Acoustic guitars that have been fitted with a pickup can be recorded using the same techniques as standard electric guitars when plugged into an amp. Interesting sounds can be created by mic’ing up an acoustic guitar and sending the sound through an amp. This can be done live – although you should be aware of feedback – or a previously recorded acoustic track can be re-amped and used exclusively, or mixed with the original acoustic track. You can get some really gnarly and original ‘electric’ sounds with creative use of overdriven acoustic guitar; it’s especially good for slide playing.

Because of the high quality, Gibsons are among the more expensive models of guitars. However, Epiphone, of whom they are the parent organization, produces high quality guitars at much more affordable prices. These guitars are usually slightly inferior to their Gibson counterparts, but the playability and style are similar, and they are still a definitely among the good guitar brands.

Boombox Guitar Tuner will get the party started. Just play a note, and it shows. Other guitar tuners don''t use the microphone, like Boombox Guitar Tuner, because it''s written with cutting-edge Flash 10.1 technology. Boombox Guitar Tuner is free to download or use online, so why waste your money on other expensive guitar tuners at the music shop? Try tuning your guitar once using Boombox Guitar Tuner, and you''ll see that it takes just seconds .


My father's Yamaha was bought in the 90's, and was the first guitar steel-string I ever played as a kid. (If you were curious its equivalent to today's model would be the LS6 ARE). To this day I still find myself going back to it. It's little quirks makes it really special, even though I have martins and taylors and even gibsons. There's little nicks and chips in the paint in some places, which really shows it's history. It's also stood the test of time. It still plays great after almost 30 years of being lugged around from place to place, dropped, hit against walls, etc. It's just simply great. - zabathy1
In 2005, after two years of research and development utilizing Jimmy Page’s actual guitar, Gibson Custom Shop issued a limited run of Jimmy Page Signature guitars based on Jimmy Page’s No. 1 1959. This time, Gibson worked directly from Jimmy Page’s actual guitar, which he lent to Gibson for the project. The guitar featured just one push-pull pot, just like Page’s No. 1, which reversed the phase of the pickups in the up position, which in Page’s own words gave “a close approximation to the Peter Green sound.” Gibson also went to great lengths to replicate the accuracy of the pickups, creating two custom pickups, which were available only in this guitar. The pickups were based on the Burstbucker vintage-style pickups, but featured stronger Alnico magnets and slightly higher output than the other Burstbuckers, as well as slightly higher treble response, which accurately reproduced the sound of the pickups in Page’s guitar. Gibson also replicated the neck profile, which was heavily modified prior to Page acquiring the guitar, and the Grover tuners that Page favored.

Time to turn our attention back to the guitars themselves. The following are some of the better low-cost electric guitars available on the market today; refer to an anatomy of electric guitars to see definitions of guitar pieces and places. When you're deciding, go to a store and try them out for heft, comfort, stability, sound quality, and appearance. Shop around, comparing, for instance, online prices against local store prices. This is an investment, so choose wisely.

It mostly comes in black color. it is a right handed 6 string electric guitar. The body is given a polyurethane finish whereas the neck is given a satin finish. The fret board is composed of 24 frets and has a master white tone. The guitar is relatively affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 15,642. For stage performances, this guitar will give you a nice experience and a classical feel.


The GrandMeister Deluxe refines the German firm's best-selling compact head, with four flexible channels and a host of built-in effects. Just about everything is MIDI-powered, so you can edit and store presets to your heart's content. The rear panel includes the latest Red Box recording output, and there's also a new improved iPad app that you can use to edit and store presets, either at the end of a lead or using a wireless MIDI adaptor. The GrandMeister Deluxe 40's four channels sound quite different from those of its predecessor: they're more balanced, with slightly less treble emphasis and a smoother but no less powerful bass response. There's plenty of headroom on the clean channel, which dovetails seamlessly with the higher-gain crunch channel. Both clean and crunch are very tweed-influenced, dominated by a warm midrange that's equally flattering to humbuckers and single coils, especially when boosted and laced with a little of the GrandMeister's digital reverb, which can be combined to taste with delay, chorus, flanger, phaser or tremolo. The two American-voiced lead channels have all the gain you could possibly need for almost any musical genre, from classic rock to modern drop-tuned metal, with a nicely sculpted top-end that squeals and snarls on demand. As a do-it-all tool the GrandMeister 40 takes some beating. All of its many features work efficiently and it's hard to point the finger at shortcomings, because there really aren't any.
Most guitar especially for those which have more than 1 pickup have selector switch. Attached on the body and normally below the 1st E string on the body of a stratocaster guitar. And on the top shoulder for Les Paul. Its a basic things to understand the switches on which pickups its toggling. First, you need to understand what is the switch for???
What a Beauty! This is a beautiful example of a RARE Vintage Japanese Alvarez 5053 made on 1/11/74. This one is Rare folks with its Old style script logo in mother of pearl inlay check that out...The first thing you can't help but notice on this guitar is how beautiful this guitar looks amazing fit & finish apperance is top shelf..its as good or pretter then others including the Martin ... its not just pretty guitar to look at and admire either it is really well build to play built using some very EXOTIC and beautiful looking tone WOODS as well very high end feel to this one ...as seen in the pics ( new better pics soon to come )It was built using a beautiful grained Sitka spruce top and the gorgeous Back is vivid book matched Brazilian Rosewood as is the sides BR and this examle overall is truly a stunning example, along with the backs center flamed maple section in contrast of the Brazilian Rosewood side sections WoW!, and the beautiful vintage hexagonal cellulloid inlays. modeled after the Martin D41, this guitar is in excellent used vintage collectible condition with only a few finish checks to this guitars glass like finish that one has that warm natural patina only a real 37 year old guitar can earn. Overall very good - excellent vintage condition! It's bound body is masterfully ornately - multi bound, as is the Honduran Mahogany neck & headstock is bound. Action is excellentt and can be easily adjusted up or down to meet your preference by way of an easily adjustable bridge . Truly is a great playing & sounding highly collectible Japanese vintage guitar in its own right. Its Very rare and it has old Alvarez Script Logo! Who cool is that....This is a super rare guitar that tend to go quickly that is getting harder and harder to find! in any condition let alone like this baby it both plays beautifully but it sounds fantastic! Let me know if interested Thanks for looking! Joe.

It can get a bit difficult trying to properly depict certain aspects of effects pedals to our newer musicians out there since much of music tends to be described in an intangible sort of manner which relies heavily the assumption of prior knowledge and personal tastes which is why we try our best to not get the pros out there the meat of the information they are looking for, but describe it in a way that players of even entry levels can comprehend. So with that in mind, one of the more complex aspects of effects pedals for newer musicians is their implementation of a signal chain.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.

"It's a labor of love," says Youngman, a guitar master who's been handling guitars since the '50s and '60s when rock 'n' roll was still in its infancy. But he's not just a surgeon; he's a neck specialist. "If the neck doesn't feel right, you're not going to play." He's always been good at setting guitars up, and today he works mostly from home, although he also does repair work at Guitarasaur in Watuga. "It's always nice to make someone happy. It makes me feel like I'm doing something right."
Located in Reno, Nevada, our shop, The Strings of Reno provides services to both local musicians as well as those located throughout the United States and even abroad. If you are nearby, and would like a one on one appointment please give us a call. If you are not within driving distance of Reno, NV, please call or email us with the nature of the work you need taken care of. We are not just about guitars, if it has strings, we can fix it!
{"reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","pageName":"[gc] services:repairs","prop2":"[gc] services:repairs","prop1":"[gc] services","prop5":"[gc] services:repairs","prop6":"[gc] services:repairs","prop3":"[gc] services:repairs","evar51":"default: united states","prop4":"[gc] services:repairs","channel":"[gc] services","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] services"}

I have been a bass player and still am however I started on guitar at 12 and went back to it about 12 years ago. There really isn’t too much difference of perfecting your craft on either instrument. The most important thing to realize is when to play and when not to. I spent years learning how not to be a busy bass player and now that I have such a passion for playing guitar, I’m learning how to sound busy without really being busy.
Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
This cutoff is based on the average used price on Reverb over the past year, and while the $1000 cutoff is relatively arbitrary, it is as good a point as any to divide between entry-level gear and more heavy artillery. Here again, we are not combining wattage and cabinet size variations on the same models, which inherently decreases the ranking of any amp series with a multitude of different configurations.
The Epiphone DR-100 acoustic guitar definitely falls under the category of “entry-level” or “student” instrument, but sound quality has not been sacrificed for the sake of a lower price point. Many guitar instructors urge their students to invest in this model because of its resonant mahogany components. There can be some buzzing because of its lower action, but beginners will have a better learning experience because of the improved tonality. Epiphone is a strong name in guitars, and considering the low price, the DR-100 is a good buy. We recommend it for the mahogany alone, but the tone quality is also appropriate – and perhaps even better than it should be – for the price.
If you play with your guitar’s tone controls all the way up, your tone is going to be trebly and bright — possibly even painfully shrill at high volumes. To get a handle on their range, get a clean sound cooking out of your amp and play at every numeral stop on your instrument’s tone pot dial. And for multi-pickup models, do that for each individual pickup and all the blended settings. Find a few positions you like, and while playing a tune you know by heart, roll to different settings for verses, choruses and solos and see how tonally diverse and interesting things become. On stage this can be a very impressive way to create fresh sounds — subtle, but noticeable — without relying on pedals or amp channel switching.
We've had a thread here in the last couple months about Squires, with some pretty discerning forum members praising their quality and tone. You don't need to spend a lot of money these days for a good guitar. The one the OP bought was years ago. The fierce competition in the guitar market since the economy went bad, has forced manufacturers to up their game, and recent production is of a much higher standard.
The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
Alongside the Stratocaster, Les Pauls have defined rock ’n’ roll. Everyone from Jimmy Page to Slash to Zakk Wylde has wielded one of these, and the guitar’s fat, creamy tone with near-endless sustain is instantly recognizable. Not everyone can afford a bona fide Gibson, though, but the Epiphone Les Paul Standard makes those sounds accessible to most of us.
{"eVar4":"vintage: guitars","pageName":"[gc] vintage: guitars: harmony","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop18":"skucondition|0||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop1":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitars","prop5":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop6":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop3":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop4":"[gc] vintage: guitars","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
Vox's first electric guitars, the Apache, Stroller and Clubman were modelled after solid-body, bolt-neck Fenders, which at the time were not available in the UK. A four-string Clubman Bass followed shortly after. These first guitars were low-priced, had unusual TV connector output jacks and were produced by a cabinet maker in Shoeburyness, Essex. Vox president Tom Jennings commissioned the London Design Centre to create a unique new electric guitar, and in 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. The first Phantom guitars were given to The Echoes to trial and were used by them until 1970. They were used on many of the recordings by The Echoes and records they did with other artists such as Dusty Springfield. Aside from the unusual body and headstock shapes, Phantoms featured copies of the Fender Stratocaster neck and its attachment, the Strat's three single-coil pick-ups and standard vibrato bridge that in this case copied a Bigsby unit. Aside from being a bit awkward to hold for seated playing, the Phantom guitars now approached professional quality, performance and price. Phil "Fang" Volk of Paul Revere & the Raiders played a Phantom IV bass (which was eventually retrofitted with a Fender neck). It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which had only two pick-ups (rather than three) and was made specifically for Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones, again using a Bigsby-like "Hank Marvin" bridge. By the end of the decade, Stones bassist Bill Wyman was shown in Vox advertisements playing a teardrop hollow-bodied bass made for him by the company, subsequently marketed as the Wyman Bass. Many guitar gear authorities dispute that he ever actually used the instrument for recording or live performance. See also Vox Bass Guitar. Vox experimented with built-in effects and electronics, with guitars such as the Cheetah, Ultrasonic, and Invader offering numerous built-in effects. Ian Curtis of Joy Division is known to have owned two white Vox Phantom VI Special effects guitars which had push button effects switches on the scratch plate. Amongst many innovations were the Guitar Organ, which featured miniaturised VOX organ circuitry activated by the contact of strings with fret contacts, producing organ tones in key with guitar chords. This instrument was heavy and cumbersome with its steel neck and external circuit boxes, and rarely worked correctly, but was a hallmark of the ingenuity of this company.
I HAVE A P38-12E I BELIEVE MINE WAS MADE IN SPAIN ALSO. LATER THEY WERE MADE IN MIAMI AND LATER IN CHINA KEEP IT IN GOOD SHAPE I HAVE MANY GUITARS ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICS. EXCELLENT ACTION AND SOUNDING GUITARS FOR THE PRICE I HAVE GIBSON,EPIPHONE,IBENEZ, THE BEST SOUNDING 12 STRING I EVER OWNED WAS A TAKIMINE. WHICH WAS STOLEN IN LAS VEGAS. EVEN HAVE A 12 STRING ACOUSTIC I MADE. I ADDED A FISHMAN AND MADE IT ELECTRIC I ALSO PUT A TUNEMATIC BRIDGE ON IT. THEY ALL HAD DIFFERENT SOUNDS BUT THE ACTION ON THE PALMER IS THE BEST. I EVEN HAD A VICTORIA VIOLIN BASS WAY BEYOND A HOFNER. JUST BECAUSE YOU DIDN'T PAY BIG BUCKS DOESN'T MEAN ITS NOT BETTER THAN A MARTIN. I PLAYED MY UNCLES MARTIN HE MADE AT THE FACTORY WHEN HE WORKED THERE. AND IT CAME NOWHERE CLOSE TO MY PALMER OR TAKAMINE. PALMER CAME CLOSE TO MY 1960s GIBSON DOVE. DOVE HAD A BETTER SOUND PALMER HAD BETTER ACTION. HOLLYWOOD PHIL. GUITARIST AND SINGER FOR THE GWB BAND. I'M ALSO HEAD SOUND AND LIGHTING TECH FOR THE METAL BAND BLACKFATE.
Typically, players tend to place their delay and reverb effects within the effects loops of their amplifiers.  This placement is especially helpful if you get your overdrive and distortion from your amplifier instead of pedals. Otherwise you would be feeding your delay repeats and reverb ambiance into the overdrive and distortion of your amplifier, which can sound muddy and washed out.  You can also place your modulation pedals within the effects loop of your amplifier as well for a different sound.
Looping – These pedals are miniature recorders that capture a passage, which you can then play back as much as you like. Many looper pedals also allow you to layer multiple recordings, and advanced models support extra features like built-in rhythms, mic and other instrument inputs, MIDI, USB and more. It’s worth noting that all the power of a looper pedal does come with a steep learning curve, so be sure that you’re experienced enough to handle one of these bad boys before you bring home one of your own.
Editorial comment – I advise folks when considering fretwork to consider not choosing a size or leveling operation resulting in less than .040” height if they want to play a style with frequent fret hand slurring, i.e. rock, blues, shred etc.  Low fret height is less capable of sustaining a reasonable fret leveling in the future, making it that much closer to refret time.  You don’t have to choose a very tall size if that is uncomfortable for you, but only choose a low height if that is really what you want and are accustomed to.
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.
Compared to other plastic exterior multi-effects, the RP360 XP feels solid and durable. And this is reflected in many reviews, which mention the pedal's reliability as one of its good traits. Versatility and value for money also came up a number of times, both from pedalboard owners that have downsized, and beginners who are just trying out multi-effects.

Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
First, you have so many different types music – flamenco, jazz, country, blues, classical, rock and pop, to name just a few. Then you have musicians performing at different levels – there are the beginners who’ve never held a guitar before, there are experienced guitarists playing in bands, then there are professional guitarists, who make a career out of playing the guitar.
I had a similar problem and went with a similar solution - the Vox Tonelab amp modeler and multi-effects unit. Has a headphone out that works fine for practice. Plus it is working well for gigging as well. I can practice tunes with the exact amp and effects that I'm going to use. When I get in front of the guitar amp, I just need to get a clean sound and give it a little color in the tone. It isn't perfect for gigs, but it is SO easy to practice with and can sound like a Fender, Marshall, Hiwatt, Mesa - whatever. This is starting to sound like an ad, so I'll stop. :-) – Anonymous Jan 18 '11 at 10:47
For guitarists who must have original-era Strat® sound, look and feel, the Classic Series '60s Stratocaster Lacquer epitomizes the instrument during its second decade, when musicians used it to conjure and create electrifying sounds never before imagined or experienced. With authentic features including a nitrocellulose lacquer finish in classic Fiesta Red, everything about it takes you back to a wildly creative time when rock music came into its own—from surf to psychedelia and more—and players started to discover in earnest just what a phenomenal instrument the Stratocaster really was.
Most newbie guitarists want a small amp that sounds good but doesn’t cost too much. The amps listed above are that and more. However, there are some guitar players who mean business from the beginning, and won’t want to waste time on small beginner amps when they have the resources and ambition to grab an intermediate or pro-level amp. If you know you are going to stick with playing guitar, and if you can justify it in your budget, that’s not a bad idea.
Most electric guitars feature multiple pickups. Some will have two or three single-coils. Some will have two or three humbuckers. Many offer a combination of single-coil and humbucker pickups. This combination offers the player a wide range of tonal options. Pickup configurations are often abbreviated by referring to single-coils with an "S" and humbuckers with an "H." The placement of each pickup is indicated from the neck down towards the bridge. Thus an SSH configuration has single-coils at the neck and middle positions and a humbucker at the bridge.
The original flanger effect was produced back in the 1960’s by recording to two tape deck simultaneously and mixing the result. As they were recording, an audio engineer would lightly touching the flange of one the reels of tape. When it played back, it created a swooshing effect similar to what you hear when a jet airplane takes off. Stomp boxes use a delay effect to create a similar sound.

Gain is the strength of the electronic signal carrying your sound. A standalone gain booster is essentially just a preamp, and can be an effective way to overdrive the preamp section of your amp, creating easier musical-sounding breakup and increasing the amp's power. A gain booster in a stomp box lets you instantly boost your sound level for solos without altering your fundamental tone.
{"pageName":"[gc] vintage: silvertone","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop2":"[gc] vintage","prop1":"[gc] vintage","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"marshall","prop5":"[gc] vintage","prop6":"[gc] vintage","prop3":"[gc] vintage","prop4":"[gc] vintage","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
Interestingly, the 2019 version of this guitar doesn't stray too far from the more expensive Standard model in terms of looks - some even prefer it over more expensive models because of its streamlined appearance. While there are no high grade tonewoods involved, the Les Paul Tribute still uses the same mahogany body and maple top combination. The 24.75" scale length neck also follows after the Standard model, complete with a 22-fret rosewood fretboard and a 1.695" nut width. As the name suggests, this model features a slim taper neck profile that modern players will appreciate. Finally, it is equipped with a 490R humbucker for the neck and a 490T humbucker for the bridge, which reproduces the sound of old Les Pauls from the '60s.
No doubt many of you thought that the very first electric guitar was Les Paul’s legendary “Log.” Well, regardless of who was responsible for its invention and evolution, electric guitarists throughout the world are truly grateful for the ability to amplify their instruments, as are their audiences. This capability to connect to dedicated guitar amps along with the use of distortion and guitar effects has spawned entirely new genres of music. Pickup types and configurations, as well as specialized switching options and tone controls also help generate different sounds. But when you break it down to the basics, there are really only three types of electric guitars in existence to this day, excluding acoustic-electrics - the aforementioned Hollow Body, Semi-Hollow Body, and Solid Body varieties.
There are two types of acoustic guitar namely the steel-string acoustic guitar and the classical guitar. Steel-string acoustic guitars produce a metallic sound that is a distinctive component of a wide range of popular genres. Steel-string acoustic guitars are sometimes referred to as flat tops. The word top refers to the face or front of the guitar which is called the table. Classical guitars have a wider neck than steel-string guitars and are strung with nylon strings. They are primarily associated with the playing of the solo classical guitar repertoire. Classical guitars are sometimes referred to as Spanish guitars in recognition of their country of origin.
Some single cabinets use mixed speaker sizes, although this is less common. Examples include MESA Engineering's 1x15"/4x10" cabinet,[8] Peavey's PVH 1516, which has 1x15" and 2x8" speakers.[9] and Traynor's TC1510 combo, which has 1x15" and 2x10". Other large single cabinets with speaker sizes other than 10", 12" or 15" are less commonly used, but they do exist. Examples include the 6x8" and 8x8" cab configurations. Users of two cabinets may use two 4x10" cabinets (more easy to transport than a single 8x10" cab), a 15" cab and a 2x10" cab, or other variations (e.g., a 2x15" cab and a 4x10" cab).
{"id": "113900398", "categoryId":"site5ABA", "name":"Vintage Vintage 1960s Decca DM1-204 Natural Acoustic Guitar", "pageUrl":"/Used/In-Store-Vintage/Vintage-Vintage-1960s-Decca-DM1-204-Natural-Acoustic-Guitar.gc", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Vintage-1960s-Decca-DM1-204-Natural-Acoustic-Guitar/000000113900398-00-180x180.jpg", "hasFeatures":"0", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"", "value":"179.99", "priceMin":"179.99", "priceMax":"179.99", "msrp":"", "productVisibilityMSRP":"1", "restockPrice":"", "openBoxPrice":"", "clearancePrice":"", "isPlatinum":"0", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"1", "brand":"In Store Vintage", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/brand/gc/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"0.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"0", "reviewHowManyReviews":"0", "usedOrNew":"used", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site5LFMID,site5LAAB", "stickerText": "Vintage", "isVintage": "1", "outletonly": "", "checksum":"134135816000", "priceVisibility": "", "itemType": "Vintage"}

Reverb is the persistence of sound in a particular space after the original sound is removed. When sound is produced in a space, a large number of echoes build up and then slowly decay as the sound is absorbed by the walls and air, creating reverberation, or reverb. A plate reverb system uses an electromechanical transducer (actuator), similar to the driver in a loudspeaker, to create vibration in a plate of sheet metal. A pickup captures the vibrations as they bounce across the plate, and the result is output as an audio signal. A spring reverb system uses a transducer at one end of a spring and a pickup at the other, similar to those used in plate reverbs, to create and capture vibrations within a metal spring. Guitar amplifiers frequently incorporate spring reverbs due to their compact construction. Spring reverberators were once widely used in semi-professional recording due to their modest cost and small size. Due to quality problems and improved digital reverb units, spring reverberators are declining rapidly in use. Digital reverb units use various signal processing algorithms in order to create the reverb effect. Since reverberation is essentially caused by a very large number of echoes, simple DSPs use multiple feedback delay circuits to create a large, decaying series of echoes that die out over time.
The world is full of amps. It is so full of them in fact that it is somehow hard to choose not because there is not enough good ones, but too many of them. Which is very unfortunate, as it raises the entry level requirement for understanding what you are buying. This means that a whole lot of people get intimidated when trying to pick an amp. Like if they want a mini amp that they would want to carry with them when they go somewhere. Which is why I sat myself down the other day, bargaining all the while, and compiled a list of the best small guitar amps, for the sake of all the big musicians trying to play them. Hopefully at least some of you will find it more or less useful, since I had to categorize these according to price, sound quality, tone quality, comfort of use and even the general usefulness. What I am trying to say is, it was a lot of work.

Since 1971 Hoffman Guitars has provided a full range of services to guitar players nationwide.   We have always worked to provide the finest in instrument repair services and handcrafted guitars.  We provide a full range of repair services, including factory authorized warranty service for C.F. Martin, Gibson, Guild, Fender, Taylor, Jim Olson and others.  I (Charlie Hoffman) have built over 600 individually handcrafted guitars, which are (or have been) played by such players as Leo Kottke, Tim Sparks,  Dakota Dave Hull, Ann Reed, Jerry Rau, Charlie Maguire and others.  In addition, we carry a fairly complete range of accessories for guitar players (strings, picks, capos, pickups, cases, etc, etc.).  In this day and age it may seem a bit anachronistic but we really believe in customer service and strive to provide the very best.
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, unforgettable journey, slideshow, TV, radio. Featuring muted electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
Lest anyone think left-handed guitarists are at a disadvantage compared to their right-handed contemporaries, consider this list of some of the best known lefties: Paul McCartney, Dick Dale, Jimi Hendrix, and Albert King are just a few of the world’s most esteemed left-handed guitar players. In the 1950s and ’60s, though, left-handed guitars were often difficult to come by, especially for guitarists on a budget. This makes left-handed...Continue Reading

Overall quality is Great! Great intonation and holds tune once the strings are "broke in", as with any guitar ! Everything you would expect from a quality instrument. Action could be a little lower, but that can be a fairly inexpensive modification. The "extras" are decent except for the gig bag. The bag is about the equivalent to a thin travel bag for clothing, but the quality of the guitar alone is worth the price.! Amp is decent for it's size and does the job. My only complaint is the finish on the guitar itself is a little lacking. On the one I received, the rossett around the sound hole was not lined up before the final clear coat was applied(refer to photo). For a Chinese knock off you can't be the price though! This is still a quality instrument! I've been playing for over 27 years and I would recommend this guitar for beginners and seasoned musicians alike. $123 for the guitar itself is well worth the price!


*When the item leaves our warehouse, they are generally shipped to EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service and it would usually take 7 – 10 days to United States. We ship our products from Mainland China where our manufacturing factory is located. We will inform you once your order has been shipped and we will be providing you with the tracking number so you can conveniently monitor the shipments progress on EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service website or SF Express and USPS and Parcel Force website.
New Mooer Red Truck Multi Effect Pedal. Mooer Red Truck. The Mooer Red Truck is one of the most full-featured effects strip on the market. Featuring several effects modules within one unit, this is designed for players who prefer the simplicity of single effects over multi-effects and want a portable solution for rehearsals, gigs, or where carrying a lot of gear is an issue.
I was just old enough to catch the tail end, but many folks remember the days of the record store.  Large vinyl albums, huge artwork, leafing through the stacks….it was a cool time that lasted longer than the days of cassettes, 8-tracks, and CDs.  Nowadays, most music buying is relegated to the online variety.  But there was a time during the 1960s where record stores were THE place to get your music, and musical instruments!That’s right, in window displays or hanging above the stacks of vinyl, guitars like these were waiting for teenagers.  Again, just a cool time!  This Decca guitar was sold through Decca Record stores.  In early 1966, Decca Records jumped into the electric guitar frenzy.  This was around the same time when CBS has bought Fender and only a few years away from MCA buying Danelectro. Curiously enough, Decca Records was a subsidiary of MCA.Anyway, Decca and many other companies saw the potential profits of electric guitar sales and quickly tried to capitalize.  There was a whole line of guitars, amps, and accessories, all imported from Japan.  The entire instrument line was handled through Decca’s 21 branches and distributors throughout the USA, but the company seemed to concentrate on the east and west coasts.  There was also a Decca subsidiary in Canada as well.This particular guitar was made by Kawai, and featured a design that was semi-exclusive to Decca.  Kawai was producing and exporting thousands of guitar to the USA at this time, and Kawai’s prices were very competitive, but Decca decided to go with an (as of this writing) smaller, unknown Japanese company to produce the guitars.  Many of the Decca electrics featured non-adjustable truss rods and just seemed to always be on the “cheap” end.  But some of the them did sound very good.  Sometimes you’ll see some really odd Decca electrics that literally copied the Teisco look from the same time period.  There were also some cool hollow bodies with set neck designs as well as the late 60s  line of guitars, like the DMI 231 pictured below.
The 2555X Silver Jubilee reissue has the same silver vinyl covering used on the originals, and looks just as handsome. The controls are pleasingly familiar, with a simple front panel layout featuring controls for bass, mid, treble, presence, together with a preamp gain and two master volume controls - one for lead and one for rhythm. A push/pull switch on the output master volume changes channels, while another on the gain knob flips the 2555X into rhythm clip mode, changing the clean channel into something a lot more aggressive. The third rocker switch changes the output stage mode from pentode to triode, dropping the power from 100 down to around 50 watts, and softening the attack a little. The sparse rear panel also features a series effects loop, a fixed-level frequency-compensated DI output, and a jack socket for a single-button footswitch, used to change channels. Overall, the 2555X is built to last and look good for a long time, with Marshall's typically high build quality and attention to detail. Apart from its association with Slash, Joe Bonamassa, and various other high-profile users, the main reason why 2555s are so sought after is their sound. We're pleased to report that the reissue amp is tonally as accurate as it possibly could be, with perhaps a touch more gain and low-end punch than the original. The 2555X accurately reproduces the original tone - and with a few minor exceptions, the look - of the original, at a price that's very reasonable compared with the competition, especially for a UK-made product.
There’s a 10-watt, eight-ohm Fender Frontman 10G amplifier with a six-inch Fender design speaker that will give you plenty of amplification if you’re learning in your bedroom or apartment. There’s even a two-band EQ giving you more tonal control and a silver-face mesh grill paying homage to Fender’s classic vintage amps. They’ve also thrown in an instrument cable (for connecting your guitar up to your amp), an electronic tuner for keeping things sounding right, a gig bag, a guitar strap, a pick sampler (so you can audition different thicknesses of pick to determine the best for your playing style), plus an instructional DVD to make sure you start your learning off on the right foot.
Chorus – This is the subtlest type of modulation effect. It does exactly what its name suggests, making it sound as though multiple instruments are all playing in unison. The effect could be compared to running a signal through two amps at once and setting one on a slight delay; in fact, that’s how many artists created chorus effects before these pedals were commonplace.
In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer's existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.

The Sex Pistols, Steve Jones' brutish power chords and flamboyant gutter-glam solos were a perfect mirror for the taunting bile of Johnny Rotten – and a yardstick for every punk-rock noise-maker that followed. His legacy was set with indelible riffs on one record – 1977's Never Mind the Bollocks… – that inspired guitarists from Slash to Billie Joe Armstrong. It was an attitude as much as a sound. As Jones told a journalist during his days with the Sex Pistols, "Actually, we're not into music. We're into chaos."


So here we are at the end of our journey (well, probably not yours). Maybe you have found the best guitar practice amplifier from this list and cannot wait to buy it or maybe you still want to have your options. BUT my point is that starting with an amplifier for practice is a great idea. Not only will the amp serve a very particular purpose it was made for but you will also save quite a lot of money. For instance, most amplifiers under $100 are great for practice so you can check out our list of the best cheap amplifiers for beginners. And while I know a lot of people don’t like the idea of “cheap” being in the same sentence as their instrument or equipment, the thing is cheaper does not necessarily means bad. Is a $100 amp going to win over an amplifier in the best amplifiers $1000 list? Probably not, but as I already mention the best “objective” amplifier (or what brands and people deem to be the best at the moment) is not always a good option for everyone. That is especially a case with someone who is just starting off their journey into the world of music, amps, guitars and everything of that sort.
(function(){"use strict";function s(e){return"function"==typeof e||"object"==typeof e&&null!==e}function a(e){return"function"==typeof e}function l(e){X=e}function u(e){G=e}function c(){return function(){r.nextTick(p)}}function f(){var e=0,n=new ne(p),t=document.createTextNode("");return n.observe(t,{characterData:!0}),function(){t.data=e=++e%2}}function d(){var e=new MessageChannel;return e.port1.onmessage=p,function(){e.port2.postMessage(0)}}function h(){return function(){setTimeout(p,1)}}function p(){for(var e=0;et.length)&&(n=t.length),n-=e.length;var r=t.indexOf(e,n);return-1!==r&&r===n}),String.prototype.startsWith||(String.prototype.startsWith=function(e,n){return n=n||0,this.substr(n,e.length)===e}),String.prototype.trim||(String.prototype.trim=function(){return this.replace(/^[\s\uFEFF\xA0]+|[\s\uFEFF\xA0]+$/g,"")}),String.prototype.includes||(String.prototype.includes=function(e,n){"use strict";return"number"!=typeof n&&(n=0),!(n+e.length>this.length)&&-1!==this.indexOf(e,n)})},"./shared/require-global.js":function(e,n,t){e.exports=t("./shared/require-shim.js")},"./shared/require-shim.js":function(e,n,t){var r=t("./shared/errors.js"),i=(this.window,!1),o=null,s=null,a=new Promise(function(e,n){o=e,s=n}),l=function(e){if(!l.hasModule(e)){var n=new Error('Cannot find module "'+e+'"');throw n.code="MODULE_NOT_FOUND",n}return t("./"+e+".js")};l.loadChunk=function(e){return a.then(function(){return"main"==e?t.e("main").then(function(e){t("./main.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"dev"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("dev")]).then(function(e){t("./shared/dev.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"internal"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("internal"),t.e("qtext2"),t.e("dev")]).then(function(e){t("./internal.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"ads_manager"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("ads_manager")]).then(function(e){undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"publisher_dashboard"==e?t.e("publisher_dashboard").then(function(e){undefined,undefined}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"content_widgets"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("content_widgets")]).then(function(e){t("./content_widgets.iframe.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):void 0})},l.whenReady=function(e,n){Promise.all(window.webpackChunks.map(function(e){return l.loadChunk(e)})).then(function(){n()})},l.installPageProperties=function(e,n){window.Q.settings=e,window.Q.gating=n,i=!0,o()},l.assertPagePropertiesInstalled=function(){i||(s(),r.logJsError("installPageProperties","The install page properties promise was rejected in require-shim."))},l.prefetchAll=function(){t("./settings.js");Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("qtext2")]).then(function(){}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe)},l.hasModule=function(e){return!!window.NODE_JS||t.m.hasOwnProperty("./"+e+".js")},l.execAll=function(){var e=Object.keys(t.m);try{for(var n=0;n=c?n():document.fonts.load(u(o,'"'+o.family+'"'),a).then(function(n){1<=n.length?e():setTimeout(t,25)},function(){n()})}t()});var w=new Promise(function(e,n){l=setTimeout(n,c)});Promise.race([w,m]).then(function(){clearTimeout(l),e(o)},function(){n(o)})}else t(function(){function t(){var n;(n=-1!=y&&-1!=g||-1!=y&&-1!=v||-1!=g&&-1!=v)&&((n=y!=g&&y!=v&&g!=v)||(null===f&&(n=/AppleWebKit\/([0-9]+)(?:\.([0-9]+))/.exec(window.navigator.userAgent),f=!!n&&(536>parseInt(n[1],10)||536===parseInt(n[1],10)&&11>=parseInt(n[2],10))),n=f&&(y==b&&g==b&&v==b||y==x&&g==x&&v==x||y==j&&g==j&&v==j)),n=!n),n&&(null!==_.parentNode&&_.parentNode.removeChild(_),clearTimeout(l),e(o))}function d(){if((new Date).getTime()-h>=c)null!==_.parentNode&&_.parentNode.removeChild(_),n(o);else{var e=document.hidden;!0!==e&&void 0!==e||(y=p.a.offsetWidth,g=m.a.offsetWidth,v=w.a.offsetWidth,t()),l=setTimeout(d,50)}}var p=new r(a),m=new r(a),w=new r(a),y=-1,g=-1,v=-1,b=-1,x=-1,j=-1,_=document.createElement("div");_.dir="ltr",i(p,u(o,"sans-serif")),i(m,u(o,"serif")),i(w,u(o,"monospace")),_.appendChild(p.a),_.appendChild(m.a),_.appendChild(w.a),document.body.appendChild(_),b=p.a.offsetWidth,x=m.a.offsetWidth,j=w.a.offsetWidth,d(),s(p,function(e){y=e,t()}),i(p,u(o,'"'+o.family+'",sans-serif')),s(m,function(e){g=e,t()}),i(m,u(o,'"'+o.family+'",serif')),s(w,function(e){v=e,t()}),i(w,u(o,'"'+o.family+'",monospace'))})})},void 0!==e?e.exports=a:(window.FontFaceObserver=a,window.FontFaceObserver.prototype.load=a.prototype.load)}()},"./third_party/tracekit.js":function(e,n){/**

Gibson is easily one of the most identifiable guitar brands in the world today, and even with the premium price tags of their instruments, many continue to look up to them as their dream instruments. Thankfully, the company has toned down the price a bit on some of their guitars, one of which is the J-15, which enters this list with its good balance of workhorse ready features, premium prestige and reasonable price tag.
{ "thumbImageID": "NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Brown-Sunburst/K47821000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Yamaha NTX500 Acoustic-Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Brown Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000152018", "price": "449.99", "regularPrice": "449.99", "msrpPrice": "499.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Yamaha/NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Brown-Sunburst-1500000152018.gc", "skuImageId": "NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Brown-Sunburst/K47821000003000", "brandName": "Yamaha", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Brown-Sunburst/K47821000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000152019", "price": "449.99", "regularPrice": "449.99", "msrpPrice": "499.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Yamaha/NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Natural-1500000152019.gc", "skuImageId": "NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Natural/K47821000001000", "brandName": "Yamaha", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Natural/K47821000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000152017", "price": "449.99", "regularPrice": "449.99", "msrpPrice": "499.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Yamaha/NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black-1500000152017.gc", "skuImageId": "NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/K47821000002000", "brandName": "Yamaha", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/NTX500-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/K47821000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Ring modulator: A ring modulator produces a resonant, metallic sound by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave generated by the device's internal oscillator. The original sound wave is suppressed and replaced by a "ring" of inharmonic higher and lower pitches or "sidebands".[70][78] A notable use of ring modulation is the guitar in the Black Sabbath song "Paranoid".[79]
Zactly!!!!!!!! Terry Kath, hands down the greatest ever! Hendrix is on everybodies list as the best, well Jimi said Terry was the best and if Jimi said it it's good enough for the rest of us. I just can't believe it took until Sept. 24th 2009 for someone to put his name down! To bad he valued the band concept more than his ego or he would be more well respected.
The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.

The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
Carvin is a guitar company with a different business model than the rest. You won’t find them at your local music store because Carvin only makes custom guitars. Their instruments are based around a handful of templates and each feature components that are individually chosen by the buyer. For this reason, it’s very rare to find two Carvins that are completely identical.
Gibson also tops the list of best electric guitar brands that retain a consistent design. Among the popular models, the Les Paul is a favorite guitar that has been ruling the music world for several decades. It is a high-end, USA-made instrument that comes in a variety of variations. Other famous Gibson guitars include the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335, and Firebird.
I have never had a negative experience here. The staff is genuinely pumped about guitars. Every time I have gone in, I have always been greeted in a friendly manner and I have never felt that I had asked a stupid question. I really appreciate that they are able to take some of the intimidation out of purchasing a new guitar and put no pressure at all to buy. I'm so glad this store exists here in Seattle! Thank you so much guys!
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.

The next step is to figure out what gauge, or thickness of string is best suited to your playing ability and style. Thinner gauges are easier to fret and bend, and may be better suited for beginners, until callouses build up on the fingertips. Heavier strings tend to produce greater volume and fuller tone. Nylon strings are typically categorized as light, medium or heavy tension. Steel strings for both electric and acoustic guitars are categorized by the gauge, or thickness of the lightest string, the high E string, measured in thousandths of an inch, with .09 being a common size for an electric set. A set of electric strings may be labeled .09-.042 - this is the gauge of the lightest and heaviest string in the set. Acoustic sets are a little thicker, so a typical medium-gauge set might be .012-.054.
There are several good reasons why you might want to wire your Strat pickups in series. If you want more volume and midrange out of your pickups, the parallel/series switching may be the perfect option. As I mentioned, parallel wiring of two pickups is what you are used to hearing from a Strat. Parallel wiring adds transparency and clarity to the tone.

The Les Paul Custom then became known as the “tuxedo” Les Paul with its Ebony and Alpine White color finishes, accentuated with shiny gold hardware. The Custom PRO features a classic gold LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and a gold stopbar tailpiece. You’ll find more gold in the headstock with the gold Grover tuners. It also features a fully bound body, headstock and neck, as well as pearloid fretboard inlays.
hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is mormal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part  of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have instaleed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five wat switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds—thankls sean
Roger McGuinn worked with C. F. Martin & Company to develop a seven-string folk guitar. McGuinn’s guitar (the D7) is tuned the same as a standard folk guitar with steel strings, but the third (G) string is augmented with a harmonic string one octave higher. The intention was to offer the six-string player the chance to play “jangly” twelve-string style lead guitar.
While pretty much every noise musician uses the guitar as a weapon of mass destruction, Mark Morgan of scuzz-worshippers Sightings uses his guitar for sheer negation. Playing in 50 shades of gray on found and borrowed pedals, the leader of this longtime Brooklyn noise band is quicker to sound like a vacuum humming, toilet flushing, or scrambled cable porn feed than Eric Clapton or even Thurston Moore; a unique sound that has all the emotion of punk, with none of its recognizable sounds. As he told the blog Thee Outernet: “Probably the biggest influences on my playing style is sheer f—king laziness and to a slightly lesser degree, a certain level of retardation in grasping basic guitar technique.”
A hard-tail guitar bridge anchors the strings at or directly behind the bridge and is fastened securely to the top of the instrument.[20] These are common on carved-top guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Paul Reed Smith models, and on slab-body guitars, such as the Music Man Albert Lee and Fender guitars that are not equipped with a vibrato arm.
×