It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.
Like many others, Reinhold Bogner (born in Ulm, Germany, like the EL84 tube!) started his career with Fender mods. He founded his company in 1989 in Los Angeles and succeeded in earning a reputation among guitar amp manufacturers. His brand became famous with models like the Ecstasy 100A and 100B, where "A" stands for American (with 6L6 tubes) and "B" for British (with EL34 tubes). Among its famous users, you'll find Steve Stevens and Steve Vai (apparently your name must be Steve to be Bogner's friend).
This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
Numerous classic guitars made by the likes of Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, and Guild are worth thousands, sometimes tens of thousands; a little expensive for the average player, and often these are the preserve of investors and collectors. Early versions of the Gibson Les Paul, SG and Flying V guitars, or the Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster. But there are still very many affordable, great sounding, and exciting to play vintage guitars that offer something simply not available in a new guitar. A well-built vintage instrument, although expensive can actually be superb value for money in comparison to some of the new guitars available at that price.
With guitar companies continually coming up with new models or refreshed versions of their bestsellers, guitar players can feel both excited and overwhelmed to try out and buy the latest shredders and jazz boxes. Will these really be better than their vintage archtop or not? Are the new humbuckers any good? Will the new version of an old favorite be a good buy? – And the list goes on.
Nylon strings are essential for any classical instrument, and if you are planning to play classical music or Latin styles such as flamenco, a nylon string guitar is the way to go. Steel strings are more appropriate for rock, pop, blues, and pretty much everything else that doesn’t fall under the classic umbrella. You can check out our article on the best classical guitars for beginners.
Orville Gibson founded the company in Michigan and stayed a family business until the early 50's. Ted Mcarty ran the company from 1951 or so, and is the "father" of most successful Gibson electric guitars, the Les Paul, the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335 and so on.. In the late 60's Gibson was bought by the Norlin Corp, who mainly were known for making refrigerators. Most feel Gibson adopted a quanity over quality approach to guitar making during this period and 1970's to 1980's Gibson electrics are considered less desireable by most guitar collectors, and considered outright junk by many others.. Cosmetic changes to Gibson models during that period apparently reflect the poor taste of the buying public during that era... and while a 1974 Gibson SG may look ugly compared to the classic 1961 or 1968 models, please remember this was the era of ployester liesure suits and Chrysler Cordobas.. In 1986 Gibson was bought by a group who understood guitar making, and is a privately held company to this day. Gibson quality has appeared to improve steadily from 1987 to present day, but it seems to be unanimous that todays models do not approach the craftsmanship of the late 1950's when Gibson apparently peaked.

The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.

I have a hunch its a cheapo guitar and probably not worth a neck reset. Can't tell if it has a bolt on neck. my other guitars all have more warped soundboards though. The saddle is sort of cradled in wood by the bridge, the angle could be better, but I'm surprised there is any angle considering the saddle only pops out like a millimeter. The bridge curves down towards the pins to provide the angle. It probably has been set up in the past by someone who wanted an acoustic guitar to play like an electric, then it got reversed it later by way of the truss rod.
No information beyond this debut is available. It’s also probable the Merson “Tempo” name was applied to other acoustic guitars. Merson instruments from this period do not appear to have been widely distributed, so they are probably a regional phenomenon, although they did get notice in The Music Trades, a major trade publication. Other instruments distributed by Merson in 1948 included Harmony, Kamico, Favilla, Temp and Supro electric guitars and stringed instruments; Covella, Fontanella and Galanti accordions; Tempo Bandmaster, Merson, Merson Ultratone, and Rudy Muck brass instruments; and Kohlert Thibouville, Freres, Penzel-Mueller, Barklee and Merson woodwinds.
Founded in 1976, Schecter Guitar Research started out by producing replacement parts for existing guitars of the era. They then took the production a step further by custom building guitars, and have grown steadily ever since. Today, Schecter is known for their extensive line of mass produced electric guitars, and their instruments are well received in the rock, punk and metal circles.

On my guitar, the bridge plate is held on by five screws. Three on the back of the plate, two towards the neck on the front. You may need to remove the intonation block things.One or all. If you decide to take any off, use your calipers and measure from the front of them to the back of the bridge plate, so that you don't lose your intonation. Mark each saddle like in the picture.
When buying any instrument don't buy cheap. I've been playing 5 string for 36 yrs. The most important thing in a 5 string is the tone ring with a resonator. many good brands on banjo's. I have a alverez denver belle flat top tone ring, white eagle arch top tone ring but my favorite is a honher Artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a Good acustic guitar my favorite is a martin D-35 ease of play and tone are awesome. The tone is what you are after.
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
The assets of Kay/Valco were auctioned off in 1969. The upright bass and cello lines were sold to Engelhardt-Link, a new company formed by a previous Valco member, which has continued production (see #Kay basses for details). The Kay name (and some of its trademarks, such as Knox[citation needed]) were acquired by Teisco importer, Weiss Musical Instruments[2] (W.M.I., Sol Weindling and Barry Hornstein), who put the Kay name on the Teisco products beginning in 1973, and continued on through the 1970s.[11][12]
Mr Swike appears to know what he is talking about, and has undertaken a body of work that is unfortunately for sale while only being 70% complete. Some of the instructions are incomplete (like showing what North polarity looks like on Stew-Macs polarity tester, but not South), and at least one (the Varistor mod) wildly inadvisable. Why not get the book done, checked out by objective professional parties, and then released as a complete reference book?
i play a squire jazz bass, it has always sounded good and played very good. wanted to " jazz it up" a bit so i was searching for new pickups and control pots and stumbled on your site.. first thing i thought was oh wow, how freaking cool is that.. after ALOT of searching, i purchased the obsidian wire control pots for a jazz bass as well as the control plate since mine looked pretty worn.. i also got the v-mod pickups from fender. install was just as smooth as advertised, especially since i had never even cracked open a bass before, ever.. done in less than 30 minutes ( as far as the wiring ) the pickguard had to be removed and cut to fit, and the old knobs didn't fit ( totally expected ) it is now done and i cannot believe the difference in tone and clarity.... all i can say is your products are innovative and really much more than i expected... thank you..." - Bob Vintage Jazz Bass® Wiring

Chords are the heart and soul of playing guitar. Many guitar players seldom do anything else, other than strumming chords. The chord is the basic building block of guitar music. A chord is simply a combination of two of more notes played simultaneously. Different combinations give you different chords. There are different classes of chords, such as Major Chords, Minor Chords, Triads, Suspended Chords, Diminished Chords, etc...

By 2001, Michael Kelly Guitars added its first acoustic guitars and electric guitars. These collections have evolved and are now sold around the world. To this day, Michael Kelly remains focused on our vision statement to be "Built On Sound" and each time we put the cherry on top by giving the musician a bold look. We are proud that we do not offer the cookie cutter boring guitars that are readily available from so many brands. We know there are players that prefer classic simplicity and we very much respect that. However, Michael Kelly will continue to be the brand of choice for those that prefer something more boutique and unique.


This is the first defined price range that is worth talking about. Here's where you run into some pretty decent guitars that pack a lot more value for being just beyond the beginner's tier. Even so, there are also a lot of guitars here which simply aren't worth the price, no matter how good the marketing. We've tossed those out the window and are only sharing the two models we know deliver the goods.
This specific review is for the full-size guitar, which is 40”, so if you read all the reviews on Amazon, many of them are for the ½ and ¾ size. If you’re an adult with smaller hands, purchasing the smaller sizes may be a better bet than trying to wrestle with a full-size instrument. Size doesn’t necessarily have to do with this guitar model’s tone, which many reviewers say is quite good for the price.
* The guitar has a mahogany neck, but a basswood body. Do not let anyone tell you this is a bad thing. Basswood is a completely acceptable wood for musical instruments. It is not worse or better than mahogany or maple. It is just different. Once again, the differences involved will probably be irrelevant when added into all the other things that players do with amps, strings and pedals to create tone and sound from an electric guitar.
Vengeance and Gates’ ascent to the top of the metal guitar heap did not always seem inevitable. Avenged Sevenfold began life as a somewhat traditional Orange County–style metalcore act, as evidenced on their 2001 debut, Sounding the Seventh Trumpet, for which Vengeance served as the primary guitarist. But the band has been reinventing and refining its sound ever since. By A7X’s third effort, 2005’s City of Evil, they had morphed into a swaggering, thrashy unit with an adventurous edge that showed itself in everything from the grand, instrumentally dense songs to the band’s theatrical image.

A lot of people begin with a nylon string acoustic, often called a classical guitar. They’re reasonably priced at beginners level (don’t go too cheap), the design has a wide fret board to accommodate your inexperienced fingers and the nylon strings are easier on your aching fingertips. You have to agree, they can sound kind of dull unless that dream of yours is of becoming a famous, classical guitarist like John Williams — certainly not a bad thing. So nylon string acoustics are great to learn with, but there’s a risk you’ll want something more pretty quickly.
The Air Norton started out simply to be the Airbucker version of the Norton. DiMarzio thought it would make a distinctive-sounding bridge pickup with high-gain amps, but they soon discovered that it's a radically neat neck pickup, too. The tone is deep and warm, but not muddy. It's hot, but not distorted. It's even got cool harmonics, which are really unusual for a neck humbucker. The patented Air Norton magnetic structure reduces string-pull, so sustain is improved; and pick attack and dynamics are tremendously controllable and expressive. Combine the Air Norton with The Tone Zone in the bridge position for a perfect blend of power and tone.

The obvious first step is too loosen the truss rod, however, after inspection I learn the truss rod is already completely loose. In order to straighten the neck we opt for a heavier gauge string which places more tension on the neck, pulling it straight. The heavier gauge is necessary to render the neck flat, without it string buzz is overwhelming.
On this clip you can hear more things. First of all, the size is defined by the separate recordings of the original riff and the delayed riff, thanks to some reamping! This allowed me to spread them across the stereo field so the sound develops across the horizontal axis, rather than the depth. I was also able to adjust the delay time so that it isn't behind the beat. Finally, I decreased the feedback level and I had always control over the dry/wet balance via the volume fader of the delayed signal track. Isn't that nice? And the cherry on the cake is that with this sort of manipulation you have much more flexibility! Listen to this example:
For many people who pick up the guitar for the first time, learning scales is often not at the top of their priority list. This is normal and as a beginner guitarist, there is other more important foundation knowledge that should first be acquired. However, at the point when you start learning scales as a guitarist is when you know you’re starting to get serious about playing. Learning guitar scales is a fantastic way to practice your technique and theory. Scales also come in handy for a variety of purposes such as: Writing music Improvising/jamming with others Understanding how music
Schecter's C-6 Plus belongs to their basic line of guitars. It features their own Super Strat body shape which is finished with a glossy charcoal burst finish. The tonewood of choice for this build is basswood, an inexpensively sourced wood, which is what allows such a nice guitar to be priced at this range. There are some aspects of basswood which work great with guitars designed for heavier genres, and on top of that, it is light weight. Don't take this for granted since it'll be hanging on your shoulders and back for long periods of time.
If you’re a player performing live or in a studio, all of this is just the opening pre-credits sequence to your signal then being captured via a microphone, which then sends current through another cable to a mixing board, which then has its own preamplification, equalization and filtering, which either goes to the power amplifiers of a public address system or to some kind of recording device, which then involves…aw, I’m getting tired, and I think we’re getting the point: how can anyone call *any* of this “natural”? Does *any* of this occur in nature? Does any of this sound like we’re carving a flute from driftwood or clapping a couple empty coconut shells together?
So here we are at the end of our journey (well, probably not yours). Maybe you have found the best guitar practice amplifier from this list and cannot wait to buy it or maybe you still want to have your options. BUT my point is that starting with an amplifier for practice is a great idea. Not only will the amp serve a very particular purpose it was made for but you will also save quite a lot of money. For instance, most amplifiers under $100 are great for practice so you can check out our list of the best cheap amplifiers for beginners. And while I know a lot of people don’t like the idea of “cheap” being in the same sentence as their instrument or equipment, the thing is cheaper does not necessarily means bad. Is a $100 amp going to win over an amplifier in the best amplifiers $1000 list? Probably not, but as I already mention the best “objective” amplifier (or what brands and people deem to be the best at the moment) is not always a good option for everyone. That is especially a case with someone who is just starting off their journey into the world of music, amps, guitars and everything of that sort.
Fusion players such as John McLaughlin adopted the fluid, powerful sound of rock guitarists such as Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. McLaughlin was a master innovator, incorporating hard jazz with the new sounds of Clapton, Hendrix, Beck and others. McLaughlin later formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra, an historically important fusion band that played to sold out venues in the early 1970s and as a result, produced an endless progeny of fusion guitarist. Guitarists such as Pat Martino, Al Di Meola, Larry Coryell, John Abercrombie, John Scofield and Mike Stern (the latter two both alumni of the Miles Davis band) fashioned a new language for the guitar which introduced jazz to a new generation of fans. Like the rock-blues icons that preceded them, fusion guitarists usually played their solid body instruments through stadium rock-style amplification, and signal processing "effects" such as simulated distortion, wah-wah, octave splitters, compression, and flange pedals. They also simply turned up to full volume in order to create natural overdrive such as the blues rock players.
Speaking of overdrive and distortion, I come from the slightly less-is-more school. I recently heard Eddie Van Halen say he likes to crank things until they’re ready to explode, and then backs them down just a hair. I dig that way of thinking, and it applies whether you get your distortion from a pedal, a cranked NMV (non-master-volume) amp, or an amp with a more modern preamp-gain circuit.

Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).

A very, and in my opinion (from experience), the most difficult technique to learn and one of the most versatile. From simple single string transitions (a term I use to describe it I don't know the actual term) and used in jazz to quick shredding in rock. Learning this skill was not only a task, but helped me more fully understand a lot of musical theory.


But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
"The Choice of Professional and Student Musicians Everywhere" This eight page catalogue was included as an insert in the 1963 annual "school music" issue of Downbeat magazine (September 1963). As well as keyboards and pedal steels, this catalog contains seven guitars, three basses and ten amplifiers - from student guitars such as the Musicmaster and Duotone to professional models like the new Jaguar.
A more successful early electric was the Ro-Pat-In "Frying Pan" guitar. This was played lap-steel style, and was the earliest I know of that uses something close to the magnetic pickups as they exist in modern guitars. This was conceptualized by George Beauchamp in 1931... he played Hawaiian style, thus the lap steel design. He met Adolph Rickenbacker and together the two worked out the details of the pickup system, and put this into production in 1932... the company name was eventually changed to "Rickenbacher".
My cousin Mike had a red Lotus LP Custom copy that his mom got for him, it was a bolt-on one, looked just about like the one you have in your pic. It played pretty nice, but the tuners and pickups sucked. We added a set of Grovers and a pair of (then popular) DiMarzio super 2 pickups. Mike used this Lotus guitar for 3 or 4 years until he got a Guild s-100. He sold the Lotus for 125.00 after taking off the DiMarzios and Grovers. He gave me those parts and I installed them on a stripped and mutilated 71 SG Standard that I painted with auto enamel (a nice Candy red). I later sold the SG to Mike. The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
That is, if the tone caps in parallel filtered from within th 1k-2k and 3k-5k frequency band with the pot determining how much of those ranges are filtered off, then moving the 2nd cap parallel to the pot should shift the 2k window of the bigger cap so it would be filtering less of the 3-5k at one end of it’s sweep, and more of the 1k-3k filtered at the other end of it’s sweep. (my frequency selection and math here are conceptual only, and not to be taken as accurate measurements).

Although most of us who participated in this article have years of experience with guitar amps, none of us was particularly familiar with all the latest beginner models. There are few reliable professional reviews of beginner amps, but I sorted through what we found, searched through music stores and websites, and sampled numerous models at the recent National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles. This experience gave me a good idea of what’s available now.
The semi hollow construction with sapele top and mahogany back body provide a warm tone that resonates nicely, especially when coupled with the Infinity R Humbuckers. The comfortable medium sized frets make the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar a great option for the jazz and blues players out there and the high-quality hardware such as ART-ST bridge and tailpiece are reliable and hard wearing.
"Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired
I'm actually the designer of this devices and I myself had bought all the software in Apple. I'm really a big fan of JamUp, Bias, and Ampkit. Personally I like all the functions provided by JamUp such as JAM, LOOP, 8-track recording as well as the guitar effects and amps. But the Amps in Bias is a litte more juicy than in JamUp. A good way is using Bias amps in JamUp which just make a good combination of the two software. They can be used in that way :)
The Omen-6 is a stripped down take on the Hellraiser, with the same sleek double cutaway design and HH (dual humbucker) configuration, but at a more affordable price point. But what's good about it is how Schecter is able to maintain the premium look and attention to detail at this lower price point, including the carved top design. While the name again implies something evil, this guitar is quite good for the price.

Clearly, when playing live rather than recording, the room you are in will create its own reverb. Live performance spaces are often prepared with a combination of acoustically absorbent and reflective materials to achieve the desired balance. Sometimes this means hi-tech purpose made fittings made of special materials. Often it's just judicious arrangement of curtains and rugs, combined with bare walls.
From guitar faces to the different kinds of axes, here is the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Squeezing the talent that’s blessed our ears for all these years into a list of 10 is just as difficult as choosing which limbs to lose or keep. The list is by no means definitive, but it’s an accurate representation for the uniqueness of the music the guitarist has made. In short, these famous guitar players have played the melodies that have made grown men cry, and probably gave you a taste of how your guitar face would look like pretending to play that solo. Of course many great guitarists may not have made this top 10 list, but feel free to add your own favorites in the comments.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
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