There is clearly a great deal that the guitarist can do for the sound by changing guitars, strings and amps, but from the perspective of the recording engineer it's also important to think about how the guitar cab is interacting with the room it's in. For example, Roy Thomas Baker mentions that he sometimes sets up the same guitar cab in different rooms because of the effect on the sound. Even if you're restricted to one room, a number of producers suggest trying out different positions of the amp in the room. Tony Visconti: "It's not so much that you're miking a guitar — you're miking a guitar in a room. I had a cellist in here recently, and I moved her until I got a good sound. Once I put her in one particular corner, her cello just sang — the room just filled up with the low end, and the sound exploded! A person who hasn't had years of experience might not have thought of doing that, but I could tell there was something lacking when she was in the centre of the room. That's mic technique. It's not so much the instrument; the room is very much part of the sound."
The steel-string beauty is crafted from solid Sitka spruce on the top, which features solid Indian rosewood back and sides, and a slim mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard. You’ll notice some impressive decoration on the BR-160 (as we mention in our full review), including an exclusive Dalmatian-style tortoiseshell pickguard, accurate 14:1 butterbean-style tuners, and an elaborately decorated motherof-pearl headstock.

"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)
Shreddage 2: Absolute Electric Guitar is our answer to the challenge of total guitar sampling. It is a complete instrument with elegant scripting, intuitive mapping, and incredible depth. This virtual guitar for Kontakt is the ultimate weapon for rock & metal music, built from the ground up for realistic playing in any hi-gain style. All samples were recorded on a 7-string guitar and are provided clean/DI so you can use your own custom amp tone - or use the included Peavey ReValver HPse.
The Triple Crown TC-50 is a three-channel amp, with independent preamps covering clean, low-gain and high-gain ranges. The front panel packs three identical sets of controls including gain, master volume, bass, mid, treble and presence, together with a two-way toggle switch that changes the channel gain and voice. There’s a small toggle switch for manual channel changing, and a pair of master output level controls, one of which is footswitchable. The feature-rich rear panel includes Mesa’s exceptional CabClone speaker-emulated output, with a balanced XLR, headphones socket and line out. The TC-50 also benefits from a footswitchable effects loop, separate reverb level controls for each channel, and MIDI switching for all the major functions. The Triple Crown’s clean channel is highly versatile, going from butter-sweet clarity through to edgy blues soloing, with a lot of control over that ‘just on the edge’ sweet spot. The Lo Gain channel is where the TC-50’s crunch and classic rock tones live, with a multi-layered overdrive and harmonic overtones that shift with varying degrees of pick attack. Flipping the toggle switch into Drive mode adds a subtle midrange bump, invoking JCM800-approved snarl and a dose of extra gain. The Hi Gain channel adds more of the same - lots more, so much so that in the upper reaches we think this is probably the most gain ever from a Mesa amp. No doubt about it, the Triple Crown has three channels packed full of world-class tone that only a handful of amps can compete with.
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
Firebird is one of those less known, but legendary Gibson models. The 2016 version brings the core of what this bodyshape is all about, with more modern components. Even though my experience with Gibson Firebird is very limited, it’s one mighty guitar. It comes with mini humbuckers, and the sound is pretty unique. You can play anything from rock to metal on this bad boy, without being limited in any way.
If your audio track suffers from a lot of spill, or includes chords, the pitch correction may not work correctly. Where spill is loud enough to be audible, you'll hear this being modulated in pitch alongside the wanted part of the audio as it is corrected. As a rule, chords are ignored, so guitar solos, bowed stringed instruments and bass parts (including fretless) can be processed, and only single notes will be corrected.
Our Parlor size guitars are approximately 25% smaller than our full size guitars but what really makes them special is they have a 2 inch shorter neck design. This means children and small adults (under 5 ft tall) don’t have to reach as far holding certain chords making playability even easier. Most of our customers buying our Parlor guitars are coming from little Martins and Taylors.  They say the Easy Play Parlor has 30-50% easier playability and sound is slightly richer and deeper.  Shipped from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska.  100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
What makes a good beginner electric guitar? Well, it should be cheap and easy to setup so you can start playing immediately. After comparing almost 13 guitars, we believe that Squier by Fender Bullet Strat is the best electric guitar for beginners. You don't have to take my word for it, but there has been some pretty solid positive reviews about this guitar.
Music enthusiasts can find a wide range of new and used guitar amplifiers on eBay, often for deep discounts.  Buyers who want to explore a wide range of possibilities should simply enter the keywords "guitar amplifier" into the eBay search bar, while those with more particular needs can refine their search by adding keywords associated with the make and model of the amplifier, as well as its color or condition.  The "ask the seller a question" feature will enable the buyer to ask additional questions pertaining to style, sound, and condition (if the guitar amplifier is used).
EMG DG20 David Gilmour Wired Pickguard   New from$329.00In Stockor 8 payments of $41.13 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Seymour Duncan SH4 JB Humbucker Pickup   New from$79.00In Stockor 4 payments of $19.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson '57 Classic Humbucker Pickup   New from$164.99In Stockor 4 payments of $41.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING EMG JH Set Custom James Hetfield Signature Pickup Set   New from$249.00In Stockor 6 payments of $41.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Pickups
A common format of bass amplifier–the "combo" amp–contains the amplifier electronics and one or more speakers in a single wooden cabinet. Combo amps have been used by musicians since the 1920s, as they are convenient for transporting to rehearsals and for performances at small to mid-size venues. Combo amps range from small, low-powered "practice amps" used for individual practice, to mid- and large-size and more powerful combo amps which produce enough volume for rehearsals and small to mid-size venues (e.g., nightclubs). For larger venues, such as stadiums, bassists may use the "bass stack" approach, in which one or more separate speaker cabinets, each with one or more speakers (but not containing an amplifier) and a separate "head" containing the amplifier electronics are used. With a large "bass stack", a bassist can obtain a much higher wattage and onstage volume than a "combo" amp could provide. As with an electric guitar amp, a bass amp is not simply used to make the instrument louder; performers use the preamplifier and equalizer controls and, particularly in amps from the 1980s and 1990s onward, the onboard electronic effects, to create their preferred tone.
Lyle guitars were some of the best COPY CAT guitars made during the LAWSUIT years - years where Lyle (made in Japan) attempted to COPY higher end American made Gibson and Fender guitars - hence 'lawsuit' guitars. There are some other companies that attempted to 'copy' American instruments but many of those were made in Korea or other countries and were not of the quality that the Japanese 'Lyle' copies of American instruments. They would have done well to make their own branded guitars - they're very well made. Another 'copy' company from that era is Ibanez - they made excellent instruments, too, and they paid quality guitarists to help them market their marque - George Benson, for example. Enjoy your guitar.
Usual general wear. Some noticeable impression marks on face. Piece of decorative trim missing from headstock. Plays but Action is high. Neck truss needs adjusting. There is a slight buzz with action as it is (sounds like it's from bridge area). Frets look good. Not perfect but a classic in good condition in need of a little tune up. SOLD AS IS. Ships wrapped and secured inside a Road Runner hard shell case which itself will be plastic wrapped. Ships Priority from Alaska.
Fuzz – A dynamic distortion effect that sounds just like the name. Fuzz was originally created by putting a pinhole or cut in the speaker of an amplifier. Original fuzz pedals use a transistor-based circuit to create the sound. Compared to distortion, fuzz is more raw, abrasive and doesn’t compress the tone. These pedals typically perform best at the front of your effects chain into a clean amplifier.
The lowest note on the double bass or four-stringed electric bass is E1, two octaves below middle C (approximately 41 Hz), and on a five-string it is B0 (approximately 31 Hz).[22] The requirement to reproduce low frequencies at high sound pressure levels means that most loudspeakers used for bass guitar amplification are designed around large diameter, heavy-duty drivers, with 10", 12" and 15" being most common. Less commonly, larger speakers (e.g., 18") or smaller speakers (e.g., the 8x8" cabinet, which contains eight 8" speakers) may be used. As a general rule, when smaller speakers are used, two or more of them are installed in a cabinet (e.g., 2x10", 4x10" and 8x8"). For 12" speakers, combo amps and cabinets are available with 1x12" and 2x12"; less commonly, 4x12" cabinets are seen. For 15" speakers, combo amps and cabinets usually have 1x15", although 2x15" and even 4x15" cabinets exist (Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead used 4x15" cabinets). A small number of 1x18" bass cabinets are sold (e.g., Trace Elliot).
Although there are now several digital guitar recording preamps which model amps and cabs, the Roland VG88's split pickup system allows you also to experiment with modelled guitars and pickups.Digital noise removal plug-ins (again best used before delay effects are added), produce even fewer side-effects and so may be the best option when recording into a computer-based system. However, you can often achieve a worthwhile improvement using simple low-pass filters — before I moved over to working almost exclusively on the computer, I often used the side-chain high-cut filter in my Drawmer DS201 gate to remove hiss from guitar tracks. The sharper the filter, the less the wanted sound will be affected, so a plug-in with an 18 or even 24dB/octave slope should be even more effective than the 12dB/octave filters the Drawmer uses. The trick when setting them up is to pick the lowest shelving frequency that doesn't materially change the original sound, other than to take the edge off the hiss. Using filters in this way also helps reduce finger noise and squeaking on acoustic guitar parts and can even help disguise moderate clipping distortion caused by recording at too high a level.

As an acoustic guitar player, and not a very good one at that, I'm always looking for some advantages, and by advantages I mean something that will make me sound better, not necessarily play better. So when I heard about a device that can add distortion, or reverb, or echo effects to an acoustic instrument, without needing to plug in to an external amp, I didn't believe it until I saw/heard for myself.

Steve Albini, on the other hand, finds it useful to think in terms of blending 'bright' and 'dark' mics. "Normally I'll have two microphones on each cabinet, a dark mic and a bright mic, say a ribbon microphone and a condenser, or two different condensers with different characters." Eddie Kramer's discussion of his Hendrix sessions reveals a similar preference: "Generally speaking, it was either a U67 or a Beyerdynamic M160, or a combination of both, which I still use today. It might be slightly different, of course, but the basic principle's the same — a ribbon and a condenser."

Unlike the Gio model of Ibanez included in their guitar package that only has two humbuckers for pick-ups. The GRX70QA has the three pick-ups configuration made popular by Ibanez consisting of neck humbucker, middle single-coil, and humbucker for the bridge. This pick-up combination goes well with the 5-way switching controls, volume and tone, to harness the sound esteemed for the kind of play.


Being in the entry level section of the market, the Blackstar ID:Core Stereo 20 V2 is meant to be an all-in-one practice rig complete with amp modeling and effects. But what makes it stand out is the use of two 5" speakers for a fuller stereo sound, which complements the amp's versatile voicing features. Speaking of voicing, this amp is loaded with 6 essential tones to play with, two variations of clean (warm and bright), crunch (normal and super) and overdrive (OD1 and OD2), which by themselves are enough to play most musical styles. But being from Blackstar, this amp is equipped with their ISF (Infinite Shape Feature) knob that lets you fine tune the voicing of the amp to your preference. In addition, the ID:Core Stereo 20 V2 comes with 12 built-in effects, covering essential modulation types, delays and reverbs, all of which add up to a portable amp that gives you a lot of tone options.

The solid-body electric guitar is made of solid wood, without functionally resonating air spaces. The first solid-body Spanish standard guitar was offered by Vivi-Tone no later than 1934. This model featured a guitar-shaped body of a single sheet of plywood affixed to a wood frame. Another early, substantially solid Spanish electric guitar, called the Electro Spanish, was marketed by the Rickenbacker guitar company in 1935 and made of Bakelite. By 1936, the Slingerland company introduced a wooden solid-body electric model, the Slingerland Songster 401 (and a lap steel counterpart, the Songster 400).
Splitting the humbucker #1: by grounding the coil-tap and connecting the hot lead to output we’re rendering the coil closer to ground useless because both of it’s leads are grounded. What we’re left with is the coil closer to the hot lead. Since we only have one coil, it will not be hum-cancelling on it’s own. It’s common to split a humbucker, so it can be wired with another coil in parallel, making the noiseless combination, especially on H-S-H guitars.
Start with all of the mics clustered together three to six inches from the grille cloth, pointed at the center of the speaker. On a multiple-speaker cabinet, don't assume that all the speakers sound the same. Rather, listen to each of them at a sensible volume, and then mic the one that sounds best. If the speakers sound alike, a miking position close to the floor will generally provide a little more low end.
The following songs have been selected to highlight some of the best electric guitar songs from the 1980s. Each song includes links to tab, and wherever possible links to free audio versions of the song. A guideline for the difficulty of each song has been included. The assumption with these guidelines is beginner guitarists can play the ​basic essential open chords, F major, plus basic power chords. Difficulty assessments do not include the guitar solos.
Low frets aren't a bad idea, and Carvin is a very good brand for guitar, amp, etc. To me, it seems that the neck shape is going to be very important for you. Double-check what Carvin's return policy is, and if you think it will work for you (whatever it is) then I would totally say go for it! The caveat is that I would bring it to your local music store for them to do the setup, setups and intonations usually need to be done after shipping, and you'd need to have it done if you were changing string gauges anyways, so....
Drop A in D standard variation - A-G-C-F-a-D: Used by Mastodon on most of their first album (Remission) and on some songs on other albums. Also utilized by Periphery on the song "Zyglrox" as well as "Alpha" and "The Bad Thing." Also used on occasion by Black Label Society, who previously tuned it a half-step up, which Alter Bridge also utilizes on some of their songs such as "Broken Wings", "Come to Life", "I Know it Hurts", "Still Remains", "Breath Again", and "All Hope is Gone." Creed, Architects, and Sevendust all use this tuning tuned a half-step down on their songs "Bread of Shame", "Early Grave", and "Home" and "Chop" respectively, with the latter also tuning down a full step for the songs "Death Dance" and "Not Today". Danish industrial metal band Raunchy used this tuning tuned one and a half-step down (F#-E-A-D-f#-B) on the song "Dim the Lights and Run" from the album A Discord Electric. Wage War also utilize this tuning one whole step down for songs like "The River" and "Spineless" off their album Blueprints.
So leaving aside the complexities of exactly emulating acoustic instruments with speaker technology -- which we have all come to accept although no speaker can sound quite as sweet as (or at least not exactly like) the acoustical nuance of a fine wooden stringed instrument, we reach the vast majority of modern music - amplified sounds. Again, stringed instruments are among the most difficult to emulate, if not the most difficult to emulate technologically, because of the vast and infinitely variable set performance possibilities which in turn produce a vast and infinitely variable set of physical reactions. Even if MIDI notation can document the coordinated left-hand/right-hand performance of various pitches, velocities, durations and legato, our VST is strained to faithfully reproduce every possible physical result of every possible combination of performed licks.
I've been coming in since they opened, and it's been crazy cool to watch this little corner shop grow into a major Seattle contender. That's really saying something, as there are some really incredible locally-owned guitar shops in the Greater Seattle Area. As has been mentioned, the service is the selling point. The entire staff are very, very cool people who are perfectly happy to talk shop without trying to push you on a sale. There's a lot of regulars, and combined with the student roster, it definitely has it's own little built in community. Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop. Kyle, the tech, is an expert. The other guys all do good work as well. This is my go-to shop for basically everything guitar-shop related. And I'm very picky.
The neck wood is used for the headstock and for the back of the neck (where your thumb rests when playing the instrument). Be careful not to confuse the neck wood with the fretboard wood, as they are separate and different. All our necks are handcrafted from quality tone woods. If you're just starting out, we recommend you choose the wood that appeals to you most based on its appearance, and don't worry too much about how the type of wood affects the sound or performance of the instrument.
On a Gibson type (like the Les Paul, 335 or SG) there are four knobs, one set of volume and tone controls for each of two pickups. The top two are volume and tone for the neck (Rythm) pickup. The bottom two are for the bridge (Treble) pickup. In the middle switch position, both sets of controls are available. If you have a Gibson type with three pickups the control layout can vary from instrument to instrument. The Epiphone Les Paul SG with three pickups has three volumes (one for each pickup) and a single (or master) tone control just next to the output jack. The Ace Frehley Les Paul (3 pickups) layout is such where the neck (Rythm) pickup is controlled by the top pair, the bridge (Treble) pickup is controlled by the bottom pair and the middle switch position activates the bridge and middle pickups that are controlled by the bottom set (Treble) of knobs.

If you are serious about studying guitar and taking your playing to the next level, you must possess not just a command of chords and scales but an understanding of improvisation and how to express depth and feeling. This certificate program, taught by Berklee’s world-renowned guitar faculty, enables you to develop your guitar technique and hone your skills in any style, from rock, jazz, and country to metal, blues, and beyond. Upon completion, you’ll be able to recreate parts played by your guitar heroes—but more importantly, you’ll be better able to realize your own unique sound.
We spent 45 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. One of the best things about an electric guitar is its portability. Most times, however, you can't say that about the amps you need to go along with them. Fortunately, these mini amplifiers have come along, developed by the top names in full-size models, and offer incredible sound quality in an exceedingly portable package. We've ranked these micro monsters by tonal character, power, and control. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best mini guitar amplifier on Amazon.
Congratulations on buying yourself a top-notch axe — but you’re not ready to shred just yet. A good guitar also requires the right amp to achieve the right sound. Amps can be a daunting purchase (you certainly won’t be starved for choices on the beginner and enthusiast side of the price spectrum) and there are a lot of qualities that need to be taken into account. Want a low-cost amp that’s durable? Shoot for a solid-state amp. Want better sound? We suggest an all-tube amp instead. Want the most tonal variety on a budget? A modeling amp will get you all kinds of sounds without requiring a fleshed-out pedal board. But at any rate, no matter what you’re looking for in an amplifier, these 10 picks cover all the fundamental bases. So purchase, plug in and let’s rip.
Some guitars are equipped with active pickups that require batteries as an energy source and incorporate a preamp for sound-shaping. Active electronics may also include filters and equalization circuits for added sound control. Guitars with active electronics generally have a higher output than magnetic pickups and produce cleaner, clearer sound. Most guitar pickups are passive.
We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .010 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!), cleaning and polishing. One of the best things about this guitar is the modification to a factory flaw that most TW's we've seen have. The finger board is too long from the nut to the first fret, thus most all of these we have seen will not intonate, thus not play in tune. We had a compensated nut, modified and installed on this one (see photo collage). I don't know where they acquired it, but it worked like a charm. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 "Round-wound" strings. Guitar looks near new and plays great. No case.
After the introduction of the Fender Stratocaster Ultra series in 1989, ebony was officially selected as a fretboard material on some models (although several Elite Series Stratocasters manufactured in 1983/84 such as the Gold and Walnut were available with a stained ebony fretboard). In December 1965 the Stratocaster was given a broader headstock with altered decals to match the size of the Jazzmaster and Fender Jaguar.
John Mayer: features a select alder body, a thick C-shape maple neck with African rosewood fingerboard and 21 Jim Dunlop 6105 narrow-jumbo frets, American Vintage hardware and a trio of “Big Dipper” single-coils with a special “Scooped” midrange voicing and 5-way pickup switching. Available in a variety of finishes, including black with 3-ply mint green pickguard and gold hardware, 3-tone sunburst and olympic white with brown shell pickguard and as a limited-edition version with a cypress mica finish, white vintage amp knobs and a 3-ply parchment pickguard. In 2010, Fender also released a limited 500 run of John’s personal BLACK1 strat.
This guitar is perfect no matter if you’re a beginner or have been playing for many years. The design is vintage at its best, with a lovely soft V-shaped neck and great colors, namely Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red. This guitar has a very traditional look that most people like. True, some people would feel that it’s a little bit too mainstream, but others would reason that hey, if it’s good enough for everybody else, it’s good enough for me!

I participated in what I think was perhaps Gibson's best SG...a prototype made for Robbie Krieger. It had my then-patented carbon fiber "T" cross section fingerboard which absolutely took care of the #1 problem with SGs...the rubber neck syndrome. It also had a beautiful flame maple top on the mahogany body and it got a cherry sunburst. Fabulous guitar. Robbie must still have it.
In the fall of 1964, it's generally accepted that hide glue was replaced with white polyvinyl acetate PVA glue (Elmer's) after the move to the new Martin build facility. (But hide glue was still used until the mid-seventies for gluing tops to the rim and in some other situations.) A notation was written in Grant Remaley's personal memos on Sept 29, 1964 indicating Martin was starting to use "cold" glue. It is generally thought the type of glue used does affect the sound of the guitar. Starting some time in the 1980s Martin started switching from white glue to yellow aliphatic resin (titebond).

Here we have a Faithful Recreation of the classic Martin D-18 that was well crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This is an excellent vintage Japanese guitar as it has been well taken care of all these years And has spent its years in California in the perfect climate to preserve the guitars original structural and cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still JVG rated at very good to excellent with no cracks or finish checking none – clean and still shines like glass….. its 1-11/16ths at the nut neck is a nice comfortable medium slim profile, neck is straight with correct amount of slight relief, action is good medium low and plays with ease and sound is clear and volume is good, tone is vintage sweet from its Aged tone woods. This is a true Lawsuit model as it has the direct image shape & size of the vintage Martin it copies is is a very cool D-18 guitar, its 33 years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. .

Originally this effect used 1/4″ tape going round a machine like the Echoplex. It then recorded whatever you were playing and played it back to you a set time later.Since its launch in the 1950’s tape based delay started to appear in more and more recordings. Its saturated sound and imperfect repeats gave it some stunning character that is still loved today.Now tape is dwindling so most people have moved on to emulated digital pedals. These get close to the sound of an original tape unit without any of the added maintenance.
The Ibanez GRX20ZBKN is part of the GIO series developed for players who want Ibanez quality in a more affordable package. The guitar is suitable for all types of music, but often a favorite of rock, metal and shred lovers. It features an alder body and a maple neck which feels sleek and fast. Great for moving quickly up and down the neck for those fast riffs and licks. A solid good looking low budget guitar for the beginner and intermediate.
Pots generally come in two types: 500k or 250k. K refers to 1000 ohms and is a measure of resistance, which is the amount of resistance the signal from your pickup receives before being passed to your output. As a result, increasing or decreasing the amount of resistance your output receives via your volume pot affects the overall volume of your guitar.
In the vintage setup, the pickup is wired to the pot lug alone, with the tone control capacitor being attached to the output side. This tends to allow the volume to be rolled off without losing too much high end. This is great for those who play clean rhythm by just lowering their guitar volume as opposed to switching amp channels or turning off a boost pedal. It’s old-school, and it works. The downside is that the tone control sometimes has to be rotated a bit more before its effects are heard.
What can you expect from a shop whose exterior is painted in Eddie Van Halen stripes? Everything! Their selection of pedals was astounding. One of the largest selections I've come across in any store. I left having bought about a dozen things. Dangerous place! They are obviously a big dealer in PRS guitars because they had a nice selection of the USA made guitars. The Guitar Store represents Seattle right with an awesome staff and a vast selection of great guitars. With an ongoing series of in-store events and appearances by notable musicians, there is always a reason to stop in. Last year the shop hosted a monthly "build your own pedal" workshop--how cool is that?
Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE, is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009 In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately ...more on Wikipedia

The amp has the usual basic controls: Volume, Bass, and Treble, plus a Gain knob that adjusts the amount of distortion. Once you start turning some of the Champion 20’s other knobs, all sorts of additional tonal possibilities arise. The Voice knob accesses simulations of different amps: Tweed (1950s-era Fender amps heard on early R&B records such as “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” and “In the Midnight Hour”), Blackface (mid-1960s Fenders, often used by Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan), British (reminiscent of the classic Vox amps used by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and U2), and Metal (somewhat like the sound of the Marshall amplifiers favored by rock and metal players from Jimi Hendrix to Slash). Each of these four simulations has three different variations that alter the tone a bit.
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Should space restrictions or volume levels make these methods impractical, try adding an air-guitar part as an overdub to a conventionally miked guitar track. The principle is similar to vocal doubling, for which the same part is performed twice; you may not be able to do this for an improvised solo, but for rhythm parts or composed lines, it's a snap. In addition, double tracking with a bright acoustic guitar or a smooth-sounding hollow body will add extra richness and some slick, big-budget zing to your mixes.
In any case, by late 1933 or early ’34, Dobro expanded its amp line to include what is probably the first twin-speaker amplifier! This had a football-shaped speaker grille with lyre and Dobro insets, and two 8″ Lansing field coil speakers. Nothing else is known about this amp, but it may have had the same chassis as the single-speaker version. It can be seen on page 104 of Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (All American Music Publishers, 1988).

From its beginnings in 1970, Mesa/Boogie was beloved for its small-but-powerful Mark series amps; in 1989, however, the company decided to take its game to a new audience. The result was the Rectifier range of bigger and beefier Dual and Triple Rectifier amps. Since then, the Dual Rectifier has become one of the most popular rock amps on the planet.
By the way, I’d like to also take this opportunity to thank collector and one of VG’s earliest subscribers Jim Dulfer for invaluable help in an ongoing research effort, providing access to his truly impressive paper collection and photographs of some of his instruments. These catalogs are filling in many, many holes in information. You will be reaping the benefits in upcoming “Different Strummer” columns in both information and illustrations, as well as in upcoming book project. Thanks to Jim from guitar fans everywhere!
Gibson is easily one of the most identifiable guitar brands in the world today, and even with the premium price tags of their instruments, many continue to look up to them as their dream instruments. Thankfully, the company has toned down the price a bit on some of their guitars, one of which is the J-15, which enters this list with its good balance of workhorse ready features, premium prestige and reasonable price tag.
Mic placement is pretty crucial. You can get a million different EQ responses depending on where you throw the mic in front of the cab. I personally have the best luck - or at least I think so - when I back the mic off a little bit. I know a lot of engineers throw it right on the grille to get the bass boost, the proximity effect and all that garbage, but I find that if I back it up about six inches, I get a more balanced EQ curve.
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.
Look for lyrics or chord changes. Many songs have guitar parts made up solely (or mostly) of chords. This is especially true for rhythm guitar parts. In this case, the tab may forgo typical tab notation in favor of a simplified list of chord changes. These chords are almost always written in standard chord notation (Amin = A minor, E7 = E dominant 7, etc.) Simply play the chords in the order that they're listed - if it's not noted otherwise, try playing one chord per measure, but if the changes don't sound right, listen to the song for the strumming pattern.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
CALIFORNIA CLASSIC models feature superb playability, distinctive looks and an unmistakable Fender vibe. The fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and natural solid mahogany back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and koa binding and rosette, give them an elegant two-toned aesthetic that was made for the stage. California Special and California Classic acoustic guitars are equipped with a Fender- and Fishman-designed PM preamp specifically tuned to complement the unique shape and voice of each instrument—complete with tuner, frequency and phase controls.
The AX8 features the same core modelling engine as the Axe-Fx II for identical sound quality, but has different CPU power and offers just one rather than two amp blocks in its signal chain. It's still pretty potent, though, with 512 onboard presets that are built from a series of blocks. You get amp and cabinet blocks plus blocks for the most commonly used effects, and a looper. There are 222 amp models, over 130 Factory cabs, plus 512 User Cab memory slots and loads of effects. Everything has a massive amount of editable parameters to get the sound just right, either accessed from the AX8's physical controls or via the free editing software if you connect it to a computer. With rock-solid construction, the AX8 lays out its 11 footswitches in an easily accessible manner. All of them can be assigned to a host of tasks, all aimed at making your onstage experience go as smoothly as possible. Sound-wise, Fractal's realistic amp tones, carefully tailored cabinet models and crystal-clear effects give you tones that can stand up next to any conventional amp and effects rig. If you like the idea of an Axe-Fx II but aren't keen on the rackmount format or thought it out of your price range, the AX8 may be right up your street.
I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.
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Another factor that may need to be considered is the length of the speaker cable. Very long speaker cable runs may affect the performance of the system, either by causing line loss of power or by affecting the impedance. For best performance and highest wattage output with bass stacks or combos with extension speakers, bassists typically use the shortest possible speaker cable.
While you can learn on any of these, we recommend a solid-body guitar, which includes all the models featured on this page. The main advantage of a solid body guitar for beginners is that they are easier to control in front of an amplifier. By this we mean you are unlikely to experienced squealing feedback from the amp, which can be a big annoyance when it happens all the time. Solid body guitars are often simpler to hold as well, as hollow models tend to be a bit bigger in size.
Before we go into the parts of an electric guitar, it’s worth noting that there are three different body types: solid body, hollow body, and semi-hollow body. The main difference between them is the way the bodies are constructed, and the amount of resonance they produce. If you’re into punk, rock, metal, or any style of fast or heavy music, then it should be solid body all the way. It allows for louder sounds and more sustain, while avoiding the feedback issues that affect some hollow bodied instruments at higher volumes. The hollow and semi-hollow bodied guitars on the market will appeal to players who prefer softer styles, such as jazz, country and blues, as well as soft rock and pop, as they offer a full, rich and more resonant sound with lots of bass. Beginners will be best off sticking to a solid bodied guitar, as they are easier to handle in most scenarios. For the rest of this anatomical breakdown we’ll focus on solid body guitars.
When in doubt, reach for the Dummies guide. These standardized, annotated guides have taught countless people to do countless things that were once over their respective heads. Like the Hal Leonard complete guide above, this massive, 648 page door stop includes six different sub-books, including three basics volumes and three genre-specific guides. It’s the everything-to-everyone approach. It might be overwhelming, but at least you’ll have everything you need in one place.
If you see a "\n/," where n = some number, perform a tremolo bar dip. Quickly hit and release the bar to dip the note's pitch. The number between the slashes gives an indication of the pitch you should dip to - dip the pitch by "n" semitones (a semitone is the same as the pitch between two adjacent frets.)[1] For instance, "\5/" means to drop the pitch by 5 semitones, which will be the same tone as 5 frets below the original note.
The phrase “guitar amplifier” in itself is almost a bit misleading. Sure, it “amplifies” your guitar — but guitar amps really do so much more. Arguably, even as much as your choice of guitar, your amplifier will have an immeasurable influence on your sound. Beyond the basics of volume, bass, midrange and treble, your amp can provide warmth or bite to your sound, or anything from a sparkling clean tone to a blazing distortion. Amplifiers are constructed utilizing different size (or even multiple) speakers and can derive their tone from tubes, transistors, or even digital modeling. They can be very basic with just one volume knob; or they can offer a variety of gain and EQ options along with built-in effects.
Also joining the Univox amp line in ’71 (illustrated in a ’72 flyer) was the Univox U-4100 Minimax Amplifier, already showing a different style, with dark tolex covering but still the oval logo plate on the upper left of the grille, now covered in black with vertical “dotted” lines (surrounded by a white vinyl strip). The Minimax was designed for use with bass, organ, electric piano or guitar, but really was a bass combo amp. It packed 105 watts through a 15″ Special Design speaker with 27-ounce Alnico magnet and 21/2″ voice coil, powered by 11 transistors, no tubes. The back-mounted chassis had two channels with high and low inputs, plus volume, bass and treble controls for each channel. Recommended especially for keyboards was an optional UHF-2 High Frequency Horns unit with two horns for extra bite. The flyer for this amp was still in the 1980 Unicord book, but a ’79 price list no longer mentions it, and it was probably long gone, though some may still have been in stock.
The $300-$500 price range of acoustic guitars is perfect for all levels of players. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, this price point gets you a good guitar that will sound great while not breaking the bank. While you won’t find any American made acoustics under $500, you will find some by popular American brands offering cheaper versions of their high end guitars that are made in Mexico or China.

Processors, on the other hand, comprise an entirely different water heating appliance filled with piscean vertebrates, as they tend not to need any of the dry sound, other than in a few specialist applications. As a rule, processors such as EQ and compression are connected only via track, bus or master insert points — at least until you have the necessary experience to understand why you might want to break the rules once in a while. Having got that off my chest, let's look at some specific effects (we'll look more closely at processors another time).
The Epiphone DR-100 acoustic guitar definitely falls under the category of “entry-level” or “student” instrument, but sound quality has not been sacrificed for the sake of a lower price point. Many guitar instructors urge their students to invest in this model because of its resonant mahogany components. There can be some buzzing because of its lower action, but beginners will have a better learning experience because of the improved tonality. Epiphone is a strong name in guitars, and considering the low price, the DR-100 is a good buy. We recommend it for the mahogany alone, but the tone quality is also appropriate – and perhaps even better than it should be – for the price.

The JX44 Air Control™ allows up to four guitars and six amps to be used at once, as well as a built-in Radial DI, an SGI interface for longer cable runs, and an X-Amp to make the reamping process incredibly efficient. No wonder it won the Music Players ‘Wish I Had One’ award! Pair it with a Headbone amp head switcher and the JDX 48 for the ultimate in control and consistent tone night after night.
With the PAC112V there is no harm going with the crowds. The Pacifica is a crowd-pleaser precisely because of its versatility – and so whilst it might have a very recognisable look, this electric gives you the opportunity to craft a sound that is entirely your own. The only drawback is its weight, which is not much of a drawback at all – particularly for this price.
Both Brian May from Queen and Ritchie Blackmore did use treble boosters for sure in their rigs to get more gain out of their amps. Germanium transistors are very inconsistent and are subject to temperature changes so they can be finicky. They also certainly color your tone to a large extent, which is something you may want. Clean boosts that use silicon transistors are much more common and reliable, they can also boost your signal without effecting your tone too much. For a general clean boost I would go for a modern one. If you want an old school sound, I’d check out a germanium based unit. Or like me, I’d get both.
The Ibanez pickup sound is great and solidly diverse throughout the 5-options, providing lots of versatility for a variety of different music styles.The tuning is nice and extremely stable, and you can even dive-bomb on the whammy without throwing it out of whack. The frets are perfect, and the action is almost perfect, with that quality feel to it.

 Everybody needs to start somewhere. However, where you start often decides where you end up. For example, if you buy a bad guitar when you start playing, you are a lot more likely to stop playing, and if it happens, you wouldn't be buying any more guitars. We believe guitar manufacturers have a sort of duty to make and supply reliable guitars for beginners. Guitars at beginners' level are as important as high-end guitars for pro. This is where Smash comes in.
As early as 1924 or so, Lloyd Loar had experimented with amplifying acoustic instruments, though it would not be until the ’30s that his efforts would pan out (without great commercial success). He was undoubtedly ahead of his time. The only amplifier technology available to Loar was primitive radio amplification, hardly adequate for cutting through the horn section. As the ’20s progressed, Hollywood invented “talkies,” and huge valve amplifiers were developed to fill theaters (the music trade press at the time repeatedly published essays assuring musician readers that talkies would have absolutely no effect on the jobs of theater organists!). Part of this technological development included the invention of more and more tubes and the improvement of older designs, which increased the possibilities for instrumental amplification.

Winner of the prestigious Music Inc. Product Excellence Award, 2017, the HeadRush Pedalboard Guitar Amp And FX Modelling Processor wholeheartedly deserves a spot on our best multi FX pedals list, thanks to the huge amount of effects within as well as its vast array of amplifier, cabinet and mic models. This is one of the best options for working musicians, yet still remains affordable.
Today I was working on my fave guitar, a James Trussart Steelcaster. Instead of reconnecting my tone pot and capacitor as usual, I ran two wires from the tone pot’s wiper and ground terminals, the spots where the cap normally connects, and soldered them to a little piece of stripboard with sockets for connecting the caps. Then I recorded quick demos for six possible cap values. I started with the two most common values, and then added two lower values and two higher ones.
:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335 as part of its Electric Spanish line of guitars, and it was the world’s first commercially released semi-hollow guitar. Featuring a solid center block in an otherwise hollow thinline body, the then-radical design effectively combined the round, airy tone of a traditional archtop with the sustain and feedback-fighting benefits of a solidbody. Its groundbreaking design is one of the most imitated around.
Yeah there is no double about it the Epiphone Special 11 is unreal value for money and even though I have over the years filled my Den with guitars some worth a lot of money the Epiphone Special 11 is my go to guitar. I just cannot fault, great tuners, pickups and basically the only guitar I have that stays in tune 90% plus of the time. It is also the lightest of my guitar collection weighing in at about 5.5lbs. For $299 Australian they are an absolute steal. If I could only have one guitar I would go to this Epiphone Les Paul Special 11 ever time.
If, like me, you're a complete and utter sucker for watching musicians strip their songs down to the barest essentials and perform them with minimal accompaniment, then you're going to lose your mind over the stripped down, guitar version of "Wildest Dreams" that Taylor Swift has just dropped from her acoustic session at the Grammy Museum Sessions last year. Performing the hopelessly dreamy song with just her voice and her electric guitar, the performance is jaw droppingly good and the song honestly sounds even better than it does on the studio track from 1989.
I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.
This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?

Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.
Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
PRS McCarty 594 Electric Guitar The PRS McCarty 594 is a vintage-inspired electric guitar with plenty of premium appointments such as a . It’s part of the Core Electric Series, the company’s lineup of high-end guitars. This means that the McCarty 594 has all the bells and whistles you can expect from a premium instrument. For pro musicians, this is an investment worth every penny.
Telecasters are another guitar in Fender's lineup which include a single cutaway to get at those higher frets. These guitars feature two single coil pickups which can be used separately or with each other for producing large-scale sounds. Telecasters are well-known for producing a thin, biting sound which is common in country music, but nowadays they are popular amongst indie musicians as well. These aren't the ideal guitars for heavy metal or rock music. If you want to concentrate on country or indie music, a Telecaster can do the job for you.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
Orville Gibson patented a single-piece mandolin design in 1898 that was more durable than other mandolins and could be manufactured in volume.[10] Orville Gibson began to sell his instruments in 1894 out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1902, the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd. was incorporated to market the instruments. Initially, the company produced only Orville Gibson's original designs.[11] Orville died in 1918 of endocarditis (inflammation of the inside lining of the heart chambers and valves).[10]
In 1956 Jennings was shown a prototype guitar amplifier made by Dick Denney, a big band guitarist and workmate from World War II. The company was renamed Jennings Musical Industries, or JMI, and in 1958 the 15-watt Vox AC15 amplifier was launched. It was popularised by The Shadows and other British rock 'n' roll musicians and became a commercial success.
Electrical impedance is like two different sizes of hose. High impedance is like a garden hose, Low impedance is like a fire hose. The amount of water pressure coming through a garden hose is great for reaching your garden but if you need to run a long length of hose up the street, the pressure from a garden hose will give out after a certain distance. You definitely need that high pressure fire hose.
Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”

Harmony was founded in 1892 in Chicago by Wilhelm J.F. Schultz. Sears acquired them in 1916. Harmony made guitars for others under many names, some of which they acquired from other companies due to bankruptcies. These include Oscar Schmidt, Stella and the Sears brand Silvertone. Harmony went out of business in 1985. A new company is currently selling guitars under the Harmony name – many of these are classic Harmony designs such as the Harmony Rocket electric guitar.


Semi-hollow designs are similar to hollow-body guitars, but typically feature a thinner body with a central wooden block inside. This helps to control feedback while giving the instrument some of the same tonal characteristics as a hollow-body. This type of guitar has been used successfully in just about every genre of music, with the exception of extreme metal.
As for the nuts and bolts of digital delays, any thorough, from-the-ground-up explanation is more than can be entered into in this space (and most of you at least know the basic principle behind binary encoding by now anyway, right?). Simply think of the digital delay pedal as another form of sampler: it makes a small digital recording of your riff, and plays it back at a user-selectable time delay, with depth and number of repeats also more or less selectable. The higher the sample rate, the better the sound quality. Early affordable 8-bit models really did leave a lot to be desired sonically, but as 16, 20 and 24-bit designs emerged, the reproduction of the echoes increased dramatically in quality.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory
I don't remember if it was actually an LP special II, but the first guitar I bought with my my own money at about the age of 15 was an absolutely beautiful Epi Les Paul. Black, with a really nice quilt maple top. I fell in love with the way it looked. Well, it turned out that guitar sucked. I mean it really sucked. Bad intonation, bad tuners, bad pickups, bad bridge, everything.I saved up my money sacking groceries for like 6 months and I ended up spending that hard-earned money on a crap guitar. I put it on layaway and my dad would drive me up to the store once a month and every time he would try to talk my into other guitars, Fenders mostly (he is a musician also). Nope. I really liked the way the guitar looked. I was young and stupid.

you put in a lot of work, its not biblical correct, pretty good...but take with a grain of salt. but some guitars are made in Korea. I bought a Yamaha 3 piece back like a Kiso Suzuki, I would it was made in Japan The tuners said made Japan. I thought the pawn shop was crazy. I got it for $100 Love this guitar and then one day I looked at the the decal in the sound hole and in the tiniest print "Made in Korea" I felt a pang like o' crap I bought a Korean guitar. But I have a few Acoustics High end a Guild made in the 80's and this Yamaha is incredible. better or just as good as my old Suzuki


Frank Bowers Interestingly enough, they have completely different approaches to the job. Bo cranks his Gibson Firebird straight through a Peavey 6505 half stack with nothing in line but a tuner, while Frank rocks out on his Gibson Les Paul Customs through a Digitech GSP-2101 preamp, a Mesa/Boogie TriAxis preamp, a TC Electronics G-Major processor, a Mesa/Boogie 2:90 power amp, and a Marshall 4x12 cabinet. During their show, they each take jaw-dropping solos, and they share the spotlight on some of the best-executed twin leads since Thin Lizzy’s “The Boys Are Back in Town.”

A real hall-of-famer from Ibanez, which displays true rock style and lightning-fast playability in an affordable beginner-friendly package. With the classic Superstrat body in a range of colors, this RG is made of solid basswood and features a slick, thin Wizard III maple neck, with rosewood fretboard and 24 jumbo frets, making it superb for chugging powerchords and fast soloing.

Little Martin: Designed around a modified O-14 fret body, the Little Martin series is built at a smaller 23″ scale length. With the exception of the LX1 and LX1E, which both have solid Sitka spruce tops, Little Martin series guitars are constructed with HPL top, back, and sides. Recent models incorporate a greater amount of synthetic materials, such as Stratabondnecks and Micarta (as opposed to rosewood or morado) fretboards and bridges. The guitars employ Modified X-Series “X” bracing, reinforced by a bowtie plate made of graphite. Little Martin series guitars do not havepickguards or fretboard inlays.
This list would have been incomplete without us mentioning the Shure SM57-X2U. Because it is a plug and play device, as it uses USB connectivity, this microphone enables its user to record itself/herself while jamming to his/her favorite songs.  As its manufacturer claims this unit is capable of offering a frequency response that is tailored for vocals. What is more, the model also has brightened midrange as well as bass roll off.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: None - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 707 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Tribal Purple, Black flame, Tribal Green, Blue Quilt, Satin Natural, Blue Flame
For those players who prefer the good old valve sound and searching for one on a reasonable price, the VOX AC10 can be that great choice of an amplifier for the job. This 10 watts amp with 1×10” inch celestion speaker has a 2x12AX7 tube preamp section and 2xEL84 valve reactor power section housed in a closed back cabinet and its trademark grill cloth to deliver a genuine VOX brown sound. 
In one position, lug A and lug B are not connected (that is, the circuit is open). In the other, both lugs are connected (the circuit is closed). To use our seven-sound mod as an example: In one switching position, both lugs are not connected, so the neck pickup connected to the switch is not engaged. In the other position, both lugs are connected and the neck pickup is engaged.
James Valentine of Maroon 5 has a strong idea of what he wants in a guitar and so, along with the craftsmen at Music Man, has created his dream machine. Valentine's desire was for a guitar that blends innovation and a modern vibe, with a reassuringly classic appeal - a bit Gibson semi, a bit Fender Tele perhaps. So, with that in mind, an ash body - in this instance finished in what Valentine calls 'Trans Buttermilk' ('Trans Maroon' is, of course, available, too) - has been mated to a nutty-looking roasted maple neck. This is delightfully figured and comes with Music Man's proprietary wax and oil finish for a tactile but drag-free experience. Build and finish are, as always, dead on. Pickups and controls are interesting: while both pickups are standard humbucking size, the bridge unit is actually single coil, its pole pieces slanted like a Tele or Strat across the chrome cover. Controls are simple, but with a couple of neat twists in the form of push-push pots on both controls - an active boost of up to 20dB on the volume, and a coil-split for the neck humbucker on the tone. We like the 'hidden' nature of these sonic extras, because it adds genuine usability but keeps things uncluttered and intuitive. The Valentine looks familiar but just different enough, feels great sitting or standing, boasts a real player's neck, and its palette of tones - delivered in a fuss-free manner by a clever control and switching setup - is simply superb. Of the hundreds of models that have sought to blend humbucking and single coil tones, this has to be one of the best electric guitars.
Compared to the previously mentioned good guitar brands, ESP (Electric Sound Products) guitars are relative newcomers to the scene. The Japanese company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and they produce mostly electric guitars and basses. The company became very popular among metal guitar players, however they are versatile enough to be used for any style.
Although the G&L Legacy electric guitar was released one year after the passing of Leo Fender, it is designed to the specifications of the original Stratocaster but with a few modern features specific to G&L instruments. The Legacy included, for instance, G&L's Dual Fulcrum vibrato and Schaller tuners and was available in a combination of different tonewoods. Even if the G&L guitars from before Leo Fender's death are more collectable, the Legacy electric guitar is still considered a high-quality instrument.
Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.
When Bob Dylan described the Band's "wild mercury sound," he was really talking about Robbie Robertson's guitar, as exemplified by his torrid, squawking solo on "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" from their 1966 tour. But by the time the Band were making their own LPs, Robertson had pared down his approach, evolving into a consummate ensemble player. "I wanted to go in the opposite direction," said Robertson, "to do things that were so tasteful and discreet and subtle, like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper… where it was all about the song."
Opening the case, the AE doesn't disappoint. There are the classic lines of the AE body, with just the right amount of bling, you instantly feel that you are looking at a quality instrument. As you'd expect from Ibanez, the neck, quite frankly is a dream. Featuring its advanced comfort profile to be found on all the AE range, it is slim and relatively shallow and combined with the silky satin finish makes it a joy to play. Tonally, the combination of Sitka spruce and the bracing result in a guitar that is seriously bright while still being well balanced and that definitely projects. It also sustains forever and, while uncomplicated, will sit exceptionally well in a band situation. At this price, the AE500 is a serious contender and gives the Martins and Gibsons in this price range a run for their money.
Wah pedals can sound eerily similar to a human voice, and they were actually a favorite of Jimi Hendrix, who many have said possessed the most expressive guitar playing amongst all the great guitarists. Wah pedals are great to activate right when you’re about to take a solo and when you really want to make it sound like you’re speaking with the guitar.

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Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]

Designed to restore Fender’s reputation after a group of employees led by William C. Schultz took over ownership from CBS in the early 1980s. The pickups used in early models were dual humbucking Red Lace Sensors in the bridge position and a single Blue Lace Sensor in the neck position. Later models (post 1995 or so) used three Gold Lace Sensors or a Red/Silver/Blue set in a Strat-like configuration, as well as low-friction roller nuts, locking synchronized vibrato bridge and tuners, and a bound contoured alder body with ash veneers. These instruments were discontinued in 1998 with the advent of the American Deluxe series. In 2011 Fender released the Modern Player Telecaster Plus as a part of the Modern Player series. The guitar has a humbucker in the bridge, a Strat pickup in the middle, and a Tele pickup in the neck positions.
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by lexxus gomes The amp that you use can fundamentally change the sound of your guitar. For example, many "hard rock" musicians like the "chug chug" of a Marshall stack, while blues guitarists may like a Blues Deville. I kind of like the "clean" sound of a Fender Twin Reverb, myself, although I usually just record without an amp into my mixer, and use a guitar effects processor to simulate an amp sound.

Guitar brands such as Antoria shared some Ibanez guitar designs. The Antoria guitar brand was managed by JT Coppock Leeds Ltd England. CSL was a brand name managed by Charles Summerfield Ltd England. Maurice Summerfield of the Charles Summerfield Ltd company contributed some design ideas to Hoshino Gakki and also imported Ibanez and CSL guitars into the UK with Hoshino Gakki cooperation from 1964-1987.[3] The Maxxas brand name came about because Hoshino Gakki thought that the guitar did not fit in with the Ibanez model range and was therefore named Maxxas by Rich Lasner from Hoshino USA [4].
It features a handsome Grand Auditorium shape with a soft cutaway for good access to the higher frets, while the satin-finished sapele neck is incredibly playable – as is the case with all Taylor guitars. The iconic brand keeps costs low with laminated sapele back and sides paired with solid Sitka spruce on the top, as well as producing it in the respected Mexican facility.

You can assemble your own system from disparate components, hardware and software, and spend a lot of time and confusion getting them all to work together. But the easiest and ultimately most cost-effective route is to purchase one of the least-expensive Apple Macintosh computers, all of which come with Apple's free GarageBand software installed. This will provide you with a wealth of tools for amp emulation and effects in an integrated environment for multi-track recording and editing (and it includes a wealth of drum machine, synthesizers, and sampled instrument libraries as well.) If you outgrow Apple GarageBand, you can suppliment it by purchasing Apple MainStage for $30 and/or Apple Logic Pro for $200.


Strings produce sound in the guitar. In electric guitars, because there are no holes, the vibration is passed to a pickup which senses the vibration of the strings passes the signal on to the guitar amplifier. There are two types of strings for electric guitars, light and heavy gauge. Lighter ones are easier to play and allow easy bending of notes, but they are more likely to break and produce less volume. On the other side, heavier ones produce high volume but are hard to play and require more finger pressure to bend notes.
I followed with visits to six Los Angeles music stores to play as many guitars as I could (more than 60, including multiple samples of many models), so I could get an idea of what their right-out-of-the-box quality was like and which ones offered the best value. I emerged with a list of the most promising models, and I contacted the manufacturers to request samples. In a couple of cases, I allowed the manufacturers to substitute models that they felt were better suited for this article.

No matter your vision, SparkFun's products and resources are designed to make the world of electronics more accessible. In addition to over 2,000 open source components and widgets, SparkFun offers curriculum, training and online tutorials designed to help demystify the wonderful world of embedded electronics. We're here to help you start something.


That is true, but without the many fine guitarists of today, who will inspire the gifted musicians of tomorrow. Musicians are artists and it would be quite dull if they all copied each other and sounded the same wouldn’t it? Whether we like it or not the world keeps on spinning regardless of what we want, think or do. Enjoy the gifts that are shared today, because we’re not guaranteed a minute more.
Lastly, there is a core group of survivors in this company. Nice people but probably not the most dynamic or skilled. That said, they manage to get the job done under some pretty trying circumstances. Getting hired and quitting or getting fired after 6 months makes their job much more difficult because they needed to train you and it takes time away from their work only to have that person leave. If you don't have what it takes to work here then stay away because this causes more harm to all involved including yourself. There are people working under stress with families to provide for who don't need to get hosed by some 'guitar dude" who couldn't cut it. In summary, don't get starry-eyed because you think guitars are cool and that will carry the day. Think about what this place will do to your credentials and ability to move on to the next stage of your career which working at Gibson will force sooner than you expect and by all means, be considerate of those special folks who will have to re-fill the gap after you leave.
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Open the case and you will find over 689MB of rich guitar tones ranging from 70 to 130BPM. These sensational loops are neatly arranged into 3 categories comprising of 50+ Ballad Hooks, 50+ Steady Riffs and 50+ Upbeat Jams, all applicable to a vast range of genres! From the clean, delay-drenched chime of Ballad Hook 'Serene' to the upbeat overdrive of Steady Riff 'Perpetual' and the crunchy swagger of Upbeat Jam 'Loose', STUDIO GUITARS redefines quality guitar samples and delivers them in stunning 24-bit high definition.
The list of musicians who are (or who have been) in love with their vintage Fender Bassman amps—especially the 4x10 tweed variety made between 1957 and 1960—is pretty much endless. Just for starters (past and present), there's Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Mike Campbell, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmie Vaughan, John Fogerty, Josh Homme, Brian Setzer, the guy up the street from me... . Again, this is just the tip of the iceberg, people. After all, many professional music industry analysts have heralded Fifties 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest amps—ever.
With this new edition, they scrapped the DVD from the previous version, and introduced online video and audio clips, as a supplement to the book's teachings. They didn't take it overboard though, with just 85 videos and 95 audio tracks, but at least it's a step in the right direction. You can't learn music by just reading about it, you need audible tools.
One type of "effect" I've thought would be useful to have in a multi-pedal, though I've not seen it, would be to have a configurable automatic gain control (level compression) which would be applied before a distortion effect, followed by a gain adjustment after the distortion which would undo some or all of the effect of the previous AGC. For example, things might be set up so that playing at a level of -20dBm would boost the signal by 21dB (clipping slightly) and then reduce volume by 20dB, while playing at -10dBm would boost by 12dB (clipping a bit more) and then reduce by 12dB. – supercat Apr 30 '13 at 22:01
As this effect is more pronounced with higher input signals, the harder "attack" of a note will be compressed more heavily than the lower-voltage "decay", making the latter seem louder and thereby improving sustain. Additionally, because the level of compression is affected by input volume, the player can control it via their playing intensity: playing harder results in more compression or "sag". In contrast, modern amplifiers often use high-quality, well-regulated power supplies.

Guild acoustic guitars are played by some of the best professional musicians in the business. From this standpoint, Guild is on par with Martin and Taylor, and completes the triumvirate of American acoustic guitar titans. As you’d expect, the prices follow suit. However, the GAD series offers a way for intermediate players to get a Guild acoustic for a reasonable price.
A neat recording solution for when you want the sound of a speaker running flat out, but without being thrown out of your flat by your neighbours!A practical method endorsed by those engineers who don't like to leave their comfortable chairs too often is to combine the above techniques by using two close mics, one on-axis and one off-axis, plus one distant mic a few feet from the cabinet. If the close mics have very different characteristics, for example a capacitor mic on-axis and a dynamic mic off-axis, you'll get an even greater choice of tonality, as you can vary the mic balance being recorded. Switching the phase of individual mics can often yield interesting combinations and, if you really don't want to leave that chair, you can also delay the ambience to increase its effective distance when it is combined with the other mics. Each millisecond of delay is roughly equivalent to 12 inches of added distance.
Most models come with single-coil Hi-gain pickups as standard equipment. Many post-British invasion Rickenbacker players such as Peter Buck, Paul Weller, and Johnny Marr have used instruments with these pickups. Rickenbacker’shumbucker/dual coil pickup has a similar tone to a Gibson mini-humbuckerpickup, and comes standard on the Rickenbacker 650 C. Vintage reissue models, and some signature models, come with Toaster Top pickups, which resemble a classic two-slotted chrome toaster. Despite their slightly lower output, “Toasters” produce a brighter, cleaner sound, and are generally seen as key to obtaining the true British Invasion guitar tone, as they were original equipment of the era.

Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.
For rehearsals, studio recording sessions, or small club performances, electric and upright bass players typically use a "combo" amplifier, which combines a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and a speaker (or multiple speakers) in a single cabinet. Combo amps come in a variety of speaker configurations, such as one speaker (e.g., often one 12" speaker or one 15" speaker, although there are some micro-amps with one 10" speaker) or two speakers (e.g., two 10" speakers) or four speakers (e.g., four 10" speakers). The dividing line between practice amps and combo amps that can be used for live venue shows is described in the power in watts section. The most powerful combo amps available deliver between 800 and 1000 watts to the internal speakers.
When you've put your blood, sweat and tears into developing your talent, you want your music to sound amazing. And with the proper recording gear, you can ensure your sound is captured exactly how you intended. From audio interfaces to studio monitors to extremely powerful subwoofers, this section's wide range of recording gear offers up plenty of examples of ways to make your recordings better than ever. The right audio/video arrangement can take the stress out of recording, giving you more time and energy to concentrate on what's most important - your music. If you're unsure where to start the search for recording gear, checking out some of the top-rated and best-selling products is definitely the way to go. Want to attach your mic directly to your PC or Mac? The Blue Icicle performs dual functions as an XLR to USB adapter and a studio-quality microphone preamp. Offering a quick and easy way to perform digital and audio recording, this handy tool is a must for every musician's gear bag. Maybe you're in the market for a studio monitor? If that's the case, the Mackie MR8 mk3 8" 2-Way Powered Studio Monitor is a fantastic choice. Built with a clear focus on accuracy, this low-profile studio monitor is perfect for musicians who really want to capture the full character of their music. This section is also home to an assortment of GoPro video cameras. With a GoPro, you can record your set firsthand from the stage, giving your fans a unique "view from the top." Take a look at the GoPro HERO+ LCD for example - this camera captures your world in stunning HD video. It's rugged, waterproof and built into its own protective case - exactly what you need to record those high-energy shows. Another fantastic GoPro option is the HERO4 Session. Smaller and lighter than any other GoPro currently on the market, the HERO4 Session captures 1080p60 video and 8MP photos in a simple design that's so compact it can go just about anywhere. This is just a quick sampling of what's available when it comes to recording gear. There are lots more products to consider, so spend some time browsing through them - you never know when the right piece of equipment is going to leap off the page and into your professional setup.
the guitar was made for gretsch by Tokai Gakki in the very early 70's.they sound sweet play great, i have one also .at age 40 it needs very little more then a frett job to fix it back to like new. mine is a model 5989. is 6028. I don't hink it is worth much. It''s just an old japaneses import. It is a well made guitar and I enjoy playing it since my other guitar got stolen....
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
Synonymous in the electric guitar industry, the Gibson brand continues to produce some of the best electric guitars on the market, including the Les Paul Studio. Designed with a classic look that maintains the appearance of a vintage quality, this electric guitar comes with a neck that is slimmer than most traditional models, allowing for ease and smooth transitions when switching between notes. The guitar utilizes an upgraded version of humbucker PAF to cancel out any outside interference that detracts from the quality of the sound, while maple and mahogany wood are combined to deliver both definition and sustainability. Other features include traditional tuners that can be manually altered, a Graph Tech Nut for precise spacing between strings, and a neck heel with the class Les Paul design. Well reviewed and great for the price, the Les Paul Studio is one of the best electric guitars available if your cash flow allows.
Finally, the Univox 1085 PA Amplifier System ($1,035) was another piggyback with 10 tubes, 105 watts, four channels, eight inputs, external echo or equalizer connection, four volumes plus master volume, bass, middle, treble, presence, reverb with footswitch, and a cabinet with four 15″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets and 2″ voice coils. It also had 12 high-frequency horns with crossover networks, usually used with two cabinets.

The output of the rails is a crunchy, high sustain rock tone that turns your Strat into a much heavier and hard-hitting instrument. The pickguard, pots and five-way volume selector are all included with the wiring taken care of. It’s also really easy to change pickups using a solderless method that allows you to remove and add pickups by simply using screws.
With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place. The core learning systems for beginners, for blues rock and country, the songs, the genre specific exercises, an active user forum and a series of tools. I specifically like the Jam Station tool. It includes a number of backing tracks in different keys and tempos for most of the genres being taught on the Guitar Tricks platform. With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place.Other useful tools included are a scale finder, a metronome, a chord finder and a fingerboard trainer. Guitar tricks is continually improving. A new interface has just been added that makes it look more modern and very attractive. The core learning system lessons are also updated on an ongoing basis. This allows them to incorporate the latest teaching methods and keep the lessons modern and relevant.

Guitar pedal multi-effects units comprise several effects in just one package. Multi-effects units utilize digital processing to bring out different sound effects when playing guitar. These digital multi-effects pedals come with internal memory in order to save your individual settings. Among the top-rated multi-effects brands you might want to check out are the DigiTech RP and GNX series, the Boss ME-20 and ME-50 models, the Boss GT-6 and GT-8, the Zoom G2, G3, and G5, various Behringer models, and the Line 6 POD.
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.
I have an old 1964 60watt Australian Goldentone which I love and will keep. Had a Marshall 800 Lead at one time (head and quad box) when I was in a band but let that go when I stopped gigging. I tried a 50W ENGL combo as I was looking for an amp that was easier to cart around than my old Goldentone and I was blown away with the sound and the build quality. The ENGL should be in the top ten.
I am not a real musician but I feel like one whenever I go in there. I bought my guitar there a few years ago. I have taken it and a travel guitar in there to get re-strung and Pat has always been so helpful and engaging. I follow his FB pages and saw him perform an original song "Will you Take My Name". I was so blown away by the song that I actually proposed to my wife by singing a version of that song. (His version is much better!). He has built a great following in a short time and has a nice selection of guitars and accessories. I really like his frequent FB posts of him showing a guitar he is working on, or a song he sings. Also, he features a lot of customers singing and playing whenever they stop in. This store has a great vibe. If you are in the area, stop in even if you don't anything, you will have fun. And if you need something, well then you've come to the right place!
The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.

Musicians might not want to be replaced by machines - we (or they, as it were, because I lost whatever musician credentials I might have earned annoying people with my wooden flute as a beggar on the streets of a tourist town when I started programming computers to play music) might make a strong case that no machine can express the human soulfulness of music. It is easy to conclude that, the more of the musical task that is assigned to a machine, the less soul is expressed in the music. Well, great big rock-n-roll wall of sound that all over your acoustic guitar soul. That stack of Fender amps I can hear five miles from the stadium where David Gilmore is strumming a guitar is as much an instrument as was the Shepard's lute - and a much more popular instrument now, for audiences attuned to the daily roar of tires crushing air against pavement.
The Broadway by Epiphone features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, producing a bright sound rounded up by the warmer tone of the spruce. It also has a hard maple neck with a Slim Taper C profile, a rosewood fingerboard with block-and-triangle abalone inlays, binding on the headstock, body, fingerboard and around the F-holes, a mother-of-pearl Tree of Life inlay on the headstock, gold hardware, a three-way pickup selector and an adjustable floating tremolo bridge.
Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep, fully hollow bodies and are often capable of being played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar, and therefore of being used unplugged at intimate gigs. The instrument originated during the jazz age of the 1920s and 1930s, and is still considered the classic jazz guitar, nicknamed the “jazzbox.” Like semi-hollow guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes. Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavily, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation (popular in country and rockabilly) with single-coil pickups and sometimes a Bigsby tremolo has a distinctly more twangy, biting, tone than the classic jazzbox.
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