you just removed.
You couldn’t call it a pedal, but Fender’s tube reverb, in its original or reissued form, has always been considered one of the best spring reverb units around, and can be added at the front end of any amp (although this isn’t ideal if your overdrive sound comes from a channel-switching overdrive preamp placed after the reverb). Other amp makers in the USA and the UK also offered stand-alone reverbs, plenty of which can sound totally fabulous. Fender was actually a little slow getting onboard reverb into its amplifiers, though, and makers such as Gibson and Ampeg offered combos with fantastic sounding built-in reverb in the early ’60s.
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Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA7QM guitar equipped with EMG 707/81-7 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 5-Piece maple/walnut Wizard II-7 neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard 7 bridge Pearl dot inlay
Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.
The STRATosphere is not affiliated with Fender Musical Instruments. Strat®, Stratocaster®, Esquire®, Telecaster®, Tele®, Jazzmaster®, Jaguar®, Mustang®, P Bass®, J Bass®, Fender® and the distinctive headstock design of Fender guitars are registered trademarks of Fender® Musical Instruments. All applicable Fender products are covered under warranty by The STRATosphere.
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The VOX Pathfinder 10 is one of the best cheap amps on the market today, but don’t be fooled by its budget friendly price tag – this is a powerhouse of tone. Its pricing and ease of use makes it ideal for beginner guitarists but its signature, high quality VOX sound is why it’s also relied upon by professional guitarists and studio engineers everywhere.
A nice twist on this Squier is the use of a humbucking pickup in the bridge position, which is the reason for the HSS moniker (Humbucker-Single-Single). Humbuckers—two single-coil pickups sandwiched together and wired out-of-phase so they cancel out noise—are much quieter than single-coil pickups. However, they don’t have the trebly twang of single-coil pickups. Most rock guitarists use the bridge pickup most of the time because it has a brighter, more cutting sound than the neck pickup, so in most situations the HSS Bullet Strat will deliver a robust and hum-free sound.
For most players, the ideal location to place modulation effects—which include phase shifters, flangers, chorus, rotary, tremolo, vibrato and so on—is directly after a compressor and/or overdrive/distortion pedal. When these effects are distorted after the fact, the sound tends to smear and lose definition (particularly with chorus), although there are a few exceptions where distorting a flanger or phase shifter can sound really cool. The best example is Eddie Van Halen, who doesn’t use distortion pedals and instead generates all of his distortion from the amp. When a flanger or phase shifter is placed in front of a distorted amp or overdrive pedal, it can create dramatic thick, jet-like phasing and flanging effects (See Example 2, below).
Our original hand made guitar we’ve been building for 32 years that competes with guitars 3 times its price, the 50 Series has all the prerequisites of the traditional American guitar. Compared regularly to Martin D18 and Taylor 5 Series, but with easier playability and a lower price since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. For 2018 Denny added a more detailed ivory zipper stripe binding and installed the new 2018 Fishman Isys Plus electronics system to make this guitar truly special. Shipped direct from Denny’s hands to yours. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
The classical guitar repertoire also includes modern contemporary works – sometimes termed "New Music" – such as Elliott Carter's Changes,[17] Cristóbal Halffter's Codex I,[18] Luciano Berio's Sequenza XI,[19] Maurizio Pisati's Sette Studi,[20] Maurice Ohana's Si Le Jour Paraît,[21] Sylvano Bussotti's Rara (eco sierologico),[22] Ernst Krenek's Suite für Guitarre allein, Op. 164,[23] Franco Donatoni's Algo: Due pezzi per chitarra,[24] etc.

It goes to show…there is no “best” guitar players…it’s all a matter of perspective, taste, interpretation, etc….. Above all, much of it has to do with the players in question being at the right place , at the right time, playing what the audience wanted to hear from that performance at that point in time. It’s a big world full of talent undiscovered and sadly, it will remain just that: undiscovered.


The Les Paul guitar line was originally conceived to include two models: the regular model (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom model, which offered upgraded hardware and a more formal black finish. However, advancements in pickup, body, and hardware designs allowed the Les Paul to become a long-term series of electric solid-body guitars that targeted every price-point and market level except for the complete novice guitarist. This beginner guitar market was filled by the Melody Maker model, and although the inexpensive Melody Maker did not bear the Les Paul name, its body consistently followed the design of true Les Pauls throughout each era.

SOLD OUT! Takamine EF406 RARE Here we have a RARE and GORGEOUS 1999 limited Edition Takamine acoustic-electric guitar, model EF-406. This instrument is a PREMIUM example of a New York or also called a Parlor guitar and is a Hand Crafted in Japan model an amazing example of Japans high Quality workmanship & fit & finish and is truly just as good as it gets. As you can see from the pictures, it is simply gorgeous to look at. It has a classic slotted headstock with Top Quality gold open gears and gold tuners with Pearl buttons. The Top- Back & sides are all a High grade choice AAAA FLAMED KOA with natural Koa color (there is no stain)and none was needed to bring out the AWESOME grain patterns of this Rare Native Hawaiian Wood. The top sound hole apears to be bound or painted and inside looks same as out /all Takamine internet information leeds to say the tops on this model is solid however we can not guarantee this as fact. The electronics are a GRAPH-EX pre-amp system: peizo transducer, with "exciter," volume, bass, treble, and mid controls. It comes with a deluxe, plush hardh shell case, note: In he picture close up of the ack of the headstock you may notice a dull spot running threw the center over the made in Japan tag area this is just a spot of waxed area that was inadvertently missed and not rubbed out... it is fine this guitar is in Excellent used condition. .


Some guitarists use identical pickups in each position and still get contrasting sounds from each pickup. Others use different types of pickups, often to balance the tonal tendencies of a particular pickup position. For example, a guitarist might choose a moderate-output pickup in the neck position and use if for clean-toned chords, but opt for a high-output bridge pickup for a louder, more distorted, solo sound. A pickup of that type will probably sound darker than a single-coil, but a player who finds the naturally twangy bridge position a little too bright would welcome that change.
Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.
Back again! I sold the Eagle Jazz bass copy, but have acquired a hollow body 3/4 bass that we believe said Lyle or Aria on the peg head (badge gone). Interestingly it seems like possibly a copy of a Kay design, florentine cutaway with a sunburst. Three of the tuners are missing the bushings, and I'd love to know how to get replacements! I may have to manufacture something, but don't own a metal lathe. Also found a Strat copy that says Mark II on the peg head, nice mahogany neck, in a dumpster along with a Jackson Dinky. Stole parts off the Dinky to make the Strat copy whole, and I like it better than the Mexi-Strat and Squier Affinity start I had, so I sold those, and the Jackson after replacing the bridge parts I'd stolen off it. Besides, I still haven't got all the magic marker off the pick guard on the Mark II (recently heard they were made by Cort, or whoever makes Cort). I bought a Telestar (believe it was made by Teisco) in a thrift store for maybe $12.99 or something like that. I love the pickup sound, but the neck doesn't get any wider as it approaches the body and the frets get closer together. I also have a San Antonio made Alamo like that, and sold off a Silvertone (made in Japan) tiny hollow body with that issue. The necks are hard to play! But I like that pickup on the Telestar so much I can't part with it.
A compressor acts as an automatic volume control, progressively decreasing the output level as the incoming signal gets louder, and vice versa. It preserves the note's attack rather than silencing it as with an Envelope Volume pedal. This adjustment of the volume for the attack and tail of a note evens out the overall volume of an instrument. Compressors can also change the behaviour of other effects, especially distortion. when applied toward the guitar, it can provide a uniformed sustained note; when applied to instruments with a normally short attack, such as drums or harpsichord, compression can drastically change the resulting sound. Another kind of compressor is the optical compressor which uses a light source (LED or lamp) to compress the signal.

Speaking of session guys, we have Joe Messina, but where are his partners Robert White and Eddie Willis? Or Dennis Coffey? There’s a whole slew of great musicians whose names get forgotten but whose playing we all instantly recognise – alongside the Funk Brothers, there are the likes of Buddy Emmons and Grady Martin from the A Team, and then there’s the Wrecking Crew and the whole LA scene. Someone has already remembered Glen Campbell but how about Howard Roberts and Ted Greene? Whoa! How can you guys have neglected Barney Kessel, truly a top ten contender?


The “quacky” tone of the middle and bridge pickups, popularized by players such as David Gilmour, Rory Gallagher, Mark Knopfler, Bob Dylan, Scott Thurston, Ronnie Wood, Ed King, Eric Clapton and Robert Cray, can be obtained by using the pickup selector in positions 2 and 4. The neck and middle pickups are each wired to a tone control that incorporates a single, shared tone capacitor, whereas the bridge pickup, which is slanted towards the high strings for a more trebly sound, has no tone control for maximum brightness. On many modern Stratocasters, the first tone affects the neck pickup; the second tone affects the middle and bridge pickups; on some Artist Series models (Eric Clapton and Buddy Guy signature guitars), the first tone is a presence circuit that cuts or boosts treble and bass frequencies, affecting all the pickups; the second tone is an active midrange booster that boosts the midrange frequencies up to 25dB (12dB on certain models) to produce a fatter humbucker-like sound.
I think jackson (particularly the USA models) are truly the most versatile of all the high end electric guitars. The build quality is second to none as they are made at the custom shop by very experienced luthiers, the woods used are exotic and tonally superb. The hardware is the best around Floyd rose/ Seymour Duncan's and the action/playability is fantastic. All in all you feel although expensive, you feel like you're getting your monies worth. But the great thing is that they produce an incredible array of sounds which covers all aspects of musical style from the beefed up classic grind of a Gibson, to the stringy percussive violin sounds of a start and everything in between. The USA ones are expensive but I have 2 (an sl 1 and sl 2) and given the enjoyment and reliability they have given me, they owe me nothing.
i play a squire jazz bass, it has always sounded good and played very good. wanted to " jazz it up" a bit so i was searching for new pickups and control pots and stumbled on your site.. first thing i thought was oh wow, how freaking cool is that.. after ALOT of searching, i purchased the obsidian wire control pots for a jazz bass as well as the control plate since mine looked pretty worn.. i also got the v-mod pickups from fender. install was just as smooth as advertised, especially since i had never even cracked open a bass before, ever.. done in less than 30 minutes ( as far as the wiring ) the pickguard had to be removed and cut to fit, and the old knobs didn't fit ( totally expected ) it is now done and i cannot believe the difference in tone and clarity.... all i can say is your products are innovative and really much more than i expected... thank you..." - Bob Vintage Jazz Bass® Wiring
Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.
It features a solid mahogany top with laminated sapele back and sides, leading to a warm tone that’s a joy to listen too. Despite the small body size, the BT2 has a robust projection, thanks to the arched back. The neck is joined to the body via screws, which tarnish the look a little, but leave no impact on the slick playability or the tone, so aren’t a big deal.
Eddie Kramer has a slightly different approach, working from a familiar setup of favourite close and ambient mics (including the Beyerdynamic M160 ribbon mic) and then mixing them together to taste. "I use a three-mic technique: an SM57, an MD421 and an M160, all in a very tight pattern. Then I can pick and choose the tone quality, because each mic is totally different. I combine these together, and then I put a U67 away from the amp to get the ambience."
Located in Kobe, Japan, this manufacturer made the famous Maya brand guitar. Maya guitars were in production from 1970-1980. It's been suggested that Maya may have been responsible for the Aztec badge. You'll notice that Maya has been attributed to a company known as Tahara. At this point I do not know if Maya assisted in production or if Tahara produced some Maya guitars as a subcontractor. Maya and El Maya badges have also been attributed to Chushin Gakki. More research is needed to clarify this point.
Blue Book Publications: Blue Book Publications publishes a number of print guides for musical instruments, and it also maintains a subscription-based website. The website is divided into electric guitars, acoustic guitars, and guitar amplifiers in addition to other instruments. Unlike Used Price, you will have to register for a paid membership with this site to get the information you need to self-appraise your guitar. You can access the prices online or purchase print editions to be mailed to you.
“It was just a different world,” Ford says. “There was ‘Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert,’ Ed Sullivan, Dick Clark, and they would have one band on and you would wait all week to see who that band was going to be. And you could talk about it all week long with your friends — ‘Saturday night, Deep Purple’s going to be on, what are they going to play?’ — and then everybody’s around the TV like you’re watching a football game.”
Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, we have decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities: the smooth oval neck grip, the well balanced asymmetrical body shape, and the neck heel allowing unrivaled playability.
As nobody wants to lug around a 50-watt combo when casually travelling, many guitarists rely on portable amplifiers to quench their amp needs while on the road, street corner or beach. Power isn’t particularly important in this category – size and weight are the most crucial aspects. Other factors such as being battery-powered and having a headphone jack are also key features of these amps. One of the most impressive is the Roland Cube Street, which is a street performer’s dream as it offers great portability, a decent 5-watt output, two channels and several on-board effects.

Like Television not too long before them, Fugazi founders Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto engaged in a locomotive, dub-influenced dual-guitar shouting match. Though most of the talk around Fugazi inevitably leads back to their founding ethos, that way of thinking and operating permeated the music as well: Together, MacKaye and Picciotto were anti-frontmen, playing like a living, fire-breathing, two-pronged embodiment of democracy.
Most Heroic Moment: The simple, searing lines of 1990’s “Turnover.” D.B.

Many community, vocational or technical colleges offer technical and musical programs for those who wish to become guitar technicians. Many are instrument construction and/or repair programs. Guitar tech courses include construction, set-up, structural repair, fretwork, structural design and finishing for acoustic and electric guitars. Any courses involving musical theory and music technology may be helpful in advancing a guitar tech's career.
Epiphone makes some great guitars for beginners, and they get the top spot on my list. Epiphone is owned by Gibson, one of the biggest names in the guitar world. As a subsidiary, Epiphone is allowed to make budget versions of classic Gibson guitars. This means newbies have a shot at starting out on a legendary Gibson design such as the Les Paul or SG.
This interactive package (complete with a book, an instructional CD, a wall chart poster, a guitar pick and three sheets of fretboard stickers) equips the novice with everything he or she needs--short of an electric guitar and an amplifier--to become competent to play in a band within three months. The course is divided into twelve weekly lessons. Each lesson outlines the objectives of the week ahead and concludes with one of twelve specially commissioned backing tracks over which the novice can use the newly learned techniques. The book concludes with tips how to get the right sound from a guitar, amplifier and effects, as well as tips on forming a band, playing live and recording. If you've ever wanted to play in the band instead of just watching it, now you can!
Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.
Hey Johnny, have just been reading your article which I found very interesting. My 11yr old daughter, a great ukelele player & an extremely quick learner, I am thinking of stepping her up to a guitar. The delimar is an acoustic or a bothie acoustic-electric, as she hasn’t established her style of music yet, thought a bothie would give her both options. Am hoping you could express some advise on what could be the best way of approaching this transition and a list of guitars to check out for her. I don’t want to be fooled and purchase a sh*t one so to speak! Greatly appreciate your time and advise. Thanks Jules
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Fulcrum Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Duncan Designed - Pickup Configuration: S-S-S - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Colors
Capture ideas and create songs easily with a riff-based workflow, loop recording, automatic track creation (4 tracks), 7 guitar-oriented effects, support for amp models (AmpliTube, PodFarm, StudioDevil and others), 1 InstantDrummer (expandable), and more. Stay in the creative flow with tools that look like gear, and create complete songs without putting down your guitar!
Sound engineers prevent unwanted, unintended distortion and clipping using a number of methods. They may reduce the gain on microphone preamplifiers on the audio console; use attenuation "pads" (a button on audio console channel strips, DI unit and some bass amplifiers; and use electronic audio compressor effects and limiters to prevent sudden volume peaks from vocal mics from causing unwanted distortion.

Eventually, silicon transistors replaced germanium ones, helping to combat the inconsistent sounds of the germanium version (each circuit varies, and they were often affected by hot temperatures). Silicon completely changed the distortion, making it brighter, edgier, and more aggressive, as exemplified by the famous Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. The later introduction of the integrated circuit provided even more stability. Digital emulators can now universalize effects in a standalone unit. Materials don’t lie, however; when compared to their analog ancestors, the digital units lack the unique wildness of the germanium effect.
Sometimes referred to as a fret “dress” and setup, The Works includes precision level, re-crown and polish of your instrument’s frets along with complete set-up of truss rod, string height (action) and intonation. This work will minimize fret buzz, eliminate fret pitting and divots, and improve your overall tone! The whole instrument will be cleaned and polished and all hardware and electronics inspected, cleaned, and lubed.
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In ’71, Univox introduced what are arguably their coolest-looking amplifiers, the B Group, covered in nifty two-tone blue vinyl. Remember, this was the tail end of the heyday of Kustom, with its colored tuck-and-roll amps, and the two-tone blue with a red-and-white oval logo was boss. The lettering was the same uppercase blocks as on the outline logo. These new Univox amps were hybrids, with solidstate power supplies and lots of tubes – lots! The Univox B Group had two combo and two piggyback guitar amps, two piggyback bass amps and a piggyback PA. It is not known how these were constructed, but because previous amps had Japanese chassis put into Westbury-made cabinets, these were probably built that way also.
Kaman and his technicians began by building traditional square-backed guitars, but by the sixth prototype were using oscilloscopes to develop the now familiar bowl-backed shape, its spherical shape being self-reinforcing, thus eliminating the need for bracing. After some experimentation, the carved, round-crowned Ovation three-and-three headstock was developed. The modern Ovation guitar with a Lyracord back was born.
The trusty traveler guitar:  There are many makes and models, and of those that we reviewed, some that are cheaply priced (i.e. under $150) are just that- cheap.  Traveler guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and some more complex models offer foldaway design that buckle at the neck joint.  Additionally, there are acoustic electric models if you desire the flexibility of plugging in.  First, it is best to determine "why" you are seriously considering a travel guitar before getting into the research.  Answer that question for yourself first, and it could steer you away from a specific traveler guitar and toward a different size acoustic guitar body.  Also, it might re-affirm your choice.  Consider the following questions:
They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.
Buying an electric guitar is a very personal process, with many things to consider before you make your final choice. It’s not just a case of picking something with a nice color – you are usually parting with a substantial chunk of hard-earned cash, ranging anywhere from $100 to $2000 – or more – for some guitars, and therefore patience is required to find something that really suits you.
If you’re just getting started playing electric guitar, you’ve definitely come to the right place! Sam Ash is the ultimate destination for all of your electric guitar learning materials! We are proud to offer everything you need to learn how to play electric guitar including instructional guitar books, guitar instructional DVDs, guitar tablature books, guitar music books, guitar reference materials, and even guitar chord charts to assist in your learning! We also carry all the accessories you need to get started, including guitar tuners, guitar picks, electric guitar strings, guitar straps, guitar amps, guitar cables, guitar stands, and much more!
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