Many recordings feature multiple guitar tracks playing simultaneously, but sometimes this can clutter up the mix. Another approach is to make each part sound distinctive by using different combinations of guitars, amps and effects. Panning the guitars to various areas of the stereo spectrum will create space for each part, while subtle use of ambient effects can create a sense of depth. EQ can be used to help guitars blend together. Try cutting certain frequencies from one guitar track and boosting those same frequencies in another.

The 1964 TRG-1 was a slightly more asymmetrical variant of the WG body style, with offset double cutaways and offset waists. It had the squared-off Bizarro Strat head introduced in ’63 and rectangular-edge fingerboard inlays. The tail was a primitive top-mounted trapeze. Most of the face of the guitar was covered with a large metal pickguard, which had one two-tone neck pickup. The volume and tone knobs were above the strings, as was a small sliding on/off switch for the amp. In the off position, the guitar played out as a normal electric guitar. Horizontal grill slots were cut into the pickguard, behind which sat a 3-inch speaker. The amp operated on two 9-volt batteries installed in back. The TRG-1 shown in the subsequent ’64-65 catalog had a new, hooked headstock, but all the examples I’ve seen have the squared-off Bizarro Strat head. Also, the model I have has a TRE100 designation on the back sticker, so at least some were called this.
Ten is not enough. If you are not here for the first time and you already checked our article on the top acoustic guitars and the recommended electric guitars you know how we roll.And if we are going to review a lot more than just 10, why not split them into proper categories that will help you choose what is working best for you. As it will take a lot of time to write all these for you, please be easy on us. For the people that do not want to waste that much time thought and just want a quick list with some great effects we prepared the comparison charted listed below:
When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
While the general purpose is to emulate classic "warm-tube" sounds, distortion pedals such as the ones in this list can be distinguished from overdrive pedals in that the intent is to provide players with instant access to the sound of a high-gain Marshall amplifier such as the JCM800 pushed past the point of tonal breakup and into the range of tonal distortion known to electric guitarists as "saturated gain." Although most distortion devices use solid-state circuitry, some "tube distortion" pedals are designed with preamplifier vacuum tubes. In some cases, tube distortion pedals use power tubes or a preamp tube used as a power tube driving a built-in "dummy load." Distortion pedals designed specifically for bass guitar are also available. Some distortion pedals include:
Build Your Own Effect Pedal. Mammoth Electronics makes an effort to offer our customers a very neatly packaged and personally customizable effect pedal kit. Each guitar pedal kit comes equipped with everything you need to build your own effect pedal as quickly and inexpensively as possible without sacrificing quality. These DIY guitar pedals kits are designed to make building your own effect pedal easy for everyone from the hobby builder to the manufacturer. All parts are labeled and packaged in the kit for easy identification. Enclosures are fully customizable to the user specification and specially wrapped in a protective foam for safe transit. We’ve provided a wide selection for any effect pedal kit needs you might have. From a simple boost pedals, and fuzz pedals, as well as overdrive, distortion, and compression kits. We also have a wide range of modulation kits, including delay, reverb, tremolo, and phaser effect pedal kits. If you need a quick fix or a more complex guitar pedal kit, Mammoth Electronics offers a variety of options making it effortless to build your own effect pedal with a sound quality that will make an impression. We work hard to build relationships with only the best brands for our customers. These strong relationships allow us to provide extremely competitive pricing on all of our DIY guitar pedals kits.. We’re confident you will save yourself money & time if you build your own effect pedal with Mammoth Electronics. Mammoth Electronics offers customized DIY guitar kits and effect pedal kits that allow you to experiment with, create and amplify your own taste of music, without compromising on the sound quality. With added protective layering, these kits are safe for transportation and transit. We’re passionate about helping our customers build the best effect pedal possible so please Check out our Facebook page where you can provide feedback, share tips or ask any questions you might have about your latest projects.

Taylors are okay as guitars go, but... I've owned three, sold them all in mint condition and lost considerable coin in doing so. I think they belong on this list because they charge hand made prices for MASS PRODUCED guitars. Don't believe me? Take the Taylor that you own and do a search for it on eBay. That's right, at this very moment there are hundreds of guitars just like yours for sale on eBay. And that's only checking this one sales venue! These guitars are worth half of what you paid because the market is saturated with them. Taylor cranks out hundreds of them per day and 100's of thousands per year. If you're shopping and seriously considering a Taylor, you can get comparable quality and far better value elsewhere. Choose carefully and you'll see your investment go up in value. Aside from some special, collectable models of Taylor, you will loose money on this brand.

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In 1956 Jennings was shown a prototype guitar amplifier made by Dick Denney, a big band guitarist and workmate from World War II. The company was renamed Jennings Musical Industries, or JMI, and in 1958 the 15-watt Vox AC15 amplifier was launched. It was popularised by The Shadows and other British rock 'n' roll musicians and became a commercial success.


These guitars work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Semi-hollowbodies are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, ’60s pop and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes, though these can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B.B. King's famous Lucille.
Chorus pedals can provide a nice subtle doubling effect to the guitar or an extreme “watery” effect when maximized. Famous tunes that use chorus is “Come As You Are” (1991) by Nirvana, and “Brass in Pocket” (1979) by The Pretenders. But basically almost any clean guitar sound in the 80’s had some chorus on it! Certain effects are timeless such as overdrive, reverb and delay. Other effects like chorus can evoke certain time periods such as the 80’s so that is something to keep in mind when using an effect.
Kaman and his technicians began by building traditional square-backed guitars, but by the sixth prototype were using oscilloscopes to develop the now familiar bowl-backed shape, its spherical shape being self-reinforcing, thus eliminating the need for bracing. After some experimentation, the carved, round-crowned Ovation three-and-three headstock was developed. The modern Ovation guitar with a Lyracord back was born.
Gibson is the brand that made the epic Les Paul model. It was made by a man named Les Paul. He is the man behind the company and the brand has made some of the finest guitars of all time. It has modeled for entry-level to expert level players. This is one of the best among popular brands of electric guitars. Mr. Orville Gibson founded this company in 1902.
You can hear one all over Led Zeppelin’s debut record and all over Jeff Beck’s trademark “Heart Full of Soul” intro riff from the Yardbirds. He also used it extensively on the Jeff Beck Group sessions. Of course the most famous fuzz pedal is the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face. This pedal was favored by Jimi Hendrix and set the benchmark for fuzz tones that we are still chasing to this day.
In 1950 and 1951, electronics and instrument amplifier maker Leo Fender through his company, designed the first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar with a single magnetic pickup, which was initially named the "Esquire". The two-pickup version of the Esquire was called the "Broadcaster". The bolt-on neck was consistent with Leo Fender's belief that the instrument design should be modular to allow cost-effective and consistent manufacture and assembly, as well as simple repair or replacement. The Broadcaster name was changed to Telecaster because of a legal dispute over the name.
For instance, the guitars that have a solid body are the most numerous out there. These models are as sturdy as they come, but they do not offer one plenty of resonance and sustainability. If you are interested in a design that mimics the figure of acoustic units, then you should pay attention to those guitars that have a hollow body. These products are able to deliver plenty of resonance, but they might not be of great help when it comes to feedback.
Filters can also be sweeping filters controlled by a wah-wah pedal. Wah-wah pedals are a foot controlled pedal that kind of looks like a car’s gas pedal. As you press the pedal forward, the filter moves to the lower end of the the sound spectrum, leaving the mid- and high-end sounding more pronounced. As you bring the pedal back, the high end is filtered, leaving a muffled sounding guitar tone.

Two full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by bands such as A Day to Remember (on Mr Highway's Thinking About The End, Welcome To The Family, Violence (Enough is Enough), Life Lessons Learned the Hard Way and Sticks and Bricks), In Flames, Hostility, Issues, Static-X, Bring Me the Horizon (since Suicide Season), Hellyeah, Amaranthe, Breaking Benjamin (since Phobia), Parkway Drive, Otep, Spineshank, RED, Bury Your Dead, Eye Empire, Dirge Within, Remembering Never, and occasionally Chevelle, Darkest Hour, Evanescence, 9oz. of Nothing, and For the Fallen Dreams.
Place one mic on each speaker at the same distance and orientation, and check the pair for phase cancellation by panning them to the same spot and listening in mono. The minute differences between the speakers, mics, and mic positions, combined with double-tracking, creates a monstrous presence when the tracks are hard-panned in the mix, and opens up a world of possibilities for separate EQ and effects processing. If you don't need the guitar to dominate the mix, you also can sum these mono-compatible tracks together to a single pan position for a noticeably bigger sound.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
The Ampeg Bassamp Company, founded in 1949 by Everett Hull, responded to the growing demand for electric bass equipment by producing a line of bass amplifiers. Ampeg bass amps were widely used by electric bass guitarists in the 1950s and 1960s. The first bass amplifier offered by Ampeg was an 18-watt model with a single 12" speaker and a rear ventilation port called the Super 800. In 1951, they introduced a 20-watt version with a 15-inch speaker. In 1960, they introduced the B-15 Portaflex, a flip-top 25-watt tube bass amplifier with a single 15" speaker. While the Ampeg Portaflex had a pleasing bass tone, and was used by studio bassists such as James Jamerson and Carol Kaye, it was not powerful enough to be used in a stadium or arena concert.[3]

Jump up ^ Peterson (2002, p. 37): Peterson, Jonathon (Winter 2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA.: The Guild of American Luthiers. 72: 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 2011-10-21. Retrieved 9 October 2012.
Why do these genres not require the use of a tone knob, or sometimes, require a tone knob to be fully open? Well, for metal and hard rock, first of all, most of the tone shaping happens on the amp and/or on the pedals, especially for those who use high gain distortion pedals. The pickups on typical hard rock and metal guitars are humbuckers, which are warmer and have less treble. Couple that with high gain and high output pickups which compress the signal and also take some of the treble away, and keeping the tone knob open becomes that much important so that the tone will not be muddy and keep its cut and punch. For country, well, I guess that’s just *the* sound of the genre, and wide open Telecasters and Stratocasters are the weapons of choice.
PRS guitars are among the best on the market. Their style, tone and design are unique, giving them a pretty good chance against much more established brands. PRS Custom 24 has been my go-to choice, and will remain so in foreseeable future. If you are looking for good old American craftsmanship combined with a killer tone, PRS is definitely worth checking out.
Octave/Pitch Shift – A frequency-based effect that takes the input of your guitar tone and shifts it in pitch anywhere up to an octave above or below. This is useful to simulate a bass guitar line or the higher pitched strings of a twelve-string guitar. Some octave or pitch shift pedals double your guitar tone before shifting making them more akin to Harmoniser pedals.
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Delay is essentially echo, but it can be so much more when used well. The two most important knobs are “time” and “repeats”. Time will increase the length between repeats, and repeats will adjust how many echoes are heard. While it is tempting to max the repeats and enter space rock land, less can be more. Used gently you can get reverb or slap-back rockabilly sounds. With careful knob setting you can even create harmonies and loops like The Edge.
There are a couple of important things to look out for when buying an acoustic guitar for the first time, one of which being plastic hardware – especially if it’s used on the bridge or the tuning pegs. Unless you are paying less than a hundred dollars for the instrument, there’s no reason why a good beginner guitar should have a plastic bridge or saddles, which aren’t particularly durable and do nothing for the instrument’s tone or sustain.

In 1967, McCartney gave his 4001 a psychedelic paint job, as seen in the promo film for Hello Goodbye, and in the Magical Mystery Tour film.[7] A year or so later the finish was sanded off; a second over-zealous sanding in the early 1970s removed the “points” of the bass’ cutaways. McCartney predominantly used the Rickenbacker bass during his time with Wings, until the late 1970s.
The Blue Midnight was released in 2011 with a limit to the key of C, also on the less expensive side of the market. It features stainless steel cover plates with a wider back gap for enhanced volume while playing. The unique feature of this harp is the comb, which is made out of translucent blue plastic. The comb allows for brighter tone than the black combed models. It also has a special just intonation (JI) "Chicago tuning". It is also now available in other keys.[23]
Firstly, we advise sticking with a brand name you can trust. We’ve established that there’s nothing particularly premium about the guitars on offer at $200, but by sticking with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha, Epiphone, Oscar Schmidt and the others on this list, you at least guarantee a guitar from a renown guitar manufacturer with some history, instead of something thrown together by a company who don’t specialise in instruments.
Another LTD model that is easily on the same level as the standard ESP stuff is the MH-100QMNT. The guitar comes from the very top of LTD’s entry level lineup, and brings a great price to performance ratio. I’ve had a lot of time to play with this guitar, and at first it didn’t sit right with me. As I played it more, I got used to the contour of the neck and the way its body ‘moves’. From that point on, ESP LTD MH-100QMNT grew on me rather quickly.
From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  
Bottom Line: The Zoom G3X is everything a guitar multi-effects pedal should be, and then some. As strange as it sounds, as we researched what owners of this pedal are saying about it, it was difficult to find any outright negative comments (any negative feedback tends to be centered around the notion that digital multi-fx don’t sound as good as individual pedals, which is a hotly debated topic). You have to consider how amazingly low the G3X price tag is versus how many features it packs in. It’s not the best in the world at any one thing - the looper isn’t as good as a TC Electronic Ditto, and the delays might not match up to a Strymon - but it does a lot of things quite well, and the user interface is such a pleasure to use. The Zoom G3X will be your best friend if:

In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.
By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
The more solid wood there is, the better the overall resonance, sustain and tone of the acoustic guitar. Solid wood, specially those used on the tops of acoustics, also resonate better as it ages. The downside to solid wood is mainly its more premium cost, and not to mention it uses more wood resources than laminate wood. Solid wood is also more prone to damage, so they require extra care especially from changing weather and humidity. Laminate woods are more affordable, and they are also more sturdy and resistant to damage. On the flip side, they will lack the resonance and sustain of solid wood, but this can be a good thing if you're looking for vintage mid-range focused tone.
Even with tone control maxed some high frequencies get cut. To let all the frequencies through you can either get a no-load pot or make one. CTS makes them for Fender and what they do is simply break the connection between the wiper and conductive element when pot is maxed. Additionally, they have an indentation so once they reach maximum setting they “click” and it’s not that easy to turn them back. To make your own just cut (or cover with nail polish) the element near the end, so that resistance between the wiper and the opposite lug reads infinite when maxed, at lower settings it should read as usual.

I was thinking about my personal favorite and it’s just too hard to choose only one. There are too many brilliant creations and all unique in their own way. I love the simplicity of “highway to hell”, the beautiful, mysterious, wah wah riff of “Voodoo child”, I have a weak spot for almost every guitar riff by John Frusciante or Slash and not to mention the zillion riffs that aren’t even on the list. Thank god it never stops.

Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work
All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.
Our Parlor size guitars are approximately 25% smaller than our full size guitars but what really makes them special is they have a 2 inch shorter neck design. This means children and small adults (under 5 ft tall) don’t have to reach as far holding certain chords making playability even easier. Most of our customers buying our Parlor guitars are coming from little Martins and Taylors.  They say the Easy Play Parlor has 30-50% easier playability and sound is slightly richer and deeper.  Shipped from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska.  100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
One look around our shop and you'll see that we're serious about offering our customers a large selection of instruments, equipment and gear. You'll find both new and used instruments, and our top-notch staff are here to help you choose exactly what fits your needs, preferences and budget. If you're interested in learning new skills and techniques, check out the group workshops we host on a regular basis. We cover a wide range of music topics, so stop by and see what class we're holding next. Can't make it in? Give us a call at 505-889-6300, and we'll be happy to answer all your questions.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.
I love squire guitars because they are cheap and affordable. I love the fact that I now have a stratocaster so if you think that they suck think again. I can play under the bridge and scar tissue etc on my squire stratocaster honestly for those that can't afford a fender this is the best thing that has ever happened to me because I can now play an electric guitar which is not only good but it is brilliant
This Schecter is an entry-level guitar into those kinds of tones that are an alternative to the standard Fender and Gibson sounds. Also, the arch top offers another kind of “feel” for playing that gives you slightly more accessible right-hand technique (it’s subtle, but it’s there), plus the body shape tucks the switches and controls out of the way.
Telecaster is considered to be the oldest solid body electric guitar in the world. Capturing that type of pedigree is not easy, but Squier managed to pull it off. Handling the Squier by Fender Vintage Modified Telecaster brought back some of the best memories of my youth, when Telecaster was the go to axe. This is definitely one guitar worth trying out.
This style of volume effect rhythmically reduces and swells the volume of the signal in a regular cyclic fashion.  Often heard in Country and Western type guitar tracks, tremolo was commonly built into older amplifiers and is one of the earliest recorded effects.  The speed and depth of the effect is controlled on the pedal by way of one or two potentiometers.  When set to the tempo of a song, the player can produce an extra layer of rhythm on top of what is being played.
If you’re paying attention, you probably noticed that I forgot to mention EQ and volume pedals. Actually I didn’t. Placement of these particular pedals depends more on what you want to achieve with them than any hard and fast rules. For example, you may want to place a volume pedal at the very front of the signal chain to perform dramatic fade in and fade out effects or to better regulate the guitar’s level before it hits any effects (or you could just do what I do and use the guitar’s own volume control). Placing the volume pedal near the end of the signal chain just before the delay and reverb effects allows you to perform professional-sounding fades or mute the guitar’s signal without cutting delay or reverb tails short. If you use a loop switcher, a volume pedal can be paired with a single effect, and you can use the volume pedal to blend or mix that effect independently.
Yamaha is considered as among largest music instruments selling company in India, which provides a wide variety of guitars. S series, Yamaha RGX, RGZ electronic series, SG series (SG 5,SG 7) etc are the best models of guitar. Now they become the world’s largest manufacturer of a full line of musical instruments. They earned good name by providing super quality guitar at an affordable price. Available price is Rs. 8,000/- onwards (approx).
The simplest close-miking technique using a single mic is one that’s familiar to anyone who has gigged in a venue large enough to have a full sound-support system. Stick a Shure SM57 or similar dynamic mic within an inch of the grille, and away you go. This technique frequently delivers a direct, punchy, in-your-face guitar tone that feels muscular in rock-oriented tracks. If you have a Royer R-121 ribbon mic or some other good ribbon or condenser option that can handle the sound-pressure levels involved in close-miking a guitar cab, these will offer variations on the traditional mids-forward SM57 flavor. In many circumstances this simple technique proves entirely adequate, or at least makes a good foundation to build upon, but you still need to consider exactly where to position that mic, and subtle variations of approach will reveal nuanced differences in the tones you can achieve. Also, if you’re playing a combo or extension cab with more than one speaker, listen carefully to determine which is the best-sounding speaker – or the one that’s right for the track – and mic that one (if you’re not sure, and have two appropriate mics, record two speakers to separate tracks to select from later, more of which below).
BC Rich is a fashionable brand of guitar that has been available since the year 1969. This is an American brand of acoustic & electric guitars & bass guitars. The brand produces 6-string electric guitars mahogany or basswood bodies. This brand is not as popular as other brands of electric guitars as it specializes in guitars for heavy metal & hard rock crowd. It is the choice of only those guitarists who are looking for an instrument that looks sound as edgy as possible. It offers trendy appearance and classic style of playing an electric guitar. The starting price of this brand of guitars is 29,000 INR approximately.

If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
The Epiphone Dove Pro is such a good guitar that it’s going to be a contender for a top pick in pretty much any list, but in this one we’ve given it the title of best value electric acoustic. You can spend a lot more money and not get much more guitar, and you can even spend more money and not get a guitar as good. The Dove Pro is that accomplished.
Acoustic amplifiers are intended for acoustic guitars and other acoustic instruments, especially for the way these instruments are used in relatively quiet genres such as folk and bluegrass. They are similar to keyboard amplifiers, in that they have a relatively flat frequency response with minimal coloration. To produce this relatively "clean" sound, these amplifiers often have powerful amplifiers (providing up to 800 watts RMS), to provide additional "Headroom" and prevent unwanted distortion. Since an 800 watt amplifier built with standard Class AB technology is heavy, some acoustic amplifier manufacturers use lightweight Class D amplifiers, which are also called "switching amplifiers."

Behold anther complete package from Les Paul guitar Epiphone series of electric guitar, with everything that you need to start playing right from the onset. For every beginner looking for that perfect set, this guitar they can rely on, not just for its sound quality, but also for the fact that it is a complete package offering lots practicality in terms of mastering the act of strumming and sound generation.
So what is the point of getting a small guitar amp? I mean you can get a whole lot of sound out of a medium sized amp without all of the sound issues that the small amps have. And yeah they are more ungainly and harder to lug around, but at least they have the sound and power required to handle a live performance and even band practice. Plus you can turn down the sound and practice at home just as well, right?’
(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.
Description: 1966-1967 Model. Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Vibrato - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Single Coil - Pickup Configuration: S-S - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Blonde, Black, Sunburst - Guitar Type: Electric
The sets, as mentioned above, are paired with Vox's BC108, which is a compact, portable, semi open-back cabinet that is front loaded with a single "8” VOX Original 8 Ohm Speaker" rated at 25W input (Dimensions W x D x H: 260 x 200 x 285 mm/10.24" x 7.87" x 11.2"). The BC108 also comes with two 1/4" jacks, wired in parallel, for adding another cabinet. Vox has also suggested the compact BC112, a semi-open back, oval port cabinet containing a single 70W, 12" Celestion G12 V-type speaker, to pair with the MV50.

Started in 1997 by Steve Suhr and Steve Smith, this Lake Elsinore, California-based guitar-building brand is the finest in a relatively new wave of manufacturers. They do not have a line of guitars, per se. Instead, they make every single guitar to order. This high-end boutique style manufacturing in a large-scale format was all but unheard of until the internet changed the world. Now, this brand can offer dozens of shapes, pickup combinations, finishes, etc. reasonably. But don’t let the fact that their guitar shapes seem like knock-offs of other long-standing brands fool you. Any Suhr guitar you’ll encounter is going to be of the utmost in quality of construction and sound. There simply is not a better custom brand out there with the same vast catalog of offerings. There are literally thousands of possible combinations, so if you are looking for a unique and superb instrument and are willing to pay for it, it’s hard to say there’s anything better.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 43.2mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Bound, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Gibraltar/Accucast - Hardware: Black - Pickups: EMG 81/85 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.
It’s curious to note that also tauted in the ’39 Grossman catalog was the National Res-O-Lectric Pick-up Unit, designed to be added to National and Dobro amplifying guitars. This was not sold as an accessory, but had to be factory-installed for $25. On single-cone guitars, the bridge assembly/cover was replaced with the pickup assembly, faced in gloss black Ebonoid. On tricone guitars the pickup would be built in to the silver cover. It’s not clear if these were also mid-’37 developments or if they appeared closer to the ’39 Grossman catalog publication date.

Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.


Acoustic and electric archtops are identical in design with the only difference being the addition of electro-magnetic pickups and pots. Archtops can either be full-bodied or thinline. The full-bodied archtop retains good volume and acoustic resonance when played unplugged though feedback may be an issue when amplified. The thinline body minimizes feedback by sacrificing acoustic volume and resonance.


This fuzz sounds great! Different from a standard fuzzface or tonebender sound, and much more musical in my opinion. Not buzzy at all, very smooth. It is not one of those over-the-top fuzz sounds. It's more of a fuzzy overdrive. But really the amount and quality of the fuzz is highly dependent on the transistors. Q1 seems to effect the amount of output, and Q2 changes the character of the fuzz. I tried many combinations and ended up using 2N2222's for both (BC109's also sounded great!). One other ... full review
Hello all. I have a brand name guitar, which was very popular in the 1980s, and still is being manufactured under Gibson today. I didn't see it in your list though. It's a Kramer Stagemaster. It's a beautiful guitar, which I may never part with. Strat-Style with Neck-Thru-Body & Floyd Rose Trem. The headstock states Kramer American. These were passed off as American made models, however I understand that they were actually made in Japan. The style and appointments are strikingly similar to my Ibanez Proline 2550 from the same era, which has 'Crafted in Japan' written on the headstock. I know that Kramer made a lot of American made guitars out of Neptune, New Jersey, however these were all bolt-on neck guitars. Does anyone know where these Neck-Thru Kramers were made, or why they have American printed on the headstock if they are not tues American made guitars?
The Ibanez Artcore line is a beautiful example of modern guitar manufacturing. Normally, hollow-body guitars, even those from Epiphone, provide interesting challenges to companies trying to produce axes on a mass scale, and thus they have to charge a higher dollar. The Artcore series provides buyers with an option to shell out a fraction of the price for a really impressive guitar. The AF55 is a fully hollow option that will make you think you should have paid double for it.
While a high school degree is not necessarily required, it does provide an edge for graduates who wish to become guitar technicians. Students should concentrate on classes such as music, band, English, shop class and mathematics. A major part of any education should include guitar lessons. Techs often need to be able to play by ear and must be able to pick up on any nuances in an instrument's sound and tuning.
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Are you in earnest need of a guitar and do you want to buy that right now. Well, if the answer to this question is yes, then you will have to stop and think for a while before you actually make the investment. This is because of the fact that buying a guitar is an expensive investment, so you must to be quick to arrive at a decision. Now you should be asking yourself some pretty interesting questions before you buy a guitar so that you do not have to regret later on in any way.
A direct user interface can give far more musically rewarding results than dozens of parameters, menus and alpha dials. Often, even a panel of knobs isn't anywhere near as natural to play as, say, a Korg Kaoss Pad. Here's something Kaoss Pad 3 owners can try at home: choose effect DL2 (Smooth Delay) in which the pad controls delay time on the X-axis and depth on the Y-axis. Next route your favourite solo patch through it and set the FX depth to about 12 o'clock. Solo wildly whilst simultaneously stroking the top right-hand corner of the Kaoss Pad with short, circular motions. With practice, you should be able to produce delicate pitch sweeps as the delay shifts in time. As you control depth by vertical motion, practise diagonal upwards sweeps followed by vertical downward ones to smoothly dampen the effect. Hey, it takes years to master the violin, so a few evenings spent waggling your finger over flashing LEDs shouldn't be too arduous. Next try the same technique with lush solo pads: simple yet devastatingly effective! Paul Nagle

Even with such a lightweight configuration, the Fishman F1 system is still more than capable of rendering the tone of the DCPA4R with a great deal of accuracy due to the superior tight focus on the preamp. This guitar is our pick for the top acoustic electric guitar if price is no object. There are many other awesome models out there and we urge you to check them out as well, but you'll likely find that your search could have ended right here.

Although acoustic guitars have recently surpassed electrics in popularity, the electric guitar is still the most prominent instrument in rock music, and it’s a key component in many country, R&B, pop, and jazz groups. If you want to play in a band, you’ll probably want an electric guitar. You’ll also want one if you want to develop the ability to play melodies and solos because electric guitars are, in general, better designed to accommodate fast fingering and more able to stand out in a musical group.
Guitar Tricks is available 24/7, anytime and anywhere I want to use it. It is browser based and I can get to it from any computer, even when I am away on vacations.  There are different video resolutions that can help with adjusting to a slower internet connection or to watch the lesson on the go on a mobile phone. There is also an iPad app available for free, and no need for additional in-app purchases, that gives access to the core features of Guitar Tricks.
Most[citation needed] early blues harmonica players throughout the 20th century[when?] have been known for using Hohner Marine Band harmonicas[citation needed] because they were the most available at the time[citation needed]. However, as other harmonica companies[who?] began to expand and Hohner produced different types of harmonicas, harmonica players started to develop preferences[vague].

Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽
John Mayer and Frusciante are very talented guitarists, but to include them at the expense of legends like Clapton, Duane Allman, Neil Young, The Edge, Brian May, George Harrison…that's unforgivable. I'll admit that Jack White needs more time to prove himself too, but of all the recent guitarists listed, he is the one with the most vision and confidence in his ideas. He is his generation's Jimmy Page.
When Bob Dylan described the Band's "wild mercury sound," he was really talking about Robbie Robertson's guitar, as exemplified by his torrid, squawking solo on "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" from their 1966 tour. But by the time the Band were making their own LPs, Robertson had pared down his approach, evolving into a consummate ensemble player. "I wanted to go in the opposite direction," said Robertson, "to do things that were so tasteful and discreet and subtle, like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper… where it was all about the song."
it's really hard to beat the ric sound. the 335 12's and fender 12's are cool, but really the ric has the sound we're all familiar with. that being said, everyone has different tastes and I encourage you to play as many different ones as possible. Jimmy Page used a Fender 12 on Stairway. I went rick for that early beatles sound. the neck is tiny but it's part of the instrument.

For rehearsals, studio recording sessions, or small club performances, electric and upright bass players typically use a "combo" amplifier, which combines a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and a speaker (or multiple speakers) in a single cabinet. Combo amps come in a variety of speaker configurations, such as one speaker (e.g., often one 12" speaker or one 15" speaker, although there are some micro-amps with one 10" speaker) or two speakers (e.g., two 10" speakers) or four speakers (e.g., four 10" speakers). The dividing line between practice amps and combo amps that can be used for live venue shows is described in the power in watts section. The most powerful combo amps available deliver between 800 and 1000 watts to the internal speakers.
not even close. No offense but John Mayer is trash absolute trash. Jack White is decent but not a guitar god at all. This is my list, and I'm going to leave out every guitar player that came before the Beatles, not saying Chuck Berry or B.B. King couldn't shred, but I'm trying to relate to the modern idea of Rock and Roll. I'm also judging on a lot more than just ability to "shred". And to the one goon…Jimmy Page SHINED live, that was Led Zeppelins appeal, you felt like you were at the biggest show on Earth…you probably just watched a few videos on youtube from the end of the band's career when he was a herion addict.
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
Here we have something quite beautiful and very sweet sounding that I picked up directly from the very talented luthier himself while in Hawaii ...I liked this one because it has some very beautiful intricate inlay hand work see the gorgeous inlaied rosette and fingerboard not overstated just classicly tasteful WoW.. this is a Gorgeous all SOLID WOOD Hawaiian figured Koa Tenor Ukelele. I love the tone of this beauty and so will you its classic Uke tone is rich and full and plays like butta... Top wood : Solid Koa Back & Sides Material Solid Koa Neck Material : Solid AAA flamed grade Mahogany, Headplate wood: Solid Koa Strings : Italian Aquila Strings Fingerboard wood : Solid Rosewood Bridge wood : Solid Rosewood Nut Material : Real Buffalo Bone Finish : Polished Satin nitrocellulose instrument lacquer Scale Length : 17" Overall Length : 26 1/2 "( 673 mm ) Fingerboard Width At Nut : 35 mm Fingerboard Width At 12th Fret: 43.8 mm # Of Frets Total : 20 Hand picked for its great solid construction and impecable workmanship fit & finish are top notch, excellent volume & tone -playability and beauty. You will be hard pressed for find one this sweet for twice the price... Just $329. Direct comes with a top shelf hard shell case / included .
Slicer – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is chopping in and out. This percussive effect is akin to sequencer-type effects used by synthesizers. The effect turns the volume of the signal on and off, and sounds like the signal is being “chopped up” or “sliced” in a specified pattern. The BOSS SL-20 Slicer features 50 patterns to turn your guitar into a groove machine!
Rather than being period-correct reincarnations, Fender's Original series aims for a ‘best of decade’ vibe. So, this Strat is alder bodied with a ‘round-laminate’ rosewood fingerboard that was implemented in mid-1962. In a mid-'60s style we get Pure Vintage ’65 Gray-Bottom single coils on an 11-screw mint-green pickguard with aged white controls. Meanwhile, a concession to modernism is the second, lowest, tone control, which originally would have been for the middle pickup, but here works on both the middle and bridge pickups. Another 'modern' inclusion is the ubiquitous five-way lever switch, which didn’t actually replace the original three-way switch on the Stratocaster until 1977. We defy anyone who opens a case and sees one of these beauts not to have an ‘OMG’ moment. The guitar that launched thousands of dreams back in the day still impresses 64 years on. You’ll find these ‘fixes’ on many Fender Custom Shop models, of course, but while these don’t come with any ageing or relic’ing they are significantly cheaper. Yet, viewed from a 2018 perspective, it gives Fender’s USA models a rare unity, a vintage nod to the escalating modernism
 of the Professional and ultra-tweaked and posher Elites. If you hanker after a new USA-made production Fender and want the most vintage-spec possible, this is now it. Vintage-inspired, yes, but with the fixes that many players will embrace.
American guitar manufacture was at its peak in the 1960s, with numerous highly-respected guitar companies making instruments at all levels; from the likes of Kay, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Fender and Gibson. But Harmony was one of the very biggest producers, at one point the biggest, selling guitars branded both as Harmony, and rebadged for numerous other distributors. In fact, in the mid/late 1960s, Harmony was said to produce more guitars than all other American guitar manufacturers combined. Most were entry or intermediate level instruments though, and although examples of most models are easy to find, examples in really good condition are rare.
New York City native Joe Charupakorn is a guitarist, author, and editor. He has interviewed the world’s biggest guitar icons including Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, Carlos Santana, Neal Schon, and Dave Davies, among many others, for Premier Guitar. Additionally, he has written over 20 instructional books for Hal Leonard Corporation. His books are available worldwide and have been translated into many languages. Visit him on the web at joecharupakorn.com.
Starfield was a guitar brand owned by Hoshino Gakki. In the 1970s, Hoshino Gakki and Kanda Shokai shared some guitar designs and so some Ibanez and Greco guitars have the same features. The Kanda Shokai Greco guitars were sold in Japan and the Hoshino Gakki Ibanez guitars were sold outside of Japan. From 1982, Ibanez guitars have also been sold in Japan as well as being sold outside of Japan [3].
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Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.
Martin’s re-entry into electric manufacturing is related to the association of Richard (Dick) Boak with the C.F. Martin company. Dick Boak, with dreams of being a luthier and constantly working on guitar projects on his own, joined Martin in 1976 as a draftsman. In 1977 Boak was assigned to the project of designing an electric guitar for Martin. This resulted in the development of the E-18, EM-18 and EB-18 guitars and bass. The first prototypes of this new electric guitar series were produced in 1978, ten years after the demise of the GT-70/75, and production commenced in 1979 with guitar serial number 1000.
"Rocksmith" came out in 2011, following in the footsteps of "Guitar Hero" and "Rock Band" in look if not in game play. Developer Ubisoft claims that it can teach you to actually play the guitar. Unlike its predecessors, where you play along with any number of hit or classic rock songs, pushing the right button at the right time to earn points and unlock rewards, "Rocksmith" requires an actual guitar that you plug into your console. Thus, you're playing the actual notes to the songs, which increases the difficulty of the game.

Six-point rocking tremolo: This was the original rocking vibrato designed by Fender in the 1950s. Like the two-point tremolo, it is through-body, spring-loaded, and provides individual string intonation and height adjustment. Some players feel that because this type of tremolo rocks on six screws it provides greater vibration transfer to the top and hence better resonance.


OM-42PS: Paul Simon’s signature acoustic model (manufactured in the 1997 model year) is based on the OM-42, which had not been manufactured since 1930. Alterations were specifically requested by Simon himself. From the original planned run of approximately 500, only 223 were produced, making these a collector’s item. A standard version of the OM-42 is in the current range.
Unfortunately, a few years prior, we were playing in a festival where there were many bands. THAT soundman flat out refused to use a direct signal and insisted on mic’ing my cabinet. I had spend MONTHS designing and programming my TWO preamps, one for the stage and the other for the board… certain effects were sent to one and not the other… My whole sound was based on two pre-amps running at the same time. This is about as close as I’ve come to physically punching anyone. I told him to plug in to the XLR output right “there.” He wouldn’t… made excuses as to not knowing which channel on the snake ithe other end was plugged into. (That made no sense at all… wouldn’t he know which channel the MIC was in? All he had to do is remove the mic, plug that end of the cable into the output of my unit.) Weeks later, people in the audience commented to me that they remembered that I played and sang the gig “fuming” over something. Half of my sound wasn’t there AT ALL.
Marshall Chess assembled in his words "the hottest, most avant garde rock guys in Chicago" for the album sessions consisting of Pete Cosey (lead guitar, later with Miles Davis) Phil Upchurch and Roland Faulkner (rhythm guitar), Louis Satterfield (bass) Gene Barge (tenor sax), Charles Stepney (organs) and Morris Jennings (drums). Since Muddy wasn't as accustomed to this style, he only contributed vocals, but he still played an essential part in this recording. Electric Mud (1968) was mostly recorded in live takes with few overdubs and that off-the-cuff live feel that's captured on it makes it stronger. On the opener, "I Just Want To Make Love to You," pounding drums and Cosey firing out raw screaming guitar grabs your ear with Muddy's confident singing pushing the music along. The solo on this song is nothing short of phenomenal. The guitar starts playing some distorted melodic notes then morphs into this gigantic screeching feedback riff becoming louder and wilder then continues to morph from a tearing solo until it reaches this intense mind-bending groove that sounds on the brink of collapse. At this point, the guitar cuts out, leaving you breathless, with just drums and Muddy's voice building up back to the verse, then with an out-of-your-mind guitar and organ playing off each other to the end. The next song, "Hoochie Coochie Man," begins with an incoming guitar sound and has the opposite feel of the last track. Muddy's vocals seemingly come out of the speakers at you as alternating lines come from the left and then right, giving the listener a disorienting acid-like effect. A liquidy sounding guitar that washes over like a wave accompanies the verse and changes into an expressive wah-wah lead on the chorus. There's a great, fun cover of "Let's Spend The Night Together" which the Stones must have taken as a huge compliment, having their idol cover one of their songs. Muddy and the band turn it, around making it appear like he wrote it with a big mean sounding back melody, soulful distorted guitar lines and Muddy's commanding voice sounding the way he might have sung in a club in Chicago. "She's Alright" has a trippy beginning with bass notes fluttering up then swaying back down to open up to smash your head against the wall along with crashing cymbals matched by a dirty guitar that has real spirit to it. The song makes great use of cross-overs with a screeching guitar bouncing back and forth between speakers and then somehow transforms and ends with a pleasant distorted instrumental version of "My Girl." Original material was also written for this record like "Tom Cat" and "Herbert Harper's Free Press News," with the latter as a vaguely topical song about the sixties with lines like "world is moving much too fast" and "where ya gonna run to, where ya gonna hide" and a fuzzed out guitar that parallels the confusion and outrage of the lyrics. "The Same Thing" closes Electric Mud with a slow heavy blues feel to it and a stretched out, aching guitar on top.
Three full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by Dead by April (on some songs), Metallica in the song "Invisible Kid" from St. Anger, Asking Alexandria (G#) on their self-titled album, Damien Deadson, Love and Death, Architects and The Acacia Strain. Staind also uses this tuning (but with the 2nd string tuned up 1/2 step to emulate a 7-string guitar), as well as several other modified variations of this, such as one in which the 5th string is also dropped from D# to C#.

Everything about the shape and feel of the S6 Original is meant to be as close to familiar acoustic guitars as possible, including its playability, which is brought about by its 25.5" scale length, 1.8" nut width and 16" fingerboard radius. Tone wise, you're getting a crisp yet warm tone thanks to its pressure-tested solid cedar top, which also adds to the overall earthy appeal of the instrument.
You can simulate any sound of three pickup guitar with two pickup guitar and vice versa, the only problem is getting it with proper wiring or customizing it. Even they will not sound the same may be close enough for your application or even better. And don't forget about potentiometers problem. The 250K potentiometer will cut some frequencies from humbuckers while 500K make singles brighter than they are by default. It may be not a problem or critical to choosing favorite tone :D
Initially inspired by his older brother Jimmie, Stevie picked up the guitar at an early age and was playing in bands by the time he was 12. By the time he formed his legendary trio Double Trouble in 1980, Stevie Ray Vaughan was already a legend in his adopted hometown of Austin, Texas. After hearing and seeing Vaughan playing at Switzerland’s Montreux Jazz Festival, pop icon David Bowie invited Stevie to play on his Let’s Dance album. Vaughan’s career took off form there.
Phase Three began in 1974, bringing some of the biggest changes to the series with it. Univox swapped in its own humbuckers, made unique in part due to their visible white bobbins. This change took the Phase Three Hi-Flier solidly out of the realm of Mosrite Ventures copy territory and into its own realm, considering the tone and high output changed the sound so significantly. The presence of these humbuckers – found on other Univox guitars of the same era – make the Phase Three versions some of the most highly sought after Hi-Fliers.
“It had ‘Walking the Dog,’ ‘Route 66,’ and others on it,” Millard says. “That has tone. The reason it has tone is that it was made in the worst damn studio possible. Everyone who worked there said this was a shithole. There was no sound separation, they used lousy mics, they never cleaned it. Andrew Loog Oldham, who was the manager at that point, said that was the key to the sound.”
Regardless of your age, gender or musical preference, you deserve to hone your skills on a guitar that's built by dedicated craftsmen who are just as passionate about music as you are. Thankfully, you don't need to look any further for a beginner guitar that perfectly suits your skill level and influences. Before purchasing your first guitar, there's definitely a few things to consider. For one, you should think about your own music tastes. Is there a sound that you're hoping to achieve? Maybe you have a certain band in mind whose style you'd like to replicate. If so, it helps to do a little research on what that musical artist uses in terms of gear. The good news is that this catalog has plenty of acoustic and electric guitars to choose from. In fact, many of the most well-known and trusted guitar brands specialize in their own affordable yet high-quality beginner models, including Epiphone, Fender, Yamaha, Martin and countless others. For an ideal electric guitar that's specifically designed for enthusiastic novice players, the Squier Bullet HH Stratocaster has everything a beginner needs to take their talents to the next level. This special version consists of pitch-black hardware throughout, right down to the black-taped humbuckers. Other features include three-way switching, synchronous tremolo and a rosewood 21-fret fingerboard with maple neck. Overall, the Squier Bullet HH Stratocaster is a remarkable axe for any budding shredder. This category also contains a wide range of starter bundles, such as the Ibanez JamPack IJV50 Quickstart dreadnought acoustic guitar pack. Combining all of the essential ingredients that a beginner guitarist needs to begin their musical journey, this package includes a beautiful V50 natural-finish acoustic, an accurate electronic tuner, a gig bag, strap and an accessory pouch. With so many beginner options available in the world today, there has never been a better time in history to learn the guitar. Whether you have ambitions of fame or just want to strum along to your favorite songs, the sheer joy and satisfaction you can get from learning the guitar is unlike anything else, and whatever you're looking for, you could bet that this section has it.
In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Mahogany - Back: Solid Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Dovetail - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Maple - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Maple - Hardware: Open Gear Tuner, Chrome - String Instrument Finish: Open Pore Natural

Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.

The principal difference among the Strats was in finish options. All had 21-fret maple necks, three single-coil pickups, volume and two tone controls, and five-way select. The SWG came in yer basic red or black, with maple ‘board and chrome hardware. These had traditional non-locking vibratos. The SGV was offered in red with white graphics. The SSX was the dusey, with purple burst (white outside, purple in center), tiara turquoise, blue pearl, metallic white, black and candy apple red finish options, with… with matching colored maple fingerboard and (that’s and) matching chrome hardware.
CostHelper Electric Guitar Guide - [New Window] - Find out how much an electric guitar should cost. Get price guidelines and shopping tips for an electric guitar. A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200 to $400 for a beginner's outfit; a better quality kit can run $500 to $2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000 to $5,000 or more for the instrument alone.
1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson’s mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world’s greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom’s 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that’s just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic ’59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original!
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Out of all the hopped-up Caucasians who turbocharged the blues in the late Sixties, Texas albino Johnny Winter was both the whitest and the fastest. Songs like his 1969 cover of "Highway 61 Revisited" are astonishing showpieces of his lightningfast thumb-picked electric slide playing. Jimi Hendrix sought him out as a sideman, and Muddy Waters recognized his talent at first glance, becoming a friend and collaborator: "That guy up there onstage – I got to see him up close," Waters later said. "He plays eight notes to my one!"
During the late Middle Ages, gitterns called "guitars" were in use, but their construction and tuning was different from modern guitars. The Guitarra Latina in Spain, had curved sides and a single hole. The Guitarra Morisca, which appears to have had Moorish influences, had an oval soundbox and many sound holes on its soundboard. By the 15th century, a four course double-string instrument called the vihuela de mano, that had tuning like the later modern guitar except on one string and similar construction, first appeared in Spain and spread to France and Italy. In the 16th century, a fifth double-string was added. During this time, composers wrote mostly in tablature notation. In the middle of the 16th century, influences from the vihuela and the renaissance guitar were combined and the baroque five string guitar appeared in Spain.[33] The baroque guitar quickly superseded the vihuela in popularity in Spain, France and Italy and Italian players and composers became prominent. In the late 18th century the six string guitar quickly became popular at the expense of the five string guitars. During the 19th century the Spanish luthier and player Antonio de Torres gave the modern classical guitar its definitive form, with a broadened body, increased waist curve, thinned belly, improved internal bracing.[34] The modern classical guitar replaced an older form for the accompaniment of song and dance called flamenco, and a modified version, known as the flamenco guitar, was created.
Prince at #10 just shows me that whoever made this list hasn't seen him play that often. And really, KR doesn't even need to be on the top 10. JH is way overrated, yes on the list, but NOT #1. But anyways, cool to see Prince even on the list. Those stupid people writing those comments are probably the ones that say "Prince plays guitar?" They are so living in a box!

It’s as simple as it gets: On/Off, Tone and a “clean-to-drive” Volume switch that becomes dirtier at higher volumes. Anything else you will need stomp-boxes, which this amp pairs well with thanks to its no-frills concept. Just do yourself the favour and invest in high-end pedals – otherwise you will ruin the amp’s exquisite tone with unsuitable digital effects.
This preamp can also offer a gain control. Essentially, it’s what drives the power levels of the signals to the amp, but it can also boost volume. If the preamp doesn’t have a gain control, it can be assumed that it’s already factory-set to a certain level of gain. One way around the lack of a gain control is to use the volume control on the main amp. Either way, it’s very helpful when you find you need to compete in a multi-instrument band when you feel like you’re being drowned out or you’re experiencing unwanted feedback when you do try to vie for being heard.
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Enlarging/ Drilling Holes: Often required to upgrade tuners, or occasionally to change control pots. Enlarging a hole in wood seems simple enough, and it is. But it's also an easy way to ruin the finish of the guitar and worse. The problem is because there is no wood in the center of the hole, the edges pull upwards instead of cutting. It often results in large ammounts of chipout or worse. The answer is to run the drill BACKWARDS. This will ream the hole out without the risk of chipping. If the hole needs to be made significantly larger, it is often best to use a bit one size up from the desired hole size and run it backwards till the drill has gone just below the surface. Now you can drill the desired size hole normally relatively safely. The washers or dress rings will hide the slightly larger starting bevel that remains. Whenever possible, drill half way through from both sides or clamp a "backer board" in place. Do NOT use much pressure on the drill, let it do the work, excess pressure is usually due to dull bits, and almost always results in some king of damage. If you must drill through the finish where there is no hole use the same method as described for significantly increasing the size of a hole, but apply masking tape over where the hole will be drilled prior to starting.
Gut strings were the original strings for the classical stylist.  They were literally made from the guts of farm animals, mostly sheep.  The intestines and the process used to make these strings became more expensive than nylon and thus have fallen out of favor.  Even though you may hear the term “cat gut” strings, this style of string was never made from the innards of our cute, cuddly, feline friends… just the beasts we like tend to use as a food source.
You can hear one all over Led Zeppelin’s debut record and all over Jeff Beck’s trademark “Heart Full of Soul” intro riff from the Yardbirds. He also used it extensively on the Jeff Beck Group sessions. Of course the most famous fuzz pedal is the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face. This pedal was favored by Jimi Hendrix and set the benchmark for fuzz tones that we are still chasing to this day.

This is the Autumn Brown El Dorado. The finish is outstanding, and it’s also very easy to handle at only 7 lbs. We used 24 extra fat frets. Dual humbuckers provide the sound, and it comes with a whammy bar. We used gold hardware to complement the nice finish. Like other Big Lou guitars, this one features our 1 7/8″ nut width and 8mm string spacing. The construction involves a “set” neck, so it can’t be swapped out, but the factory is ISO9001 certified, so this guitar is a very high quality instrument. Considering the price at $379, it’s a great value. I really tried to keep the cost down, but that arched top costs a small fortune to build. If you can make a statement by playing, that’s the best. But if your still in training, this guitar will make a statement just sitting there. I took the first one off the assembly line for myself. I had to have it.


Guitars. Having all your guitars set up properly is an obvious essential for dialing in good tone. I like low-ish action, and for low action to work, I need to set my guitar necks to have just a bit of relief so the strings won’t buzz and rattle, and in turn choke the tone. I’m always checking the neck relief on my guitars and adjusting the truss rod accordingly.
Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.
Delay/echo effects can sound pretty good when plugged directly into an amp’s input (See Example 3, above)—hell, the Edge built a whole career out of doing just that—but if you want absolutely clean, pristine delay and echo effects with no distortion, the effects loop is the only way to go. Reverb effects should always be patched into the effects loop (See Example 4, below) unless you always play through the cleanest of clean sounding amps. Overdriven or distorted reverb just ain’t very pretty, and it can destroy any semblance of clarity or definition and smear your sound like the ketchup on a baby’s face when it’s trying to master the fine art of eating a messy pile of French fries.

The Hawaiians are likewise hard to identify. One looks to be similar to the later Teisco EG-7L, with a Gibson sort of shape and a pair of offset rocket shapes on either side of the pickup which house roller wheels for volume and tone. A second appears to have a rounded body similar to a Rickenbacker frying pan, looking perhaps like the later Teisco EG-K. This had the same slotted pickup as the J-1, and a single volume control. Finally, there’s an unidentified eight-string lap with an elongated sort of rectangular body and an elevated fingerboard. This had a volume and tone with white knobs, and the tuners were behind the head, rather than sticking straight up, as on later eight-strings.

This guitar is a great platform for making a few mods to turn this into something that punches away above its weight. For more on this, check out this blog post from guitar experts Mike and Mike’s Guitar Bar, who also go to the trouble of running down the various aspects. Alternatively, you could save about $50 by opting for the Vintage Modified Jazzmaster, instead.
If you’re interested in learning how to play electric (or even acoustic) guitar, you obviously need to pick up an instrument. But that’s only the beginning of the gear you need to get to shredding. Second only to a guitar itself, you’re also going to need an amplifier – the device responsible for projecting the sounds of your chosen guitar. The problem is: for a beginner, this task is as daunting as it is expansive.
Epiphone zenith guitar from the early 1960's,made from the 1931-1969,,16-3/8" body,oval pearl inlays,sunburst in color,single wide binding top & back.this guitar has a deep scratch on the top but not thru the wood,a couple extra holes in the top body on each side of the frettboard were it looked like an extra pickguard was,lots of finish crazing on the back of neck.this guitar has a new set of strings and plays and sounds great with nice action.
Before doing a setup, I’d recommend you put a new set of strings on the guitar. Specifically put the type of strings on that you intend to use in future, since different gauges (and sometimes brands) can require a slightly different intonation setup. If you don’t know how to restring a guitar, then have a look here: http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/08/stringing-guitar.html

Gibson filed a lawsuit November 18, 2010 in Federal court, the Central District of California, against WowWee USA and their Paper Jamz battery operated guitar toys charging trademark infringement.[27][28] The lawsuit claimed the Paper Jamz toy guitars copied the looks of some of Gibson’s famous guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson Flying V, the Gibson Explorer, and the Gibson SG. On December 21, 2010 Gibson was granted a request for an injunction against WowWee and retailers in the United States which were selling Paper Jamz guitars: WalMart, Amazon (company), Big Lots stores, Kmart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us, Walgreens, Brookstone, Best Buy, eBay, Toywiz.com, and Home Shopping Network (HSN)[29][30][31] The case was dismissed with prejudice (dismissed permanently) January 11, 2011 by Federal Judge R. Gary Klausner.[32][33]
He has a way about him that makes you stop and listen, but he isn’t in your face. His sound is very melodic, which is why his tone was so perfectly matched to answering the needs of the vocals, yet he still holds his own in every tune. Bright, confident and edgy, he is a serious guitar-player and he has no intentions of holding back! People often say that he carries humour in his music, which is quite a clever characteristic to portray with this piece of equipment.
The EG-6N had a similar profile but tuners were mounted on a square-topped head with the buttons facing up. This had a dark square-ended fingerboard with dots and a single chrome-covered pickup with black center insert and exposed poles (same as on the SD-2L/4L), volume and tone control. The EG-8N was similar except for having a light fingerboard with black dots, and two of the chrome/black insert pickups, volume, tone and threeway select. A folding stand to hold the steels was available (this was a standard Teisco product from the mid-’50s on).
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
Your signal chain starts at your guitar and passes through each cable and pedal until it reaches your amplifier, the speakers, and finally your ears. If you use a collection of dedicated effects stompboxes, you will be faced with a perennial question raised by guitarists: what is the best way to connect these units into a single signal chain that is easy to set up and won’t degrade your tone.
The really important player on the scene today in the low end and intermediate price bracket is Mainland China. Whereas Yamaha and other makers have produced guitars in Taiwan for quite some time, Mainland Chinese guitars were always noted as being of extremely low quality. In the past few years, however, that situation has changed dramatically. In the past ten years, China has moved rapidly toward entrepreneurial private ownership of business. The new leadership has pushed this process quickly. China now permits foreign ownership of factories and businesses as well as encouraging Chinese citizens both from Mainland China and Taiwan to set up their own ventures. Just as the Koreans were able to progress from very low-end student models with crude workmanship to remarkably sophisticated guitars more quickly than the Japanese had, the Chinese now have all the advantages of the prior experience of Americans, Japanese, Korean and Indonesian ventures. In addition it should be noted that while Chinese labor is remarkably inexpensive, with an average annual income in China today of under $1,000, Chinese labor is by no means unskilled. China has a very high literacy rate and its workers are skilled and motivated. In the past the world has had areas with cheap labor and other areas with skilled labor. China is a major force to reckon with because it offers cheap skilled labor. The Chinese today are producing instruments in many different settings, ranging from small workshops specializing in handcrafted instruments on up to huge industrial complexes with the latest automated technology. Only ten years ago Chinese-made violins were viewed as almost a joke. They were violin-shaped objects but certainly did not play or sound like one. Today we at Gruhn Guitars are selling beautifully crafted Chinese violins made with excellent wood and superb craftsmanship at very reasonable prices. Some of these instruments compare very favorably with European and American violins costing thousands of dollars. Gibson has set up a factory in China to produce Epiphone guitars and numerous American makers, both large and small, are having guitars, banjos and mandolins made there. Whereas it would be prohibitively expensive to make guitars or other instruments in Japan today using techniques similar to those employed by Martin and Gibson in the 1930s with assembly line production but still featuring a high degree of hand craftsmanship and human judgment, in China today it is economically emminently feasible to do so. The violins we import are beautifully crafted and even feature genuine varnish finish for a very small fraction of the cost that companies such as Gibson charge simply for the option of a varnish finish on one of their standard models. The Chinese are very rapidly taking over the student- and intermediate-grade markets. Not only do they produce fretted instruments, but they have taken over a large segment of the piano market as well as producing wind instruments. I have seen and played prototype acoustic Chinese instruments which rival American-made guitars by some of the same American manufacturers bringing in these imports. It will be most interesting to see how this develops.

I own a v100 gold top modified to fit regular humbuckers and boy it is great. I have played it with gibson lps and it holds it own. Not as nice really but damn it sounds great. I have an SG too but have never played an SG before this guitar. I am weirded out by the light body. Are they all like that? I know they are all neck heavy but this seems out of order. I do like the sg though more every time I pick it up.


The placement of pickups on the guitar's body has a significant influence on the tone they generate. Pickups located near the bridge sample the strings where they have the least overall motion. The result is accentuated treble sounds or "bite." Pickups located nearer the center of the strings—closer to the neck of the guitar—produce a tone characterized by more midrange and bass sounds.
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Founded by the American Orville Gibson in 1902, Gibson is without a doubt the other legendary electric guitar brand. Their most famous model holds the name of the very popular guitarist Les Paul, who collaborated with Ted McCarty in its design back in the 1950's. Unlike the Telecaster and Stratocaster, the Les Paul boasts a mahogany body, a set mahogany neck, a rosewood fingerboard, and a maple top. Among the many Les Paul players we find Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin:
If you are recording the output of a bass amp, try to use a mic that will capture more of the low-end than a typical stage mic. An SM57/58 will work, but a mic with a more extended low-frequency response would be a better choice. The Sennheiser 421 is often used, as is the classic kick drum mic, the AKG D112, which has a bumped-up response tuned specifically for low-pitched instruments. I prefer the Electro-Voice RE-20 (you know, the “announcer’s mic”)—it’s more neutral, and it has an extended low-end response, so you’ll get not just boom, but real depth.
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It was Berry’s songs from the late Fifties with cut boogie patterns—like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Johnny B. Goode” and “Carol”—that realized electrically the guitar ambitions first dreamt by Robert Johnson. Berry’s tone—courtesy of a hollow-body Gibson through a tweed Fender amp—was raw and loud. This, along with his duckwalk, ringing double-stops and songs about cars and girls, grabbed the youth market. Tall and handsome, he brought the guitar as the “cool” instruments to a ready audience via appearances on TV and in movies, in a way that the Beatles would repeat in the early Sixties.
This page contains information, pictures, videos, user generated reviews, automatically generated review and videos about Washburn XM DLX2 but we do not warrant the quality, accuracy or completeness of any information on our web site. If you have more information about Washburn XM DLX2 please write a review. Some reviews are automatically generated generated by using verbal representation of publicly available numeric rating information musicians entered while writing review of Washburn XM DLX2. User generated reviews of Washburn XM DLX2 represent opinions of credited authors alone, and do not represent Chorder's opinion.

The frets are the little metal pieces that are installed in the instrument's neck. Frets do not make a significant difference in the sound of the instrument. They come in various sizes and materials. If you're just starting out, we recommend choosing Medium size frets made of Nickel-Silver. For a more scalloped feel, we recommend Extra Jumbo size frets. For increased durability (wear-and-tear), we recommend Stainless Steel frets. Some customers have reported stainless steel frets to be very slippery and brighter sounding when compared to nickel-silver frets – this could be a good, or a bad thing depending on the player.


Another cool place I just found was Madison Guitar Repair out of Fridley. I went there a couple weeks ago. It's a little hole in the wall place where they just work on guitars and have tons of parts. Really nice guys that seem like they know their stuff pretty dang well. Never used them but considering that all they do is luthier work I'd give them a shot.
The 1934-’35 Dobro Hawaiian had the relief sections around a round central bridge/pickup “cover” with a Dobro “lyre” logo between the pickup and the neck. The more-or-less rounded lower bout (cutout at the butt) culminated in two little pointed shoulders, which then tape into the neck, giving it an almost “Spanish” look if you squint and ignore the cast designs. The tapered head had two cutouts in the middle and a triple-stepped top extended on the bass side. The principal difference between this earliest Dobro and the one shown in Gruhn/Carter is the tailpiece, which was a curved, cast-in affair, unlike the rectangular tail on the later version. Also, the side relief panels are painted black, with the whole thing clear-coated to seal it. On this first Dobro electric lap there is no volume control. The jack is on the but, in the bottom cutout, next to the strap button.
The FR6UC's matt black flat finish and lack of bling lends the instrument a mean, no-nonsense aesthetic that would be a perfect fit for the modern metalcore player. There's an ebony fingerboard and its neck is a five-piece affair, with two thin strips of 0.5mm walnut between three sections of maple. The FR6UC's suitably rock-looking distressed pickup covers house a pair of Bare Knuckle Aftermath humbuckers with "accelerated bass response for exceptionally fast tracking of high-speed staccato riffing with crushing midrange and precise high-end articulation". The 14.7k-ohm bridge unit comprises a trio of ceramic magnets, while the neck is Alnico V with a DC resistance of 11.5k ohms. This instrument is built cleanly with excellent fretwork, as you would expect from a Japanese guitar at this price point, although it has to be noted that - considering its relatively compact proportions - it's a little on the weighty side, weighing in at 3.8kg (8.4lbs). The FR6UC's Bare Knuckle Aftermaths in full humbucking mode are perfect for a gamut of king-size-yet- articulate heavy rock tones, from Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age right through to Deftones and Slipknot. That said, the Aftermaths are by no means all about metallic high gain; back off the volume and switch to position two or four to get one of the inner coils in isolation and you'll enjoy pleasantly springy Strat-style tones. It may be none-more-black in appearance, but there's a broad range of hues on the FR6UC's sonic palette.
The Vox Show Room shows the classic amps behind the British Explosion of sound in the 60's. VOX, at one time was one of the largest musical instrument producers in the world and their products were utilized by almost every major music group during the nineteen sixties. From The Shadows to The Beatles to U2, VOX is the "voice" of generations of musicians worldwide.
Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.

This diagram shows 3 single coils wired in parallel, allowing seven tone choices. The typical 3 single coil guitar contains a 5 way rotary switch which allows you to get 5 sounds - each single coil; neck and middle in parallel and middle and bridge in parallel. This modification will give you 2 more sounds - all 3 pickups in parallel and Neck and Bridge in parallel.
000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
Some bridges have a lock position and at this point should be engaged. Other floating bridges will need to be stabilized by using pieces of wood fitted inside the cavity (accessed from the back of the body) to prevent the tremolo block from moving. Vintage Fender-style tremolo bridges can be stabilized by fully tightening the spring tension screws. Whatever method is used, the bridge must sit as we will want it to when we are done with the set-up procedure- parallel to and nearly flush with the top- so care must be taken at this stage to get the position of the bridge right.
In May ’71, Ovation tried once more. It introduced the K-1217 Typhoon V bass, about which no information is available, but based on the Eclipse, the difference may have been pickups. The K-1235 Eclipse was also introduced. This was a guitar offered only in a black finish that looks somewhat like graphite. It had chrome hardware, no binding, dot inlays, three-way select and two volume and two tone controls. The pickups had metal covers with black inserts and a single blade-style pole. In June ’72, all Electric Storms were discontinued except the Tornado and Eclipse, which made it another half year, until January ’73, by which time the Electric Storm had subsided into quiescence.
A. Most electric guitars have several control knobs on the body. The amount of knobs and what they do can vary, so it's worth experimenting, but we'll go over the most common configuration. The majority of electric guitars have three control knobs and one switch. One control knob is for volume and the other two are for tone, with one controlling the neck pickup, and the other controlling the bridge pickup. The switch is to change between using the neck or bridge pickup.

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Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.

Festive music track with cheerful and happy mood, with “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” song melody. I’ve included in pack different logo and looped versions of this track, for your comfortable using. This celebratory track can be used for Winter Holyday projects, children arcade games, as New Year jingles, advertising and Youtube commercial video. Enjoy!
The GT-70 was a re-styled two-pickup, single-cutaway recalling the F-55s. The cutaway retained the wide horizontal angle of before, however the upper bass bout received a more graceful treatment, with a slight inward curve as it met the neck at the 16th fret. The controls were the same as before; the elevated pickguard had become a large white affair, the tailpiece was the V-notched Bigsby. Pickups remained our familiar DeArmond humbuckers. Gone were the plastic bridges in favor of metal adjustable finetune variety. Finishes were either burgundy or black. The first prototype serial number was 203803. Around 1,450 of these were made between January of 1966 and October of 1968.
This mod works great for Strat-type pickups or aftermarket Tele-style reproduction pickups that don’t already have a plate. Some pickup companies make P-90s that don’t have a metal base plate, and these can be twang-ified in this way, too. The best part is that, if you don’t like the sound, you can just peel the plate off and be right back where you started.
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Guild began in New York in 1953 but eventually moved to Rhode Island. Fender purchased Guild in 1995. Fender seemed only interested in Guild as a brand of acoustic guitars. The classic Guild electric guitars were not being made at first. But then some of the classic electric models were re-introduced. Cordoba Music Group (makers of classical guitars) purchased Guild and sells both electric and acoustic models based on the old designs.
I love reading interviews with engineers and producers, but the more of them I read, the more I come up against the basic problem that my brain is like a sieve. I'm forever thinking to myself "I really must remember that technique", but unless I dash off and use it right away the knowledge just skips out of my ear and heads for the hills, probably glad to be free. And even if I vaguely remember reading a fascinating passage about de-essing nose-flutes, I'm damned if I can recall where I read it or who recommended it.
There seems to be a lot of confusion about the origins of Palmer guitars. I know a few people have said they are made in America but I cant find anything about that site. However there is a guitar maker and restorer called James Arthur Palmer in Stoke on Trent, England. If you simply google his name then nothing will come up but if you enter J.A.P. guitars it will lead you to his site. Hope this helps.
Black trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
So much has changed since our last refresh – where do we begin! First we answered some common questions that you might have. Then we reviewed our top ten chart and individual categories, and removed several older models including the Gibson Les Paul Faded T 2017, Epiphone’s G-310 SG, and the ESP MH-50. We added many others including one of the greatest guitars ever made, the Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci Majesty Monarchy, the premium Fender Eric Clapton Stratocaster, the Yamaha RevStar RS420 and Mark Holcomb’s signature PRS MHHB2 SE.
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The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.
Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]
Recently while cruising around EBay I was able to find pretty strong evidence that the 700 and 800-series Kents were made by Kawai. Or maybe... the necks of the 700 and 800-series Kents and the Kawais were made by the same manufacturer. I don’t know if Kawai kept the factory that made Teisco operating after it was acquired. It appears that Kawai had more experience building hollow-bodied guitars than Teisco. So I call the 700 and 800-series Kents Made by Kawai. You can call them Made by Teisco if you want. Of course, the possibility exists that they were both made by an entirely different company. Who knows? The 1960’s were like a ‘wild west’ period of Japanese guitar making.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black
In 2009, Vox refined the Virage design with the Virage II series of guitars. This series repeated the double and single cutaway bodies of the earlier Virage series, but also included the Series 77 (with double horns emulating the Gibson SG series), the Series 55 (with resemblance to the Gibson Les Paul single cutaway), and the Series 33 (with lower cost fabrication than the 77 and 55 series). The Virage II series features a CoAxe pick-ups which resemble the earlier Three-90 features, but claimed to be lower noise. The one-piece cast MaxConnect bridge of this series is aluminium and provides both a saddle and anchor for the guitar strings.
Finally introduced in 1936 was National Dobro’s first wooden Hawaiian Electric Guitar. These Hawaiian laps were built by National Dobro in Chicago. This had a squarish pear shape, rather wide and frumpy, with two sharp points for shoulders and fairly wide cutaways. This was “…solid wood finish, in hi-lited mahogany,” which is basically a shaded mahogany sunburst. The top was bound. A square neck rose up to a squared-off flat three-and-three head, now with plate tuners with plastic buttons. The 26-fret fingerboard (23″ scale) had dot inlays plus little numbers written along the treble edge for each fret position! This first wood-body looks to have some sort of elevated pickguard, also made of wood. The old, improved Stimson pickup was housed under a large, two-part rectangular cast bridge assembly with a slotted cover revealing the pickup poles, and a slightly elevated back section with rear slots for attaching the strings. Two little wings were appended to either side of this rectangular housing, the treble side with a volume knob, the bass side with a screw-on microphone-type plug attachment (this would be favored over 1/4″ plugs on Supro laps for years to come). A square metal Supro logo plate was mounted between the end of the fingerboard and the pickup cover. Again, cost was $75, including the amp.
The Roland Blues Cube Artist looks and sounds the part of a vintage tweed tube era amplifier, but the innards tell a different story, being a solid-state amp with Roland's Tube Logic technology. And for something with tube amp modeling and USB direct recording, the amp comes with a streamlined set of features, having just two channels, clean and crunch, both of which have boost switches. Interestingly, this more traditional setup helped the amp score high points from users who want a pedal friendly amp that has the feel of tube without its usual drawbacks. Giving it a bit of an edge over older amps, is its built-in power attenuator that lets you lower the power rating from 80W down to 0.5W. For a bit of tone experimentation, the amp comes with a "dual tone" switch for blending the two channels in a way that's musically pleasing. Roland also equipped this amp with tremolo and reverb that complements its simple setup. Finally, the Blues Cube Artist lets you expand your tonal palette via its swappable "tone capsule", which is an analog component that you actually switch out to give the amp a different sound. There are currently three available tone capsules, two of which are artist signatures from Eric Johnson and Robben Ford, and the third one being Roland's own rendition of the Blues sound.
It is a standard dreadnought with 26 frets. There are no electronics, no cutaway, and no fancy upgrades. It has a book matched sitka spruce top, rosewood fingerboard, adjustable rosewood bridge, cream colored plastic binding, rosewood back and sides, and a black inlaid headstock. The neck is not one piece and is made from presumably African mahogany. It has closed gold tone tuners, black beveled pick guard and some plain black line art for a rosette. This guitar is void of polyurethane and has a lacquer finish, so much the better.
The technique is often executed by the little finger of the guitarist which is wrapped around the volume pot of the guitar. When the note is struck the volume is increased from zero by a rolling motion of the little finger. Alternatively, the effect is achieved with a volume pedal. It is sometimes called "violining", because the sound is similar to a bowed violin. Allan Holdsworth pioneered the technique of the pedal swelling along with a delay unit to create a thicker sound that is more associated with the cello. - winner333
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You have tonnes of distortion models based on the likes of the classic DS-1 (Dist-1) and Pro Co Rat (Squeak) pedals and more as well as boost, delay and modulation effects. An onboard tuner, stereo/mono looper with up to 80- seconds of phrase recording, tap tempo, stereo headphone output for silent practice and the ability to use up to 7 effects simultaneously.
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While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally.
Whether you are a guitarist looking for new tones, or a sound designer looking for new ways to mangle your audio, virtual guitar amps and effects are a great way to achieve new sounds and enhance your productions. There are many great guitar amp and pedal effects plug-ins available on the market today to purchase, but there are also numerous effects that are available for free. In this article I'll offer up some professional guitar effect plug-ins from around the internet that you can use on your next project, completely for free.
Jump up ^ Peterson (2002, p. 37): Peterson, Jonathon (Winter 2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA.: The Guild of American Luthiers. 72: 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 2011-10-21. Retrieved 9 October 2012.
A distortion box produces what we call hard clipping, as opposed to an overdrive pedal that produces soft clipping. What does that mean? If we were to look at a note on an oscilloscope we would see a wave (hence the term sound wave) with a nice rounded top and bottom. When we overdrive or distort a note the top and bottom of the sound wave flattens out, or clips. The more clipping of the wave the more distorted the note. A fuzz pedal produces so much clipping it is seen as a square wave, completely flat on the top and bottom of the wave. There are many excellent distortion boxes on the market but some classic industry standards are the Rat distortion box, the Boss Super Overdrive (a bit more of a distortion box really), MXR Distortion +, Boss Distortion, and the Boss Heavy Metal Pedal.
The previous drawing illustrates the electrical and magnetic function of a single-coil pickup. Some pickups might use six permanent magnets in place of the six pole pieces to create the magnetic field, but the idea is the same: create a steady magnetic field around a coil in proximity to the guitar string. The name "single-coil" pickup becomes more significant when compared to the humbucker or "dual-coil" pickup.
John Scofield (b 1951) is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey DeFrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, John Mayer, and many other artists. Scofield had played a 1981 Ibanez AS-200 as his main guitar for over 20 years.[26]
In 1958, Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models: with the design change came cosmetic changes to these guitars that would later take on enormous importance. To accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, Gibson revamped both these electric guitar models with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, the Junior’s fresh look was enhanced with a new cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a new, rather yellow-tinged finish for its new design.

If this doesn’t work, or you’re just a little paranoid about hooking the guitar directly into the PC, you can get one of these. This is the Line 6 Pod Studio GX, and it’s a great value and pretty much a one-stop shopping starter kit. The box you see there is a guitar USB interface, with an input designed for guitar. It’s also got a headphone output, so you can listen through the interface. I had an older version of this ages ago, which I used for basic guitar input until I got some more advanced recording gear that worked well with guitars.


Launch price: $799 / £679 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/pau ferro (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x Vintage Noiseless Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, 6-position V6 rotary tone switch, tone, 5-way pickup selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized Tremolo, Deluxe locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Mystic Ice Blue, Classic Copper & 3-Color Sunburst
Planning for this review started right after the January 2018 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Anaheim, California. We didn’t notice any significant introductions in the under-$200 electric guitar category during our time there, but new guitars can appear at any time. We’ll be watching out for them, and we’ll get our hands on them as soon as we can.
Quirks? Some. The old Rola was kind of tired, so I saved it and put in a new Jensen Mod I had laying around (not a bad little speaker, but not a vintage Jensen, either…expect a future upgrade). The 7F7’s are supposed to be very loud and micro-phonic (which was why we don’t tend to see them in guitar amps after the mid-late 40’s), but this one sounds just fine. And they’re cheap, so it’s not like you’re hunting down good EL86’s or anything. Also, one thing that took some getting used to was the tone knob is backwards by contemporary standards. That is, turn the creamy chickenhead to the left, you get more treble (and more drive and volume). Turn to the right, and it gets very bassy and like a chewy jazzy tone.
Acoustically I own a Martin for the living room. Best sound but I won't let it leave the house. (Taylor people are so defensive, but lets face it Martin owners never have to say "Oh it sounds just like/as good as a Taylor") I own an Ovation, the thing is bullet proof, a little thin on sound but can take it anywhere. If I plug it in, it has amazing electronics and sounds 10X better. I own an Ibenez exotic wood, pretty but a stiff box that just does not resonate, hate it.

Having spent years developing the JDX 48 and Headload, it only made sense that Radial would develop a solution for guitarists who didn’t want to use an amp at all; hence, the JDX Direct-Drive™ was born! The Direct-Drive lets guitarists choose between three different amp voicings: “Combo”, “Stack” and “JDX 4×12”, with further controls to adjust the brightness of the amp. The guitarist simply plugs in their guitar through their pedals, into the JDX Direct-Drive and out to the board with an XLR cable. There are additional outputs for attaching to onstage amps or speakers as well for guitarists who are more comfortable having volume with them on stage. The engineer can then mic the amp and mix the two signals together to get the best tone out of the PA system.
Further simplifications occur for the regular tunings that are repetitive, that is, which repeat their strings. For example, the E-G♯-c-e-g♯-c' M3 tuning repeats its octave after every two strings. Such repetition further simplifies the learning of chords and improvisation;[71] This repetition results in two copies of the three open-strings' notes, each in a different octave. Similarly, the B-F-B-F-B-F augmented-fourths tuning repeats itself after one string.[73]
Good results are usually achieved using a dynamic instrument microphone placed 6-8" from the speaker, off-center. If more low-end is needed, move the microphone closer in (2-5") for increased cardioid proximity effect. Use your ears or a set of headphones to find the "sweet spot" of the speaker. Consider miking the guitar itself with a small-diaphragm condenser in the area of the picking hand aimed toward the bridge, for extra string texture in the track.
Other early phase shifters used field effect transistors (FETs) to control each phasing stage in place of the light bulbs in the ’Vibe, and certainly later units employed opamps with variable resistors (six TL072 dual opamps or similar in the MXR Phase 100, for example). Electro-Harmonix’s sweet little Small Stone, on the other hand, has a more unusual design that employs five CA3094 type Operational Transconductance Amplifiers (OTAs). The results are similar, but subtly different. Many phasers—such as MXR’s Phase 45 and Phase 90, and E-H’s Small Stone—carry nothing but a speed control, plus a “Color” switch in the case of the latter. Others have Depth, Mix and Resonance controls. The latter appears on many units with internal feedback loops (the Small Stone and most phasers before it lack this circuitry), and allows the player tweak the degree to which the portion of the signal fed back enhances the frequency peaks.

The VOX Pathfinder 10 is one of the best cheap amps on the market today, but don’t be fooled by its budget friendly price tag – this is a powerhouse of tone. Its pricing and ease of use makes it ideal for beginner guitarists but its signature, high quality VOX sound is why it’s also relied upon by professional guitarists and studio engineers everywhere.
Many great players (including Hendrix) placed the wah before distortion... though many of the modern rock guys place it after distortion to make the frequency sweep cleaner. Personally, I prefer the Wah before distortion, but it's personal taste really. Depends a bit on the pedal too - how wide the frequency notch is and what frequency range it covers. I have my Wah on a G-Lab True Bypass Wah Pad, which I think is a great product... I have a few Wahs that I like, the Keeley Mod Vox Wah and the RMC3 are probably my first choices to try out.
The Martin DSR2 also comes equipped with built-in Fishman Sonitone electronics, which features discrete soundhole mounted controls, allowing for stage-ready performance without having to drill excessive holes on the side of the body. With its continuesly high rating and incredible value for money, the Martin DSR2 should be at the top of your list when you're looking for an acoustic-electric guitar in this price range.
Reverb – The best analogy for reverb effects would be playing your guitar inside a pipe. That’s an extreme level of reverb, of course, and these pedals will allow you to go from there all the way back to subtler effects like the natural reverberation of a concert hall. This effect sounds great with a clean tone, but beware of using it with heavy distortion or else you might lose too much definition from your sound.
The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
The Effect: Flangers belong to the modulation class of effects and are among the most unusual tools you can have as a guitar player. Being similar to phasers, flangers are often the subject of numerous controversies. At the end of the day, this effect is a different kind of beast. One of the best examples of a good flanger is the Electro-Harmonix Stereo Electric Mistress. This pedal was based on an older design that’s credited with pushing flangers to the mainstream. Another thing to know about flangers is that they can make or break your tone. Due to their aggressive nature, one has to be careful how much of this effects they use. It’s easy to get overwhelmed and lost in it.
Then, as the most popular version goes, a young, jack of all trades guitarist named Les Paul got tired of all that. So, he set out to create a guitar that could be heard just as much as the louder instruments. He fiddled with a lot of electronic means to boost his sound. Some worked better than others. His piece de resistance at the time would come to be known as "The Log". It looked like what you see up there on the left:

A Customer brought this guitar into us in horrible shape. He had stored this guitar in the basement for a number of years with no issues, however in the fall of 2007 a large flood swept through our area filling his basement, and in turn his guitar, with water for almost a week. Needless to say, by the time he was able to get the guitar out it had been heavily damaged. When he brought this guitar into us it was completely covered in mud and river residue, the electroics were completely shot, and the hardware had begun to oxidize. We began by completely taking apart the guitar. We thoroughly cleaned each part of the guitar, inside and out. Once completed we were actually able to save all the original hardware from the guitar and the finish had withstood the flood. The electronics had to be completely replaced however. Staying true to the guitar we used as much era specific parts as we could find. As you can see, by the time we were done with the guitar you could hardly tell anything had happened to it!
The Ultimate Beginners Series gets aspiring musicians started immediately with classic rock and blues riffs, chord patterns and more. Now, for the first time ever, Basics, Blues, and Rock are combined in one complete book and DVD set. Follow along with 4 hours of DVD instruction and 3 hours of audio tracks, with the help of on-screen graphics and printed diagrams. The Ultimate Beginners Series: Electric Guitar Complete takes you from picking to soloing and power chords. If you're serious about mastering the blues and rock styles, this book and DVD set is a must-have.

Really loving this bit of kit. The thing that surprised me most wasn't the fourth position (which is great!) but the overall sound improvement I get from quality hardware. I have 2017 American Professional Tele and I'm amazed at the clarity that this upgrade has given me. TBH - I don't understand why Fender don't fit quality parts like this straight from the factory. Thanks guys!" - Max
What can we learn from these restaurant guests? The lesson is that we are very easily tricked into liking things we pay more for, even though they might not be that good after all. We get a particular feeling from thinking that we’re treating ourselves to something luxurious. If we, on the other hand, haven’t spent very much, we usually assume that it can’t be a good product.
MusicMan is the story of two former Fender employees who decided to create their own company in 1971. In the beginning it was called Tri-Sonix, before they changed the name to MusicMan in 1974. While the first product of the brand was a tube/solid-state hybrid amp ─ the Sixty Five, developed with the help of a certain Leo Fender ─ the company became famous for its guitars and basses. The introduction of the mythical StingRay guitars and basses in 1976 is a milestone in the company's history. The guitar is an average seller (rock players find it too "clean"), but the bass and its active Tom Walker preamp that allows to boost certain frequencies is a huge success. After severe conflicts within the team, MusicMan was sold to Ernie Ball in 1984. The brand then started to endorse famous artists like Albert Lee, Steve Lukather (Toto), John Petrucci (Dream Theater), and Eddie Van Halen (Axis), and developed signature models for every one of them.

Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future.
The Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Collection Electric Guitar is a GREAT GUITAR for $169.00 (The average selling price at the time of this review). The pickups, tune-o-matic bridge and stop piece are the same ones used in Epiphone's more expensive guitars, and are similar to what's used in much more expensive Gibsons. Although the tone adjustments have been simplified to a toggle between the three pickup combinations and an overall tone control for both pickups, this is not as big a deal as many might make of it. Given the vast array of other things that influence electric guitar sound -- strings, amp choice and settings, effects pedals and so forth -- the guitar sounds great as is.
SOLD OUT: is a faithful D-28 design copy by Takamine Japan , discontinued production decades ago its Beautiful its near mint What more do I need to say besides this one will go quickly! Just in to be processed and pictured it's all original and in TOP condition! Contact Joe to buy this beauty at: jvguitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come do not hesitate your going to love this guitar.
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.

By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
JVGuitars is very proud to present to you yet another wonderfully aged High end Law Suit guitars out of Japanese it is a hand crafted acoustic guitar built well almost 40 years ago, what many may not know is that Takamine on these high end exotic tone woods models were master built by using well aged tone woods of 25-30+ years of age at the time when built making this a true vintage guitar in its own right. This example has been very well maintained and taken care of as you will see, this is a California guitar and has not seen much of the ravages of extreme weather and other extreme changes that can damage 0 warp – dry our and Split – crack and otherwise severely damage a perfectly good instrument so this guitar shows no evidence of any of those common afflictions on the contrary this guitar is rather CLEAN over all,Its beautiful solid spruce top is pretty flat and its bridge is nice and tight as well and its bracing ( same as Martin D-28 ) is all good throughout so this guitar has good bones!, bindings too are all good, frets are good and we dressed and polished the frets and they are good for another 20+ years of play, its neck is excellent!.. Fresh install of a new Martin bone nut and compensated saddle and this guitar is set up with Martin Marquis strings and plays beautifully. The original tuning gears are in place and working excellently too. This guitar is a pleasure to play its action is very good at medium - low more on the lower side of medium and it plays with ease and sounds incredible and has even more saddle room to go lower in future if wanted . This guitar has the LOOK it just has it… its absolutely GORGEOUS with the breath taking 2-piece center seam Brazilian Rosewood back & sides - fingerboard and headstock overlay its truly stunning ,as stated it’s exotic TONE WOODS are of the Brazilian Jacaranda verity and its presence overall is stunning perhaps surpassing that of the Original Martin D-28 they copied/ I will suggest that you be the judge of that see for yourself and have a good look At some old Martins as well this guitar stands toe to toe with any of them. This example is nice and deep sounding and its volume is excellent. This guitar is JVGuitars condition rated at 9/10 vintage excellent , it is not new or mint it has a few minor dings as its over 40 years old, it has patina aging that of the color showing on the bindings have Ambered naturally with age this is what make a vintage guitar beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder. These exotic TONE WOOD series guitars in this kind of condition are hard to find these days this one is A real GEM!…… Let me know if interested Thanks for Looking Joe Email me at: JVGuitars@gmail.com excellent recording possibilities.. Pics soon to come ! any questions let me know: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Most Martin guitars made are "flat top" models. That is, they have a round sound hole in approximately the center of the flat top of the guitar, with a "pin" style bridge. Martin also made some archtop models during the 1930s. These can have a round sound hole, or two "f" style sound holes (one on each side of the top of the body), and have an arched top, with a "trapeze" style bridge. Martin also made ukuleles. If a guitar only has four strings (and is not a ukulele), this is known as a Tenor guitar. Uke size instruments with ten string are Tiples. Uke size instruments with eight strings are Taropatches. Martin also made mandolins, which have eight strings. To summarize:
Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.

Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p112 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "In Spain Falla's lead was followed by Joaquin Turina (1882–1949) and Federico Moreno Torroba (b. 1891), who began to produce works in collaboration with Segovia."
For this particular setup, I used a Fender Stratocaster. George used those quite frequently. They used a Tweed Champ. Now, these were being used quite a bit around that time. Eric Clapton was using them on Layla, and word is that when Clapton was playing on All Things Must Pass, he had his Champ there, and I know for a fact that George had a collection of tweed amps.
But here at Uberchord (click to download the free guitar learning app) we get that your dream is maybe about playing electric guitar. And if that’s what you want to do, then starting out with a good electric instrument makes sense. But what makes a “good” guitar? Well, if you are confused about what kind of Guitar to buy, you can check out our post on: Types of Guitar: Beginner’s Guide to Buying A Guitar.
I’m not a very good guitarist. In fact, some people would probably say I’m really awful. And that’s ok. But I’ve owned guitars. I can play a G chord. I can fumble my way through some 3-chord punk, alternative rock songs and a Beatles tune here and there. At the very least, I know a tiny bit about guitars and things. For example, I wouldn’t confuse a drum kit with a guitar, so score points for me there.

While hollow guitars are best suited to jazz, there have been a handful of cases where rock musicians have utilized fully hollow jazz box guitars in rock and roll. Chief among these would be Ted Nugent, who actually used the excess feedback produced by his Gibson Byrdland as a musical tool. Hollow ES-335 style guitars are used in blues and rock more frequently than the jazz box (the Beatles used the Epiphone Casino extensively), though because of the feedback they produce most musicians stick with semi-hollow instruments.
Echo is a naturally occurring effect. Since the first days of recording, men have attempted to create an artificial method of duplicating this effect. The first attempt were echo chambers (or rooms) that created a “natural” echo. These rooms still exist at some recording studios. Tape echo effects came next, offering portability and variable rates of echo. These units were often noisy, but are still favored for their warm echo tone. Analog delays solved the problems inherent with tape (bad tubes, noisy tape, and misaligned or worn out tape heads) but had limitations in the length of their delay. Finally, digital delays appeared in the 1980s and offered more delay time and added features, but also came with a more sterile sounding tone. Many digital delays now simulate tape, analog, and digital delays
Sweet and tasty Smooth Jazz track. Featured electric and acoustic pianos, electric organ with synth. Rhythm electric guitar playing chords and another creamy electric guitar playing solo. Also, this track has warm and wide bass guitar with drums and percussion. This track is great for presentations, advertising, real estate background, Youtube and other videos.
Chorus – This is the subtlest type of modulation effect. It does exactly what its name suggests, making it sound as though multiple instruments are all playing in unison. The effect could be compared to running a signal through two amps at once and setting one on a slight delay; in fact, that’s how many artists created chorus effects before these pedals were commonplace.

Amps available in ’61 included the large HG-8 (recommended for use with the EG-TW and Harp Guitar), the Amp-75C, Amp-73C, Amp-72A, Amp-72B, Amp-72C, Amp-71A, Amp-71B, Amp-71C, Amp-30, Amp-4C, Amp-15 and Amp-86 bass amp. These came in a varity of shapes, mostly with either a single color covering with a tweed grillcloth, or the two-tone Amp-30 or the two-tone Amp-15 with a cross-shaped grillcloth area. All had the Swan-S logo. These were most likely still all tube amps at this point in time.
Launch price: $1,699 / £1,006 | Body: Laminated mahogany, semi-hollow | Neck: 3-piece mahogany/maple/mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x LB-1 humbuckers | Controls: Bridge volume, bridge tone, neck volume, neck tone, 3-way selector | Hardware: Guild Tune-o-matic bridge with rosewood base, Guild vibrato, Grover Sta-Tite open-gear 14:1 tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Cherry Red, White, Black
Two other totally new guitars debuted in November of ’88, the ST-3 ($225) and ST-4 ($235). These were both Strats, with maple necks, rosewood fingerboards, volume and two tones, five-way select, chrome hardware, SAT non-locking vibrato, in black, white or red with graphics. The ST-3 had three single-coils, whereas the ST-4 had a ‘bucker and two singles. Cases or gig bags were extra.
Two other Spanish guitars were available in 1954 which were not shown in the Teisco history photo, the J-2 and the TN-54. These are pretty much a mystery. The J-2 was likely a two-pickup companion to the J-1, although by a few years later, both these models had become double-cutaways. Whether that was the case with the J-2 from the beginning is unknown, but unlikely. The description of the TN-54 is completely unknown.
Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.
I have an acoustic that I bought from a lady I know who said she has had it since the early 70's. It says 'Maya' on the headstock and the reinforcement rod cover is stamped with 'Takamine'. The sticker inside the sound hole says 'Maya', "We made this guitar for the people who love guitar music", Made by Takamine, Model No. TF1o1S, Japan. On the inside of the sound hole at the top, the wood block there is stamped with 46.6.3. The guitar is only about 3 1/4 inches deep and approx. 15 inches wide at its widest spot. Small guitar with a big beautiful sound.
One of the most over looked and shockingly good guitars I have ever played in my 23 years of chopping wood. In their rich history there have been little misses, but over all Aria guitars are supreme to their competitor especially at the price point. My 1977 Aria les paul copy has at leased twice the balls as my buddy's 6 year old Gibson and tons more playability. Forget about comparing to epiphone, seriously. eBay yourself a Aria electric and you WILL be pleasantly surprised. Aria acoustics; If your reaching for a nylon, Aria makes some of the best classical guitars with a history of employing some of the most well noted artisans of the craft, such as Ryoji Matsuoka. Fine craftsmanship all around, built with quality woods and have a tendency to get better with age, laminated or not. As for steal strings, I've only played one to be honest, but this Martin 'lawsuit' was a work of art. Thank you.
Small guitar amps, contrary to popular belief, have the ability to produce a very powerful sound. You don’t need a whole lot of surface area to have an impressive sound, as so many chihuahuas have proven by keeping up their owners nights on end with their barking. The small amplifiers, the best of them, have sound comparable to the sounds of the larger amplifiers. This has been proven many a time, especially by the band called Annihilator. The guitar player for the band has a very specific set up for himself, with a relatively small amp being one of the main parts of the set up. While his is not as small as some of the ones here, it just goes to show that a live performance does not need a large amp for good quality sound.
Eric Clapton: select alder body with a special soft V-shaped maple neck/fretboard, 22 vintage-style frets, three Vintage Noiseless pickups, 25dB active mid-boost circuit and a “blocked” original vintage synchronized tremolo. Available in olympic white, pewter, candy green, torino red (Artist Series), Antigua burst, gold leaf, EC grey, daphne blue, graffiti canvas, mercedes blue, black and midnight blue (Custom Artist), as well in olympic white, torino red and pewter with a “Thinskin” nitrocellulose lacquer finish (Custom Thinskin Nitro).
1) The tuning keys (machine heads) are as bad as it gets and if you're planning on keeping this guitar for a while and making it really workable plan on changing them ASAP and throwing the others away as far as you can throw them - Shame on you Yamaha, you could have at least used some half decent tuners!! These are an insult to your good name. So I replaced mine with Grover Sta-Tite V97-18NA (with brass colored gear) which are the best tuners "for the money" ($40) for any guitar especially for this one. However, be aware that you will also need to replace the Yamaha bushings because the I.D. is too small for the Grover post and, unfortunately,the Grover bushing O.D. is too small for the holes in the Yamaha headstock. The correct bushing that will allow an easy proper fit of the Grover tuning pegs to the Yamaha APXT2 is Kluson MBG65N or B bushings (Google it). If you elect to do this instead of letting your friendly Luthier do it, be advised that when you knock out the stock Yamaha bushings, since they're press fit it may have a tendency to split the wood on the top of the headstock. This one modification will bring this guitar from the level of a toy trying to be a serious contender to the best little guitar that money can buy.

In January 1986, Gibson changed ownership and began manufacturing a range of varied Les Paul models to suit different user needs. The 1980s also saw the end to several design characteristics that were classic to the Les Paul, including the volute and maple neck. However, due to consumer demand, the Gibson Les Paul guitar is available today in an array of choices, ranging from guitars equipped with modern digital electronics to classic re-issue models built to match the look and specifications of the guitar’s earliest production runs from 1952 to 1960.
I like...So fun...I am a big fan of the call of duty games - this one is a step above my son loves it and I do to but he is a lot better at it than I am - it is a challange for someone new to playstation...Well first starters died about ten times just beginning in campaign and yea even though I have it on regular mode it still is a challenge for me signs of I'm getting to old for this lol but there snippers on story mode when you concentrate it slows down all the enemies but give it a shot your self I like it
If your guitar is your personality, your amp is your voice. Together, they join forces to deliver your sound. Choosing the right amp ensures the audience hears each note, chord, bend, and trill-just the way you intended. From the compact convenience of a combo amp to the iconic stack to the bone-crushing fury of a wall of cabinets, your new amp is in stock and ready to ship at AMS. Read more
Alas, the DT-250 was more of a punctuation point than a sign of the times. Or maybe it was a sign of the times. The Phil Collen model (minus his name after ’85) and the flametop DT-350 made it through 1987, but this DT-250 lasted only from ’84 to ’85. Unfortunately for this heavy metal monster, pointy guitars were already on the way out when it appeared, about to be eclipsed by the Superstrat craze that would dominate the rest of the ’80s. While these redboards do not really qualify for rarebird status, they’re not all that common. Over the course of their production, only 1,432 were built for worldwide distribution.
Featuring a tremolo tailpiece, the player is guitarist is guarantee weeks of sustain. In terms of playability, the Jackson JS22 features a rosewood fingerboard that is ultra fast with breathtaking jumbo frets, giving the player a comfortable chording experience and high speed runs with little or no effort. The basswood body features an arched top armed with dangerous looks to compliment its incredible sound, an ideal choice for you.
Replace components. From plugging in and unplugging my guitar so much, the stock input jack lost its grab. So I had an extra Radioshack one lying around, and I soldered it in. Now all my cords are held tight. I also had a problem(common with Teles as I understand it) with my input jack "cup" coming out with wires and all. Once you take a look at how it's held in there, it's an easy fix.
Today we are going to show you some of the best effects pedals from this category, which you can get right now. We have chosen a variety of flavors as well as price ranges, thus making sure that anyone can have access to a good reverb no matter what. More importantly, we want to use this opportunity to familiarize you with reverb as a guitar effect.
The best guitarists of all time, voted on and ranked by many music fans, with photos and other info. With help from the wisdom of the crowd, you'll find a comprehensive ranking of the greatest guitar players in history. All the top guitarists are on this list - monster guitar heroes from rock, metal, blues, and alternative music. Are you on Team Eddie or Team Jimi? How about both!
The Headload may be the ultimate tool for gigging electric guitarists. It has the same features as the JDX 48, but allows the player to adjust the phase of their signal to be matched with a microphone and comes with equalization controls to further sculpt the sound of their direct signal. Most importantly, the Headload is a “load-box”, meaning that it can absorb the energy of the amp’s head and produce a lower volume through the amp’s speakers. This is crucial, since most guitarists only like the sound of their amp when it is driven hard at high volumes. Unfortunately, amps being pushed to their full volume is not as enjoyable for the audience. The Headload also allows guitarists to play through their favorite sounding amp heads without even needing guitar cabs!
"Mangoré, por Amor al Arte" is the title of the 2015 movie, the real life story of Agustín Barrios, an influential and important composer and classical guitarist from Paraguay. Born in Paraguay in 1885 talented Agustín was persuaded in his young adult age to move to Buenos Aires, the cultural hub of South America. In Argentina he began an affair with the beautiful Isabel but,...
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To cut to the chase, we can say that a changing magnetic field generates or "induces" electricity. It's also true that a changing electric field generates magnetism. If you feed electricity through a coil of wire, you generate a magnetic field around it. That's how you can make a magnet controlled by electricity—better known as an electromagnet. Electricity and magnetism are really two different aspects of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism.
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Otherwise, while the manufacturer is considerably shy when releasing specs regarding this product, customer reviews can give us a good idea of how well it performs under real-life circumstances. In brief, it performs well, particularly so for country music and slow rock, especially when paired with a couple more 12” speakers on top of the ones that are already integrated into its chassis.    
If you're anything like me, you started out with a basic beginner's guitar, and over time you realized that you were ready for something better. I had a Squier Telecaster(standard series) and I was ready for a change. I was set on a Les Paul of some sort, possibly a used LP Standard. I read tons of reviews, then I started reading some of the Epi Les Pauls(the nicer ones, $400-500).
The conservative way to tell if a Martin is built for steel strings is the bridge. If it's a style 18 or higher and has a belly bridge (and does not have 'banjo' tuners like early OM models), it's pretty much built for steel strings (can't use this indicator on style 17 and lower as these models never used a belly brige until the 1950s). Why? Since Martin didn't implement the belly bridge until late 1929, it's a very conservative indicator that the guitar is built for steel. The belly bridge was the last thing they did to make steel strings usable on their guitars (though certainly many models with rectangle bridges can handle steel strings too.) They started to implement the belly bridge in 1929, and all style 18 models and higher had the belly bridge by 1930. Therefore using the belly bridge as a steel string indicator is a very safe idea (assuming the bridge is original and it's not an OM). Now can steel strings be used on pre-1930 models with a pyramid or rectangle bridge? Maybe, but it's just not as definative and caution should be heeded ("silk and steel" strings would be a good and safe compromise). Note early OM models with banjo style tuners generally should be strung up 'lightly'.
I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
The music industry is one that has really felt the effects of the digitalization of the world over the last few decades. In the 1970s and '80s, recording, composing and production work would have been done manually with a complicated series of hardware mixers, synths, sequencers and other devices. Today, all you have to do is plug into a computer running the music software that's relevant to the task. These programs and tools don't only make it possible for you to work faster; you can also get started sooner, since a large selection of software packages are available to download directly. You won't need to wait for shipping: just download and start working.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?
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