Late 1934: "T" frets (aka tang frets) replace Bar frets on flat tops. (Most other guitar makers had stopped using bar frets much earlier.) Martins Hawaiian style guitars retain bar frets until at least 1938. The first Martin model to use T frets was the 00-17, introduced on a lot of 00-17 guitars #57305-57329 in 1934. Initially the first T-frets were special ordered by Martin to contain 30% nickel ("normal" fret wire is 18% nickel, 65% copper and 17% zinc). The higher percent of nickel, the harder the fret wire. This special 30% nickel fret wire was ordered from the Horton-Angell Company (the inventor and patent holder for barbed alternating "fish hook" T frets) on 8-31-1934 in an 100 pound lot, along with 100 pounds of "normal" 18% nickel fret wire. It's unclear if Martin ever used 30% nickel fret wire after this, because it was more expensive and not the norm. The same instruments also introduced the "T" neck reinforcement bar. Shortly thereafter T frets were standard. (Like with steel strings in 1922, Martin tried these innovations first on inexpensive low-end models to minimize financial damage in case the experiment was a failure.)


Even when the bass track(s) are well-recorded, and sound good, you may want to enhance the bass tone for mixdown with your favorite bass-friendly plug-in processors. Besides the obvious EQs and compressors, there are many distortion processors and amp sims out there suitable for bass. Sometimes a simple tube-warming effect is all you need to add a little subtle fatness, like the many plug-ins that simulate slight tube drive or tape saturation. I always liked the Tech 21 SansAmp on bass, and Pro Tools includes a well-modeled plug-in version of that unit. Most of the popular guitar amp modelers also include options that can add some nice grit & girth to clean bass tracks, including Softube’s Bass Amp Room and Logic’s built-in B.A.D.—Bass Amp Designer—which, like most bass amp sims, includes models of classic bass amps like the Ampeg SVT and Fliptop, along with modern bass amp & cabinet emulations. Any of these can add that finishing touch to a good bass part, and there are many freeware options as well, for those on a tight budget.
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Swan7 offers the best quality guitars for most musicians. Based in Brooklyn, New York, Swan7 provides superior quality musical instruments for the music lovers. They are specially recognized due to their durability, reliability, and affordability. Hence, no matter if you are looking for a budget-friendly choice, or are yearning to buy an expensive model, Swan7 will satisfy your thirst for the best guitar.

The lower strings of a guitar (E, A & D) will often have a nickel winding over their steel core. Nickel also makes an appearance in the frets of most guitars, which are commonly made from nickel-silver. Despite the name, this alloy doesn’t actually contain any silver, but is named for its silver appearance. It’s actually an alloy of copper, nickel, and zinc. These nickel-silver frets aren’t as hard-wearing as steel, so some guitar manufacturers use stainless steel instead to give the frets more longevity.


Two and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by death metal or deathcore musicians, such as Suicide Silence or Whitechapel (both use seven-string guitars and tune down the seventh string a full step). Utilized by bands like Nile, Motograter, Thrice, Filter (on the songs "Columind" and "The Missing" from The Amalgamut and "Drug Boy" and "The Trouble with Angels" from the album of the same name), Dead by April, RED, Ill Niño (on Dead New World) and occasionally Slipknot, Crowbar, Amon Amarth, Five Finger Death Punch, and Parkway Drive. Trapt uses this tuning on their songs "Hollow Man" and "Waiting".
The Ibanez DT-250 is a perfect guitar for shredding. The basswood is light so you can run all over the stage, jump off your stack, and still have energy to dive-bomb. Even do the splits. Notice that was a “you can.” These were outfitted with a pair of blade-pole V5 humbuckers, produced toward the end of Japanese-made pickups, before Ibanez started working with DiMarzio. They are smokin’ hot! This guitar almost leaps out of your hand when you plug it in. The Japanese improvements on the locking vibrato were also impressive, and this combines the precision of a Floyd Rose with the feather touch of a Kahler.
So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.
If the wood is the foundation of the structure, of course it will contribute to how the guitar sounds. Most people who argue that wood doesn’t affect the tone say that the string cant be affected by the wood because it is suspended between the metal parts of the guitar. If this were entirely true, you wouldn’t feel vibration in the guitar body. If the body of the guitar is vibrating, then it is going to affect the vibration of the string. The foundation of a structure will affect how it reacts to vibration.
Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.

Hey! I just opened up my 1984 g&l for the first time today and I found a design very similar to this. I had always loved the tone control on it but was too nervous to open it up for whatever goofy reason. I may try to draw it out and share it but maybe include a picture at some point as well. I’m glad someone else has looked at this because it definitely threw me for a loop when I first saw the two caps both headed to ground.
Cap in series with a resistor (shouldn’t matter which comes first). Kinman recommends this for single coils but it works rather well for humbuckers too. I installed 1nF cap in series with a 130K resistor and it works awesome. Resistor is there to limit the effect of the cap and having it in series with the cap means it shouldn’t affect pot taper as much. Larger cap means wider frequency range, so treble jump isn’t as sudden. So far, this is my favorite treble bleed circuit.
Many modern guitar amps also are equipped with multi-effects sections that encourage experimentation. There are also dozens of multi-effects pedals out there that are very affordably priced and offer a complete suite of effects. Most of these amp and effects processors feature presets created by engineers and pro guitarists to sound good at the touch of a button. Many allow you to create your own unique sounds then store them for instant recall. If you're a typical player, you'll adopt and abandon dozens of different effects boxes and presets over your playing career as your style and musical tastes evolve and change.

Kent made a lot of "student model" instruments in the 1960's. I have always found most of the guitars to be quite playable but overall, the general guitar public in my area seemed to have a low opinion of them. I recently bought a solid body one pick-up, with case, that I practise on a lot. In fact, at a recording session I was using my Gibson Lespaul and the producer was complaining about the sound of it, so the next day I brought in my Kent and he loved it, it's on two songs on the CD we were working on!
There are two basic types of pickups for electric guitars, Single Coil and Humbucking (double coil). The most practical difference is that single coils tend to sound crisp and bright while humbuckers tend to sound warmer (for more information see Seymour Duncan's detailed explanation). An electric guitar can have any combination of the two types and the combination on a guitar is described using the first letter of the pickup type in order from the one closest to the bridge. For example a classic stratocaster will be described as SSS meaning all three pickups are single coil. A more recent development is the HSS strat which means it has a Humbucker at the bridge with two Single coils. I've put the pickup configuration of each guitar below in brackets after the model name so you can easily see which pickups each guitar has and in what positing they are.
The final stages of on-board sound-shaping circuitry are the volume control (potentiometer) and tone control (a low-pass filter which "rolls off" the treble frequencies). Where there are individual volume controls for different pickups, and where pickup signals can be combined, they would affect the timbre of the final sound by adjusting the balance between pickups from a straight 50:50.
All this is to say that you don't need to worry about getting your hands on a large amp. Small amps perform better for the overall sound of your band in most venues, and any venue big enough for you to need more volume is going to mic your amp anyway, giving you all the juice you'd need. So, as you look at the amps on our list, you can evaluate them based on their EQ options, their effects, and, frankly, their look.
This includes guitar tutors and coaching software, guitar & amplifier emulators, reference tools and more. You will find tablature software in the Tablature category and software to slow down guitar solos in the Slow Down Music category. Software to tune your guitar can be found in the Instrument Tuners category and specialized chord software in the Chords category. Software designed specifically for bass guitar players can be found in the Bass Guitar category.

The Seagull S6 is another very popular choice for those looking for an affordable but great sounding acoustic. Owners claim it sounds as good as guitars in the $800-$1500 range. The S6 has a cedar top with cherry back and sides. It features a wider nut, which means this guitar will be a great choice for those playing finger style or that have larger hands. Owners of this guitar are singing it’s praises, saying that they have no regrets. The sound of this guitar is big, yet soft. Described as being “alive” with tone. Seagull has been making quality guitars at an affordable price for many years, so the S6 will not disappoint. See more on this guitar here.

Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 
Considered by many to be the first master of the electric guitar, Charlie Christian was an unbelievable jazz player with stellar improvisational skills. His quick, fluent runs down the fretboard made for some of the most inventive and innovative jazz of all time. For a sample of Christian’s great guitar work, give a listen to his song, “Swing to Bop.”
The Line 6 POD Farm program is famous for its amp simulation, however many users have realized that the quality of its modeled effects are equally superb. Some even use the POD Farm strictly for its effects! It has a huge collection of FX - up to 94 - and it modeled some of the most popular stompboxes including the MXR Phase 90, ProCo Rat, Uni-Vibe, Arbiter Fuzz Face and Big Muff Pi. It also includes modeled versions of old analog devices like the EP-1 Echoplex. Setting up is a breeze with its simple carousel-style interface, which lets you visualize your signal chain. Current Retail Price $49.00
Smaller combo amps may be easier to transport and set up than using separate amplifier and speaker units, and as such, they are a popular choice for many bass players. Bass players in quieter, more acoustic genres (e.g., jazz quartets which play in a wine bar or a folk music group which plays in a coffeehouse) may be able to use smaller, more modestly powered combo amps. Bassists who play in genres more associated with a high stage volume (e.g., hard rock or electric blues) may tend to use, larger, more powerful (in wattage) combo amps. While a gigging musician will typically only bring one combo amp to a show or recording session, some bassists in major touring bands have two or more combo amps on stage, with an "A/B" switching pedal used to select different amplifiers. In this way, a bassist could have a vintage tube combo amp and a modern solid state amp, and then switch between them to select a different tone for different songs.
My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!
The original dreadnought shape was launched by CF Martin, one of the big names in acoustic guitars, and was named after an old English warship. It features rounded shoulders, and the neck typically joins the body around the 14th fret. The dreadnought strikes the most even balance between volume, size and ease of playing, and for this reason it has been used by just about every big-named player you can think of.

John McLaughlin was invited to record with Miles Davis while still in his twenties, co-parenting jazz fusion on Bitches Brew and other Davis LPs. But he achieved guitar-god status with his own Mahavishnu Orchestra, where he made his Gibson spit fire like a many-headed dragon. A breakneck stylist, McLaughlin was peerless, mixing psychedelic rock, R&B, gypsy jazz, flamenco and Indian raga techniques. That polyglot mastery earned him huge respect from jazz and rock peers alike: Jeff Beck called him "the best guitarist alive."
Onboard effects had already appeared on various guitars, especially Höfner and Vox models, but these were not truly “active” in the modern sense. Alembic, with support from the Grateful Dead, was exploring active pickup systems, but these were still basically custom-made instruments. Both had a master volume and tone control with three-way select and a “band rejection filter tone switch,” also called a midrange bypass filter. Ovation was among the first to offer linear potentiometers to correlate movement with effect. Controls inside were mounted on a circuitboard with individual trim pots that can be adjusted to control the volume of each pickup.
Is it not within the scope of eventual computational science to notate the performance aspect of playing the guitar? Sans keyboard, sans human hand - if not by bedroom producers with too much time on their hands, then by AI analysis and pattern matching logic produced by overfunded grad students spending their Silicon Valley parents' fortunes, their AI guitar-licks algorithms trained by analyzing performance records and accelerometer measurements of real virtuoso guitarists performing? Won't a well trained bot eventually turn out some licks that fall within the scope of enjoyable human performance habits?
It has a sensitivity of 96 dB, just two units short of the M50x’s 98, but the maximum input power is less than half of that model’s, at 700 mW. The impedance is somewhat higher at 47 W vs. the M50’s 38 W. Besides the price, another identifiable upside would be the lower weight, of 6.7 oz, a feature that won’t be easy to discard after spending the whole day with the headphones on.
Upon starting the game and creating a new profile, Rocksmith 2014 asks you to assess your basic skill level so that it can tailor games and lessons to your specific ability. But it can also adapt on the fly based upon how well (or poorly) you handle a particular song, riff, or skill. That's key to Rocksmith's teaching prowess. And the feature immediately becomes clear when you select the Learn a Song mode, which allows the user to play through any one of the dozens of real licensed rocks songs included in the game.
Half a step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as: Jimi Hendrix, Coheed and Cambria, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Cannibal Corpse (Chris Barnes era), Nirvana, AFI, Rise Against, Failure, Weezer, Green Day, Kiss, The Hellacopters, Backyard Babies, Guns N' Roses, Neil Young, Van Halen, Brand New, Blind Guardian, Metallica (on the "Load", "Reload" and "Garage Inc." albums, "The God That Failed" and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 1995), AC/DC (some songs and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 2008), Slayer, Alcest, Rage Against The Machine, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Yngwie Malmsteen, Alice in Chains, The Smashing Pumpkins, The Killers, Relient K, Suede, RED on "Not Alone", Beach House, Third Day (on "I Can Feel It"), Die Ärzte (since "Geräusch") Skillet (on "A Little More"), and Vertical Horizon, Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown.
The FX8 lets you configure up to eight effects per preset, from a list of impressive effects that are modeled from classic to modern stompboxes. It also offers a more traditional work flow via Fractal Audio's "Scenes" mode, which lets you assign effects to footswitches, turning the unit into a virtual stompbox pedalboard. And since it utilizes the same algorithm as their premium processors, you can be sure that each effect model has the same sound quality. Fractal Audio is also known for their boutique like attention to detail and build quality, which is prevalent in the FX8's design. Most notably its footswitches which are designed to have no-mechanical contacts, meaning no noise and improved reliability.
This is my new, energetic positive corporate music track with confident bright mood, which contains happy optimistic piano and synth solo, driving electric guitars, drums and live bass. This track can be used as a motivational musical background for business websites, computer games, tv or radio jingles, advertising and commercial youtube video, etc. Enjoy!

Footswitches allow for handsfree control of your multi-effects pedal, so having more of them is good, as long as you're OK with the added bulk and weight that they require. Some processors have a stompbox mode feature that lets you utilize footswitches much like a traditional pedalboard, but most of the time the switches serve as preset selectors, along with other secondary uses.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
I have a yamaha sg 1000 like Carlos Santana's. It rocks! I tried it with a Gibson sg of the same price and it didn't match the quality. Then I tried a Les Paul Gibson about one and a half grand more, even that wasn't as good as the sg 1000. Lets face it, the Japanese (this does include Ibanez for they are awesome too) kick ass when it comes to quality and price!
Carvin is well-known for their fantastic guitars and amazing amplifiers, but that’s not all. There is one aspect in particular that makes Carvin guitars just a little bit more unique. They only sell their instruments by special order. Going to a random guitar shop to try a Carvin is just plain impossible. The only way you can test one is by going to one of their few stores in California. The base models cover just about any style you can imagine. From acoustic guitars to electric basses, they’ll cover your needs. When it comes to styles, they have those heavy metal jagged edges to smooth curves. They are highly customizable and it’s a certainty that they’ll have what you want. If you’re extremely picky or just know exactly what you want, Carvin will help you get your dream guitar. You can choose the tonewood, materials, different colours and finishes, basically anything and everything is available.
Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup configurations to find out what you need.
The Neoclassical Speed Strategies for Guitar is another book we’d recommend more for the seasoned player. This one provides an excellent introduction into fingerpicking with helpful illustrations of exactly how to position yourself for the quickest and most efficient playing. It includes lots of helpful examples and exercises to make it easier to master.
Wah – a frequency-based effect that creates a sound similar to a voice saying “Wah”. A Wah pedal uses a filter that sweeps across the frequency band. In a pedal wah, pressing the toe down will make the guitar signal brighter; heel down makes the signal darker. The filter can be controlled either automatically by electronics within the pedal or manually by the use of an expression pedal giving the guitarist’s hands-free control over their tone.
Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.
The relationship between power output in watts and perceived volume is not immediately obvious. The human ear perceives a 5-watt amplifier as half as loud as a 50-watt amplifier (a tenfold increase in power), and a half-watt amplifier is a quarter as loud as a 50-watt amp. Doubling the output power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural compressor at high volumes.
The previously discussed I-IV-V chord progressions of major triads is a subsequence of the circle progression, which ascends by perfect fourths and descends by perfect fifths: Perfect fifths and perfect fourths are inverse intervals, because one reaches the same pitch class by either ascending by a perfect fourth (five semitones) or descending by a perfect fifth (seven semitones). For example, the jazz standard Autumn Leaves contains the iv7-VII7-VIM7-iiø7-i circle-of-fifths chord-progression;[80] its sevenths occur in the tertian harmonization in sevenths of the minor scale.[81] Other subsequences of the fifths-circle chord-progression are used in music. In particular, the ii-V-I progression is the most important chord progression in jazz music.
If your guitar is your personality, your amp is your voice. Together, they join forces to deliver your sound. Choosing the right amp ensures the audience hears each note, chord, bend, and trill-just the way you intended. From the compact convenience of a combo amp to the iconic stack to the bone-crushing fury of a wall of cabinets, your new amp is in stock and ready to ship at AMS. Read more

The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.
alright i think we all need to stop hating on john mayer. I don't think that he really would even call himself one of the best guitarists of all time, he's obviously not far enough into his career to be criticized about this stuff. But i love him, and he eventually will make it on this list. Oh, and for all you who say he sucks and whatever, if he is so bad then why has he played with so many of the people who actually should deserve to be on this list?
The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).

The pickup selector switch as the name implies allows you to select which pickup produces sound. In some cases, it will be your neck pickup, bridge pickup or a combination of both. In other cases, such as the Fender Stratocaster there are three pickups which utilize a 5-way selector switch. This also allows each pickup to be isolated or used in combination.

A common misconception of the Lyle brand, among others, was that Norlin sued Matsumoku for copying their designs and shut them down. The actual lawsuit was indeed filed by Norlin, only not against Matsumoku but Elger/Hoshino--the American division of Ibanez--over elements of the Les Paul and SG guitar designs that Norlin/Gibson had since claimed as a trademark. The case was eventually settled out of court. Japanese companies preemptively altered the designs of their guitars in such a way that they would not be "exact" copies of Gibson guitars. The true story of the demise of the Lyle brand is largely unknown to this day.


I am running the TimeLine, Mobius, Big Sky and Flint along with a few JHS drive pedals and a POG. I have a 5 channel true bypass looper and use a DMC-3XL and TNT tap to control my MIDI devices. In the past I have had all of my drives and POG in the 5 channel looper. But I have reduced significantly the number of drives I am running. I run a SP compressor and an EM-Drive at the beginning of my chain that are my always on pedals & I’m not sure I need them in my loop. I also cut down to 2 drive pedals (JHS Double Barrel & Jetter Gold Standard). Would I be able to run the TimeLine, Big Sky, and Mobius through the bypass looper and leave them always on but bypass through that? Should/Do I need to use a TRS to do this run since I am going straight into the in/out signals? I’m trying to do some experimenting but wanted to get your opinion as well.


Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.

Drop A in D standard variation - A-G-C-F-a-D: Used by Mastodon on most of their first album (Remission) and on some songs on other albums. Also utilized by Periphery on the song "Zyglrox" as well as "Alpha" and "The Bad Thing." Also used on occasion by Black Label Society, who previously tuned it a half-step up, which Alter Bridge also utilizes on some of their songs such as "Broken Wings", "Come to Life", "I Know it Hurts", "Still Remains", "Breath Again", and "All Hope is Gone." Creed, Architects, and Sevendust all use this tuning tuned a half-step down on their songs "Bread of Shame", "Early Grave", and "Home" and "Chop" respectively, with the latter also tuning down a full step for the songs "Death Dance" and "Not Today". Danish industrial metal band Raunchy used this tuning tuned one and a half-step down (F#-E-A-D-f#-B) on the song "Dim the Lights and Run" from the album A Discord Electric. Wage War also utilize this tuning one whole step down for songs like "The River" and "Spineless" off their album Blueprints.

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