Pete Townshend turned his guitar into a machine gun. That was the actual sound he went after, slamming his guitars into speaker cabinets and toggling the pickup-selector switch violently. “To me the guitar was a symbol,” explained the Who’s lead guitarist. “It was a metaphor for a machine gun. And the only thing you could do with a machine gun in the 60s was break it across your legs. That’s what I did.” You can hear these specific sonic strategies on songs like My Generation and Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere.
I didn’t want to spend much money (I’m a cheap bastard…part of me thinks I could never truly love a 59 Bassman unless I scored it at a yard sale for a hundred bucks. Now, tone matters more than money to me, but I tend to love the tone of crappy amps just as much as high enders, so I’d feel like a stooge dropping that kind of money on an amp. Especially since I play them and would ruin the collectable value of anything by gigging with it).
Capacitors used in guitar circuits aren’t polarised, so it doesn’t matter which way round you fit the legs - we normally go with the printed side facing out from the pot. They’re measured in microfarads (uF) and will be marked with a number. You can experiment with different values and materials for different results, but if in doubt, just swap it for what you already have.
Winner of the prestigious Music Inc. Product Excellence Award, 2017, the HeadRush Pedalboard Guitar Amp And FX Modelling Processor wholeheartedly deserves a spot on our best multi FX pedals list, thanks to the huge amount of effects within as well as its vast array of amplifier, cabinet and mic models. This is one of the best options for working musicians, yet still remains affordable.

Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.
I had a 1984 Jackson Randy Rhoads Custom with a serial # in the low 400′s…that thing would sing on a note with high gain and boost with a TS-808 Tube screamer like a Sustainiac guitar…problem was the bridge was mislocated and it wouldn’t intonate correctly…sent it back…made them replace it with a new guitar (didn’t want plugs in it)…the new one had (ermmm…still has as I still own it) the EXACT same pickups, hardware down to the tuning machines, etc…EVERY single piece of hardware was moved over to the replacement (and in the case of the bridge pickup it is a proven fact as that was/is a retail version of an SH-6 wired for series/single coil/parallel…along with the pickguard with the additional hole for switch)…same types of wood used (3 piece maple neck through construction with poplar wings) yet the replacement has NEVER sung on a note. So what does that say? I have to say that the replacement does sound “better” overall in some intangible way…glassier I guess…longer sustain…yet it REFUSES to go into a sustained feedback loop.

When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
As previously stated, a dominant seventh is a four-note chord combining a major chord and a minor seventh. For example, the C7 dominant seventh chord adds B♭ to the C-major chord (C,E,G). The naive chord (C,E,G,B♭) spans six frets from fret 3 to fret 8;[49] such seventh chords "contain some pretty serious stretches in the left hand".[46] An illustration shows a naive C7 chord, which would be extremely difficult to play,[49] besides the open-position C7 chord that is conventional in standard tuning.[49][50] The standard-tuning implementation of a C7 chord is a second-inversion C7 drop 2 chord, in which the second-highest note in a second inversion of the C7 chord is lowered by an octave.[49][51][52] Drop-two chords are used for sevenths chords besides the major-minor seventh with dominant function,[53] which are discussed in the section on intermediate chords, below. Drop-two chords are used particularly in jazz guitar.[54] Drop-two second-inversions are examples of openly voiced chords, which are typical of standard tuning and other popular guitar-tunings.[55]
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The K-4L (Teisco Del Rey ET-460 Super Deluxe) had four of the large, chunky, single-coil pickups with chrome sides and black center insert revealing six square poles. These were controlled by four sliding on/off switches, plus a 3-position switch for solo, rhythm and super bass sounds, as well as volume and tone. The roller bridge had a spring-loaded muffler/mute.
Now, to answer your question I would have to point out a series of popular brands and what they are popular for. After that, you make a decision on which one is best for you. You might see where I’m going with this. There is no single best guitar brand the same way there is no single best car brand. But we do have the Ferraris and Lamborghinis, as well as the Toyotas and Nissans of the guitar world!
A phaser pedal is similar to a chorus as it thickens up your sound but also adds a sweeping effect – almost as if the speaker within the amplifier is spinning around or moving up and down. If you pretend the speaker is moving away from you and moving closer and back again – you’ll get an idea as to how it sounds. You can change the length of the effect and how quickly the movements are via the pedal.
Keep focused on one goal at a time. For example, you could spend a week or two really getting to know 5 chords (why 5? Just pick a realistic number for that window of time and go with it!). Then, in the next week or two, practice changing between those chords using different combinations. In the next week, work on your strumming or picking, using the chords and chord change combinations you've learned.

There is not one standard # of frets, but the three most common are 21, 22 and 24 frets. The extra frets simply mean you can play some additional high notes. If you are just starting out, you will probably be just fine choosing 21, 22 or 24 frets. But, you should probably avoid the fretless option unless you're specifically learning how to play fretless instruments.
The Dobros and Nationals were joined by the first Supro guitar versions in late 1935, even though their announcement didn’t appear until a few months later in the March, 1936, The Music Trades. These first Supro guitars included an aluminum Hawaiian lap steel, both electric Spanish archtop 6-string and tenor guitars, and an electric mandolin. They mark the official beginning of the Supro story.

* 3 most basic reverb modes: Room: Simulates the spaciousness of a room; Hall: Simulates the spatial dimension of a music hall; Plate: Simulates the unique reverberation character only coming from a plate reverberator. * One reverb control balances the dry/wet signal, simple enough to dial in the perfect amount of reverb for your tonal needs. * True bypass for zero tonal coloration. * Extreme mini size for great compactness. * Heavy-duty metal casing for great stability and durability; Connectors include input, output, and power supply; Powered by 9v DC. W/ a 6 inch patch cable included. SONICAKE Digital Reverb is reverb pedal designed to add dimension and spaciousness to your tone. It is extremely straight-forward to use with only one “Reverb” knob to adjust the balance between the raw d.
Rolling Stones best electric guitarist list should've been nicknamed the best average guitarist list. I didn't give this guy the time of day because I thought the bucket thing was to cover up how badly he sucks. Turns out it's the opposite. He's just weird. It's too bad the average person doesn't have the capacity to enjoy this type of advanced music.
Add your vote to this list of the top guitarists ever and help to pick the best guitar player in the history of music. These roock, jazz, blues guitarists have all had long careers filled with success and failure. Some are still jamming out today, which other rock stars died too young, before their talents could be fully appreciated. Now is your chance to give the best guitar players in the world some recognition.
Out of all the hopped-up Caucasians who turbocharged the blues in the late Sixties, Texas albino Johnny Winter was both the whitest and the fastest. Songs like his 1969 cover of "Highway 61 Revisited" are astonishing showpieces of his lightningfast thumb-picked electric slide playing. Jimi Hendrix sought him out as a sideman, and Muddy Waters recognized his talent at first glance, becoming a friend and collaborator: "That guy up there onstage – I got to see him up close," Waters later said. "He plays eight notes to my one!"
Taylor’s 214ce Grand Auditorium acoustic guitar has undergone a few changes over the years. One of the latest improvements added in 2017 concerns the wood used for the body. Because of the restrictions on the importation of rosewood, Taylor no longer uses it for their 200 series of guitars, which the 214ce is a part of. Instead, the company used the next best wood for a great, balanced tonal response: Hawaiian koa.

Squier has now seen fit to introduce Fender's revered '72 Thinline to its own range, and it looks the business, with white pearloid scratchplate, finely carved f-hole and Fender- embossed humbuckers. While you'll find the gloss-finished modern C neck across much of Squier's Vintage Modified range, you're unlikely to find tones quite like the Thinline's anywhere else, certainly at this price. Cleans from the neck and middle positions are punchy and persuasive, not dissimilar to fat P-90-ish single coils, but flicking over to the bridge humbucker yields a burly, resonant voice that screams for big open chords and an overdriven valve amp. That's why it's one of the best electric guitars for Indie and alt-rock players.
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.

You might be playing guitar in a cramped garage or a poky bedroom – but it’ll sound like you’re gigging a cathedral when you step on a quality reverb pedal. Reverb brings a sense of space, depth and drama to even the most basic guitar parts, and as this video shows, few effects deliver more atmosphere for less effort. Using the BOSS RV-5 as our demo model, we’ll show you just how flexible reverb can be, running through key controls that adjust brightness, volume and more. Then, we’ll show how your playing can benefit from three different reverb types, whether that’s the vintage sound of spring reverb, the rock-club chug of room reverb, or the stadium-sized shimmer of hall reverb.
Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
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Beside learning the basics, avoiding modeling amps and multi-effect pedals in the beginning will allow you to focus on the few basic effects every guitarist needs along the way – Reverb, Chorus, Delay and Compressor. Reverb is a must, and most amps have onboard reverb effects. Once you begin to get the hang of playing guitar and wrap your head around those basic effects you can branch out to other effects and modeling amps.
The result is not that bad and makes justice to the "live" arrangement of the song. However, when producing the recording of the song, I wanted to go further while preserving the "color" of the pedal, which I like so much. First of all, I think the delay time is a bit behind the beat. What's more, the delay line is a bit too present and "blurs" the main riff. Finally, unlike in a live performance, the sound of the guitar would integrate better into the recording if it developed along the stereo width rather than the depth. In short, it is truly impossible to try to make things the way I think they should be with this take. Fortunately, I went through the pains of splitting the signal right before the Memory Boy and I was able to use this "good" signal to apply the desired changes in no time!
I have a problem visualizing a pickup wiring diagram that I am trying to set up. I just purchased a set of the new Fluence Strat pickups and I can’t figure out how to connect one of the wires coming from the bridge pickup (yellow wire – preamp input). I am using 3 mini toggle switches instead of the 5 way switch so I am having trouble transferring the different wiring scheme. Basically, the Preamp input and the preamp output from the bridge pickup connect to the 2 connections that normally have a jumper on the 5 way switch, so I can’t figure out how to change the wiring. I can upload the diagram if that would help. Thanks.

Another name that is usually associated with PRS is Carlos Santana. He has a number of guitars that bear his name, and this one is probably the most popular one. It’s affordable, sounds great and plays like a dream. After mere hours playing it, I’ve realized just how expressive you can be with it. It impressed me enough to take a high place on my list of guitars that I have to get. Needless to say, it didn’t take me long to make one a part of my collection.

An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.
List of acoustic guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Acoustic guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson, and more. What are the best acoustic guitar companies? Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

The size and power rating of the amp, as well as the size and type of the speakers within the cabinet, will have a significant impact on the recorded sound. Obviously, huge stacks will produce a very different sound from small combos. That said, many recording engineers have found that a small, low-powered amp cranked right up can sound more exciting than a big powerhouse. Even cheap transistor amps with tiny speakers can sound great in the right context. Don’t be precious and don’t rule anything out; it’s all about the end result!
également et la corde pourra alors être ajustée à la hauteur souhaitée. L'Ibanez DOWNSHIFTER vous permet de réduire la hauteur d'une corde à une hauteur prédéfinie en actionnant simplement un petit levier. Pour que l'accordage soit précis, aussi bien en position haute qu'en position basse, vous devez régler les deux positions du levier avant d'utiliser le Downshifter.

While we have touched on the characteristics of single coil and humbucking pickups, to truly cover guitar electronics check out -‘Guitar Electronics for Musicians’ by Donald Brosnac which details the history of guitar pickups and goes into great detail about the mechanics of guitar pickups). It’s fairly heavy going for anyone new to the topic but also very interesting at the same time.


You think those guys are good? They are, but you should hear my uncle- Chris Lambert- and my cousin -Brent Lambert-. My uncle works at the Shadow Box in Columbus (or is it Cincinnati?) Ohio. He plays in a whole bunch of the music shows as a guitarist, and he rocks. Sometimes my cousin works there, too. Brent is just as good as my uncle, and they're both as good as the people you put on here.
A marvelous 6 string acoustic guitar for the right handed. It has a beautiful natural satin finish, giving it awesome looks for stage performance. It is developed by cort guitars, with over 50 years of experience in musical instruments manufacture. The body back and sides are made from mahogany, whereas the top is spruce laminated. Prices range from around INR 7,600 depending on offers available, which is relatively affordable. You can get more product details by clicking on:

So just to throw this out there- I've been trying to figure out how to set up electric guitars on my own for years and could never get it remotely figured out. At about 11:30 pm last night I decided to take a garbage fret buzzing machine of a guitar and try again. Your blog is the first time I've comprehended and successfully set up a guitar!! I'd buy you a six pack if you were in the neighborhood!
Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]
Before we go into the parts of an electric guitar, it’s worth noting that there are three different body types: solid body, hollow body, and semi-hollow body. The main difference between them is the way the bodies are constructed, and the amount of resonance they produce. If you’re into punk, rock, metal, or any style of fast or heavy music, then it should be solid body all the way. It allows for louder sounds and more sustain, while avoiding the feedback issues that affect some hollow bodied instruments at higher volumes. The hollow and semi-hollow bodied guitars on the market will appeal to players who prefer softer styles, such as jazz, country and blues, as well as soft rock and pop, as they offer a full, rich and more resonant sound with lots of bass. Beginners will be best off sticking to a solid bodied guitar, as they are easier to handle in most scenarios. For the rest of this anatomical breakdown we’ll focus on solid body guitars.
Re-amping is another increasingly common production technique, often used at the mixdown stage. This process involves a dedicated re-amping device, which takes a line-level feed from a mixing console or DAW interface and converts that signal's level and impedance to one that a guitar amplifier is able to accept. That signal is usually a separate "dry" (unamplified and unprocessed) guitar track recorded using an active 500kOhm direct box placed between the guitar and the amp.

Beyond specific favoured mics, a number of engineers also mention more general principles when choosing pairs of mics for guitar recording. Jim Scott and Stephen Street both mention using a 'cheap' or 'bad' mic with a good mic (both give the SM57+U87 combination as an example). "Between the two you can find the ideal sound," remarks Jim, "and you can get brightness and fullness."
Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.
You don't have to use plug-ins! Some synths such as the Virus TI have very flexible effects built in. You don't have to create audio effects in your sequencer. For example, I use the Access Virus synth, which features a simple delay effect, with the added bonus that all its parameters are available in the modulation matrix. One favourite trick involves routing velocity to the delay colour parameter. For parts that get brighter with increased velocity, it adds extra animation and bite if the echoes also get brighter. Unusually, the Virus also features four-way audio panning, so you can position an audio signal anywhere between the main stereo outputs and a second pair. If the second pair of outputs is routed to an external effects unit, you can play with the concept of moving a note around in a space, where its position also determines the treatment it gets. More fun can be had by modulating reverb time and colour via an LFO. The same LFO can then be used to control filter cutoff, EQ frequency and maybe wavetable position too (if your Virus is a TI). In this way, timbral changes happen at the same time as effect changes. Paul Nagle
Tuner: If you’re new to guitars and playing music, there is absolutely NO way that you know how to recognize all the notes by ear and tune your guitar without a tuner. Even if someone tunes the guitar for you at the shop, it will get out of tune by the time you’re home, so this one’s an absolute must have. Hang on for the price until we discuss the next device.
Seven-string electric guitars were popularized among rock players in the 1980s by Steve Vai. Along with the Japanese guitar company Ibanez, Vai created the Universe series seven-string guitars in the 1980s, with a double locking tremolo system for a seven-string guitar. These models were based on Vai's six-string signature series, the Ibanez Jem. Seven-string guitars experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 2000s, championed by Deftones, Limp Bizkit, Slayer, KoRn, Fear Factory, Strapping Young Lad, Nevermore, Muse and other hard rock and metal bands. Metal musicians often prefer the seven-string guitar for its extended lower range. The seven-string guitar has also played an essential role in progressive metal rock and is commonly used in bands such as Dream Theater and Pain of Salvation and by experimental guitarists such as Ben Levin.
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Yamaha-C5-Salamander-JNv5.1- Arguably the best free piano on the internet and better than many of the expensive ones as well. Modified for sf2 with five brightness levels with optional resonance and this set includes the new Dark, Mellow and Dynamic Grands.  All in a set at 592mb in size.  This version has the detailed 15 velocity layers for seamless expression.
By the time After The Rain came out, the blues critics created enough of a backlash that it started affecting sales. Muddy must have realized that the records were upsetting his blues fanbase which had been loyal to him for over twenty years. Perhaps he feared he'd lose them forever if he stayed in this direction and that the young fanbase he had now might not stick with him as long. It wasn't until 1970 and after a more normal electric blues record (Fathers and Sons) that Muddy started talking badly about Electric Mud and then only mildly at first. Muddy released some great records in the rest of his lifetime, but he never experimented much with his music again.
Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.
Using that pickup and gain level, you should be able to hear some guitar distortion. Of course, if that's not entirely satisfactory, there are a few other things you can do. If your amp has tone controls, you can turn up the mid knob to hear the guitar distortion more clearly. If there's only bass and treble controls available to you, you can turn both of these down a little to hear more distortion.
The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).
The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.
Traditional sets can sometimes feature vastly different tensions between strings, causing players to compensate with altered techniques. New York string icon D’Addario set out to even the playing field with its Balanced Tension XL sets, which boast mathematically equalised resistance for a similar feel from string to string. That means even effort when bending, strumming, plucking and slapping, and even improved dynamic control.
Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.
Likewise, the two coils of a humbucker which are wired in series can be connected in parallel. This results in a brighter sound and lower output resembling that of a single-coil pickup. Compared to coil split the sound is usually a bit fuller and the pickup's hum-cancelling properties are retained. Like coil split, wiring a humbucker in parallel requires the start and end of both coils to be accessible, which is sometimes possible with stock pickups. Unlike coil split, it also requires a DPDT switch (coil split only requires a SPDT switch).[26][28]
"NEW-DEMO" means that we are an authorized dealer of the item and acquired it directly from the manufacturer. We consider the item to be new because it has not been sold to or owned by another customer. NEW-DEMO items, however, have been on display in an active retail music store for some length of time. As a result, these items may have been tried out by other customers. They may be dusty, have fingerprints, stick marks, pick swirl, etc. Please refer to the item's description for more detailed information. All NEW-DEMO items come with a manufacturer's warranty (where applicable), but some may not have original manufacturer's packaging. Please refer to our Appearance and Technical Condition scales below for more information about the item’s appearance and condition. 

I disagree, not saying that you can hear tonewoods but saying that it isnt just the string and pickups that make a difference. There is a huge difference in how a string vibrates and pickups do pickup resonances, otherwise a semi hollow would sound exactly like a solidbody and would never feedback. Get some humbuckers put them in a telecaster and then put them in a 335 and tell me they sound exactly the same. What is important is scale length (string tension), weight and various things like bridge design. Get a hardtail strat with strat pickups and then route it for a trem bridge ... it will sound different, maybe minor or major depending on what but it will change the tone.


@Danny – As an EQ is used to filter and tweak the tone of the signal passing through it, this can be placed anywhere in the chain. For example, if you want to tweak the overall sound before the amplifier, place the EQ at the end of the signal chain. If you want to adjust the tone of your guitar before it hits your effects pedals, place the EQ at the front of your signal chain. It just depends on what you are planning on doing with the EQ and where in the signal chain it sounds best to you.

I wish I knew what goes on in there. I'm told it is a simple cut of the laminated neck and then the tone block is glued to the back. I hope it is that simple as I am about to perform some major surgery on my 9 ply neck to acomidate this construction technique . If any body out there can lend some advise on this , please do so I don't turn my bass into a clock!


In the world of amplifiers, there are amp stacks and combo amps. For beginners, a combo amp is usually the way to go, since they combine the amp circuitry and the speaker together into one unit. Check out models like the Marshall MG Series MG30CFX 30W 1x10 Guitar Combo Amp and the Fender RUMBLE 25 1x8 25 W Bass Combo Amp for a few examples of this type. For the biggest professional setups, on the other hand, a combo amp may not be quite beefy enough. That's where stacks come in, based on a head (such as the Peavey 6505+ 120W Guitar Amp Head) paired up with a speaker cabinet. You can even find some pre-made amp stacks here, like the Line 6 Spider IV HD150 150W and 4x12 Guitar Half Stack, to save you the legwork of shopping for both parts separately.
Another great book by Nicolas, this one shows you exactly how to create your own personal tone using amplifiers, effects and your guitar itself. Any beginner will benefit from this clearly written guide including everything from a breakdown of all the different ways to individualize your guitar playing technique, to information about virtual effects.
Everybody doubles their rhythm parts, but I always thought, 'Why don't they double their lead solos, too?'. It's really hard to do, especially with any bends and faster sections, and it does take a very long time, but I've been doing it a different way to make things a little easier. For instance, as soon as I've just finished a song, I'll double the lead part right away, while it's still completely fresh in my mind.
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”
Power valves (tubes) can be overdriven in the same way that pre-amplifier valves can, but because these valves are designed to output more power, the distortion and character they add to the guitar's tone is unique. During the 1960s to early 1970s, distortion was primarily created by overdriving the power valves. Because they have become accustomed to this sound[dubious – discuss], many guitar players[who?] favour this type of distortion, and thus set their amps to maximum levels in order to drive the power section hard. Many valve-based amplifiers in common use have a push-pull output configuration in their power section, with matched pairs of tubes driving the output transformer. Power amplifier distortion is normally entirely symmetric, generating predominantly odd-order harmonics.

Our fretwork is one of the things we are most proud of. We go to the extreme to make sure that your guitar is going to play the best it can. The fingerboard is planed under tension. The fretting process is done with epoxy fretting. We use a special blend of epoxy that makes re-fretting very easy without messing up your fingerboard. This process is used for multiple reasons. One of the advantages to this type of fretting is that you lose the hollow gaps under the fret that you find with the traditional way of fretting. In traditional fretting, with each fret you put on, it is like driving a wedge into the fingerboard, which causes back tension on the neck. With epoxy fretting, all of these issues are eliminated. The epoxy under the frets helps to transfer string vibration throughout the neck to the body, and relieves all stress and tension on the neck that occurs with traditional fretting. This results in a stress-free neck, which allows the truss rod to work properly and to adjust the neck accurately.

In launching the AZ series, the goal was not to merely create a completely new guitar model, but to sculpt a great guitar that can foster the potential of the modern ?third phase' while maintaining traditional elements. Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, it has decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities. The harmonic balance between bridge and pickups, nut and machine heads, neck and fret material all work together in order to help the guitarist create their desired sound. From A to Z, there is no aspect of guitar making that we ever overlook. This tradition has been passed down masterfully to the AZ series.

With his exceptional talent, it seems that everyone wants to collaborate with Santana. What’s more, when he does join hands with another artist, it seems that his raw and authentic sound always shines through, taking the limelight. That is not to say that his tracks aren’t all different and uniquely great in their own way! There are so many manipulations that he has found and continues to find with the Latin rhythm. People say that the Grammy-winning guitarist can be identified with just one single note – now that’s an achievement!
Together with Marshall and Vox, Hiwatt is considered to be one of the main contributors to what we commonly refer to as the “British sound.” The company’s history is older than the name, with owner Dave Reeves building his first custom unit in 1963. This earned a great deal of praise on the local scene for its reliability and virtually established the company’s character.  
"It seems a waste to me to work and work for years," Rory Gallagher told Rolling Stone in 1972, "and just turn into some sort of personality." Instead, the Irish guitarist, then only 23, became legendary for his nonstop-touring ethic and fiery craft. Playing a weathered Strat, often wearing a flannel shirt, Gallagher electrified Chicago and Delta styles with scalding slide work and hard-boiled songwriting. His fans included the Edge and Bob Dylan, who was initially turned away backstage at a 1978 show because Gallagher didn't recognize him.
The other US-based manufacturers were from Chicago Harmony (formerly owned by Sears), National-Dobro (Supro/Valco) and Kay. Chicago was the largest guitar manufacturing area of the US at the time. The only other manufacturer of Silvertones during this period was the Japanese-based company, Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray as it was formerly called). Teisco created some of the wildest designs for Silvertones, in our opinion. The earliest model was the TG1. This was the first guitar to incorporate an amplifier and speaker into the body of the guitar. Although some people look down on the Japanese guitars we think they've got some really interesting sounds and innovations not found on American made guitars.

: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
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The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
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Pitch-shifters work by slicing the incoming audio into extremely short sections (typically a few tens of milliseconds long) and then lengthening each section where the pitch is to be decreased, or shortening each section where the pitch is to be increased. Though cross-fading algorithms and other techniques are used to hide the splice points, most pitch-shifters tend to sound grainy or warbly when used to create large amounts of shift (a couple of semitones or more), though they can sound very natural when used to create subtle detuning effects, using shifts of a few cents. A refinement of the system, designed for use with monophonic sources, attempts to synchronise the splicing process with whole numbers of cycles of the input signal, which makes the whole thing sound a lot smoother but, as soon as you present these devices with chords or other complex sounds, the splices again become audible.
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.

The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.


Being part of Schecter's upper tier guitar line, this one comes packed with premium appointments, including a nice looking arched quilt maple top that follows the double cutaway shape of the mahogany body. It also has a 3-piece set mahogany neck that can withstand angry riff playing while the ultra access heel allows for easier upper fret access when you want to hit your audience with high note solos. The guitar has a Sustainiac Humbucker on the neck (known for long sustained notes) and the high output EMG 81 Active Humbucker that's great for metal riffs. Other features include Floyd Rose 1000 Series Tremolo, 25.5" scale length and 1.625" nut width.

OK, I’ve put a new set of strings on now. We’re now going to carry out the following steps, just like we did in the general electric guitar setup post. 1. Check and adjust neck bow (how straight the neck is) 2. Check and adjust saddle height 3. Check and adjust the intonation (how far back or forward the saddles need to sit at the bridge to keep your guitar as in tune as possible no matter what fret you’re playing)
Since Jackson is currently owned by Fender, they have the facilities, resources and more importantly, the legal right to use Strat bodies in their designs. The result are legitimate super strats from the brand that helped jumpstart the entire hot-rodded guitar market. The Adrian Smith SDX is a great example, co-designed by renowned Iron Maiden guitarist to be a road and gig-worthy metal guitar while retaining an accessible price point.
Sure, Marshall and Vox contributed to the sound of British rock in the Sixties and Seventies—but let us not forget the mighty Hiwatt DR103. Although it's often associated with the Who's Pete Townshend (who would test their durability night after night), it was a favorite of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, not to mention the Moody Blues, the Stones and beyond. Although the DR103 looks a bit like a Marshall, it certainly doesn't sound like one. This was the result of a vastly different design.

In addition, there were other assessments. I went to Guitar Center to buy an amp. I was playing my guitar through a vintage tube amp when I noticed a man standing behind me. I said, “It sounds good.” He said “It sounds really good, are you going to buy it” as he pointed at my guitar. It was then I realized he was a customer and was interested in buying my guitar.


Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.
Before Gruhn Guitars puts out any of our fine instruments for sale, they go through our repair shop to get them ready to play. Some older instruments require extensive repairs and restoration, while others just need new strings and basic setup. But every guitar, mandolin and banjo has to meet the high standards of the repair crew before it's released for sale. Our repair staff has over 75 years combined experience repairing, restoring, building and designing guitars.
Our list of best electric guitar brands will remain incomplete if we do not add Schecter in it. Schecter Guitar Research is a firm that evolved from a startup into a guitar giant during the recent years. Aimed mainly at the heavy metal side, Schecter produces several guitars that metal players look. However, players from all genres will find something of their wish at Schecter as it touches every side of this domain. Created with the utmost care, delicacy, and artisanship, these guitars exhibit the most amazing and high-end features that suffice to surpass most expensive brands in the market today.
Replace or upgrade your guitars pickup selector and other switches with the highest quality switches available from Switchcraft, CRL, Fender, Oak Grigsby Gotoh, Philmore and other top brands. Lever/blade style switches, toggle switches, mini switches, rotary switches, slide switches and other styles. For pickup selector and mini switch technical data, visit our Pickup Selector & Mini Switch Connections page to view drawings with the internal switch connections of each switch position. And if you are upgrading or replacing your pickup selector switch with a different type or style, check out the Pickup Switch Terminal Cross Reference page to view the corresponding terminals of the most common pickup selectors and switches.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.

Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965. Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars. Martin ukes are considered to be the best for craftsmenship and sound. The Koa wood models are more collectible than mahagony models. The fancier style 5 models are worth more than plainer styles 0 to 3. All sizes are collectible.


While there are cheaper Strats under the Squier sub brand, the Standard Stratocaster is the way to go if you want a budget friendly one with with the Fender logo. This guitar is fondly called an MIM (Made in Mexico) Strat to differentiate it from the American made version. While some elitists will tell you that the difference is noticeable, many others attest that it's hard to spot the difference in an actual blind test - making this a true to form Standard Stratocaster, only this one is not made in the USA.
With that said, it’s important to make a distinction between reverb pedals and echo pedals. These two are often time a source of major confusion. Here’s the deal. Reverb is similar to an echo in a sense that you are hearing the sound as it bounces off a surface. However, reverb is fairly quick and happens almost instantly. Echo effect, on the other hand, takes much longer to reach back to the user. One way to understand the difference is to yell in a smaller room, and then go out and yell in a canyon. Similar goes for delays. If you want to learn more about delay pedals, check out our dedicated guide here.
ACT TRMOLO ERSETZEN DER SAITEN Das ACT Tremolo erlaubt zwei Arten der Saiteninstallation. 1) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Rückseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht. 2) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Unterseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht.
Legend has it that funkadelic's "Maggot Brain," the 10-minute solo that turned the late Eddie Hazel into an instant guitar icon, was born when George Clinton told him to imagine hearing his mother just died – and then learning that she was, in fact, alive. Hazel, who died of liver failure in 1992 at age 42, brought a thrilling mix of lysergic vision and groove power to all of his work, inspiring followers like J Mascis, Mike McCready and Lenny Kravitz. "That solo – Lord have mercy!" says Kravitz of "Maggot Brain." "He was absolutely stunning."
Power chords are one of the staples of rock music and one of the most important guitar chord types you need to have in your toolbox. They are important to learn for a few reasons: They’re easy to play They’re used a TON in many popular songs and are very versatile. They’ll help broaden your repertoire of guitar sounds / styles. This post will walk you through step-by-step what a power chord is, how to play them and what songs you can learn to start practicing them. What are Power Chords? Whether you play an acoustic or electric guitar, you are going

SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.
When Rolling Stone founder Jann S. Wenner asked John Lennon how he rated himself as a guitarist, Lennon replied, "I'm not technically good, but I can make it fucking howl and move. I was rhythm guitarist. It's an important job. I can make a band drive." It is, and he did: Lennon was the Beatles' spark plug and bloodletter, often adding rawness to pristine pop songs. Listen to the airborne strums that power "Help!," the circular riffage of "Day Tripper" or the deceptively sloppy "The Ballad of John and Yoko" – where, with George Harrison away on holiday, Lennon turned rudimentary lead and rhythm lines into sharptoothed magic. He was also capable of generating a truly ferocious tone: In the live promo clip for "Revolution," Lennon makes his hollow-body Epiphone Casino screech like a very angry lawn mower. Still, he didn't get his due as a guitarist in the Beatles' heyday. "They call George the invisible singer," Lennon said. "I am the invisible guitar player."
We currently recommend the very popular Seagull S6 Original Cedar Slim as one of the leading beginner guitars and we named the Seagull Maritime SWS SG as the equal second highest rated acoustic guitar between $500 and $1,000 in October 2016. And in August of 2017 we named the Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QIT as the highest rated acoustic-electric guitar under $500.

Dr Doug Clark-"I stumbled onto your site while looking for an entry-level classical guitar for my grandson in Denver, Colorado. Regrettably, I'm not resident in England (though I've been there many times), otherwise I'd be on your doorstep tomorrow morning. That said, might you have any acquaintances in America (firms similar to yours) whom you could recommend? We're limited at this point (8th form next year, at Denver School of the Arts), to around $300 US. Any advice or recommendation you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Watched Harry and Meghan's wedding twice! Wish them both, and England itself, a wonderful decade ahead. PS: I took up steel string acoustic guitar at about age 60. Hence my email "handle". Still working on my skills and loving it."


The Blueridge BR-160 Historic Series dreadnought features classic vintage styling with modern improvements. For its Historic Series, Blueridge took inspiration from guitars made before the Second World War. However, instead of using the rarer and restricted woods such as Brazilian rosewood used in vintage guitars, Blueridge opted to use more abundant tonewoods that produce the same sound quality.

Marty is another player who’s built up his videos and YouTube Channels over a number of years and it’s become a vast resource for lessons at all levels. There’s a lot of stuff about how to play particular songs or how to mimic a certain musician’s style, but mixed up with these are plenty of absolute beginners’ lessons that teach the basics. There are some guest artists explaining different techniques, but mostly Marty’s The Man. The good thing about Marty is his great patience during the videos—he takes plenty of time to explain things and demonstrates them nice and slow, so you hardly ever have to stop and rewind the videos. Marty has a quirky sense of humour, too. It takes the hassle out of the harder lessons to master. He has a good website linked from his YouTube channel and a few cool, free giveaways. Check that out at www.guitarjamz.com
Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.
A basic tone control consists of a capacitor and a potentiometer (the tone control itself).  The illustration below if the basic wiring for a tone control.  The view is as you would see it from the bottom of the potentiometer, wired for a right-handed guitar.  The oval "blobs" on the potentiometer casing are solder connections.  The ground wire should be soldered to the potentiometer casing for this tone control to work - and it helps shield out unwanted noise (really noticeable if not done this way and you use metal knobs).
Whether you have your sights set on a dreadnought acoustic or a classic Squire Strat, the guitar value packages found here consist of everything a player needs to make their guitar learning experience an exciting and enjoyable one. From Fender, Dean and Alfred to Jasmine, Ibanez and Martin, all the big names are here. You'll have no problem finding the perfect guitar value package that pertains to your specific music tastes.
This guitar sounds tighter and is less loud than a dreadnought. But its construction warms its tone considerably. Its owners say that its tone is well balanced – clear and punchy but still warm. It offers clarity in the higher registers, but some boom in the lower registers. For that reason, the LL16 is suited to almost any style of playing. It will not, however, be as punchy as the Taylor 210 or as round sounding as the Blueridge.
This may seem like an odd value to consider, but most guitarists need to feel a certain connection to their instrument. It’s part of what makes being a guitarist different from other types of musicians; a sense of individuality as well as style. Your guitar will be a significant investment regardless of which brand you settle on, and while sound and construction are more critical factors overall, it’s important that your instrument inspires you. Different brands are known for cultivating different images; Gibson’s and Fender’s were made famous by the rock gods of yesterday, while Taylor’s unique acoustic bodies will conjure up a different vibe for a folk player. Again, this aspect speaks to your individual needs as a guitarist.
Now lets talk amps. I have always felt like you could hand me a great guitar played through a bad amp and I would get a bad tone. However, I can make a bad guitar sound decent through a good amp. The amp, in my opinion is the most crucial part of your tone. I always prefer tube amps that deliver a much warmer, natural sound then the solid state counterparts. However if you are play jazz or something that requires a clean crisp sound, a solid state amp good be great. All the great rock legends used tube amps such as Marshall Plexi’s, Vox AC30, Hi Watt, Fender Twins, Fender Bassmans etc. Now days they make all kinds of boutique amps that are modeled after these classic amps. Matchless is my amp of choice which is loosely modeled after the Vox AC30.
Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.
The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
In the most commercially available and consumed pop and rock genres, electric guitars tend to dominate their acoustic cousins in both the recording studio and live venues, especially in the "harder" genres such as heavy metal and hard rock. However the acoustic guitar remains a popular choice in country, western and especially bluegrass music, and it is widely used in folk music. Even metal and hard rock guitarists play acoustic guitars for some ballads and for MTV unplugged acoustic performances.

If you’re a guitarist, chances are you’ve either owned or at least played on a Zoom multi-effects pedal. It’s basically an unwritten law! They have always and continue to make some of the best multi effects pedals known to the musical world, so naturally we had to include the Zoom G3n Multi-Effects Processor (as well as a handful of other Zoom models) in this list.


Desolder the 9V battery connections and attach a 9V centre-negative DC plug to the correct poles on a 3PDT switch; if you’re not sure where to start, purchase a PCB for this online or search for the correct wiring layout. Lead a live and ground wire out from your switch to your vero, and solder them in place where the 9V battery clip was previously soldered in.
The company makes four models, the FS (fingerstyle), GC, D, and the Jumbo, each retailing at a flat price of $8,880 as of September 2011, making them amongst the most expensive new guitars in the world. The company also provides the option for customized furnishings such as exotic woods, buffalo horn nuts and saddles, mammoth ivory bridge pins and nuts, and specialized inlay and cutaway designs etc for an additional fee. The customized Petros guitars made of rare woods such as African Blackwood, Ceylon Satinwood or old flitch matched Brazilian Rosewood are sold for an extra $4,000 which with other furnishings such as ivory bridge pins can fetch over $13,000 in total.[2]
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
Processed Pitch Shifts: Few pitch-shifting algorithms are transparent enough to allow you to transpose anything by more than a couple of semitones without obvious side-effects. If what you're processing is going through an amp modeller, however, you can get away with much more radical changes. You can even do effective swoops and dives in pitch by progressively increasing the amount of pitch-shifting you apply to a note, and pitch changes of an octave or more can sound good, although they probably won't sound natural at these extremes. Sam Inglis
Although there are now several digital guitar recording preamps which model amps and cabs, the Roland VG88's split pickup system allows you also to experiment with modelled guitars and pickups.Digital noise removal plug-ins (again best used before delay effects are added), produce even fewer side-effects and so may be the best option when recording into a computer-based system. However, you can often achieve a worthwhile improvement using simple low-pass filters — before I moved over to working almost exclusively on the computer, I often used the side-chain high-cut filter in my Drawmer DS201 gate to remove hiss from guitar tracks. The sharper the filter, the less the wanted sound will be affected, so a plug-in with an 18 or even 24dB/octave slope should be even more effective than the 12dB/octave filters the Drawmer uses. The trick when setting them up is to pick the lowest shelving frequency that doesn't materially change the original sound, other than to take the edge off the hiss. Using filters in this way also helps reduce finger noise and squeaking on acoustic guitar parts and can even help disguise moderate clipping distortion caused by recording at too high a level.
A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.

For a more neutral experience, we bring you ESP E-II Horizon FR. This is one of ESP’s top tier models which packs a set of high output Seymour Duncans. Build quality is top notch, and so is the performance. We tested this guitar some time ago, with a number of us having the chance to play it for several days. Anyone who picked it up was in love it at the end of the day. It’s just that good.
The basic function of the volume knob is to change the level of your guitar’s volume output in a smooth and even way. But there’s more to it than that. Some players use the volume knob as a means of boosting their signal to make solos pop out. For example, if you keep your volume dialed in at seven or eight and perhaps lean on your amp a little more for output, you’ve got two or three more notches to ride your loudness up via the knob when it’s really time to burn. No need to spend money on a volume pedal, and unlike distortion or overdrive pedals this doesn’t change your sound much.

With parallel effects loops, half the the signal from the amplifier’s preset section is sent through the Effects Sent OUTPUT to pass through effects, while the other half passes directly on to the amplifier’s power amp section to always be heard unaffected.  With this type of effects loop, there is typically an effect level control that allows you to dial in the amount of the effect you want heard along with your unaffected signal.  We recommend setting the MIX control on any of your effects to 100% when placed within a parallel effects loop.  Our TimeLine and BigSky pedals have a Kill Dry feature (DRYSIG parameter in the GLOBLS menu) that mutes your dry signal for use in parallel effects loops—however we do not recommend using this setting when using more than one pedal within the effects loop.
The output jack is where you plug in your guitar lead. These are generally 1/4″ and transfer the signal created by your pickups to your guitar amp. They are usually connected from a ground wire and input wire. When the lead is plugged into the output jack the signal can be transferred. These can often be a source of trouble and need to be kept tight to reduce noise.

While National blithely ignored Beauchamp’s electric experiments, their competition – Dobro – was next to enter the electric arena as early as 1933, with the introduction of the Dobro All-Electric. Basically, the All-Electric was a mahogany-bodied Model 37, most usually outfitted with a 12-fret square neck. It had a large lightning-bolt-engraved coverplate, two screen holes, three little holes under the fingerboard, a slothead, and rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. Instead of the usual resonator, this had a large metal plate where the cone assembly would normally be and a Stimson pickup mounted just in front of the bridge, curiously enough with the poles slanted from the bass side near the bridge toward the middle on the treble side.
Flamenco technique, in the performance of the rasgueado also uses the upstroke of the four fingers and the downstroke of the thumb: the string is hit not only with the inner, fleshy side of the fingertip but also with the outer, fingernail side. This was also used in a technique of the vihuela called dedillo[40] which has recently begun to be introduced on the classical guitar.

You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
The kind of interface that you want should connect to your PC and the DAW (digital audio workstation) software installed on it so that you can record your playing. The Guitarport didn’t allow for recording without buying additional software that cost as much as the device; the device is essentially obsolete now but still supported. Years later I upgraded to their Toneport UX2, meant for recording and DAW compatibility. The accompanying Podfarm 2 software is quite good. The UX1 costs half as much with the same software if you don’t want or need 2 inputs (microphone or instrument). Presonus sells an interface that is quite popular, for less than $99
The Gibson style guitars generally have shorter stubbier necks, with a 233/4 inch scale length, which suits some but not all. The Les Paul, the quintessential model, boasts twin humbucking pick-ups which effectively reduce noise and produce the thick, warm tone associated with Gibsons. It is difficult not to be impressed by the tradition of Les Paul guitars. No-one will ever convince me there is a better looking guitar style. For under $1000 the Epiphone Les Paul Standard will give you a little bit of the legend to take home and for many that's a good enough reason to buy one. Epiphones are cheaper factory made versions of the Gibson USA range. For those who learn on Gibson style guitars the Les Paul is what all guitars are measured against.  more...

Manne guitars - This Italy based guitar manufacturer produces instruments with unique features. The first Manne guitar was built in 1986 and they continue to provide finely crafted instruments based on some very original design concepts. Manne's design philosophy: hand craft the finest stringed instruments then offer them to the public at a reasonable price.
I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.
Loop-based guitar plugins are slowly moving to the point of obscurity as virtual instrument technology is getting to the point where even string instruments can sound out-of-this-world good and blossom with character. But there still exists some gems out there such as Acoustic Revolutions, which updated to volume two as recently as 2015, doubling the number of loops.
American Fenders and USA Gibsons are not NOT for beginners! They are for people like myself who have invested 15+ years into developing the skills required to defend a purchase of one. IF you want beginner guitars, go see Mexico Fenders or Epiphone Guitars. Better yet, worry more about your skill and not which brand in on your headstock. I played for 11 years before I upgraded my Epiphone to a Gibson.
Interestingly, it’s the back of this guitar that’s the most visually attractive, with a drop dead gorgeous rosewood fretboard and quilt maple three-piece design. You’ll stare at it for some time before you can bring yourself to flip it over and start playing. That’s not to say the front doesn’t look good - the whole thing feels more upscale than the price.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.

While modified four-stage phasers like the Uni-Vibe and other effects before it had sought to evoke a choral-like sound, the chorus pedal as we know it didn’t arrive until affordable short-delay chips became widely available in the late 1970s. This in itself implies that chorus is a type of delay, and indeed it is, but the sonic results of the ways in which these short delays are transformed lands the effect firmly in the modulation camp, so it’s easiest to consider it as such (the function of these delay chips will be explained in more detail in the Echo & Delay section down the road). IC-based chorus effects work in a manner very similar to flangers, detailed above. The main difference, put simply, is that the short delays used to create harmonically spaced notches and peaks in the frequency spectrum are manipulated to modulate more tightly above and below specific frequency ranges, rather than shifted to swoosh broadly up and down the entire spectrum. The result, and intention, is a sound like a group of singers or similar instruments, where some voices/strings inevitably waver slightly from those beside them, producing a quivering clash of harmonics that evokes space and dimension when used subtly. The effect is possibly best heard—as pure effect, at least—in stereo, and the nature of the beast lends itself readily to stereo outputs. The broad soundstage and Doppler-like movement a good stereo chorus can spread out before you between a pair of spaced amps or L-R headphones make it one of the most spacious, three-dimensional effects available, short of long delays or cavernous reverb settings.
For more balanced tone and increased sound quality, the Agile AL-3010 comes with two tone and two volume controls, plus three-way pickup switch.The guitar comes with professionally installed strings sitting tight on an ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and solid abalone trapezoid inlays. This gorgeous guitar is highly recommended for the beginner and even the professional alike.

The Boss Waza 212 Guitar Amplifier Cabinet has been specially designed as a partner to the awesome Waza Amp head. Packed with 2 custom made 12 inch speakers and ready to roar! You can even select whether you want the back to be open or closed, allowing you to make whatever sound you want! If you want extra speakers, there's also the Boss Waza 4x12 Guitar Amplifier Cabinet with 2 x 12" speakers to pump out your riffs with.
Like many others, Reinhold Bogner (born in Ulm, Germany, like the EL84 tube!) started his career with Fender mods. He founded his company in 1989 in Los Angeles and succeeded in earning a reputation among guitar amp manufacturers. His brand became famous with models like the Ecstasy 100A and 100B, where "A" stands for American (with 6L6 tubes) and "B" for British (with EL34 tubes). Among its famous users, you'll find Steve Stevens and Steve Vai (apparently your name must be Steve to be Bogner's friend).
2) The neck edges at the fret board are not rounded and tend to be rather sharp which can really start to hurt your hands if you play for awhile . Typically this is where guitar companies skimp on their budget models and Yamaha didn't disappoint. But it's an easy fix for a Luthier who will just take some sand paper and sand down the sharp edges and dress the end of the frets if needed. Also, its an easy fix for someone with a steady hand, good eye, and a women's fingernail file. It took me about 10 minutes to round the neck edges with a fingernail file and it didn't even require touch up paint thereafter as the fret board is solid wood and the same color all the way through. She feels like a dream now and I can play all day long without the sharp neck edge digging into my hand, and my hand just glides ever so smoothly up and down the neck as it should.
For a relatively new band, Dream State have - in industry parlance - gained some serious frigging traction, playing Reading/Leeds last year, gobbling up streams in the millions and signing to hardcore label par excellence UNFD. Lead guitarist Aled does a deft line in a tapped arpeggio, while breakthrough single White Lies covers a hell of a lot of ground in its four minute runtime - combining Marmozets’ urgency in its opening and Deftones’ dynamics at the close. 

More recently, many boutique pedal manufacturers, such as the Z.Vex and Death by Audio series, have attempted to revive the analog strangeness of germanium transistors and diodes. Not bound by imitation, they continue to innovate with analog materials as if the technical innovations of the 70s and 80s had never happened. The mid-90s Z.Vex Fuzz Factory is notable for establishing internal feedback loops that are inadvertently tied to the logic of circuit bending. This means that the pedal self-oscillates, producing an absurd yet controllable noise, akin to an air-raid siren.

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The best thing about the guitar is the design and usability is perfect for the beginners, who have an idea that how to play the guitar. It also comes with a bunch of instructions that makes it even easier to use. Once you learn the basics and master it you can easily upgrade to a higher level guitar. It can give the right feel that required from a guitar.

"With a note of music, one strikes the fundamental, and, in addition to the root note, other notes are generated: these are the harmonic series.... As one fundamental note contains within it other notes in the octave, two fundamentals produce a remarkable array of harmonics, and the number of possible combinations between all the notes increases phenomenally. With a triad, affairs stand a good chance of getting severely out of hand."
Next important control knob is usually labeled as time or rate. This defines the length of echoes in a reverb. You can have them short or you can have them last for a fairly long time. Which side you will lean more towards is going to depend on the nature and tempo of your music. Slower, more subtle riffs can easily deal with long reverb times while faster sections usually work best with short reverb. Again, experimentation is the key here.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.

Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
Which guitar brand should you choose? It is one of the common questions which arise in every music lover’s mind. The basic answer is to find a guitar which can fulfill which fulfills all your demands and within your budget. However, for an appropriate solution, a user should check out all the features in a guitar before deciding which model to buy.
I recognize that these lists are really the preference of the writer and that in itself makes the list valid. However……Robert Johnson at #1? I realize that many people studied him and he was a great guitarist for his era, but he wasn’t even the best guitarist of his era. That title goes to Son House, who taught Robert Johnson. The fact is that you could have had a Clapton without a Robert Johnson. Johnson wasn’t the only player whom Clapton was inspired by.
Whether you have your sights set on a dreadnought acoustic or a classic Squire Strat, the guitar value packages found here consist of everything a player needs to make their guitar learning experience an exciting and enjoyable one. From Fender, Dean and Alfred to Jasmine, Ibanez and Martin, all the big names are here. You'll have no problem finding the perfect guitar value package that pertains to your specific music tastes.
Today's modern rock guitar sounds tend to be "drier" (less room ambiance and reverb), and most often use the close mic technique. There's really nothing to it. Simply use the close mic, run it through the compressor, set the compressor at a 3:1 ratio and adjust the threshold so that the compressor is usually working, but not squashing the signal too much. You will be able to make most of the tone adjustments you need at the amp or guitar, and chances are you won't need to tweak the console' s equalizer at all.

Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.


Next up we have the specialty electric guitars. This category consists of several different types of electric guitars, but we’ll start out with 12-string electric guitars. The fact that the low E, A, D, and G strings all feature higher octave strings while the B and high e strings both have additional strings that are tuned the same, electric guitar 12-string models have a distinctive shimmer and richness to them that guitar players love. Guitar players who favor heavier genres like death metal or hard rock may want to add a 7-string, an 8-string, or even a 9-string electric guitar to their rig for when they need some extra low-end growl and power. Other specialty guitars include baritone guitars, double neck electric guitars, and pedal steel guitars & lap steel guitars.
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