The simplest guitar amplifiers, such as some vintage amps and modern practice amps, have only a single volume control. Most have two volume controls: a first volume control called "preamplifier" or "gain" and a master volume control. The preamp or gain control works differently on different guitar amp designs. On an amp designed for acoustic guitar, turning up the preamp knob pre-amplifies the signal—but even at its maximum setting, the preamp control is unlikely to produce much overdrive. However, with amps designed for electric guitarists playing blues, hard rock and heavy metal music, turning up the preamp or gain knob usually produces overdrive distortion. Some electric guitar amps have three controls in the volume section: pre-amplifier, distortion and master control. Turning up the preamp and distortion knobs in varying combinations can create a range of overdrive tones, from a gentle, warm growling overdrive suitable for a traditional blues show or a rockabilly band to the extreme distortion used in hardcore punk and death metal. On some electric guitar amps, the "gain" knob is equivalent to the distortion control on a distortion pedal, and similarly may have a side-effect of changing the proportion of bass and treble sent to the next stage.
Also in 1952, Kay introduced the matching K-162 "Electronic" Bass, which was the first commercially available thinline-hollowbody electric bass guitar, and the second production electric bass guitar after the Fender Precision Bass debuted in 1951. Due to the use of K-162 by a bassist of Howlin' Wolf, Andrew "Blueblood" McMahon, it is commonly known as the "Howlin Wolf" bass. These instruments[clarification needed] are believed to be the first semi-hollow electrics[citation needed] (i.e., thinline-hollowbody electric with solid center-block), predating the Gibson ES-335 by six years. Their unique design[clarification needed] featured a flat top with no f-holes, a free-floating arched back, and two braces running along the top. The result was a semi-acoustic instrument that was feedback-resistant while retaining natural acoustic resonances. In 1954, Kay added the K-160 bass to its catalog with baritone tuning, according to the catalog,[citation needed] "tuned like the first four guitar strings but one octave lower." Structurally this bass was basically same as K-162 bass, except for the higher pitched tuning and the addition of a white pickguard.

It can be tough to know where to start when you’re looking at as many options as there are in the world of effects pedals. In fact, your first pedal may not even be a pedal at all – many amplifiers have built-in effects sections so you can get your introduction without having to attach an external stompbox. But if you have a more straightforward amp, or if you’re ready to try effects units that go beyond its built-in capabilities, there are some great varieties for novice users. And don’t forget that you can always look up the preferred pedals of your favorite guitar hero to inspire your own collection.
Korg SDD3000 Preamp Clone Great project! Since I finished it, it become one of my always on pedal! With a extremely subtle compression... Eclipse Device-2 DOPAMINE OVERDRIVE based on the Klon Centaur circuit. Materials: 01. Xicon 1% metal film resistors. 02. Kemet 5% MLCC (C0G) 03. WIMA Box Film... Refractor Black Octopus Pedalworx More build reports
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The Hughes & Kettner Tube Meister 36 is a distinct looking tube amplifier head that's packed with features. For something that's compact, this amp can do quite a lot of what bigger amps can in terms of functionality, including having three channels that let you switch between clean, crunch and lead and a full set of complementary controls to tweak each channel to your liking. Another interesting feature of this amp is its TSC (Tube Safety Control), which automatically keeps the tube in bias and monitors them to extend their use. Finally, this amp head comes with a built-in Red box DI, so you can plug the amp head straight to any PA system or recording console without any problem. The people also installed a power attenuator into the amp, which lets you lower the rating to just 1 Watt for quiet practice. Wrapping up its features is the built-in reverb, which compliments the amp instead of distracting users.
In terms of usage, it is quite similar to the mini Strat guitar we discussed earlier. It is a great choice for someone who just wants a cheap electric guitar for practice or someone who is an absolute beginner. Also, it is one of the best choices for five to fifteen years old kids wanting to learn guitar. It comes with small ¾ sized bodies and a 22.75inch of scale length. It has a c shaped fine maple neck with its 20fret fingerboard. 

Here's a fresh one from the JVG Vault... vintage tone much like an old classic Martin Acoustic has some wear and has the "feel" just feels great in your hands and plays & sounds wonderful. Good volume and rich sounding lows and very nice.. condition rated at a solid 8.5 / 10 or better no cracks no repairs and plays nicely with original nut & saddle still in place , optional change nut & saddle & set up add $80.00. Please SEE MORE FULL SCREEN HIGH RES PICTURES HERE: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sYamahaFG140RedLableLikeFG180?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHmw573kYa6HA#slideshow/5634523767539294722.


The Fretted Synth website has mysteriously disappeared (the likes of Native Instruments not happy that they’re giving away so much goodness for free??), so we’re linking to the Rekkerd page that still seems to host the plugins. FreeAmp3 really shouldn’t be free: it features masses of sound-shaping potential and the user interface looks great. If you just want one (free) VST guitar plugin, get this.
On May 1, 2018, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection,[7] and announced a restructuring deal to return to profitability by closing down unprofitable consumer electronics divisions such as Gibson Innovations.[8][9] (See section #Bankruptcy) Upon emergence from bankruptcy protection on November 1, 2018, KKR & Co. Inc. will be the majority owner of the company with the controlling interest.
Now that we mentioned some of the exotics, it’s time to go back to the roots. Epiphone Les Paul Standard is as old school as it gets. Legendary LP body style that brings a no-nonsense combo of hardware has always been the way to go. I actually have one of these, and after years of playing it keeps surprising me. I’d say it easily punches way above its price range.
^ “Pete Townshend: On Guitar-Smashing Regrets, Stylistic Evolution, and Becoming a Gear Aficionado”. “It’s interesting to think that the Marshall sound I helped Jim and his guys develop was built around the very low output and thin, surfy sound of the Rick. The sound I wanted was Steve Cropper, but very loud. The early Marshall with a Rick gave me that. The semi-acoustic body and a speaker stack feeding right into the guitar was what allowed me to refine tuneful feedback.”
Fender is an American company founded by Clarence Leonidas Fender in the year 1946. The company headquarter is located in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. The company provides a wide range of guitars to customers at an attractive price range. The company is best manufacturer of amplifiers and stringed instruments and has become the leading guitar brand in India too. - Musical-instruments-Online
Hi Dan! Thanks for the kind words! As somewhat of a newbie, you may find a semi-hollow-body guitar more flexible and versatile, especially if you are still finding trying to figure out what genre you are going to focus on. If you are set on the hollow-body go for, but ,if you are on the fence, the versatility of the guitar is something to consider. Those are my thoughts. Good luck!
History aside, modern-day Ibanez guitars are amazing instruments. They offer a very distinctive value and bang for your buck that is simply hard to match by other manufacturers. Ibanez has become huge in shred (fast lead playing) guitar and metal circles. High profile virtuosos like Joe Satriani, Steve Vai and Paul Gilbert have been greatly responsible for securing Ibanez’s place in super-fast, incredibly technical, shred guitar playing. Not to mention that Ibanez electric guitars simply feel “easy” to play, fast and comfortable. As far as ergonomics and playability, Ibanez guitars are hard to beat. Plus, you can get some very good inexpensive models too. If I where going to call a brand, “the Toyota of the guitar industry,” it would be Ibanez.
Five string guitars are common in Brazil, where they are known as guitarra baiana and are typically tuned in 5ths. Schecter Guitar Research produced a production model 5 string guitar called the Celloblaster in 1998.[43] A five-string tuning may be necessary in a pinch when a string breaks on a standard six-string (usually the high E) and no replacement is immediately available.
First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful.  My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do.  Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff.  Can't rave enough!  Definitely found my guitar store for life!  Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
Heritage Guitars, founded in 1985 by four long-time Gibson employees when Gibson relocated to Nashville, continues to build guitars in the original factory at 225 Parsons Street inKalamazoo, Michigan. Many of their models evoke memories of Gibson’s late-1950s/early-1960s “golden years.” The H-150 and H-157 are reminiscent of the original Les Paul and Les Paul Custom, while the H-535 is a modern version of the Gibson ES-335.
As far as reliability goes, a guitar is actually quite simple to make reliable. Build, sound quality and playability are much more important than reliability per se, simply because if the guitar is at least half-decently made it usually turns out to be quite dependable. The biggest reliability issue would be a guitar that cannot stay in tune very long. This is something that often happens in regards to the build and material quality of acoustic guitars, but with electrics it’s something that can usually be corrected by swapping out the tuning machines to locking ones, or at least better-performing ones as well as setting the intonation and neck relief correctly.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽
Guild began in New York in 1953 but eventually moved to Rhode Island. Fender purchased Guild in 1995. Fender seemed only interested in Guild as a brand of acoustic guitars. The classic Guild electric guitars were not being made at first. But then some of the classic electric models were re-introduced. Cordoba Music Group (makers of classical guitars) purchased Guild and sells both electric and acoustic models based on the old designs.

This thing is awesome! For its price you can't find any other processor that can plug into your computer and easily navigate the pedals. To connect to your computer or laptop you will need a standard printer cable (I would pick up one of the amazon basic cables for cheap.) I bought a 10 foot one which is plenty to run from the pedal to my music stand. Also once you are connected to your laptop via the USBcable, all sounds from your laptop will run through your amp/headphones. That confused me the first time when my computer speakers sounded better, haha. If you are curious, It comes with a power supply.
Simon Stockhausen began his stellar musical career at the age of five. His multi-faceted and wide-ranging oeuvre has since embraced all manner of projects and styles, including jazz and improvisational collaborations, countless compositions for ensembles and chamber groups as well as work for major European theatre companies and orchestras including the Hamburg and Berlin Philharmonic Orchestras. In 2009 he further extended the range of his musical endeavors with the creation of a sound design company through which he produces sounds, patches and libraries for software synths and plug-ins, serving sound designers, musicians and post production professionals.

Kill Switch A kill switch abruptly stops the sound while it is active and lets the sound play again whilst not active. On guitars with a pickup and pots configuration like that of a typical Les Paul this can be achieved by turning the volume for one pickup off and playing with the pickup selector in the middle position. Whilst holding a note, the player can rapidly switch between middle pickup and the silenced pickup giving a stuttering effect. Do this at your own risk because rapidly switching pickups will inevitably wear your pickup selector. This effect is sometimes implemented by a pedal which is only active while it is pressed down (unlike most pedals which are one click on/one click off). Some people will also modify their guitars to add a dedicated killswitch.

As you saw in the video, I’ve gone through the Learn and Master Guitar Setup course, and all in all, I think there is a lot of great content in there. Greg Voros teaches you the basics of guitar setup and maintenance, and he does it in a slow and detailed fashion so that even if you’re following along at home you should have no problem learning his guitar setup techniques. Keep reading for more information on the course.
So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.
While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
“It had ‘Walking the Dog,’ ‘Route 66,’ and others on it,” Millard says. “That has tone. The reason it has tone is that it was made in the worst damn studio possible. Everyone who worked there said this was a shithole. There was no sound separation, they used lousy mics, they never cleaned it. Andrew Loog Oldham, who was the manager at that point, said that was the key to the sound.”
One of my friend's first "good" guitars was a Lotus LP copy with a set neck. Your typical heavy brown 70s with a plain top LP copy but it had binding like a custom and real inlays. I helped him put dimarzios in it and we set it up. It was a pretty good guitar except for the color. His mother bought it new, and it was a medium priced guitar back then (not cheap really, it was $400 or so in the 70s).
Second, you might be wondering if it’s just better to get a cinematic VST or one that takes from a range of instruments. Fractured does have cymbals and bass kicks but, of course, the guitar creates these and this gives them a lot of offbeat character. You could easily get a more rich and deep bass kick with a drum VST, but then you lose that quirkiness that propels and highlights Fractured.  
The 700-series models were solid-body instruments while the 800-series models were hollow bodied. This is a small enough product range to make a nice little collection and the guitars are made well enough to be used. (Many of the early Japanese guitars were cheap and simply unplayable right out of the box. I know... I had one.) However interest in them seems to be rising and thus, prices are following along.
The next most important review criteria for any electric guitar, is its sound. Please allow me to be very clear here that this guitar is mostly suited for heavy rock tones, aggressive higher leads and chugging, crazy distortions. If you are more interested in a crisp, jazzy tone, maybe you should opt for a beginner’s Stratocaster electric guitar like Squier by Fender, instead. Having said that, this instrument sounds great in its genre, and also remains in tune for long periods, so you don’t have to worry about manually tuning it. Yes, the string tension is higher as compared to a 24.75” Stratocaster or XX Les Paul, but in a way this challenges electric guitar novices to acquire greater mastery over their notes!
Paul Kossoff, of Free and Back Street Crawler, favoured a 1959 Les Paul Standard. In 2011-12, Gibson’s Custom Shop made a reproduction of Kossoff’s Standard, featuring a so-called “green-lemon” flametop, two-piece carved maple top, mahogany body and neck, Custom Bucker humbucking pickups and kidney-bean shaped Grover tuners similar to those Kossoff had installed on the instrument. 100 Kossoff models were made to resemble the guitar at the time of Kossoff’s death in 1976, with another 250 in a VOS finish.
Aimee, by Pure Prairie League, Love,Me by Collin Ray, Where have you been, Kathy Matea, Landslide, Fleetwood Mac, The Reach, Dan Fogelburg, The Seven Bridges Road, The Eagles, Longer, Dan Fogelburg, Fire and Rain, James Taylor, Your The Lucky One, Allison Krause & Union Station, Time in a bottle, Jim Croce, Whenever You Come Around, Vince Gill, Man of Constant Sorrow, (as performed by Union Station),
In the early Sixties, Blackmore did sessions with legendary British producer Joe Meek and apprenticed with U.K. session ace (and Jimmy Page mentor) Big Jim Sullivan. Blackmore founded Deep Purple in the late Sixties and led the group through various incarnations. He also spearheaded metal icons Rainbow with the late Ronnie James Dio and has more recently played a role in Blackmore’s Night with his wife Candice Night.
We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!

The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.


The coolness in ’38, however, lay in two lap/amp combinations, the Supro 60 Electric Combination and the Portable Supro 70 Electric Combination. Both featured the little pearloid Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar tucked into an amp-in-case! The Supro 60 featured a rectangular case with an 8-tube amp and 4″ speaker. This amp had to be plugged in, but was definitely boss. The combo cost $60. The Portable Supro 70 combination featured the same amp but operated with batteries (“…available at any radio supply house”). Most folks are conversant with Nat Daniel’s amp-in-cases from the early ’60s, but the idea was actually developed a good 25 years earlier. Actually, Daniel may have invented the first amp-in-case in 1936, with the amps he made for the first Epiphone Electar C steel guitars. These apparently had an amp built into the case, however, they were quickly replaced with a separate Model C amplifier. There’s no evidence that the Supro was a copy of the earlier Epiphone, but the idea was clearly around at the time.
Every guitarist would love to have a place all to themselves to play their heart out, but the reality is that we can't all be so lucky. Family, neighbors and roommates are usually a factor, and they're not as likely as you are to appreciate that you finally nailed that tough passage at two o'clock in the morning. Here's another situation where headphone guitar amps come through for you: since you're the only one hearing it, you can focus on your sound completely. With a headphone amp, there's no more curfew on shredding.
I've been coming in since they opened, and it's been crazy cool to watch this little corner shop grow into a major Seattle contender. That's really saying something, as there are some really incredible locally-owned guitar shops in the Greater Seattle Area. As has been mentioned, the service is the selling point. The entire staff are very, very cool people who are perfectly happy to talk shop without trying to push you on a sale. There's a lot of regulars, and combined with the student roster, it definitely has it's own little built in community. Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop. Kyle, the tech, is an expert. The other guys all do good work as well. This is my go-to shop for basically everything guitar-shop related. And I'm very picky.

The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.


The above might sound like a trivial thing to mention, but achieving a loyal following of knowledgeable fans is not something that any brand can boast with. Judging by the rave reviews this product received it’s easy to understand why, and the 45 mm aperture drivers it operates with are proprietary to Audio-Technica, so you won’t get them anywhere else. Most headphones struggle with bass given their law diameter aperture, but the ATH-M50x renders sound accurately throughout the range.
• Vibrato: There are several types of vibrato — a/k/a tremolo or whammy bar — tailpieces. They debuted in the 1930s via inventor Doc Kaufman, who developed a vibrato unit that was mounted on a guitar’s body and had an arm that moved side to side. Today’s vibrato arms move up and down and are dominated by the top-mounted Bigsby style vibrato and various types of through-body vibrato tailpieces, ranging from the spring-tensioned arms found on many classic thin solid bodied guitar models to the dive-bombing units like the Kahler and Floyd Rose types favored by metal shredders. These also have fine-tuners for each string, to compensate for any detuning the use of the vibrato arm might produce. Gibson also offers a top-mounted Vibrola unit of its own design.
Since the early days of the electric guitar, blues musicians searched for different ways to overdrive their amplifier's signal. Of course, when rock'n'roll took off, the process of "distorting" a guitar tone became a lot easier thanks to new amp and pickup designs. Soon, musicians like Link Wray were making a name for themselves with the use of distortion. By the mid-60s, fuzz pedals were being used by teenage garage rockers around the world while performers like Dave Davies and Pete Townshend made distortion and overdrive a part of their signature sound. Today, distortion and overdrive effects pedals are a dime a dozen, and a quick glance at this section will make that obvious.
Ovation guitars are produced in the U.S. as well as in Korea and China. Those models in general have a wooden top. Recently Ovation significantly reduced the production of U.S. made Ovation models. From 2010 on better models (e.g., Legend, Elite, Custom Legend, Custom Elite) used to be available, both, made in the U.S. and made in Korea. Before that, the mentioned models were U.S. made. In recent years many U.S. made guitars could be identified by the LX in the product name (e.g., Legend 2077LX), whereas the Korean-made version of the same guitar had AX in its model name (e.g., Legend 2077AX). Again, this name-system has not been used throughout the whole guitar model range (e.g., Ovation 1617ALE). Nowadays only a few U.S. made models are being produced, mostly signature and limited edition models (e.g., Custom Legend 1769-ADII Al DiMeola). Production of the standard model range of Ovation guitars in the U.S. has been seized.[24]
Electri6ity has been around for a while now, but I think it's still the cat's meow of sampled guitar libraries because of how deeply sampled and deeply controllable it is. Its wealth of articulations will allow you to create stunningly realistic guitar tracks, but the trade-off is that there are a lot of keyswitches and keyswitch combos to learn at both ends of the keyboard, and it's a big library that costs $400. For that reason, it may be a little overwhelming to be a "go to" library, but if you have the ambition to learn and use it, your guitar tracks will have no competition.
Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.
One app I can recommend for playing these SoundFonts on smartphones or tablets is bs-16i from bismark.  Large SoundFount files like Nice-Keys-* listed at the top of this page have been tested and run perfectly on newer iPads with 3gb of Ram or more. For iPads with 2gb (Air2) it is best to limit the SoundFont size to around 600mb. For older devices try SoundFonts around 300mb.

The one-string guitar is also known as the Unitar. Although rare, the one-string guitar is sometimes heard, particularly in Delta blues, where improvised folk instruments were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Eddie "One String" Jones had some regional success.[citation needed] Mississippi blues musician Lonnie Pitchford played a similar, homemade instrument. In a more contemporary style, Little Willie Joe, the inventor of the Unitar, had a rhythm and blues instrumental hit in the 1950s with "Twitchy", recorded with the Rene Hall Orchestra.

Pickups and body styles are just scratching the surface when it comes to guitar features. No matter how overwhelming things may seem, though, if you’re only a novice or hobbyist there’s no need in fretting (get it?) over every single feature. Instead, look to the features we mentioned and go from there based on what type of music you want to play. If you’re a big blues and classic rock guy, powerful, full sound is necessary: you’ll likely want a semi-hollow or solid body guitar with humbuckers or P90s. Want to play old school country or folk? Check out hollow bodies. Are you a fan of alternative and punk? Consider a thin solid body with single coil pickups.


There are some guitarists who place the compressor last, though, to boost their signal just before it hits the preamp of their amplifier. The drawback to this approach is that any hum or hiss introduced by other effects will be increased by the compressor's output gain. Sometimes you can remedy this by placing a noise gate before the compressor, however, the noise reduction can have an effect on the tone quality. A best-of-both-worlds approach might be to put your compressor first and use a signal booster just before your amplifier. Some guitarists also like the sound of putting their wah or envelope filter before the compressor to give it a wider frequency range to affect. Experimentation is always encouraged, but putting the compressor first is recommended.
Ritchie Blackmore: a variety of versions, each with a 22-fret neck, CBS large headstock with 1970s-style decals and two Gold Fender Lace Sensors; some variants have the neck set into the body rather than bolted on and a Roland GK2A synth pickup. Reintroduced in 2009 with a 21-fret maple neck, graduated scalloped rosewood fingerboard, Bullet truss rod nut with 3-bolt neck plate and Micro-Tilt neck adjustment, flush-mounted Jim Dunlop locking strap buttons and two Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound Flat single-coil pickups (the middle pickup is omitted, but the pickup hole for the middle pickup is still present).[15]

The ultimate in superb workmanship, total versatility. This deluxe 4 pickup electric will be played with pride by the most experienced performer.  Four simulated split pickups make possible virtually unlimited sound combinations. Powerful magnetic pickups are height adjustable. Ultra fast steel reinforced neck. Head and Rosewood fingerboard bound in White. .22 Nickel Silver frets (plus zero fret), 8 “N” shaped pearl position markers, 4 volume controls, 3 position rotary tone control (high-medium-low), Rhythm-Solo-Switch, 4 slide pickup switches.  Advanced type tremolo arm.  Chrome adjustable roller-type bridge.  Highly polished yellow-to-red-to-black sunburst finish.  Size 41″x14″.
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”
Electrical impedance is like two different sizes of hose. High impedance is like a garden hose, Low impedance is like a fire hose. The amount of water pressure coming through a garden hose is great for reaching your garden but if you need to run a long length of hose up the street, the pressure from a garden hose will give out after a certain distance. You definitely need that high pressure fire hose.
I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it.  Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low!  Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone.  I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money.  But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed.  My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems.  Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.
The modern classical guitar is usually played in a seated position, with the instrument resting on the left lap - and the left foot placed on a footstool. Alternatively - if a footstool is not used - a guitar support can be placed between the guitar and the left lap (the support usually attaches to the instrument's side with suction cups). (There are of course exceptions, with some performers choosing to hold the instrument another way.)

Smaller-scale instruments are produced to assist children in learning the instrument as the smaller scale leads to the frets being closer together, making it easier for smaller hands. The scale-size for the smaller guitars is usually in the range 484–578 mm (19.1–22.8 in), with an instrument length of 785–915 mm (30.9–36.0 in). Full-size instruments are sometimes referred to as 4/4, while the smaller sizes are 3/4, 1/2 or 1/4.
SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.

An electric guitar is an expensive toy, so deciding who to buy it for is very important. Depending on the electric guitar’s purpose, its size and sound have to align with the player’s taste and goals. Profciency is also another deciding factor. If you are a beginner electric guitar player, the most important things to keep in mind is how easily you can play the electric guitar. What type of body style is suitable? What types of tones suits your tastes? These are the types of questions anyone should ask themselves when deciding who to buy an electric guitar for.
In a market filled with increasingly good Japanese copies of Les Pauls, the Ovation offerings fell, well, flat, despite obvious high quality. In ’75 both the Breadwinner and Deacon switched to Ovation humbucking pickups, metal covered with twin rows of six pole pieces. A very short-run Deacon 12-string debuted as well in ’75. In ’76 the blue finish on the Breadwinner was ditched and the Deacon acquired red, black and natural finish options. As synthesizer technology caught on in the late ’70s, some of these guitars became popular for adapting to synth playing, primarily because of their “high-tech” image.
Gibson has issued two Signature Les Paul guitars for Joe Perry of Aerosmith. The first was developed in the 1990s and was customized with an active mid-boost control, black chrome hardware, and a translucent black finish. It was replaced in 2004 by a second, more visually distinctive Les Paul, the Joe Perry Boneyard Les Paul. This guitar is characterized by Perry’s custom “Boneyard” logo on the headstock and a figured maple top with a green tiger finish, and is available with either a stopbar tailpiece or a Bigsby tailpiece; Perry typically uses a Bigsby-equipped Boneyard model in Aerosmith and solo live shows.
A group of blues-crazy Brits even took their name from one of his songs: the Rolling Stones. The blues in general, and the recordings of Muddy Waters in particular, became the “roots music” for the youth counterculture that sprang up in the Sixties. Countless bands, from the Stones on down, have assayed Waters classics like “Rollin’ and Tumblin’,” “Got My Mojo Workin’,” “You Shook Me,” “I Just Wanna Make Love to You” and “Mannish Boy.”

While most collectors aren’t necessarily going to boast that they own a number of Harmony guitars, we shouldn’t forget the important “first axe” role Harmony played for many guitarists. This company took mass production of guitars to the next level. And though you may have to sort through a few to find one that is completely intact and doesn’t allow a car to drive under the strings, they were quality-made instruments for the most part. For those of you who first learned on a Harmony Archtone, this is certainly a childhood treasure!


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learning how to play songs on guitar is not necessarily the same as learning how to play guitar. If your just repeating something without understanding it, your not learning. If you are one of the very few who can instinctively play, learn songs and teach yourself simply by doing- then it doesn't really matter- many (of the few) really successful musicians have done it this way. In most cases, a beginner should do both- learn the chords and the theory pertaining to the songs you want to play, so you can more easily connect the learning to the playing. One thing is for sure, you're not going to be able play very many songs without first knowing at least your 7 basic major and minor chords and some basic rhythm patterns. All the other primary chords (7 / 9 / 11 and 13's) are all built off these 7 basic major and minor triad structures. it's all up to you as to how much effort and time and how far you want to go with it- in any case good luck and have fun with it
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One of more commonly known effects for musicians is distortion. It falls into the family of effects sometimes referred to as "dirt" boxes: Distortion, Overdrive, and Fuzz. In simple terms, it is cutting the top and bottom of the sound wave off using a technique known as "hard" clipping to create a more square shaped wave instead of the more natural sine wave formation. A solid explanation on the techniques and methods of creating different types of distortion can be found on Wikipedia.


Here at Dave’s Guitar Shop we are proud to have a staff of world class Guitar and Amp technicians. Be it simple guitar setups, restrings, grafting on broken headstocks or restoring timeless classics our techs work at the highest quality. With a shared experience of over 50 years and access to one of the largest collections of historic guitars for reference you can rest assured that your repair or restoration will be completed accurately and with great care and precision.
After your design has been properly plotted out on the poster board you can cut it out with an exacto knife. Make sure you stay as true to your lines as possible so you have a nice clean line to trace once your ready to. Then lay out the template on body blank and trace away. I like to cut the piece of poster board the same size as the body blank I am using. It makes it a lot easier to line everything up that way. Now you're ready to move on to the next step.
Why We Liked It - The price on amazon is undoubtedly pretty high, which means that this Gibson is going to be for serious players and professionals only. You'll need to make sure you have gig bags or a guitar case in hand for protection! However, if you’re looking for the absolute best that the electric acoustic market has to offer right now, then there probably aren’t many contenders to the J-200’s crown.
Modelling/digital amps: This type of guitar amp uses digital technology to stimulate old-fashioned technology. They are able to emulate old amplifiers using software, and this feature enables them to combine several amps into one. Their programmable nature enables the user to switch digital effects such as the chorus, delay, and other features. Some models of these amps have a digital or analog output that goes directly to a recording or PA system through speaker simulation.

With this new edition, they scrapped the DVD from the previous version, and introduced online video and audio clips, as a supplement to the book's teachings. They didn't take it overboard though, with just 85 videos and 95 audio tracks, but at least it's a step in the right direction. You can't learn music by just reading about it, you need audible tools.
Maybe the pickups that came with your guitar are just cheap and not up to your standards. At that point, an upgrade might be less of a stylistic issue and would done for the purpose of improving the overall sound quality of your instrument. In most cases, upgrading the pickups on your guitar are the single most effective way to improve the overall tone and sound quality.

My first Custom was a Charvel/Jackson Star body with a custom white paint with bullet holes and dripping blood from the holes ! My friend and Guitar teacher Randy Rhoads helped me get started on the right track in 1980 ,before I was playing in clubs and headlining shows later in the 80s and 90s,I was set with the perfect guitar! Gibson is just a brand name,Epiphones are better then Gibsons ,your just paying for a name,same with Fender! Remember,one of the greatest guitars was made for less then $300,so you should never really spend more then that unless it is a custom ,then you can do what you have to!
This is where the roads came back together. Kaman continued to play guitar during his building of the helicopter business. He kept his guitars hanging on the wall, instead of in the case, so he could grab one if he felt like playing. As a result he ended up with lots of cracked backs, including one on a favorite Martin. Charles traveled down to Nazareth to get the guitar repaired and Fred Martin gave him a factory tour.

: This vintage YAMAHA is one of the greats folks and here for your serious consideration today at Joe's Vintage Guitars.... This is the Classic Vintage Yamaha FG-200 - Nippon Gakki body seems the same specs as the famous FG180...hummm? interesting She's been lovingly played for nearly 40 years,its beautifully aged now with a great feel & patina only found on real vintage guitars of this age and caliber. This guitar really has nicely opened up over the past 40 years and you just don't get booming bassy tone like this one with a new guitar thats for sure. This example is not mint but is beautiful in its own right, it does have a few nicks, dings and wear but nothing really bad at all really she just looks the part of the 40 year old Martin D28 vintage guitsr. A lot of guitar for not a lot of cash... Vintage aint goin down..get her at a great price today! Let me know...thanks for your interest, Joe email me: gr8bids@comcast.net This is an early one from the Nippon Gakki plant and has a surprising boom even for or a 200 same as our great old red lable FG180 for that matter with no real decernable diference. I cannot find a serial number but is believed to be late 60's - early 70's This old girl has Excellent low end sound!!! and tone on this guitar is wonderful - it really booms! Condition: Average vintage wear wich includes minor pick wear, scratches dents & dings for an old vintageguitar. but no cracks to be found, straight neck, trussrod is functioning properly, very good frets still playing well all the way up & down the fingerboard with no funny buzzes or dead spots... Frets 1 - 5 ( cowboy cord area )have medium play wear but still plenty of life remaining no problemo. action is very good at 3/32 1st E string @ 12th fret. Tuners are the original and in excellent working order. Bridge plate is securely fastened to top. We have just as a precationary installed A PlateMate brass plate has now been installed to any prevent further wear to bridge plate which is common among these vintage guitars. This brass plate has also contributed to its big booming tone now is even a more rich sounding competitor to a vintage Martin D-28... FRESH SET UP...with Martin Bone & Saddle... this guitar is a wonderfull fun guitar to play lots of bang for the buck factor here.. This guitar is overall a very solid well built guitar that is standing the test of time it also is a great sounding vintage guitar that plays very nicely. Ya can't go wrong with this wonderful vintage Yamaha FG Nippon Gakki guitar Has a new bone saddle and Martin Silk Steel strings. No case included but will protect and properly package for shipping. PlateMate product works very well and is easily removed if desired. To my ear it enhanced this boom-box's sound quality and is described by the manufacturer as follows: If you want to protect and enhance the sound and tones and balance out string volume of your acoustic guitar, Mitchels Plate Mate is the way to go. Mitchels Plate Mate is a small piece of brass that is applied without using or altering of tools, and is installed as fast as you can change a set of strings. This was invented and patend mainly to prevent damage caused by ball-end strings on the acoustic guitars bridge plate, it is also proven to enhance volume, tones, and balances out string volume by one of the best acoustic guitar makers in the world. Mitchels Plate Mate will protect your guitar from ball-end strings pulling up threw the bridge plate and possibly cracking the bridge or pulling the bridge off the top of your guitar which would be a very expensive repair bill. It also protects your bridge pins, and saddle by making the string windings stay down in the string holes where they belong. I have used Mitchels Plate Mate in guitars priced from $100 to $50,000 it doesnt matter the price just protect your prized posetion or investment. .
The original Fender Mustang is something of a cult classic. It was loved by alternative bands and players - including Kurt Cobain - in the '90s for its short scale, affordability and potential for modding. The Bullet Mustang is the most affordable version of the model yet. In keeping with Squier’s other entry-level models, it features a basswood body, which gives it an incredibly lithe, lightweight feel. This, combined with its 24-inch scale length, makes it a great choice for beginners. The two humbuckers are the most obvious departure from the original, providing angular grit in the bridge position and a pleasing, earthy warmth in the neck. The bolt-on maple neck and six saddle hardtail bridge feel reassuringly rigid, while the tuners did a sterling job in our tests of holding their pitch without too much hassle. The volume and tone knobs, often a clear indicator of quality control in budget guitars, are installed firmly enough with no evident wobble, while the pickup selector switch is angled so it won’t get knocked if your playing becomes too... ahem... enthusiastic. Meanwhile, the 12-inch radius, rosewood ’board is pancake flat and makes string bends simple for even the most sausage-fingered player. The C profile neck is also extremely comfortable to hold, while the satin finish makes fretboard-spanning licks a doddle. $149/£120 is practically peanuts to spend on a new guitar. For Squier to cram in the features it has, with the overall levels of build quality on display, is seriously impressive.

000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
Some of the more distinctive specifications include, the headstock shape, tuners, neck and fretboard, bridge, and pickups and electronics. The headstock shape is based on PRS’s trademark design, but inverted to both accommodate Mayer’s playing style and also to keep a consistent length of string behind the nut, which makes staying in tune easier. The tuners are a traditional vintage-style, closed-back tuner, but with PRS’s locking design. The neck shape was modeled after 1963/1964 vintage instruments, and the fretboard has a 7.25” radius. The moment your hand grabs this neck, it just feels right. Like the tuners, the steel tremolo takes a classic design and incorporates PRS’s trem arm and Gen III knife-edge screws. The bridge on the Silver Sky is setup flush to the body in the neutral position so that the tremolo bridge only goes down in pitch. By keeping the bridge in contact with the body, the guitar itself is acoustically louder, which improves the signal to noise ratio of the single-coil pickups. The 635JM single-coil pickups are very round and full, with a musical high end that is never “ice-picky” or brash.
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Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.
When two pickups are wired in series, a good portion of the treble frequencies is lost because the long pickup wire works like a resistor. Any resistor in the signal path will suppress the signal. The formula works like this: The longer the wire, the higher the resistance, and the more treble is lost. We all know this from guitar cables: When you use a very long guitar cable, the sound isn’t as detailed and transparent as it is with a shorter cable. A long cable acts as a resistor.
The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.

This is like asking, how long is a piece of string? There are more brands than can be counted. This is because the factories in the east that produce mass production instruments often change name, and will label the same instrument with different labels depending on which market it is going to. Then there are the individual luthiers, small companies, large companies, toy shops hobbiests. The answer to this therefore would have to be infinite.


Paul Kossoff, of Free and Back Street Crawler, favoured a 1959 Les Paul Standard. In 2011-12, Gibson’s Custom Shop made a reproduction of Kossoff’s Standard, featuring a so-called “green-lemon” flametop, two-piece carved maple top, mahogany body and neck, Custom Bucker humbucking pickups and kidney-bean shaped Grover tuners similar to those Kossoff had installed on the instrument. 100 Kossoff models were made to resemble the guitar at the time of Kossoff’s death in 1976, with another 250 in a VOS finish.
I’m not a Fender amp guy at all. I know, a lot of people swear by them, and they do sound great, and are a standard in the indie world. They tend to have less options and features that a beginner might want to play around with, and to get those options you end up spending more money than you might be comfortable with. You also don’t get much horsepower for the cash compared to some of the other lower priced options. To me, a cheap Fender sounds like…a cheap Fender. Blues guys sure do love those Mustangs though.
Looks like a good guitar. I honestly think that for 90% of the hobbyist players out there, after buying better pickups, the difference between the sound of a Squier and a real Fender is negligible. I could be wrong I guess, but my ear doesn't really pick up enough of a difference to justify the money for a more expensive guitar. The quality of the guitar plays a big part for me. For instance, when I first got my guitar, the frets weren't smooth. Bends sucked because the note had lost it's sound by the time it was bent all the way up. Finally through playing and polishing, they flattened. Now they play really nice. I'm sure that on a new Gibson, that wouldnt happen. Oh well. About the Tele headstock that you didn't like, what don't you like about it? Do you like the gibson style 3 tuners to a side configuration?(like an acoustic?)
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega Electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet to rehearsals and shows. 1n 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp which added the feature of metal corner protectors, which keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
With the correct strings on the guitar, and the strings tensioned to the tuning you intend to use, place a capo at the first fret, or depress the low "E" string at the first fret. While doing this, depress the same string at the 12th fret. Site along the bottom of the string and note its relationship to the top of the frets up and down the fretboard between the fretted positions. The string in this situation, since it is under tension, is essentially a straight edge, and the curve, or profile, of the fretboard can now be seen. Generally, a gap of 1/64 - 1/32 " between the bottom of any string and the tops of the 6-7th frets (when fretting the string at the 1st and 12th frets or higher) is considered acceptable. You could go a hair flatter, or even a bit more curved depending on the needs of a given player, but start here.
Some electric guitars such as the Parker Fly Deluxe® have stereo jacks to output both the magnetic and piezo pickups. For this, the Radial PZ-Select™ was born, allowing the different pickup’s tones to be adjusted and switched between without messing with the guitar’s knobs. Guitar virtuoso Dave Martone writes: “I always wanted to be able to turn these guitar sounds on and off with my feet, because my hands would always be doing something and could not get to the switches on the guitar fast enough. Frustration set in until Peter Janis at Radial contacted me and work began on the PZ-Select. There were approximately four prototypes made as we went through the necessary changes and then BAM!!! An amazing unit was born! No longer do I need that clunky cable. I use a regular TRS cable and that’s it! No more grounding issues or phase issues!!! The PZ-Select gives me full switching capability with lights to tell what channel is active! Tuner out! Piezo FX loop! Drag™ control! XLR balanced Piezo out and the list goes on!”

Hi Ri - Squier Affinity Stratocasters and Telecasters come in lefty designs. Unfortunately they are a bit more than $100. There are some guitars in that price range but unfortunately I don't have a lot of experience with them. I would tread carefully at that price point, as really cheap guitars often end up being more trouble that they're worth. Good luck, whatever you decide!

The pitch shifter effect can also be used to detune or “capo” a guitar without the need to actually retune the instrument.  These detuning type pedals have become prominent in the age of dropped tunings and seven string guitars.  The Digitech Whammy Pedal is the most widely known pitch shifter for guitarists and has been used by players like Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine fame.
Here we have another great Yamaha Its Sound is truly WELL beyond its price point someone will be very pleased. aprox..1972-74 YAMAHA FG160 WOW! . ...This is a Gorgeous MARTIN style REPLICA and for the money compares very well to the original in quality materials used..sweet vintage SPRUCE TOP now wonderfully ambered in color from age just too cool, The Back - Sides & Neck are all made from choice AAA Mahogany just what you would expect from an expensive Martin or Gibson...only you would expect to pay much more for one of those , but this is a rare early non "Nippon Gakki" model with the Red Label from Korea.. These early issue Red Label Guitars from Korea utilize the very same materials that were made in Japan. These components were used under strict quality control and 100% assembled in Korea from the very same vintage wood - components & parts as the Japan made Yamaha's. We have had many of these Red Labeled Yamaha's in the 180's & 160's currently and over the years I see up close and in person the very high grade AA mahogany neck s sides & back & the same nice nickel tuners & hardware the very same one piece solid neck no scarf joint at the back of the headstock area like the later Korean & Chinese examples ... This era exhibits just the same just as nice woods as those Japanese big dollar players but " SOME" not all are hidden treasures and are still a real bargain today when compared to the Japanese Red Label versions or a Martin or even Japan made models of this quality...fit & finish & the materials on this guitar are very nice! This guitar does not take the back seat to the Red Label Nippon Gakki version at all. The action is very EZ to play and the TONE is simply wonderful..The Condition is very good++ to excellent vintage it is not mint,and it is not beat..it has natural minor play wear and dings associated with a well loved and played quality guitar it has all the rich patina now of a true vintage acoustic and is quite beautiful in its own right. This guitar has a good history of care its a California guitar where the climate is stable and quite favorable to guitars and was adult owned & loved. This guitar has the preferable a nice MEATY U Shaped Premium Mahogany one piece solid NECK, the frets are still good, The Rosewood is gorgeous too it looks to be Premium grade as well..You will not be disappointed with this guitar at this price the sound is rich like a an expensive $1,000+ guitar, big tone ...no repairs, structural damage..It comes with a new set of Martin strings installed ready to play out of the box. TRULY STUNNING, SEE MORE ... This baby is nice and sweet in person...very nice, , with a classic MARTIN LIKE feel & Sweet-Tone that simply is very hard to beat. The neck is STRAIGHT and the frets are fine w/plenty of life left,this baby plays real nice she stays in tune very well.. .nice workmanship & choice select materials used....You will not be disappointed with this FINE YAMAHA FG160 guitar with NICE TONE & SOUND...its a real Great Player ....This guitars condition is rated at a 8+ Very good+ or better and is very good to excellent condition only a few very minor dings can be seen. this is a real Vintage guitar" and as you can see its in Gorgeous shape!. no known problems cracks-breaks-repairs with no other known issues at all. This one is is 100% READY TO GO!!! its in very good to excellent condition a solid 8+ OR BETTER. This .
Nice ible. I JUST got a Squier Tele Custom ii (2) in the mail Friday after selling a keytar on ebay for $355. I bought it because it got great reviews for having 2 Duncan (designed, made in asia?) P90's and the price was right for a 1st guitar. the only thing i do not like is the ugly tele headstock. I bought a '68 Harmony Marquis last year for my 1st 1st guitar, not really knowing at the time how unrewarding/difficult it would be to learn on a P.O.S like that. So, even tho the pups are probably the last thing I would replace on it, it was cool to read a bit by someone else with a "less expensive" tele. Look up the Custom ii online, it has a great looking pickguard and the pup selector is up on the top horn like a les paul. Thanks for the tips!

Sharlee D'Angelo (b. 1973) is the bassist for the metal band Arch Enemy, as well as the classic rock/AOR band The Night Flight Orchestra, the stoner metal band Spiritual Beggars and the blackened thrash/speed metal band Witchery. D'Angelo has also been in various bands in the past, either as a studio session player or full member. These include Mercyful Fate, Dismember and King Diamond. He switched to Ibanez in 2005. Ibanez now produces the Sharlee D'Angelo signature basses, called the SDB2 and SDB3,[11] which is tuned to D'Angelo's preferred C standard[12] (Low to High – C,F,Bb,Eb).
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
Most guitars out there usually feature a version of either one of many Gibson designs or Fender ones, but there are exceptions. Paul Reed Smith is a brand that took their own path in just about every aspect of guitar design. This made it popular with many famous guitar players, most notably Carlos Santana. The model we're looking at today is a basic version of one of their flagship guitars. The balance of performance and pure style it offers is nearly as impressive without forcing you to extend out of your monetary reach.
Maple is the most common wood used to make guitar necks. It is very hard and dense, and often has attractively detailed grain patterns referred to as figuring. Maple also has a very bright overall tone. Due to it’s figuring and its tonal characteristics maple is often used for a veneer or top laminate on more expensive solid body guitars. It is also used as a top wood in some archtop guitars, where it is usually laminated. Its hardness brings out the trebles in a guitar's sound. It is also often used for the fretboard where it adds definition to the sound. 
Solder the electronics. The pickups you purchased should come with a schematic that shows exactly how to connect these to the controls and to the input for the guitar cord. Follow this schematic, using an ordinary electronics soldering iron to complete the job. Wrap any wiring connections with electrical tape, unless the manufacturer’s instructions suggest another method.
In terms of tone, a smaller dreadnought body will be slightly lacking in projecting the low-end frequencies. That doesn't matter here thanks to being an acoustic electric. With that said, the trebles and mids give away its origin, tone-wise. Play a few chords and you'll immediately hear that classic 'Taylor sound' even from a lower mid-range guitar like this one.
He also opened the doors for left-handed guitar players by showing them that they too can master a musical instrument and make something unforgettable from it. In the same way that a “southpaw” boxer like Manny Pacquiao achieved unbelievable things in the ring, the gifted left-handed guitarist Jimmy Hendrix pushed guitar playing to its highest level.
I'm not sure if the same applies to LPs, but on my BC Rich Mockingbird (which has the same tone/volume setup) if one volume knob is all the way off it'll only mute the guitar in the center position. Say the bridge volume is at 10 and the neck is at 0, I'll still get sound if the bridge pickup is selected but I won't get sound if both or just the neck are selected.
Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.
Nowadays, you can find many in-between sets, but you'll want to have a solid understanding of what the gauges are in terms of actual measurement and how they affect your ability to perform with your desired tone.  These relatively open descriptions will also differ from acoustic strings to electric strings, so your experience in handling many types of guitar strings and gauges is paramount in making the right choice.
There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
Think of where you presently are in your journey as merely preparation and training. You are getting in shape to learn to play by developing some basic skills and building finger strength and callouses and coordination. Progress will be very slow in the beginning but if you persevere, you will reach a point where progress comes at a far more rapid pace.

Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.
Gibson guitars do tend to run on the high end of the price spectrum, but for an experienced player it’s not hard to understand why. Their guitars offer top notch craftsmanship and tone that is favored by a large segment of players. However, this does make their line of guitars less practical for beginners, who will likely want to improve in skill before making that level of investment.
You didn’t think we would forget bass amps, did you? Due to their inherent differences in design, bass guitars require a dedicated amplifier – using your old Fender Champion isn’t going to cut it. Bass amps offer more power, with some outputs reaching 1000 watts or more. Like guitar amps, bass amplifiers come in many shapes and sizes – including heads and combos – although the mid-range Hartke HD500 offers a stage-worthy 500 watts of power in a portable combo unit, with great controls and an excellent balanced tone.
I'm having a few buddies over to jam this coming Sunday. I don't have a full drum kit setup at my house, so our drummer will be using djembes, bongos, etc. To make things a little more manageable I'm telling folks to bring their electric guitars and NO effects. I have a small arsenal of 15-watt tube amps, so the idea is that we'll all just play into low-wattage tube amps at low volume and see what we come up with.

JVGuitars is very proud to present to you yet another wonderfully aged High end Law Suit guitars out of Japanese it is a hand crafted acoustic guitar built well almost 40 years ago, what many may not know is that Takamine on these high end exotic tone woods models were master built by using well aged tone woods of 25-30+ years of age at the time when built making this a true vintage guitar in its own right. This example has been very well maintained and taken care of as you will see, this is a California guitar and has not seen much of the ravages of extreme weather and other extreme changes that can damage 0 warp – dry our and Split – crack and otherwise severely damage a perfectly good instrument so this guitar shows no evidence of any of those common afflictions on the contrary this guitar is rather CLEAN over all,Its beautiful solid spruce top is pretty flat and its bridge is nice and tight as well and its bracing ( same as Martin D-28 ) is all good throughout so this guitar has good bones!, bindings too are all good, frets are good and we dressed and polished the frets and they are good for another 20+ years of play, its neck is excellent!.. Fresh install of a new Martin bone nut and compensated saddle and this guitar is set up with Martin Marquis strings and plays beautifully. The original tuning gears are in place and working excellently too. This guitar is a pleasure to play its action is very good at medium - low more on the lower side of medium and it plays with ease and sounds incredible and has even more saddle room to go lower in future if wanted . This guitar has the LOOK it just has it… its absolutely GORGEOUS with the breath taking 2-piece center seam Brazilian Rosewood back & sides - fingerboard and headstock overlay its truly stunning ,as stated it’s exotic TONE WOODS are of the Brazilian Jacaranda verity and its presence overall is stunning perhaps surpassing that of the Original Martin D-28 they copied/ I will suggest that you be the judge of that see for yourself and have a good look At some old Martins as well this guitar stands toe to toe with any of them. This example is nice and deep sounding and its volume is excellent. This guitar is JVGuitars condition rated at 9/10 vintage excellent , it is not new or mint it has a few minor dings as its over 40 years old, it has patina aging that of the color showing on the bindings have Ambered naturally with age this is what make a vintage guitar beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder. These exotic TONE WOOD series guitars in this kind of condition are hard to find these days this one is A real GEM!…… Let me know if interested Thanks for Looking Joe Email me at: JVGuitars@gmail.com excellent recording possibilities.. Pics soon to come ! any questions let me know: jvguitars@gmail.com .
The Zoom G3X features a built-in wah-wah expression pedal that controls the sound parameters in real time. It has over 100 effects and 22-amp models that bring out the amazing sounds of your guitar. This distortion pedal also features a stompbox with over 100 stage-ready effects. For computer recording, this pedal has a USB audio interface for Mac and PC. In addition, it has a balanced line-level output, an onboard chromatic tuner, and an integrated drum machine. Its 40-second looper gives it overdubbing capabilities.
Replacing switch and jack covers. These are the plastic or metal covers that hold the jack and tells you witch switch is treble or rhythm. The switch cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced, however, a metal jack plate can never break and only will need to be cleaned. A plastic plate will need to be replaced or the screw holes need to be resized, do so properly and make sure every fastener is snug including screws and nuts.
While fan-braced modern classical Torres and post-Torres style instruments coexisted with traditional ladder-braced guitars at the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional forms eventually fell away. Some attribute this to the popularity of Segovia, considering him "the catalyst for change toward the Spanish design and the so-called 'modern' school in the 1920s and beyond."[5] The styles of music performed on ladder-braced guitars were becoming more and more unfashionable; and, e.g. in Germany, musicians were in part turning towards folk music (Schrammel-music and the Contraguitar), but this only remained localized in Germany and Austria and became unfashionable again. On the other hand, Segovia was playing in concerts around the world, popularizing his modern classical guitar, as well as a new style of music in the 1920s: Spanish romantic-modern style with guitar works by Moreno Torroba, de Falla, etc. Some people consider it to have been this influence of Segovia which led to the domination of the Torres instrument. Factories all over the world began producing them in large numbers.
Death By Audio Reverberation Machine Spring type Reverb/synthetic atmosphere creator with Altitude control that allows the reverb to distort. Also has a light/dark switch to control color of the reverb. Pedal was used in a smoke free studio, never gigged and has no velco on bottom. Pedal has small speckled blemishes in paint next to volume knob. This has no effect on function. Pedal is in perfect working order. This is a great pedal for people who want to add more texture to their sound. Ive used it on synths, drum machines and samples- handles any source without discretion. The only reason for letting it go is that i have too many spring type reverbs. Thanks for looking .
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After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.
PRS recently started using quite an old idea (first suggested to us by guitar/amp technician Brinsley Schwarz). You simply add, in series, a resistor between the pickup ‘tap’ wire and ground. This mod, “doesn’t completely cancel the slug coil,” explains Smith, “it sort of three-quarters coil cancels. It allows some of the other [slug] coil through. It’s also slightly hum- cancelling.”
If metal is your jam, and you want an amp that will deliver brutal high-gain tone, this is your amp. Sized in a convenient combo package, this 60 watt beast features two channels with independent three-band EQ, pre/post gain controls and presence and resonance adjustment. It’s loud and powerful, yet small enough to throw in the back seat of your car.
The process for recording sound from a guitar amp might seem simple; you have your amp and a mic to capture it, stick mic in front of amp, press “record,” and play. Done! The truth is, though, that even when using the same guitar and amp with the same settings captured by the same mic, the results can vary greatly depending on where you place that mic. Add the variables of different mics and multiple mic placements on one speaker cab, and your sonic possibilities expand exponentially. The elephant lumbering into the room at this point in the game is the fact that more and more people are recording direct to interface using digital amp simulators, or DI’ing and applying an amp plug-in in the digital-audio workstation (DAW). These facilities have improved tremendously in recent years, but the majority of professional guitarists and professional studios still mic actual amps to record the most dynamic guitar-based music being made today, so we’ll stick with honing these old-school skills.

On electric guitars, you do a lot of plugging and unplugging of your cable, and these actions can eventually loosen the output jack, causing a crackling sound through the speaker. This crackling indicates a disconnected ground wire. To fix this problem, you first need to take off the jack plate or pick guard and locate the detached wire causing the problem.


To produce Music and create the melody man has invented some musical instruments. In this process he has created the Guitar. Guitar is the instrument in which by the vibrations of the strings we can amplify the music. It’s an instrument having “a long, fretted neck, flat wooden soundboard, ribs, and a flat back, most often with incurved sides”. The melody produced by Guitar is also depends on the better finishing of its parts and strong pickups. That’s why it’s a vital task to select the best quality of guitar.
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Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.

XM DLX2 is one of two Deluxe models in the highly acclaimed XM series from Washburn. The other one is XM DLX2F. XM DLX2 comes with a solid, double-cut body made of basswood back and maple top. Top is a two-piece and it features the characteristic XM series contour. As all models in this series are, XM DLX2 is made primarily for players of heavy metal and shred styles. Strong pickups, super fast neck and 24-fret fingerboard indicate this. Bridge section features a tune-o-matic bridge with string-through-body construction and black plating. In it`s front, Washburn installs a pair of open-coil humbuckers. Master volume, master tone and a three-way toggle pickup switch comprise the controls unit. 24-fret fingerboard is made of rosewood and it`s installed on top of a set in maple neck.
The Yamaha's FG series FGX800C is a perfectly machined instrument. If there is one thing Yamaha is known for, it's the quality of their mass-produced acoustic guitars, which people like to pooh-pooh due to the romanticization of extremely expensive handmade guitars. Yamaha has perfected this machining process to a point where you wouldn't really be able to figure out if the instrument was put together by a luthier or if it was made on a factory floor somewhere. This is the case with nearly every accessible guitar these days thanks to machines reducing errors and driving prices down.
You will see numerous inputs and outputs for sound, depending on your computer. You will want to enable the main one (in which all of the sub­devices are listed) and two others: one for input, and one for output. For input, look for something similar to “Line in”. If you only have a microphone jack, enable that instead. For output, look for “Stereo out” or something similar.
Ritchie Blackmore: a variety of versions, each with a 22-fret neck, CBS large headstock with 1970s-style decals and two Gold Fender Lace Sensors; some variants have the neck set into the body rather than bolted on and a Roland GK2A synth pickup. Reintroduced in 2009 with a 21-fret maple neck, graduated scalloped rosewood fingerboard, Bullet truss rod nut with 3-bolt neck plate and Micro-Tilt neck adjustment, flush-mounted Jim Dunlop locking strap buttons and two Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound Flat single-coil pickups (the middle pickup is omitted, but the pickup hole for the middle pickup is still present).[15]

When people ask "What are the guitar string sizes?" they really want to know about the gauges, the term referring to the diameter of the string.  The answer is... that's not quite how it works.  Yes there are standard gauges but in several standard sizes like light, medium, and heavy.  Each, when properly tuned, will exert a different tension on the guitar's neck and if you jump to another size you'll probably need to adjust the truss rod and get used to the new action of the fingerboard.


Quartal and quintal harmonies also appear in alternate tunings. It is easier to finger the chords that are based on perfect fifths in new standard tuning than in standard tuning. New standard tuning was invented by Robert Fripp, a guitarist for King Crimson. Preferring to base chords on perfect intervals—especially octaves, fifths, and fourths—Fripp often avoids minor thirds and especially major thirds,[102] which are sharp in equal temperament tuning (in comparison to thirds in just intonation).
The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!
Two full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by bands such as A Day to Remember (on Mr Highway's Thinking About The End, Welcome To The Family, Violence (Enough is Enough), Life Lessons Learned the Hard Way and Sticks and Bricks), In Flames, Hostility, Issues, Static-X, Bring Me the Horizon (since Suicide Season), Hellyeah, Amaranthe, Breaking Benjamin (since Phobia), Parkway Drive, Otep, Spineshank, RED, Bury Your Dead, Eye Empire, Dirge Within, Remembering Never, and occasionally Chevelle, Darkest Hour, Evanescence, 9oz. of Nothing, and For the Fallen Dreams.
If you want to get this game, you have a few options. The game is $60 with no guitar cable included; this is the best bet for owners of the original "Rocksmith," as the cable that came with that game works here, too. If you don't have the cable, but have a guitar, the game costs $80. If you need a guitar, too, that'll run you $200 for an Epiphone Les Paul Electric Jr. guitar, plus the game and cable.
Harmoniser pedals are also very useful. You put in the key you are playing and which harmony you would like (3rds for instance – just like in a lot of Iron Maiden songs) and as you play, the harmoniser automatically creates the harmony you have selected. This is great if you are the only guitar player in a band, or if you like to experiment with new harmonies on the fly.
Semi-hollow, slim, and designed with a comfortable ‘C’ shape exterior, the D’Angelico EX-DC Standard is a high-price electric guitar with professional grade features. Creating a more natural tone that delivers an organic quality to its sound, the Standard guitar uses Kent Armstrong Vintage humbuckers for a focused sound free of excess reverberation. The Super-Rotomatic tuners maintain their tuning accuracy for a longer time, due in part to the turning radius within the design. Strings remain at a comfortable tension due to the unique Stairstep tailpiece, creating both a strong resonant sound and assured sturdiness. A semi-hollow body designed with maple on the top and back, other features include a 3-way toggle that provides two modes of volume as well as two separate tones. Meant for use throughout various genres of music, the EX-DC Standard is an electric guitar to please the masses.
I have a Gemtone guitar tube amp that was made in Canada in early 70's I think. This is the only Gemtone I have ever seen and the only information I could find out about it (but not verify) is that it was a sub-company of Regal Instruments. I would love to find some more info about this amp but have nearly given up after several years of searching. Sorry its not really an answer but my hope is to fire up the thread again so someone with more concrete info can chime in.
Thanks for the list. Michael Gurian was a luthier in NYC who began as a classical guitar maker then began making steel string instuments in the 1960’s , I remember seeing his instruments shortly after i bought My first Martin in the dog years of the 70’s along wi Don Gallaghers instruments. Recently acquired one of his jumbos in Brazilian rosewood made in 1971 still in remarkable condition. He was among the first to compete as luthier with the big boys at Martin and gibson , even before Bob taylor jumped in.

This type of chip delivers a beautifully coloured representation of your sound. It may not be the most accurate and you are limited in the number of repeats and delay time.These are not to be confused with Tape Echo which was used for a long time in the world’s largest studios. No, these pedals were made out of necessity to take a form of delay on the road easily.
The display borrows a lot of its design cues from Guitar Hero—which is probably a good thing, since so many players are already familiar with that system. Like GH, Rocksmith has vertical columns to show you which frets to hold, and the notes move toward you until they reach a line that represents the moment you're supposed to play them. However, GH's display didn't need to move since there were only five buttons. Because it has to span the entirety of an actual guitar neck, Rocksmith's display floats up and down. If you're playing primarily notes between the fourth and seventh frets, for example, it will show you just those frets on the screen, then slide up to the 10th or 11th when it's time for you to play those.
PLOTTING OUT THE PEICES Once you have drawn out the shape of the body you can then locate and draw the cavaties that the pickups and electronics will go and set you bridge placement. It is good to know wher the center of the guitars boy is so you can make sure that the pickups and bridge are in good alignment with the neck pocket. I like to take a piece of poster board and trace the fretboard of the neck on it and cut it out, that way I can properly place my bridge according to my scale length.
Chorus is the sound at the beginning of the Guns ‘n’ Roses song Paradise City. It is a gentle, shimmering effect that is good for arpeggiated chords and adding that little extra to a lead tone (such as in the solo for Smells like Teen Spirit by Nirvana). However, we recommend using it sparingly as it can sound dated and old fashioned if over used (unless, of course, old-school is what you’re going for). Common controls include level (the volume of the effect), tone (affects the EQ of the chorus effect), rate (how quickly the note shimmers) and depth (how large and prominent the shimmering is).
The 1964 TRG-1 was a slightly more asymmetrical variant of the WG body style, with offset double cutaways and offset waists. It had the squared-off Bizarro Strat head introduced in ’63 and rectangular-edge fingerboard inlays. The tail was a primitive top-mounted trapeze. Most of the face of the guitar was covered with a large metal pickguard, which had one two-tone neck pickup. The volume and tone knobs were above the strings, as was a small sliding on/off switch for the amp. In the off position, the guitar played out as a normal electric guitar. Horizontal grill slots were cut into the pickguard, behind which sat a 3-inch speaker. The amp operated on two 9-volt batteries installed in back. The TRG-1 shown in the subsequent ’64-65 catalog had a new, hooked headstock, but all the examples I’ve seen have the squared-off Bizarro Strat head. Also, the model I have has a TRE100 designation on the back sticker, so at least some were called this.
This is like an echo where the sound you play repeats either once or multiple times depending on how you set the pedal. At low repeat settings this fills up the sound which is useful if there aren’t many other musicians. With lots of repeats it sounds rhythmic and huge. This effect relies heavily on the speed of the repeats keeping time with the song tempo. With practice it’s easy to set correctly but get it wrong and it can sound like your chords are running away from you.
Reverb sits at the other end of the tonal kaleidoscope, serving usually to add warmth and depth to a clean tone. Practically speaking, reverb simulates the sound of your guitar being played in a larger physical space. Imagine shouting at the top of your voice in a cloakroom. Then imagine doing the same thing in a church and you’re somewhere near there. Ok, that’s an extreme example, but approximating the sound as it reverberates around is quite a seductive thing when applied to a guitar. There are plenty of good examples of it being used to add a bit of life to an otherwise sterile clean tone.
Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
This tuning may also be used with a capo at the third fret to match the common lute pitch: G-c-f-a-d'-g'. This tuning also matches standard vihuela tuning and is often employed in classical guitar transcriptions of music written for those instruments, such as, for instance, "La Canción Del Emperador" and "Diferencias Sobre Guardame Las Vacas" by Renaissance composer Luis de Narváez.

Be careful. Don't be rash. With the quality of Gibson's 2016 guitars, you should never have too many problems but... if in doubt with an older guitar, take it to a guitar repair pro. You won't need to do it often at all. And it's best to book-in your guitar with an explanation of what you think is wrong. Basic premise: T.L.C. for your guitar, and you'll feel the love back. Oh, and keep your guitar clean!
Next up, Tolerances. The tolerance refers to the accurate rating of the pots ohm, so if it's a 250k pot, then it will be accurately rated at a tight tolerance of around +/-5% to 250k, a true rating. Some low quality pots can creep wildly away from the ratings, you'd be surprised. I've removed CTS pots from US and MIM Fender guitars for example, that were incredibly inacurate. 250k stamped pots that were not even 200k, and also in other cases past 300k. So, why does that matter? Well if for example we're referring to a single coil equipped guitar like a Stratocaster, they recommended a pot ohm value of 250k in both volume and tone positions. If a lower quality pot states 250k but actually reads much lower, perhaps 200k, or even substantially higher, it could result it a darker or brighter tone respectively, than what would bring out the best in the guitars pickups. Quality pots like the CTS 450 series or TVT I have come to trust, have super tight tolerances, +/- 7% and most cases even tighter +/-5%. This accuracy is worth it, a pickup manufacturer sets out to design a certain model of pickup that will sound it's 'best' (obviously this is subjective), optimal is probably a better word, for a certain pot rating. If you're fitting a harness with tight tolerance, accurately rated pots then chances are you're going to be getting the best from your pickup set. That's the important bit for me.
Everyone listens to music for different reasons. The transition of 'acknowledgment' to 'love' of an artist or song is an entirely unique experience, starting from smell, location, time of day, time of year, repetitions over time etc., that triggers interest. Obviously, anyone who bashes John Mayer is stuck on radio feeds and needs to explore his music before judging on pop tunes, and almost all Hendrix aficionados are late adopters that buy trends (a marketer's dream).
"Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired
Richie Sambora: features an alder body, a 22-fret neck with maple fingerboard, mother of pearl “star” fingerboard inlays, Floyd Rose “Original” locking tremolo, 25dB active mid-boost circuit with active/passive switch, two Fender Texas Special single-coil pickups (neck/middle) and a DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker in the bridge position. Updated in 1999 with American Vintage hardware, dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless pickups and a 12dB active mid-boost preamp with “no-load” tone circuit and bypass switch. Also available as a “standard” version with a poplar body, rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets, DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker with two standard alnico single-coils and a Floyd Rose II locking tremolo. Discontinued in 2002.
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Guitar Tuners lets you tune your guitar in seconds for free using a microphone so that you guarantee the perfect pitch of your instrument every time. Just play a note, and Guitar Tuners will display which note you''re playing, and how close you are to having that note in tune. The needle on this Guitar Tuner will turn blue you have an exact match. Just play each note on your guitar (E, A, D, G, B, E) or other musical instrument, and get in tune !
Excellent explanation! One thing that no one has touched on, yet is the physics of the high frequency components (mentioned above). When you clamp a string at both ends and pluck it it will have a fundamental frequency of waving back and forth based on a) it's length b) it's thickness and c) how tightly it's stretched. All wavering strings, though will have additional waverings. These are referred to as overtones. The first overtone will be a doubling of the frequency and the next a trippleing and so forth. Each of these overtone frequencies contribute to the rich, complex sound of the instrument. Here's a good explanation with pictures. Note the location of the frequency nodes in relation to the placement of the pickups.
The one-man band has been elevated to new heights lately, but behind the loopers and pads, there usually lies an unremarkable musician. Australian songwriter Tash Sultana brings a widescreen pizazz to the format. Her sprawling, expertly weighted amalgamations of hip hop beats, soothing synth pads and foil-wrapped shimmering tones, give way to surprising bursts of scuzzy, shred-y solos, creating an exhilarating contrast to her breathy vocals. A talent that doesn’t decay with the delay pedal.
The difference between laminate and solid wood is that laminate is several thin sheets of wood glued together, while solid wood is a solid piece of wood. The glue that binds the pieces of laminate together reduces the amount that your guitar vibrates, which in turn lessens your volume and frequency production (tone). Solid wood resonates more efficiently, so instruments that use it are louder and sound better. On the flipside, laminated woods are cost effective, reliable and resilient to weather changes.
One very interesting and strikingly modern Teisco guitar, the YG-6, appeared in Japan in 1965. It was very near the classic Strat shape, with offset double cutaways and Strat-like contours, but the horns were more pointed. The neck had the new hooked headstock and the rectangular edge inlays. A large multi-laminated pickguard stretched from the upper horn down to the lower bout control extension. Three large rectangular single-coil pickups, with chrome sides and black center insert (exposed poles) sat in front of a roller bridge and the clever platform vibrato design. Three on/off rocker switches sat above the strings, plus a small sliding switch, presumably a mute. It had one volume and one tone control, and is an exceptionally handsome guitar.

By far the most common way to sort out this tablature selection is by artist. Some best-selling highlights include the Hal Leonard Jimi Hendrix Complete Guitar Tab Library, Alfred Led Zeppelin Box Set I-V Guitar Tab Platinum Edition and Hal Leonard Eric Clapton Complete Clapton Guitar Tab Songbook. And those are just a few examples from a library packed with hundreds of books. No matter what sort of music you want to play, there's tablature ready to teach it to you.
Position 2 (outside coils, parallel connection): this one is more exciting because all poles do something. Pole 1 connects bridge pickup coil tap to ground, effectively splitting the bridge pickup. Pole 2 connects bridge pickup hot lead to the output. Pole 3 connects neck pickup coil tap to pole 4 which connects it to the output. What we end up with is a coil from bridge pickup coil tap to hot lead and a coil from neck pickup ground to the coil tap. Because of the way poles 2 and 4 are connected, these two coils will be paralleled.

The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.

All of us got carried away. We had great guitars back in the ’50s and ’60s. Then we went a little crazy. All of us – players and makers alike – started adding features and making demands that drove complexity up, up and away. Silvertone guitars represent the honest character of the guitars that created the classic music that still rules today. ... more ...

The BOSS ME-80 multi effects pedal is an excellent entry point into effects as it contains just about every type of effect you can think of. The ME-80 allows you to chain eight effect groups together in one patch with 36 preset patches allowing you to seamlessly switch from rock to funk to jazz at the push of a footswitch. There are also 36 user patches so you can create your own tone.
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
Remember how we said that Ibanez has some pretty rad entry level guitars? Well, Ibanez GRX70QATBB is one that is worth mentioning. It belongs to the legendary GRX family, and brings a well-balanced performance for the money. I actually bought one of these for my nephew, and had to put it through its paces before I handed it over. It’s a bit rough around the edges, but one visit to a guitar shop took care of that.
Yeah there is no double about it the Epiphone Special 11 is unreal value for money and even though I have over the years filled my Den with guitars some worth a lot of money the Epiphone Special 11 is my go to guitar. I just cannot fault, great tuners, pickups and basically the only guitar I have that stays in tune 90% plus of the time. It is also the lightest of my guitar collection weighing in at about 5.5lbs. For $299 Australian they are an absolute steal. If I could only have one guitar I would go to this Epiphone Les Paul Special 11 ever time.
This is where you want to go! Steve is kind, professional, and supremely competent. just brought my Taylor 614ce for a neck adjustment and electronics work. Steve told me that he was running with about a two to three week turnaround period but then did a couple of quick fixes -on the spot- that made my guitar really sing for my next gig. I'll bring it back to him for some more in- depth repair soon but for now I am a very happy camper. And he didn't even charge me a dime!! I will be visiting Steve for all my guitar and mandolin service needs in the future.
Flawless build, the action is set up so well I don't see any need to tinker with anything. Pulled it out of the box, tuned it and strummed a few chords, then set it aside for 24 hours. Re-tuned it the next day and it has stayed in tune. I cannot find anything amiss or out of place on this one. Per the serial number, this is a 2015 Indonesian build. The wood is simply perfect in appearance and the tone is outstanding for a thinline. Yeah, I am happy with this one. Recommended.
This brings us to the end of the list of best electric guitars in India. Yamaha Pacifica PAC012 Electric Guitar is our top pick because it is a versatile instrument that can play different types of music and it comes from a reputed brand which ensures quality and playability of the guitar. In addition, it has a premium look and feel and some great features.

I have a very unique Lyle guitar. It is apparently a 1972 but on the headstock it has the pearl from Gibson and it says Gibson on it as well on the headstock. It has the tail trapeze and the adjustable saddle. I recently had it set up and there is absolutely no fret buzz, it looks like it just came off the wall, stellar condition. My tech was stunned at the body condition and even the frets were like a new guitar? This is the only guitar I have seen that is definately a Lyle but it has Gibson, correctly done on the front of the headstock? I went in to the acoustic section and played a Gibson new hummingbird next to mine and it sounded cheap! I was stunned. I have no idea what this is worth but is like the perfect guitar. No dents, nicks, scratches, just and old guitar that has been babied, no warping anywhere, I think this will play another 30 years easy. If anyone knows about a Lyle with a Gibson logo and Gibson written on the headstock, please let me know

There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
I have my El Maya EM 1300 ( El Maya Japan, Kobe instruments) since 1989 but it was built during the end of 1982 and EL Maya Strat version, guitars are neck trough body, amazing instruments they are better then any guitars i ever played maybe I'm not objective , only my US Hamer is close or on that level. Does Anybody have any El Maya? and that you maybe wish to sell it? More over what are the fer prices for the almost mint state of those guitars, regards miki.
Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case

Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.
Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
This guitar comes with a 25.5-inch scale, 20 frets, and a 1.68-inch nut. The rosewood bridge features a compensated saddle for a smoother tone and warmer sound. The mahogany SlimTaper D profile neck makes it easy to play even if you’re a beginner, while the Grover machine heads will ensure your guitar stays well-tuned for an accurate musical performance.
The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.
That is not always the case with acoustic electric ones, especially with piezoelectric pickups since they pump out a relatively high amplitude signal. All you really need is a small DI box that will attenuate the signal a little, and you plug the guitar straight into a mixer. Naturally, how good this is going to sound will depend on your guitar's preamp.
The first Merson guitar advertised in The Music Trades appeared in the December, 1948, issue. This was the Tempo Electric Spanish Guitar which listed at $59.50 plus $11.50 for a Dura-bilt case. The Merson Tempo was an auditorium-sized archtop with a glued-in neck, a harrow center-peaked head which looks almost Kay. The guitar was finished in a shaded mahogany with a pair of widely separated white lines around the edges. Available source material is hard to see, but these appear not to have any soundholes. The fingerboard was probably rosewood with four dots (beginning at the fifth fret). This had a typical moveable/adjustable compensated bridge, elevated pickguard and cheap trapeze tailpiece. One Super-Sensitive pickup sat nestled under the fingerboard, and volume and tone controls were “built-in.”

All the connections are conveniently grouped together on the back of the unit. You have a mono 1/4” input for your guitar and a stereo output which allows you to listen to your playing on headphones, speakers, or a guitar amp (there’s also a balanced XLR output if you need it). Zoom also includes a USB connection, which not only can power this pedal via USB, but also turns the Zoom G3X into an audio interface! This way you can easily record in your favorite DAW. The USB connection also means you can use Zoom's free Edit & Share software so you can easily manage your patches on your computer. Just like everything else on the Zoom G3X, the input and output options are just right and provide plenty of flexibility. There’s really no major omission we can think of.
Among the popular performers of Hawaiian (and most other types of) music on the Vaudeville music hall circuit was Roy Smeck (1900-1994). Smeck was a talented instrumentalist who played guitar, banjo, ukulele, and lap steel guitar, earning the sobriquet “Wizard of the Strings.” Smeck made quite a few recordings and starred in part of the first “sound on disk” movie that was released in 1926. Like many other performers, Smeck endorsed a number of instruments by various manufacturers over the years, but is probably best known for the line of Harmonies introduced in 1927 with the pear-shaped Vita-Uke. Smeck’s name would be associated with Harmony instruments until near the end of the company’s run in 1973.
Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.

All I can say is quit wasting $ on new. A new guitar is like a new car it’s gonna lose 20% of its value once you take it out the first time. Unless you are buying a Gibson or fender custom shop etc Just go for what plays and sounds great. Perfect example is the Esp ltd ec401vf or 400. Used $300-400 has stock seymour duncan 59 neck jb bridge or the newer 401 has the dimarzio’s in it. Grovers tuners earvana nut mahogany body. Just an excellent setup for half the price of an epi les paul. Don’t get me wrong I have an Epi les paul traditional pro and it’s a nice guitar but for $750 nah. Since I picked up the 401 I hardly play my jag mustang or either of my epi l.p. or sg. Its just that nice of a guitar. If you are in the market for a les paul style or a new guitar in general take a look at the 400 series it’s a whole lot of guitar for the $
Line 6 gets a bad rap amongst the guitar community, due to the fact that they apparently operate on a ‘quantity over quality’ business model. The truth is, however, their digital modeling tech has improved vastly since that reputation stuck and they definitely deserve renewed consideration. And that’s all the more true when it comes to beginning players. As you’d likely be learning how to play songs by your favorite artists, this amp with its massive array of presets (128 to be exact) will allow you to mimic your idols with little, if any, effort. And, honestly, it’ll sound pretty great. It even has a built-in tuner, metronome to keep you on time, and real drummer loops so you can get in the swing of playing live.

“Move up to Alnico IV and the power rating comes up and the frequency response flattens out – you get a balanced and natural- sounding response from the coils, but not so it’s boosting the treble. The mid-range stays quite constant as well. And then you go to Alnico V, which has the highest power. Then the bass and treble do get boosted and the sound starts to get more aggressive – more ‘rock ’n’ roll’, for want of a better term.
The 85/15 “S” humbuckers here—again, they’re affordable versions of the Custom’s 85/15—are transparent, ‘hi-fi,’ articulate and high-output. Lush while clean and thick when clipped, the pickups have also been coil-split to take you into glassier, single-coil territory. However, you can’t coil-split them individually to form HS or SH combinations, for instance.
Gibson Les Paul and Fender electric guitars can retail for several thousands of pounds, but electric guitars for beginners are available for less than £100. One example of a cheap electric guitar is the LA Electric Guitar + Amp Pack, which features everything a beginner needs to start playing the guitar right away for under £90.00. It includes a 15 watt guitar amp with 6.5" speaker for practising, a guitar lead, a strap, a padded gig bag, a set of spare strings, a pick and a 2-year warranty. The electric guitar itself has a neck made from maple - the most common type of wood used in necks - which helps to expand on the treble sounds of a guitar due to its hardness. The guitar is capable of producing a wide variety sounds, thanks in part to its 3x single coil pickups with a reverse wound middle pickup, which enables users to experiment with playing different styles of music.

7. Line 6 Spider V 60-watt 1x10 ($299.99): Line 6 has been an industry leader in the world of modeling amps and the fifth generation of the Spider is no different. Allowing you to access more than 200 amp tones, effect options and cabinet options, the Spider has a very intuitive design that will allow you to switch presets effortlessly, not to mention a color-coded control set. Perhaps the coolest part about the Spider V is the built-in wireless receiver, allowing you to plug into an (optional) Relay G10 transmitter, letting you go cordless with your guitar. With pre-recorded drums loops, built-in metronome and included onboard tuner, plus functionality with Mac/PC and iOS/Android, this is certainly an option worth checking out.
With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place. The core learning systems for beginners, for blues rock and country, the songs, the genre specific exercises, an active user forum and a series of tools. I specifically like the Jam Station tool. It includes a number of backing tracks in different keys and tempos for most of the genres being taught on the Guitar Tricks platform. With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place.Other useful tools included are a scale finder, a metronome, a chord finder and a fingerboard trainer. Guitar tricks is continually improving. A new interface has just been added that makes it look more modern and very attractive. The core learning system lessons are also updated on an ongoing basis. This allows them to incorporate the latest teaching methods and keep the lessons modern and relevant.

The original National and Dobro companies produced the most popular and most imitated acoustic Hawaiian guitars ever made, and Valco was no slouch when it came to their electric successors. Indeed, lap steels are among the most highly regarded of Valco’s products, regardless of the brand name on the headstock. The more affordable steels still command a respectable price considering their ubiquity, and the higher-end models usually match the equivalent Fenders and Gibsons in appraisal. This is particularly true of the National Grand Console, one of the staple steels of the 1950s.

The three pickups were originally identical in their construction. With the rising popularity of using pickups in combination, Fender introduced a new feature in 1977 coinciding with the standard 5-position switch; a reverse-wound, reverse-polarity middle pickup. As the description implies, the magnetic polarity of this pickup is opposite the other two, as is the direction of the wire winding around the bobbin. This provides a hum-canceling effect (removing hum induced by poorly shielded, medium to high output AC devices) in positions 2 and 4 on the selector switch. This principle had been known for many years beforehand, being applied in the form of Gibson’s humbucking pickup and Fender’s own split-coil pickup used on the Precision Bass.
Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.
Besides its classic vibe, the best part about this guitar may be its Broad’Tron pickups. These were designed specifically for the Streamliner, and are known for their throaty midrange, booming lows and sparkly highs. They’re also louder than Gretsch’s other popular pups, the Filter’Tron, so push them hard and they’ll snarl and scream. Dial back the volume knob, however, and you’ll encounter the warmth and rounded tone for which Gretsch hollow-bodies are known.

Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
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Their songs cut right to the melodic and rhythmic core of great rock and roll. Johnny contributed song ideas and slashing guitar arrangements, but he also kept the whole thing on the rails. A straight guy in a world of addicts, perverts, weirdoes and psychos, Johnny’s politics were dubious. But, like Mussolini, he made the Ramones’ rock and roll train run on time for more than two decades. John Cummings passed from this life in 2004 after a five-year fight with prostate cancer.
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