If you are new to electronics, the essential tool you most likely need to buy is a decent temperature controlled soldering station. A basic one such as a Weller WLC100 can be had for less than $40 and will do the job just fine. Really nice ones with digital temperature readouts from Weller or Hakko are $100-$150 and as much as you will ever need for a home pedal shop. The soldering pencils have interchangeable tips, so you can keep a selection of different sizes. The one that normally comes with a new station will be suitable for most through-hole pedal kits.
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
Here, in this mini guide to acoustic guitar body types, we’ll aim to show you some of the key differences in size, shape, sound and suitability between the major variations of guitar. We’ll look at the history of some of the better known body types, and make recommendations according to the sound you’re going for and the style in which you play. So whether you’re a wispy finger-picker or a hearty strummer, we’ll explain some of the more intricate details of acoustic guitar body shapes.

ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
The Chord Harmonica consists of two harmonicas hinged together. Together, they are capable of playing 48 chords. They are 23 inches long, and each chord takes up 4 holes. The chord harmonica is used to provide chordal and rhythmic backing in an ensemble, much as rhythm guitar might do. Jerry Murad's Harmonicat's 1947 "Peg O' My Heart" was played on a Chord, with a cleverly arranged sequence of chords that produced the impression of a melody. Hohner's main Chord is known as the Hohner 48, because it plays 48 chords. Hohner from the 1930s to the late 1960s also produced the Polyphonia No. 8, which played 36 blow-only chords, in three rows. The concept failed and is often frowned upon by professional 48 chord players.
Peavey - Hartley Peavey started Peavey electronics in 1965, it went on to one of the largest musical instrument and audio equipment manufacturer in the world. They offer a multitude of guitars, amps and related gear, and the price point they use are comparatively very reasonable. One of their latest guitars, the Peavey AT-200, has the guitar world talking about its innovative auto-tune feature.
Boasting the title of the “world’s largest guitar manufacturer,” Fender is responsible for the creation and production of a number of the most iconic guitars ever conceived. The one Jimi Hendrix set on fire on stage? That was a Fender Stratocaster – similar in shape to the one pictured above. The one Bruce Springsteen plays at every concert? That’s a Fender Telecaster. Look at nearly any band on stage around the world and the likelihood is you’ll see a Fender guitar up there. And that’s no accident. Founded by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1946, this brand hasn’t just pioneered iconic looks – they pioneered iconic sound. And that’s what keeps musicians like Eric Clapton, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, and Jeff Beck so viciously loyal to the brand: unrepentant quality.
If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
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This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
The E minor chord is one of the simplest to play because you only use two fingers Take extra care not to allow either of them to touch any of the open strings, or the chord won't ring properly. Strum all six strings. In certain situations, it may make sense to reverse your finger position so that your second finger is on the fifth string, and your third finger is on the fourth string.
Let’s start off with a real classic for a classic player! This Fenders vintage modified style Strat hss has captured the happy way of the 50’s, available in Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red and it’s a guitar that just makes your life a litter bit more worth living. The design is very much like the 1950’s electric guitars, from the soft V-shaped neck, maple fretboard and 8-hole pickguard down to the smaller things, like the knobs and the switch tip- everything just brings us back!
Iidi began manufacturing guitars in 1958 in Nagoya, Japan. Iida is still producing guitars, but mostly in their factory located in Korea. They were mainly responsible for producing acoustic and semi-acoustic rather than electric guitars for major manufacturers Ibanez and Yamaha. There is speculation that Iida may have assisted Moridara for a short period in making Morris badged guitars, but that is not verified.
Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.
Electric guitars and guitar equipment - want something new? Shop online and in-store for your new guitar setup. Pick from solid body, semi-acoustic, and hollow body styles to get your ideal electric guitar. We stock all the major guitar brands like Fender, Gibson, and Ibanez. Alongside electric guitars, you'll find amps and pedals from Marshall, Vox, and Orange.

The rotary speaker effect is based on an actual rotating speaker system invented by Donald Leslie called the Leslie speaker. It was often paired with a Hammond organ, but in the 60’s guitar players also began using it for the unique tone and effect it gave the guitar. The original Leslie speaker cabinet used a two speaker system with a rotating horn and bass woofer drum. This created a cool, swirling effect where the music seemed to move around the room. Obviously, guitar pedals can only simulate this rotatary effect, which can be enhanced with a stereo amp setup. Of course you could use an actual Leslie speaker (or one of the newer competitors), but costs are high and it requires lugging around an extra speaker cabinet.
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The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
It has been stated repeatedly that the CEO is a challenge, toxic whatever and yes, all of it is true. Many if not most people who take a management position here don't last a year. This is especially true at Corporate where at any given time half of the positions are open because employee turnover is off the charts and they are horrible at recruiting talent to get replacements hired. That's a really bad combination to have in a company. So the first question you have to ask yourself is: do you want to show a job that only lasted six to twelve months on your resume with a company that has a positive, almost cult like global brand image? Or another way, how will you explain your short tenure to the next company you interview with and make them believe you weren't the problem? When I was outside Nashville and told people I worked for Gibson 100% of them said "that's a great company" even though they had no clue. It's highly likely your next potential employer will think that way as well.
Definitely agree that Fender should be number one. Marshall is over rated, and fender brings the tone way better then a Marshall hands down. Marshall makes you pay for their name, fender only charges you for the amp components and the time tested fender quality. Why do you think so many amp companies try to replicate the fender tone?... Because its awesome and blows peoples minds!
I disagree about Martin being THE BEST ACOUSTIC GUITAR. While Martin is an excellent guitar that is definitely ONE of the best! Taylor is THE BEST FOR THE HIGHER END TO MID PRICE RANGE! A decent TAYLOR will bea Taylor will beat the brakes off a brakes off the same Martin, because they SOUND BETTER and they can be used for more than one or two styles. If you are playing county music the Martin is better, but Taylor will play a lot better sound way better on every other kind of music styl! Buy a TAYLOR

Trim:  Heel cap: ebony. Fingerboard: ebony bound in white celluloid with scalloped lower end; 24 frets under A and D, 21 nickel-silver frets under G and C; single abalone dots behind 5th, 7th, 9th, 10th (slightly larger), and 15th frets; double mother-of-pearl dots behind 12th fret. Nut: bone. Bridge: mahogany capped with ebony; nickel-silver-plated steel screws to adjust bridge height and pickup contact. Tuners: six nickel-plated steel, worm-gear machine tuners by Grover with convex head surfaces and decoratively cut plate outline. Endpin: black bakelite; extends through tailpiece. Pick guard: imitation tortoise shell plastic raised on wood brace affixed to top with two steel dome-headed screws. Lacquer: dark orange-brown sunburst.

The S2 Custom 24 features a mahogany body with book-matched flame maple top, that follows the same double cutaway shape and detailed arch as the original Custom 24. The guitar's mahogany neck is also not far off, being rafted from mahogany with PRS' distinctive 25" scale length. It has a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard that has a comfortably narrow nutwidth of 1.656". Finally, the S2 Custom 24 owes its voice to its dual humbucker pickups that include the S2 Vintage Bass and the S2 HFS Treble - which provide PRS' characteristically open and clear tone. You can push or pull the tone knob for single-coil tones should you need them.
The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.
The “quacky” tone of the middle and bridge pickups, popularized by players such as David Gilmour, Rory Gallagher, Mark Knopfler, Bob Dylan, Scott Thurston, Ronnie Wood, Ed King, Eric Clapton and Robert Cray, can be obtained by using the pickup selector in positions 2 and 4. The neck and middle pickups are each wired to a tone control that incorporates a single, shared tone capacitor, whereas the bridge pickup, which is slanted towards the high strings for a more trebly sound, has no tone control for maximum brightness. On many modern Stratocasters, the first tone affects the neck pickup; the second tone affects the middle and bridge pickups; on some Artist Series models (Eric Clapton and Buddy Guy signature guitars), the first tone is a presence circuit that cuts or boosts treble and bass frequencies, affecting all the pickups; the second tone is an active midrange booster that boosts the midrange frequencies up to 25dB (12dB on certain models) to produce a fatter humbucker-like sound.
Martin began with a 000-size guitar, which had 12 frets clear of the body. They rejected the 27" scale idea, as this would have been impractical since the high string tension on a guitar would have made the instrument hard to play. Instead they used a 25.4" scale length. To accommodate Bechtel's request for 15 frets clear of the body, they squared the body's shoulders to add 1 5/16" to the clear part of the fingerboard. This allowed 14 frets clear of the body. Since they felt aesthetically the bridge should remain halfway between the center of the soundhole and the endblock, there really was no way to make the guitar have 15 frets clear. The bottom bout was reshaped slightly to match the new shape of the upper bout (note when the 000 went to 14 frets in 1934 it retained this initial OM body shape).
This is the point where the neck meets the body. In the traditional Spanish neck joint the neck and block are one piece with the sides inserted into slots cut in the block. Other necks are built separately and joined to the body either with a dovetail joint, mortise or flush joint. These joints are usually glued and can be reinforced with mechanical fasteners. Recently many manufacturers use bolt on fasteners. Bolt on neck joints were once associated only with less expensive instruments but now some top manufacturers and hand builders are using variations of this method. Some people believed that the Spanish style one piece neck/block and glued dovetail necks have better sustain, but testing has failed to confirm this. While most traditional Spanish style builders use the one piece neck/heel block, Fleta, a prominent Spanish builder, used a dovetail joint due to the influence of his early training in violin making. One reason for the introduction of the mechanical joints was to make it easier to repair necks. This is more of a problem with steel string guitars than with nylon strings, which have about half the string tension. This is why nylon string guitars often don't include a truss rod either.

In the image above, the first higher peak we see is E4 (i.e. the low E-string on a guitar in standard tuning), the second peak is E5 (i.e. an octave higher) and the following high peaks are B5, E6, G#6, B6, D7, and so on. Remember that the test rigs only have two strings, both tuned to E, and plucked open. So what you are hearing is a mish-mash of tons of overtones that shape the character of the “tone” that you hear.
Got myself a Palmer today 050627, it´s a doubleneck 12/6 and seems to be of rather good quality. Needs some neck adjustment but so did my brand new Gibson LP to :-). Mine was imported from Germany to Sweden from a firm called JJ Music (JoJo) but i also have trouble finding out were they are built, what kind of wood and so on is used. Would be nice if someone knew something about these guitars or were to find something about them on the net. I really don't want to disassemble the guitar to check what kind of mics and stuff are used.
Depending on how you count them, there are 23 types of guitar pedals out there that can take you from "just another guitar player" to being that guy with the definitive tone and stage presence that everyone knows of around town. The only problem is it's a lot to wade through. But we've got you covered with quick summaries of what each pedal does, examples you can hear, and some visual examples for each of the guitar pedal types...
Another thing to bear in mind is pot taper. Two most commonly used tapers are linear and logarithmic. Linear taper, as name suggests, linearly increases resistance throughout it’s range. That’s ok for some applications, but not for volume pots. Our humanoid ears work in logarithmic fashion, so volume pots need to have logarithmic taper in order for us to hear smooth transition between quieter and louder settings. If volume jumps suddenly in the first 20%-30% of volume pot range and then does almost nothing in the rest of the range, it’s likely that you got a linear pot instead of logarithmic.
The LP-100 is among the most affordable, but also the most popular Epiphone models. It is the quintessential beginner guitar. Epiphone Les Paul-100 brings you that classic aesthetic in a package that is affordable and capable of sounding rather great. While it’s not something you’d want to do a world tour with, this Epiphone is perfect for beginners and intermediate players.

Takamine GS330S: Like Yamaha, Takamine is a Japanese guitar company. They also have low price Jasmine series for beginners. I don’t recommend you buy Jasmine series if you have enough budgets because Jasmine has a laminate top. Go for the GS330s, it has a solid Cedar top, cedar is a kind wood that make better sound when aged. So if you buy Takamine GS330S and keep it for a long time, the guitar will sound better and better. For more details features and price, check out here.
One type of "effect" I've thought would be useful to have in a multi-pedal, though I've not seen it, would be to have a configurable automatic gain control (level compression) which would be applied before a distortion effect, followed by a gain adjustment after the distortion which would undo some or all of the effect of the previous AGC. For example, things might be set up so that playing at a level of -20dBm would boost the signal by 21dB (clipping slightly) and then reduce volume by 20dB, while playing at -10dBm would boost by 12dB (clipping a bit more) and then reduce by 12dB. – supercat Apr 30 '13 at 22:01
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.
This is the name given to the amplifier, separate from the speakers. It’s the pre-amp and amp in one box, which is usually placed on top of a cabinet or a stack of speakers. This is a common configuration for large venues, and it might be useful to have a separate amp head if you play a lot of festivals or “battle of the bands” events, where the speakers are generally provided by the organizer.
While a little on the pricey side, their products are seen as particularly powerful and reliable overall. The H&K Trilogy is well appreciated for its versatility, allowed by the high level of German technology and engineering involved in its construction.  It has easy MIDI control and three channels, a clean, crutch, and lead, all with boost options that give a lot of freedom to musicians who are into experimenting.
The Custom Classic Telecaster was the Custom Shop version of the American Series Tele, featuring a pair of Classic and Twisted single-coils in the bridge and neck positions, as well as a reverse control plate. Earlier versions made before 2003 featured an American Tele single-coil paired with two Texas Special Strat pickups and 5-way switching. Discontinued in 2009 and replaced by the Custom Deluxe Telecaster series models. The 2011 version of the Custom Shop “Custom Deluxe” Telecaster featured a lightweight Ash body with contoured heel, Birdseye maple neck, and a pickup set that included a Twisted Tele neck pickup and a Seymour Duncan Custom Shop BG-1400 stacked humbucker in the bridge position.

This type of chip delivers a beautifully coloured representation of your sound. It may not be the most accurate and you are limited in the number of repeats and delay time.These are not to be confused with Tape Echo which was used for a long time in the world’s largest studios. No, these pedals were made out of necessity to take a form of delay on the road easily.

There is a weekly newsletter that features lessons from different genres and difficulty levels. Whenever I open that newsletter I feel compelled to try out that featured lesson. I believe that this is a big reason why my guitar playing is improving so quickly. I am continuously trying out different styles and techniques and I get better overall while doing this and having fun.

Be careful. Don't be rash. With the quality of Gibson's 2016 guitars, you should never have too many problems but... if in doubt with an older guitar, take it to a guitar repair pro. You won't need to do it often at all. And it's best to book-in your guitar with an explanation of what you think is wrong. Basic premise: T.L.C. for your guitar, and you'll feel the love back. Oh, and keep your guitar clean!
Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.

Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]
In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer's existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.

Martin actually got into the electric guitar business in the late ’50s when it started slapping DeArmond pickups onto some of its acoustic guitars yielding the D-18E, D-28E and OO-18E. These pickups were the DeArmond humbuckers with chrome sides and a black center in a trapezoidal hole, large pole pieces along one side and smaller poles along the other. Prototypes of the D-18E began in 1958 and in 1959 production began on it plus the D-28E and OO-18E.

Adding a minor seventh to a major triad creates a dominant seventh (denoted V7). In music theory, the "dominant seventh" described here is called a major-minor seventh, emphasizing the chord's construction rather than its usual function.[27] Dominant sevenths are often the dominant chords in three-chord progressions,[18] in which they increase the tension with the tonic "already inherent in the dominant triad".[28]
Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.
A little bit of history will make this clearer… The original Fender Stratocaster switches were 2-pole 3-way switches (that’s actually what I have on my schematic, I think you’ll see why in a bit) and were intended only to select either the neck, middle or bridge pickup. However these were “make before break” switches where, as the switch is moved across from one position to the next, the next contact is made before the previous contact is broken. People found that if you could get the switch to rest in between those three positions that you’d actually have both neck and middle or middle and bridge pickups connected at the same time and, most importantly, it sounded good! It became a common thing to rest the 3-way switch in between the positions, so common that in the 60’s people were filing notches in the detente mechanism of the 3-way switch. These became the “notch” positions. In the 70’s, Fender adopted this popular mod into their stock switch thus becoming what we now use and call a 5-way switch but is, in fact, a 3-way switch with 5 positions.
This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.
While experimenting with the Vortex for this article, I was impressed by quite how well the ambient mics seemed to turn a close-miked guitar sound into something that sounded like it was on a record, but the downside of this approach for most home recordists will be that the Vortex is not easy to recreate in a smaller studio — so I thought I'd pass on some ways I found to make it more manageable on a smaller scale. One problem most small studios have is that they don't have large numbers of screens, but in practice I found that I was able to get decent results by putting the guitar cab in the corner of the room and using one or both of the room boundaries in place of the screens. Visconti's trick of aiming ambient mics at the studio glass also turned out to be handy to increase the apparent distance of the farther ambient mic.

While the bulk of new players will likely want an amplifier for their electric guitars, acoustic-driven music is still plenty popular amongst players of all skills. And while acoustics are fairly loud on their own, some players still want to pump up the volume from time to time, as well as shape their sound. And you can do all that without sacrificing the warmth of your guitar’s sound with the Behringer Ultracoustic AT108. Perfect for home practices and coffee shop performances, this amp was specifically designed to enhance the volume and tones of an acoustic guitar (or, more accurately, an acoustic-electric). It also has a secondary microphone input to amplify your voice alongside your guitar.


Here is a list of the schematics that are exclusive to this site. We created several and we have redrawn some schematics that were already available on the internet  for readability or ease of use (these needed an easier-to-read format, corrections or part identifiers).  Many of these schematics include “modernization” that are included and explained in the “Project” for the given schematic.  You may freely post links to any of the pages or files on this site, but please do not put copies of these files on your site. We frequently update our files.  If you want to see photos of the original units of any of these guitar effects see our  “Originals” board on Pintrest  Note: All Trademarks mentioned here belong to their owners and not to General Guitar Gadgets

When two pickups are wired in series, a good portion of the treble frequencies is lost because the long pickup wire works like a resistor. Any resistor in the signal path will suppress the signal. The formula works like this: The longer the wire, the higher the resistance, and the more treble is lost. We all know this from guitar cables: When you use a very long guitar cable, the sound isn’t as detailed and transparent as it is with a shorter cable. A long cable acts as a resistor.
Let’s start off with a real classic for a classic player! This Fenders vintage modified style Strat hss has captured the happy way of the 50’s, available in Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red and it’s a guitar that just makes your life a litter bit more worth living. The design is very much like the 1950’s electric guitars, from the soft V-shaped neck, maple fretboard and 8-hole pickguard down to the smaller things, like the knobs and the switch tip- everything just brings us back!

Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.


By the turn of the century, new-metal grinders and post-grunge plodders had given loud guitars a bad reputation. Then Jack White hit the reset button. With each savage riff, he reconnected hard rock and roots music and showed that a blues-based band could escape what he calls "note-pushing Stratocaster white-blues bullshit." And he didn't let his analog leanings prevent him from ingenious use of a DigiTech Whammy pedal – the secret behind the faux-bass thunder of "Seven Nation Army" and the screaming leads of songs like "Ball and Biscuit."
For visual clarity, I’ve indicated ground connections with a down-facing triangle. As you probably know, all ground wires must be electronically connected to each other. (One convenient method is to solder all pickup ground wires, the output jack ground, the pickup selector ground, and the bridge’s ground wire to the back of the volume pot, and then run a jumper wire to ground the treble control. In conventional wiring, all pots must be grounded, but here, it’s not necessary to ground the bass pot.)
I gave some relief to the guitar, just enough to be able to move a business card on the 8th fret. I think the truss rod adjustment is ok now. Strangely it's still buzzing. I compared the height of the bridge to my Navigator N-LP-380LTD and i have the same height on the RLG-120 the same. The string that buzzes the most is the D string!!! E and A string buzz too but less than the D. Don't know if i want to raise the bridge more. G B E are ok! Don't know if the D slot on the nut is too low. Seems like the slots on the nut on my guitar are higher than the ones on your Burny. Don't know what to do. Frets seem even. Any chance it's the saddles or something? Do they play a role on buzzing. I will raise the bridge tomorrow morning and see how it goes. Any idea what should be a standard string height on these guitars? Lets say height on 1st fret, 5th fret, 8th fret, 12th fret, 16th fret, 22nd fret. Can we say that? Can you tell me yours to check with mine?
Inspirational, motivational and light background tune with beautiful and atmospheric melody. Good production audio for the slideshow, presentation, youtube, advertising, business project, motivational and successful videos, inspiring moments, bright achievements, film scores. I used electric guitar, muted guitar, piano, staccato strings, bass, drums, Glock, bright pads.
Gold trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches. 

Comes with hard case.This is the iconic Yamaha apx-6a. Made in the 1990s it has the iconic Yamaha AMF preamp/Eq system. This specimen is in overall faircondition for a guitar that is over 20 years old. It has normal scratches and other sings of wear. Shipping is free. Estimated arrival is 4-8 business days. A signature is usually required at the time of delivery.
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I love this guitar! I am so happy with this axe and haven't put it down since it arrived. I don't think that you will find a better value in the Martin lineup, especially for an all solid wood guitar and a free HSC. People complain because this wasn't made in the USA, but I don't think that anyone would complain after playing this beauty. The action right out of the box was perfect, just like any high end Martin should be (plays like my HD28 and D18). This thing plays like butter and is silky smooth. Some people complain about the stratabond neck, but I love the feel of it and it is rock solid and should last forever! The finish and style of the guitar is very minimalistic, which is something that I love. It may be too plain for some people, but I love it. Something just
In a way, guitars are a lot like cars — spending more money can get you more performance through different specs and trims. The extra money usually goes into paying for better parts rather than more options; there aren’t a whole lot of places to add to a guitar (unless you want the ZZ Top spinner installed). Big bucks can get you better quality wood, a nicer finish, higher-end hardware, and fancier inlays. Some of these upgrades can alter the sound or simply make help playability. For example, the same guitar cut from poplar won’t sound as good as one cut from alder wood. Better tuners mean your axe will go out of tune less often. That said, some guitars will offer features that others don’t, such as tremolos and automatic tuning. Do your research and, as always, know what you need versus what you simply want.
At the beginning of the Teisco saga, Teisco instruments were primarily built for domestic consumption in Japan. The early guitars were fairly high quality by contemporary Japanese standards. As the ’60s dawned, Teisco increasingly got caught up in the export market, and by the mid-’60s were major players in the low-end or beginner arena, with instruments sold primarily by mass merchandisers such as Sears and at discount department stores which were rapidly developing at the time. It was mainly in this latter niche that Teisco guitars are known in the U.S. In order to give this narrative some structure, I’ve divided the Teisco history into four basic periods: I-Gibsonia; II-Frumpy Fender-ama; III-A New Spectrum of Originality; and IV-Copydelia.
It will take time to write and update all of the content at once. Come back regularly and I promise that there will be always something new for you to read, the list with essential guitar effects will be constantly updated. If you are just starting out, we recommend going through some online guitar training before you dive in the guitar pedals world.

An octave generator is a simplified form of pitch shifting. This effect will allow you to add an octave—usually below—the fundamental note. Units that add a lower octave exclusively are referred to as sub-octave generators. They can add a lot of depth to the guitarist’s sound. Many bass players also use sub-octave generators to significantly fatten up their sound.
Some great IR's by Redwirez are available for free at their website as some kind of 25th anniversary thing, and if you use windows you can use VSThost as your "DAW" although all it does is host plugins. It's great because it loads so much quicker than a full DAW and doesn't have all the tricky options that just distract you from playing guitar. Like a real amp, it's plug-n-play (after setting it up, of course--- you'll want to set the sample rate to 192khz so that you can get ~8000 samples a sec with oversampling at 4x on each plugin). It can record, too, so it's a really easy, simple solution. Of course, you'll need a real DAW to mix and master.
Patti Smith famously described Tom Verlaine's guitar sound as "a thousand bluebirds screaming." Television's leader soaked up the flavor of favorite records by John Coltrane, the Stones and the Dead – then synthesized them into something entirely new on the band's 1977 debut, Marquee Moon, spinning out endless fluid solos in concert with fellow guitar aesthete Richard Lloyd. Verlaine has kept a low profile in recent decades, but he remains a model for generations of guitarists with a taste for both punk violence and melodic flight.
When I received this Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Electric Guitar, Vintage Sunburst I discovered there are cracks in the wooden body, under the paint. I can tell that the wood was cracked before it was painted because the paint flows into the crack in one instance on the back, is visible up over the "shoulder" close to the strap peg and can be seen under the paint on the front. In another instance the paint bridges a crack on back below the cutout shoulder and can be seen under the paint in the right light front and back. Is this normal? (There was no sign of shipping damage on either the outer carton or on the inner product box). Regarding playing, the bass strings buzz on the frets when fretted (not my fingers) which probably can be corrected by adjusting the bridge. I was under the impression that Epiphone guitars were ready to use right out of the box. I have contacted Epiphone/Gibson company to advise on the cracks and the buzzing bass strings. I am concerned that the cracks may get worse, and if this is this normal for a guitar in this low price range made in china. I got a reply from Gibson Customer Service which said "We would need to see pictures, but it would be highly unusual if there actually were cracks in the wood. The set up on an instrument can shift during shipping and handling, so a new instrument may need to be set-up." I will probably return this instrument and buy one in person from a music store where I can see and try the product before buying it.
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Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.
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Acoustic guitars are generally larger than electric guitars. They also tend to use heavier-gauge strings. Heavier-gauge strings will require a bit more finger strength than the lighter-gauge strings found on electric guitars. Getting comfortable holding the guitar and fretting notes is important on both acoustics and electrics, but may be slightly more physically challenging with acoustics versus electrics.

The AC15C1X is a modern take on the venerable AC15, with improved reliability and built-in effects. Vox's familiar clean and overdriven tone is ever present, courtesy of its three 12AX7 preamp tubes and two EL84 power tubes that drive a 12" Celestion Alnico Blue speaker - a speaker that many Rock and Blues players prefer. The amp has a dedicated Top Boost input for those who want Vox' distinct jangly tone. Finally, it comes with tremolo and reverb effect to add space and texture to your guitar tone.


If you have been looking for an electric guitar that effectively blend tradition with modernity; the Gibson Les Paul Faded 2017 is the excellent choice that fit such description. This guitar stands as the perfect union between the old and the new—featuring a 490R modern and 490T humbuckers, closely followed with 22 frets designed for amazing bends and great feel.
While Fender specialize in the single-coil pickup, it’s Gibson who are masters of the pickup in general – and it shows when you browse the chart in our dedicated Gibson pickup article. However, you’ll quickly discover that there is no ‘one Gibson pickup’, as the brand offer a wide range including single-coils and humbuckers, medium and high outputs, and vintage and modern tones. You’ll find different pickups on all of Gibson’s famous models, including the Les Paul, Firebird, SG and Flying V. Perhaps they are best-known for their PAF-style humbuckers – an awesome vintage tone that is well-replicated in their famous Gibson ‘57 Classic Plus.
For electric guitar amplifiers, there is often[vague] a distinction between "practice" or "recording studio" guitar amps, with output power ratings of less than one watt to 20 watts, and "performance" or "stage" amps of 30 watts or higher.[citation needed] Traditionally,[according to whom?] these have been fixed-power amplifiers,[jargon] with some models having a half-power switch to slightly reduce the listening volume while preserving power-tube distortion.
Most overdrive/distortion pedals can be used in two ways: a pedal can be used as a "boost" with an already overdriven amplifier to drive it further into saturation and "color" the tone, or it can be used with a completely clean amplifier to generate the whole overdrive/distortion effect. With care - and with appropriately chosen pedals - it is possible to "stack" multiple overdrive/distortion pedals together, allowing one pedal to act as a 'boost' for another.[44]
View tab notation as a representation of the guitar's strings. A tab is usually written using six horizontal lines, each corresponding with a string on the guitar. The bottom line represents the lowest, thickest string, while the top string represents the highest, thinnest string. For standard tunings, this means that the lines will represent, from the bottom up, the low E, A, D, G, B and high E strings.
GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is the free, modular and expandable effects processor from Native Instruments, combining creative effects routing possibilities with ease-of-use and pristine sound quality. The included FACTORY SELECTION library provides one stunning amp with 17 cabinet emulations, plus 13 effects and sound modifiers to shape and enhance any audio signal.
Some pedals, such as clean boost pedals and transparent overdrive pedals merely provide a much powerful signal to feed into the preamp section of the amp, causing natural overdrive. Overdrive pedals can provide both a boosted signal and an already distorted signal. Distortion pedals have different kinds of circuits that provide different kinds of distortion; the pedal provides an already distorted signal. Digital overdrives and distortions rely on electronic means of producing the signals, with some resorting to modeled sounds.
Once you've mastered a few songs on the guitar, you may want to record what you can do so others can hear you shred a wicked solo. Or you may want to use your recording to help improve your skills. In either case, recording your electric guitar outside of a studio can result in poor sound quality that is less than desirable or noise complaints. Depending on your situation and equipment, there are many factors you'll likely have to tweak on your way to getting the best recording, but with a little effort, you'll soon be able to listen to an awesome recording of your musical ability.
If you have been playing for a year or two and are looking at something to replace your current model, it would be wise to save a little more and go for a mid-range guitar that may cost between $300 and $500. On this kind of guitar you’ll notice a big difference in sound, as well as the feel of the instrument and the overall playability. Use this page as a starting point to find something that may suit you. Until then, you are probably best off sticking with your current guitar.
Although originally founded in California in 1979 as a company that made replacement parts for guitars, Schecter now produce many models of their own – both mass-produced and custom shop guitars. Like the others on this list, Schecter provide guitars for some big names and have a range of signature models including the guitars of Dan Donegan, Keith Merrow, and Jeff Loomis.
SOLD OUT; Here we have another great vintage Takamine this one is a timeless classic recreation of the trusty and also great sounding Martin D-17 , this fine Takamine F349 example was well crafted in Japan nearly 24 years ago. This guitar is a very good++ vintage Japanese guitar and has been well maintained and plays amazingly with great low action still to this day all these years later. Its made of all Mahogany( other than rosewood fingerboard & bridge ) that is a high grade solid Mahogany neck it really has a nice substantial feel to its medium profile with a 1-11/16ths width at the nut, The sound box is also ALL Mahogany and it offers a nice rich vintage tone one might expect from the company Takamine has copied in this case the Martin D-17 directly, This example’s cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still pretty nice not exactly like new vintage but is JVG rated at very good with NO major cracks at all and NO finish checking = none – . she did have some small paint chips here and there that we easily matched with clear mahogany stain lacquer applied with a brush tip to the spots only and one spot on the lower treble bout where 3 discolor spots were ( cold be from factory ) it looked original anyway I touched that up a bit as well later I buffed the touch ups back she looks much better now and this will also help to preserve its original finish integrity as well as keeping up her beauty. Great low and playing action on this one it really plays with ease Take a good look she still shines like glass and her sound is clear and the volume is very good, and tone is vintage sweet from its well Good and well aged tone woods attribute to making this guitar sound as good as she does. This F349 model is a full size Dreadnought as and she is faithful in its shape & size of the vintage Martin D-17 it copies other than its original design Takamine headstock shape… a very cool D-17 guitar, its 23+ years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. Please look her over well feel free to ask any questions. This is a nice players guitar and is sure to please. It is JVG Rated 8.5/10 very good+ Vintage used condition. WYSIWYG .

This book emphasizes tabs with the accompanying music notation. It’s not a long book and one that a beginner will likely outgrow at some point. However, it provides a good introduction to get you playing songs you’ll recognize fast. It does a fine job of explaining everything the newbie needs to know including how to position yourself. Build those good habits early!
Speaking of, you’ll probably look to upgrade either the bridge or the tuners at some point, because heavy whammy use will pretty quickly throw this out of tune. If you don’t use a whammy often, this makes a very fine choice, indeed. The neck is satin finished for better feel. All in all, a very worthwhile guitar that comes in at less than half the price of most of the other options on this list.
Today’s beginner guitars are far superior to the hunk of wood with strings I started with, and now there is a huge array of instruments to choose from. In fact, I’d go so far as to say if you only intend to play guitar for fun you’ll never need to spend another dime on gear beyond your starter setup, if you don’t want to. (Except for things like strings and picks, of course.) That definitely wasn’t true thirty years ago.

This preamp can also offer a gain control. Essentially, it’s what drives the power levels of the signals to the amp, but it can also boost volume. If the preamp doesn’t have a gain control, it can be assumed that it’s already factory-set to a certain level of gain. One way around the lack of a gain control is to use the volume control on the main amp. Either way, it’s very helpful when you find you need to compete in a multi-instrument band when you feel like you’re being drowned out or you’re experiencing unwanted feedback when you do try to vie for being heard.
A now affordable alternative to the Tri-Axis and other Mesa Boogie Amps, the Studio Preamp contained all of the versatility one would expect from a Boogie. This 2-space machine is based on the classic Mesa Boogie Mark IIC+ amplifier, but in the popular rack-mountable form of the late 1980s. It features 5 preamp tubes and a blackface circuit, so it’s perfect for those chasing after a Fender-esque clean or 90’s mid-gain lead tone. And like most Mesa’s, you’ll get a convenient EQ for those final tweaks.
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I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.
Thanks for posting the cool video. I have a Decca like that one. Its pickups migrated to my #1 guitar, which is a relative from roughly the same era (early 1970’s), a Daimaru (sunburst, jazzmaster / jaguar copy surf guitar body, tremolo, etc.). The Decca now has one Daimaru pickup (I wrecked the other one when I was a teenager — thinking I was going to ‘improve’ it), but otherwise, my Decca looks basically identical to yours — except for it has the original tuners, and I angled the bridge in the 1990’s. The neat sound you can get from one of these particular Deccas is the placement of the bridge pickup, it’s a bit further from the bridge than a lot of other electrics, which gives it a neat, plunky sound to it — as is apparent from your video.
Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup configurations to find out what you need.

Tuner: If you’re new to guitars and playing music, there is absolutely NO way that you know how to recognize all the notes by ear and tune your guitar without a tuner. Even if someone tunes the guitar for you at the shop, it will get out of tune by the time you’re home, so this one’s an absolute must have. Hang on for the price until we discuss the next device.
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If you’re new to the world of guitar or bass, a looper pedal is a great way to hone your skills. A looper pedal is not an effect, but more a tool that allows you to record chord progressions, notes or riffs and then play it back through your amp. It’s ideal for playing a chord progression or rhythm section, looping it and then playing a lead line or riff over the top – like two guitars playing together.
Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Casino Coupe™ Ltd. Ed. AJ-100 Acoustic Guitar PRO-1 Spanish Classic PRO-1 Classic 3/4-Size Epiphone Masterbilt® Olympic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith Classic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Classic Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Ltd. Ed. EL-00 PRO Mahogany Epiphone Les Paul SL™ Electric Guitar PRO-1 Acoustic PRO-1 Classic Acoustic Epiphone SG-Special VE™ Electric Guitar PR-150 Ltd. Ed. DR-100 Wine Red DR-100 Les Paul Express Les Paul Ukulele Outfit PRO-1 Plus Acoustic Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Special-II Wine Red Epiphone Les Paul Special VE™ electric guitar Les Paul Studio LT™ Electric Guitar Les Paul Special II Epiphone AJ-210CE Acoustic/Electric Outfit SG Special AJ-220S PRO-1 Ultra Acoustic/Electric AJ-100CE MM-30S Ltd. Ed. 1963 J-45 Ltd. Ed. 2014 Hummingbird Artist Toby Standard IV MB-100 Les Paul Player Pack PR-4E Acoustic/Electric Player Pack DR-212 EB-0 Slash "AFD" Les Paul Special-II Outfit Masterbilt DR-400MCE Epiphone Embassy PRO Bass Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Studio Ltd. Ed. EJ-160E Acoustic/Electric G-310 (LH) G-310 Ltd Ed "1964" Caballero Electar Inspired by "1939" Century Lap Steel Outfit Ltd. Ed. EJ-200 Artist AJ-220SCE Toby Deluxe IV Les Paul 100 Slash "AFD" Les Paul Performance Pack Toby Bass Performance Pack Ltd. Ed. Hummingbird PRO Jeff Waters "Annihilation-II™" Flying-V Worn G-400 Dot Studio PR-5E Toby Deluxe-V Hummingbird PRO Dove PRO EL-00 PRO PRO-1 Explorer Performance Pack PRO-1 Les Paul Jr. Performance Pack Goth Les Paul Studio Thunderbird-IV Goth Thunderbird-IV EB-3 G-400 PRO Les Paul Studio G-400 PRO (LH) Viola ES-335 PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 Nighthawk Custom Quilt Ltd. Ed. ES-339 P90 PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 Wildkat Wine Red 75th Anniversary Century Amplifier Les Paul Standard Dot EJ-200SCE Inspired by 1964 Texan (LH) EJ-200SCE (LH) Inspired by 1964 Texan Dobro Hound Dog Round Neck Wildkat Allen Woody Rumblekat Goth '58 Explorer Ltd. Ed. 2014 Les Paul Traditional PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 LP Standard Red Royale Les Paul Standard (LH) Casino Coupe ES-339 PRO Ltd. Ed. James Bay Signature "1966" Century Outfit Les Paul Custom 100th Anniversary Ltd. Ed. Björn Gelotte Les Paul Custom 2015 Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard Epiphone Les Paul Traditional PRO-II™ Wildkat Royale Ltd. Ed. Riviera Custom P93 Red Royale 1956 Les Paul Standard PRO Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Tamio Okuda Elitist Coronet™ Outfit Tom Delonge ES-333 Riviera Custom P93 Wilshire Phant-o-matic Thunderbird PRO-IV Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO Blueshawk Deluxe Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Explorer Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Flying-V Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Explorer Bass Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO (LH) Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Johnny A. Custom Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia Explorer Custom Artisan Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia RD Custom Artisan Outfit Masterbilt® De Luxe Classic™ 4-String Acoustic/Electric Bass Guitar Les Paul Custom PRO Dobro Hound Dog Del. Square Neck Dobro Hound Dog Del. Round Neck Casino Epiphone Stagebird™ 6-String Electric Banjo Epiphone Les Paul ES PRO™ Epiphone Inspired by “1966” Century Archtop Mayfair™ 5-String Banjo Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Joe Bonamassa "Treasure" Firebird™-I Ltd. Ed. ES-295 Premium Ltd. Ed. Emperor Swingster Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Standard Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Riviera Custom P93 Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Blue Royale Allen Woody Rumblekat™ Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Jack Casady Blue Royale Bass Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Wildkat KOA Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Custom PRO KOA Ltd. Ed. LP Custom Blackback PRO Ltd. Ed. LP Standard Florentine PRO Les Paul Classic-T FT-350SCE Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Red Royale Ltd. Ed. Brent Hinds Flying-V Custom “MayDay Monster” Les Paul Standard Ltd. Ed. Brendon Small Snow Falcon® Outfit Les Paul Custom PRO (LH) Masterbilt DR-500MCE Masterbilt 2015 AJ-45ME Dave Navarro "Jane" MM-50E Professional Dobro Hound Dog M-14 Metalbody Zakk Wylde Custom Plus Bullseye Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard PE Ltd Ed Jack Casady Signature Bass Tommy Thayer "White Lightning" Epiphone Sheraton™-II PRO Joe Pass Emperor-II PRO Les Paul Custom Classic PRO Masterbilt® MM-40L Mandolin 1984 Explorer EX B. B. King Lucille Emperor Swingster Les Paul Tribute Plus Outfit Les Paul Ultra-III Prophecy Les Paul Custom Plus EX Prophecy Les Paul Custom Plus GX Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom Les Paul Black Beauty 3 Epiphone Ltd. Ed. 20th Anniversary Jack Casady Bass Outfit Emperor Swingster Royale Broadway Jack Casady Signature Bass Masterbilt EF-500RCCE Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom-7 Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Inspired by "1955" Les Paul Custom™ Outfit 2014 Tak Matsumoto DC Custom Ltd. Ed. Masterbilt AJ-500RCE Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia Les Paul Custom Ltd. Ed. Tony Iommi SG Custom Ltd. Ed. Tony Iommi SG Custom (LH) Gary Clark Jr "Blak & Blu" Casino Gary Clark Jr "Blak & Blu" Casino Bigsby Ltd. Ed. Union Jack Sheraton ES-175 Premium Ltd. Ed. G-1275 Doubleneck Slash "Rosso Corsa" Les Paul Standard Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1965" Casino Vintage Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1966" Custom Riviera Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1964" Texan Elitist Casino Epiphone FT-100 Player Pack Epiphone FT-100 Acoustic Epiphone Ltd. Ed. "1961" G-400 PRO Epiphone SG-Junior Electric Guiter Player Package FT-100CE Ltd. Ed. Tommy Thayer "White Lightning" Explorer Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Matt Heafy "Snøfall" Les Paul Custom Outfit (7-string) Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Matt Heafy "Snøfall" Les Paul Custom Outfit (6-string) Ltd. Ed. Björn Gelotte "Jotun" Les Paul Custom Outfit Ltd. Ed. Richie Faulkner Flying-V Custom Outfit Ltd. Ed. Joe Bonamassa 1958 "Amos" Korina Flying-V Outfit Ltd. Ed. Slash Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Ltd. Ed. Slash Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Premium Outfit Thunderbird Vintage PRO Bass Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Jason Hook "M-4" Explorer Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Dot Deluxe CE Coupe (Nylon String) SST Coupe (Steel String) Hummingbird Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele Les Paul® Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton "1964" Texan Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton "1964" Texan Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton Les Paul Custom PRO Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton Les Paul Custom PRO Ltd. Ed. Slash Firebird Ltd. Ed. Slash Firebird Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. John Lee Hooker 100th Anniversary Zephyr Outfit Ltd. Ed. "Mayday Monster" EJ-200SCE Outfit
Lawsuit Takamine F375s Hand built in Japan and still in excellent vintage condition! Build type is Rare Exotic Tone woods series Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back-sides-fingerboard & headstock overlay JUST Gorgeous. Its workmanship is really top shelf by any standards, We installed and set up with Martin Marquis 80/20 strings 12's, as well as setting this guitar up with a New bone nut & saddle, Condition is very good with a few minor hard to see scratches on its back you have to look closely sometimes at an angel ( clear coat only not threw to wood ) general play here and there as any 37 year old guitar that has been played would get... dinks and such but nothing major to detract from its obvious outward beauty, This example has an excellent neck its 1-11/16th's at the bone nut, fingerboard is very good as are the frets at 90%, its straight and has a nice meaty feel, has the Martin design detail of the Diamond Volute on back, original tuners are excellent as well, a warm vintage vibe to this 37 year old vintage Gem. Tone is rich with good volume she Sings well!!! JVG Rated 9/10 higher if it wasn't for the few minor clear coat scratches in its clear coat not to the wood that I can see more like swirls and such may be possible to fine grade 3000 wet sand and polish out its possible if it doesn't sell soon when I get the chance I'll do it, its a commitment because it may not sand out alone it may require a few thin clear lacquer applied and buffed out to cure it forever if so a guitar of this caliber deserves the attention.. ( the price will go up after I do that work ) and that really doesn't have to be done to make this guitar just very good -excellent vintage it would bring it very close to mint!.... aside from the few minor scuffs this guitar still qualifies as vintage excellent right now, just thought I would point those out. So to be clear about this listing the way you see it now is the way it is offered.Its a F375s and not the EF375s yet This guitar has a factory installed transducer type pickup installed and it sounds wonderful, Its said to have been installed by original owner in Tokyo by Takamine shop its a very clean job I call it CLEAN where they do not make extra unnecessary holes for output jack instead they use the END PIN hole and its a combination strap pin and or output jack, So this guitar is either Acoustic or Electric really nice in deed in SUPER Condition well above average. This beautiful instrument comes with its original hard shell case it to is in very good vintage condition its heavy duty molded type with plush black interior all functional fully. This is the total package. Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Johnny Marr is an iconic and influential guitarist best known for his work in the Smiths, which broke up in 1987. His guitar phrases and his genius for crafting textured and tonally rich rhythmic leads has influenced countless rock guitarists of the last quarter-century. Since leaving the Smiths, Marr hasn't exactly been idle or resting on his laurels.
Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.
There’s a lot of knowledge here to digest, so the best advice anyone can give you is not to sweat it too much. You aren’t going to become a pedal encyclopedia overnight, and even if you could, you’d be missing out on the fun experience of trial and error that comes with figuring out your first pedals. The truth is that some of the most distinctive guitar and bass effects ever recorded have been the result of artists experimenting with effects units they’d never used before – especially in the 1960s, when pedals were brand-new to everyone.
Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.
I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.

BYO takes pride in providing you with a BETTER guitar kit. We have worked with our supplier for many years, making sure we provide our customers with the highest quality products. We have our kit manufactured to our specifications and we have been providing guitar kits to builders for over a decade! We inspect each kit before we ship, checking for great neck fit, and making sure there are no problems with the body and neck. We repackage the all the hardware and electronics, putting all the correct screws with the correct parts and making sure you get ALL the parts for your kit. We don't just re-sell kits, we also have a custom shop where we make USA made guitar kits. We use this know-how to make sure our imported kits are of a higher quality and will give you a great experience and a great guitar. If by chance we miss anything, we are happy to replace, repair, exchange or refund. We have also written clear, easy to understand, step by step instructions that will make building your guitar a breeze, but if you have any questions, we are happy to answer any questions you may have along the way.
The wonders of digital delay arrived on the pedalboard in the early 1980s with what seemed massive capabilities of long delays, clean signal reproductions, and the endless fun of one, two, or up to 16 seconds of looping delay. In many cases, in the early days, reproductions weren’t really all that clean (or were cleaner than analog, but colder and harsher too), and many delays were prone to digital distortion if pushed, or poor resolution on the decay of the signal. Even so, the techno-power of the new technology stamped all over the bones of the old analog delay units, and for a time threatened to bury them entirely.
Tokai was founded in 1947 and is based in Hamamatsu, Japan. Tokai began production of acoustic guitars in 1965 and by 1968 was producing electric guitars for the American market. Tokai still exists as guitar manufacturer. Tokai made guitars for Fernandes, Mosrite and Fender Japan. Tokai badged guitars included the house brand Tokai as well as Cat's Eyes, Conrad, Drifter, Hondo, Love Rock, Mosrite, Sigma and Silver Star. Possible badges include Artist Ltd., Gaban, Gallan, Gession and Robin. It's suggested that Tokai made Hummingbird acoustics as well, but if these were related to those made by Humming Bird I haven't quite sorted out yet.

We have done hundreds of guitar 'set-ups' / repairs / restorations over the years and know how to do them to a degree that 95% of 'players' will be very satisfied. We're not just changing strings and polishing. We'll check and adjust the neck for correct string height at the 7th fret (should typically be about the thickness of a .010 gauge 'E' string when fretted at the first fret and the 12th fret). We also check for a 'body bump' in the neck as if that can't be addressed to a 'playable' degree, then the balance of the adjustments will be for naught. As we're in a very dry climate, we will check for 'fret overhang' due to neck shrinkage and 're-dress' the frets accordingly. If it's a 'bolt-on' neck, we'll check for neck joint / screw integrity and repair as necessary. We check and adjust for correct intonation using our 'Peterson' strobe tuner and our other 'analog' tuner. Electrics are typically intonated with 'fresh', .010 strings installed (if you want it intonated with a different gauge, just let us know). We inspect and test the electronics, especially looking for any 'aftermarket' re-wiring / mods / incorrect repairs. We inspect the integrity of the tuning machines and repair as necessary. Of course we do all the standard cleaning, adjusting and test playing once the 'basic integrity' of the instrument has been addressed.


Epiphone offers one for every guitarist out there and has a product lineage featuring electric, acoustic and other options. One of its famed options among the acoustic line is the Les Paul Ukulele, a true vintage piece. The guitar has been termed as the market leader in the acoustic guitar field. It comes with mahogany body facilitated by top laminated, rosewood fingerboard and maple top. The tone of the same is truly resonating.
What makes it truly stand out is the infinite Reverb this pedal provides. If you’re looking to get an all-around “stomp-box” featuring everything you ever wanted with remarkable sound output, this work of art by EH is designed to make you never think about getting another Reverb pedal. It can fit in any form of setup, and it is destined to conquer your flavor.
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