Route the body. You’ll need to make a cavity (a hole that goes partly through the body of the guitar) in the back of the guitar to fit the electronics for the volume, tone, pickup selection controls. You will cover it later with a bit of material (usually hard plastic). You’ll also need one cavity in the front of the guitar for each of its pickups. Rout the pickup cavity (or cavities) to the depth recommended by the manufacturer.[9]

Steel-string Acoustic Guitar The steel-string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar that descends from the classical guitar, but is strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. The most common shape is the dreadnought (originally developed by C.F. Martin & Company), which incorporates a deep soundbox and a smaller and less pronounced upper bout, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance. Other popular body styles include the larger jumbo body shape, as well as the smaller auditorium (000) body style and even smaller grand concert (00) body style. Check out the Martin Ed Sheeran X Signature Acoustic Electric for a smaller body type with a punchy sound.

Unabashedly brute class, with typical German overbuilding, the Schallers shown here are the Incredible Hulk of the bunch (Fig. 17). At a hefty 272 grams, they have the might to get noticed when you fasten them to your axe. If you have a guitar with a tiny headstock, you’ll hear and feel a difference with the Schallers. Whether or not you like the change is subjective, and it depends on the makeup of the rest of your guitar.


Went here for the first time yesterday to get the strings replaced on my acoustic guitar. Kevin, the owner, completely encompasses the definition of true customer service. He not only was professional, courteous and friendly but also willing to talk me through the process as he was re-stringing my guitar when I asked if I could watch and learn. I highly encourage coming here, especially for a an excellent and personal experience! I will be back no doubt!
When buying your first guitar, it’s sensible to stop and think about what you are buying it for. Is it just something to learn on? Will you be upgrading in a year or two when you start thinking about forming a band, gigging, and recording? If so, you may be better off trying one of these affordable electric guitars, which all offer a solid platform on which to learn.
Ok, funny enough last week i got my old squire Tele out the loft to perform a maintenance on it and i adjusted the Truss rod, action, innotation. I've installed some nee pick ups too. But it still doesn't mean that there aren't easier guitars out there to play. There are differen't necks, frets, body shapes etc that all factor in. Someone has already said that a Tele is one of the hardest to play so i still think my question is valid
Good point Gary. The T5 is in a separate category. I found it to be useless as a true acoustic. Thin, weak tone due to its shallow body. Plugged in as an amped acoustic just so-so, and as an electric for rock with overdrive or distortion, pretty good. The Ovations with deep contour bowls, like my Elite 2078, while not so easy to hold, are better at everything, especially unplugged tone, and cost half as much.
Our guide to guitar strings, the hope and savior of beginners across the world. We're going to cover the types of guitar strings, how they're made, the best brands, the standard gauges, how to pick the right ones for your instrument and style, what to expect in terms of cost, and much more. Take a ride with me through Ledger Note's guitar string guide...

There are different ways to play electric guitar. One is to just play the electric guitar, and to take it as it is. Another way is to play the guitar as a sort of synthesizer. With the right effects (delay, reverb, volume swells, added octaves), no one would even know that it was a guitar. Neither way is wrong, but we refer to both as "playing electric guitar" even though they're being used in completely different ways that may as well be different instruments. Drama ensues.


• Now let's add some slap-back room delay. In the seventh insert (which, incidentally, comes post‑fader in Cubase, as does insert eight), go to Delay/StereoDelay. In the left channel, try setting Delay to 1/16T, Feedback to 6.5, Lo to 50, Hi to 15000, Pan to ‑100, and Mix to 20, and enable Sync, Lo Filter, and Hi Filter. Use the same values for the right channel, but with Delay at 1/16, Feedback at 7.3, and Pan at 100.
Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 55mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 8 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Fixed - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: IBZ-8 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, White
If you want to get this game, you have a few options. The game is $60 with no guitar cable included; this is the best bet for owners of the original "Rocksmith," as the cable that came with that game works here, too. If you don't have the cable, but have a guitar, the game costs $80. If you need a guitar, too, that'll run you $200 for an Epiphone Les Paul Electric Jr. guitar, plus the game and cable.
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
Want to get a good impression of how the SJ 200 sounds? Well Dylan can show you how it strums, Emmylou how it picks, or listen to Pete Townshend thrashing nine bells out of his one on Pinball Wizard. You might also want to take in George Harrison’s Here Comes the Sun or anything by the Everly Brothers. As you'd expect, given the "reassuringly expensive" (i.e. enormous) price tag, the build quality throughout is faultless, superb. The first thing you notice when you sit down to play it is just how sweetly the neck sits in your hand and how easy it is to play. It’s a big lump of money, but when you buy the SJ 200 we guess you’re not just buying the guitar, you’re buying a piece of history.

Amongst the best guitar brands in India for acoustic guitars, Martin is one that stands out. Martin is one of the best known brands for its steel-string guitars. It is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars which produce top notch sound quality. However, the company is best known for their signature dreadnought acoustic guitar with X-bracing. It is truly one of the best guitar brands for some of the best quality guitars in the market.

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In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
However, when I’m building a guitar, there’s a myriad of small adjustments I can make to steer the instrument on a desired trajectory. These micro mods are interactive with each other and, depending upon the combination, offer a wide variety of sonic outcomes. But these little mods can also be applied to existing guitars—your guitars—in any number of permutations and to great affect. Let’s take a look at five mods that are easy enough for most players to try.
But a lot of bands also go in to a pro studio for the shared experience… add to that the expertise offered by a producer and engineer. In this scenario, you might have a hard sell but I’ve had a lot of producers and engineers call me to order an Axe-Fx after hearing one in this context. Nick Raskulinecz, Richard Chycki, Jack Douglas to name a few. In some case  guitar tones are prepared in advance on the Axe-Fx and then the “team” works together to decide what the album is going to sound like. I’ve also done consulting where the Axe-Fx was used to Tone Match the sound of stems from “the last album” or an old masterpiece. I also just saw a video where a band kept fooling this superstar producer by switching to the Axe-Fx and telling him it was the real amp he had set up in the live room. In all of these cases, you’re basically also dealing with many of the same things from the “top ten” list above. I also think it can save time and money. Just think about how easy it makes re-amping and how important that can be to notching things up a level… re-crafting guitar tones around a new mix idea. By the way, these things are all equally true for established artists as well; doing your first album is not really all that different in this regard.
We're not suggesting you become your own handyman 24/7. If your house roof tiles are falling to bits, you'd call a pro, right? But basic setup can be done, and if you eventually need help from a guitar pro, it's good to be able to explain what your bugbear is. Guitar players and guitars are all different, and it's simply good practice to think about what you do and don't like about your treasured instrument.

When looking at acoustic pianos, there are so many variations that can lead to differences in tone: upright vs. grand, hammer types, mechanical condition, the player, mic choices, and mic techniques. No matter what, though, the piano tends to be a behemoth in the mix – for better or worse – so most often you'll be looking to cut holes out for other things in your mix.
Original Martin OMs from approximately 1929 to 1931 are extremely rare and sell for high prices. Many guitarists believe that the OM—a combination of Martin’s modified 14-fret 000 body shape, long scale (25.4″) neck, solid headstock, 1-3/4″ nut width, 4-1/8″ maximum depth at the endwedge, and 2-3/8″ string spread at the bridge—offers the most versatile combination of features available in a steel-string acoustic guitar. Today, many guitar makers (including many small shops and hand-builders) create instruments modeled on the OM pattern.[5]
Neck-through guitars feature a (usually laminated) neck that, unsurprisingly, extends through the entire length of the body, with ‘wings’ or ‘fins’ glued onto the sides of the body. This gives even more stability to the neck and even more sustain and resonance when played. Neck repairs are, again more difficult and costly. However, the increase in stability means these repairs are much less likely to be needed.
Though, it is important to know that diving into the world of building your own guitar pedals requires a vast amount of knowledge. A person who builds DIY guitar pedals should have a rather keen understanding to circuit board electronics, because this will allow them to understand how exactly to put a guitar pedal together, as well as troubleshooting.
Primarily, people also use Mahogany wood to construct the guitar neck. Since it’s able to prevent the neck from warping, you’ll never have to worry about any impact that can deteriorate the quality of sound. Furthermore, the body ends up with a spruce top. In comparison with cedar, spruce is much brighter and provides better echoes through the instrument.
Gibson market the J-200 as the most powerful acoustic guitar on the planet, and we might just agree. It’s so punchy, and has so much presence, both in the low end and right up there with the more sparkling high notes. Combine this with the L.R. Baggs Anthem pickup system, and this is a guitar that is aimed squarely at live performances where the acoustic needs to really make itself heard. It’l
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For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

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Delay pedals take your original signal, a guitar chord or note for example, delays it and plays it back exactly how the pedal hears it the first time. It can either play the note back once or multiple times depending on your settings or “feedback time”. Often, you’ll see Digital Delay pedals as well as Analogue Delay pedals. The major difference is that digital delay pedals will offer longer delays and a ‘cleaner’ exact sound, however guitarists often prefer the analogue sound for all the subtle nuances and slight unpredictability in sound. This comes down to personal preference but both options sound great.
Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.

The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!
The word distortion refers to any modification of wave form of a signal, but in music it is used to refer to nonlinear distortion (excluding filters) and particularly to the introduction of new frequencies by memoryless nonlinearities.[32] In music the different forms of linear distortion have specific names describing them. The simplest of these is a distortion process known as "volume adjustment", which involves distorting the amplitude of a sound wave in a proportional (or ‘linear’) way in order to increase or decrease the volume of the sound without affecting the tone quality. In the context of music, the most common source of (nonlinear) distortion is clipping in amplifier circuits and is most commonly known as overdrive.[33]
The Epiphone Company is a musical instrument company which was founded in the year 1873. Epiphone is specialized in making Guitars and are one of the largest producers of guitars in the world. Epiphone has several ranges to choose from, as they brand them in different groups. Few of the Epiphone ranges of guitars are, Epiphone Sheraton, Epiphone Casino, Epiphone Texan and The Dot etc. Besides guitars Epiphone also manufactured upright basses, banjos and other forms of stringed instruments.
The last rating is the value, which gives you an idea of how good a purchase the guitar is for the money. You’d expect most sub-$200 guitars would give you good value for money, while guitars in the $1000 have to work harder to justify their price tags. Finally it’s worth noting that each rating is relative to its overall price. Of course a $2000 Gibson is likely to play and sound so much better than a $150 Squier, but they may both receive a rating of around 8 for features because we keep the ratings relative to the price.
A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.
The most defining feature has got to be the neck. It’s thicker than the standard Strat neck, which gives extra meat to work with when bending those strings. Even the fretboard was designed around this technique, with its narrow frets and flat fretboard. It’s not the cheapest one out there, but Fender Stevie Ray Vaughan Stratocaster is definitely one of the best Strats around.

:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.


Guitar cables (or jack leads as they are sometimes called) are a relatively inexpensive part of any setup compared to the instruments themselves, but as the link between your guitar and amp or recording interface, they are a crucial component. A frayed, broken or otherwise imperfect cable will introduce crackle, buzz and other nasties into your signal chain. Even a bunch of distortion pedals may not disguise it. Before recording, make sure your cables are in good order. If not - replace them!


If you wanted to wire a 4 conductor Dimarzio or Seymour Duncan in this way, just look at the diagram. Solder the 2 "middle wires" together, tape the connection, then solder the outer wires to the output. Be very careful when working with 4 conductor wiring. The colors and polarity are very important. You could easily make a mistake and wire an "out-of-phase" arrangement which would have low output, a squawky, thin sound AND the humbucker would NOT be hum canceling.
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However, John Leckie states an interesting preference for an SM58 and U67 rig instead: "SM57s tend to be that little bit brighter than the SM58, which really isn't what you want when you're miking up an electric guitar amp. You really want to pick up a flat signal, an 'unstimulated' signal I suppose is the word... The U67 gives you the warmth and a broader sound."
There are so many great things about the small guitar amps that we miss out on. While it is no shame to admit that some issues persist in the sound and ability of smaller amps, it is also worth saying that they have a whole lot of benefits that might be the reason some people decide to pick them up. I have had many amps over the years and my small amp is possibly my favorite piece of equipment (other than all the guitars on their own). I have taken it on many a trip when I had to stay somewhere that was not my home, and it has helped me keep my workout hours up to the standard that I had gotten used to. One of the very first amps I ever had was actually a small amp, nestled in my tiny little room in between my bed and my wardrobe inside which my guitar stood. My point is, whether you are just starting out or you have been playing for a while, you will find a use for your small guitar amp, especially if it is one of the best available on the market.
Electric guitars are versatile instruments. If you’re not entirely sure where your playing career is headed, pick a Strat-style solid-bodied guitar in a ‘sensible’ colour, and you’ll have an instrument that can do pretty much anything – and one which you won’t be embarrassed to get out of its case when (and if) you get through the ‘death metal’ phase!
So, I was looking for a single-ended amp. Say what you will about class A/B amps (and, to be fair, most of the great recorded tones in rock history are class A/B push-pull amps), some of them don’t really get singing until they’re too loud for the bedroom or studio. Sometimes you just need to hear that cranked tone without getting the knock from the neighbors. To quickly recap:

When gluing a set neck guitar it’s important that you don’t use an excessive amount of glue. The glue should be applied to the base of the neck and base of the neck cavity. Try to limit the amount of glue so that it doesn’t come into contact with the edges of the neck or pickup cavity as this can impact on the tonal quality of the guitar and sustain.

You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
Here we have another excellent FG160 for your serious consideration the Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early - mid 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an early 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges. This example is MADE IN JAPAN and was built well over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards as well as some of the best Exotic grained Honduran Mahogany woods available ( see pics please for that detail ) in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged with beautiful patina of a true vintage instrument and is a true vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label but the golden lable. The frets are very good - original. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings from a well loved and adult respected instrument. This fine example is here and in stock... We upon receiving have remove the strings cleaned and detailed the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, and this guitar to plays very well and optionally available upgrade if wanted please ask us...may include new bone nut/saddle/ we have several of these old Yamaha's and they are truly amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics ... Interested ? ask Thanks . .

As players such as Bobby Broom, Peter Bernstein, Howard Alden, Russell Malone, and Mark Whitfield revived the sounds of traditional jazz guitar, there was also a resurgence of archtop luthierie (guitar-making). By the early 1990s many small independent luthiers began making archtop guitars. In the 2000s, jazz guitar playing continues to change. Some guitarists incorporate a Latin jazz influence, acid jazz-style dance club music uses samples from Wes Montgomery, and guitarists such as Bill Frisell continue to defy categorization.

Six slot-headed Classics were offered. The 133/8″-wide GN50 Standard ($65) had a yellow spruce top and mahogany neck and body. The 141/4″ GN60 Concert ($79.50) featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian Imulawood body. The 143/4″ GN70 Grand Concert ($99.50) sported yellow spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood. The 15″ GN80 Auditorium (4109.50) was the same as the GN70 but with 4″ X 403/8″ dimensions. The 141/4″ GN90 Concert featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian rosewood body, with extra binding. The 14 1/2″ GN100 Grand Concert ($169.50) came in yellow spruce, Brazilian rosewood and ornate inlays. Cases were extra.
No matter what style of music you are into, you won’t have to look far to find a like-minded guitar builder. The electric guitar can trace its roots back to the big-band days, and there are several companies that excel at creating excellent guitars for jazz. Likewise, there are those companies that have grabbed on to the heavy metal genre and make guitars built for extreme mayhem.
My 10 year old was getting bored with his previous instructor's teaching methods and had been begging us to drop guitar lessons. We thought we would try a different instructor. We've had only one meeting, but I saw a light reappear in my son's eyes and he is excited to start lessons with Jon. The video lessons and use of newer computer technology and has my son excited and motivated to keep learning to play.
The Tube Screamer pedal has a long list of iconic users including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Gary Moore, John Mayer, Joe Bonamassa, The Edge and many more. As such, it is only expected for a company like Ibanez to take advantage of its popularity to extend their reach in the amplifier market - resulting in the creation of the Tube Screamer Amp (TSA) series. The Ibanez TSA15H leads the series in terms of ratings, with its compact yet versatile head profile while having the same combination of tube amplification and built-in tube screamer circuitry. At its core are two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6V6 power amp tubes, a standard configuration that sounds good on its own. Its standout feature is the implementation of a Tube Screamer circuit, which comes complete with the same controls as the iconic green pedal it is based on.
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If you're a fan of the Grateful Dead, check out the D'Angelico Premier Series DC Grateful Dead Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar. In the acoustic department, the Alvarez Artist Series AD60 dreadnought acoustic guitar comes highly rated, thanks to its hand-selected spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and powerful tone. Singer-songwriters and fans of acoustic-driven music must check out the latest Ed Sheeran Martin guitar, the comfortable, easy-to-play Divide Signature Edition Little Martin acoustic-electric.
Were its fate left to the Electric Storms, Ovation may never have made it out of the ’60s. However, the breakthrough occurred when the company picked up the endorsement of pop star Glen Campbell, who began his career as a session guitarist and folk singer, at one point touring behind Ricky Nelson. In ’65 he was a member of the Beach Boys, but by the late ’60s he had broken through to be an enormously popular balladeer with country-tinged hits like “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and “Wichita Lineman.”
The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.
One of the most useful features of guitar-amp simulation plug-ins is that they can help mask some quite serious problems with whatever you're putting through them, without necessarily changing it beyond all recognition. I've found that even relatively clean settings can disguise such horrors as clipping on transients to a surprising extent. If you're ever faced with a badly recorded guitar part (even one that's played on an acoustic guitar, or through an amp), try putting it through an amp modeller.
A band can sound good with conventional amps and PA gear. But it takes musicians who are sensitive to each other as well as the overall sound of the band. It takes a skilled soundperson who has the gear (and knows how to use it) and enough time to get a proper soundcheck.  Going direct attempts to solve these problems. Adding IEMs (In Ear Monitors) solves more. Yes, you don’t have amps blaring behind you. No, you don’t look like Jimi at Woodstock. Yes, you have to get used to the way things sound and learn how to perform without amps. 
The Vox Show Room shows the classic amps behind the British Explosion of sound in the 60's. VOX, at one time was one of the largest musical instrument producers in the world and their products were utilized by almost every major music group during the nineteen sixties. From The Shadows to The Beatles to U2, VOX is the "voice" of generations of musicians worldwide.

The new generation of ‘boomers’ as they were known, thrived with the growing push on consumerism.  This of course included buying records and with the pin ups of Rock and Roll like Elvis and Chuck Berry – they felt part of a new movement which understood them and related to their struggles, such as growing pains, responsibilities and fitting in with society.
Having a tuner on your pedal board is useful but these days I more often use a clip-on tuner, specifically the TC Electronic Polytune Clip (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US). I don't like the main signal to run through the tuner all the time if I can help it (I use the GigRig G2 switching system) but if you don't have that luxury, then look for a tuner with True Bypass like the TC Electronic Polytune 2 (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US) or use a Volume pedal that has a Tuner Output (many do these days!).

Far as commercial recordings go, the oldest recording seems to be by the Hawaiian group Noelani Hawaiian Orchestra in 1933, which did four songs featuring the electric lap steel recorded on Victor records. However, the guitarist is unknown. Bob Dunn recorded electric lap steel in 1935, as part of the country swing group Milton Brown and His Musical Brownies. George Barnes recorded "Sweetheart Land" and "It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame" with Big Bill Broonzy in early 1938, followed a couple weeks later by  Eddie Durham with the Kansas City Five. Barnes played conventional guitar, not lap steel, so that's the first recording of a "conventional" electric guitar performance.
Line 6 gets a bad rap amongst the guitar community, due to the fact that they apparently operate on a ‘quantity over quality’ business model. The truth is, however, their digital modeling tech has improved vastly since that reputation stuck and they definitely deserve renewed consideration. And that’s all the more true when it comes to beginning players. As you’d likely be learning how to play songs by your favorite artists, this amp with its massive array of presets (128 to be exact) will allow you to mimic your idols with little, if any, effort. And, honestly, it’ll sound pretty great. It even has a built-in tuner, metronome to keep you on time, and real drummer loops so you can get in the swing of playing live.
By 1941, much of the pre-war Supro line had disappeared, to be replaced with what would eventually turn out to be a good portion – and look – of the post-war Supro line. Gone were the Supro Avalon Spanish, the acoustic resonators and the nifty amp-in-cases. The Supro Avalon Hawaiian was gone, in name, though its spirit was directly inherited by another lap, the Clipper. Also gone were the mated pickups in favor of a more traditional design with exposed polepieces. These with some variations, would prevail for the next decade or more.
The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.

hey paul. i have a dorado 6 string acoustic. they really are beautiful guitars (for the price and value). if you email me (swiver84@hotmail.com) i will send you pictures of it. i'd like to see some of your dorado as well, i've only seen a couple others on ebay. i lost one on ebay yesterday by 1$! i am still kickin myself in the butt for that one. it went for 36$.


Tuning Instabily: Problems with tuning stability are almost always cuased by improper tuning technique (always tune UP to the note) or a binding nut. (There are RARE occasions where the string isn't seating correctly at the bridge, and we're not considering problems with set up regarding a tremolo) Even the cheapest geared tuners don't "slip" as a rule. If a geared tuner is failing it will make a "poping" type of sound as the gear jumps teeth. If the gears are loose, it is possible to pull a string flat with extensive (excessive?) use of a tremolo. If notes are going sharp it is due to the nut binding. What happens is excessive tension builds up between the tuner and the nut in order to overcome the binding. Then as you play the vibration of the string allows it to wiggle through the slot equalizing the tension, and making the string sharp. See above for info on a binding nut. If a fretted note is sharp it is an indication that the nut slots are not deep enough (or excessive presure with high frets/ scalloped or worn fretboard). If a string is going flat, it is always bridge related. Either a problem with the string seating fully (common w/ trapeeze tailpieces and ball ends in vintage tremolos (the reason they came up w/ bullet ends)) or binding on a rough saddle/ the edge of the trem block. Again, it is possible to cause a tuner to back off with extream tremolo, but rare.
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Most newbie guitarists want a small amp that sounds good but doesn’t cost too much. The amps listed above are that and more. However, there are some guitar players who mean business from the beginning, and won’t want to waste time on small beginner amps when they have the resources and ambition to grab an intermediate or pro-level amp. If you know you are going to stick with playing guitar, and if you can justify it in your budget, that’s not a bad idea.

Cole Clark guitars are made largely using Australian indigenous timbers. Solid timber is used in preference to plywood.[2] Clark’s discovery of the best type of wood for his guitars came whilst searching in Australia in 1998. He came across Bunya Pine, and found out that it had the perfect characteristics for the sound board on an acoustic guitar. Whilst researching this type of wood, Clark also discovered that Bunya is about 18% stronger than Spruce wood, which a traditional choice when constructing a guitar. Blackwood is also another favourite material of Cole Clark’s for building their guitars (http://www.coleclarkguitars.com/technology.asp).


In late 2012 I decided that I had all the modern guitars I needed. I’m not gigging much, just writing and recording. There were a couple of vintage guitars I was interested in. A Vox teardrop, especially the Mark IX, and the Fender Coronado. The Voxs turned out to be too expensive for me, especially the Mark IX, which was a 9-string beast meant to sound similar to a 12-string. Those are very rare and priced out of my range. The Coronado, I might be able to afford one day, but I’m not as interested as I was. The new reissues sell for about $700, but they’re different from the originals in several important ways.
Get ready to rock with the First Act Electric Guitar with Amp. It's scaled down for smaller players, yet it's designed with the same materials, electronics and appointments as First Act's full-size guitars for full rock sound. One high-output humbucking pickup delivers big rock distortion and classic clean tones. The maple neck and rosewood fingerboard offer a solid feel and warm tone. Classic hard tail bridge pumps up the sustain. Independent volume control means the ultimate in sound tweaks.
Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
I bought an effects pedal off eBay a couple of weeks ago that was defective. Anyone acquainted with eBay's horrendous customer service knows that it's far less hassle to just eat the cost of repairs rather than try to get a guy in India to understand and help with the problem. Enter Kevin at Grumpy's Guitars. He immediately opened up the pedal and fixed it while I hung out with him and played a beautiful old Juzek half-size bass and browsed through his small but comfortable, remarkably cool store. Half an hour later, I'm holding my repaired pedal, which, I might add, he also did some extensive preventative maintenance on, and he asks me for $10! Most places charge a $60 bench fee just to open the sucker up! I insisted on tipping him another $20, not only because he deserved it, but also because I still got out with my problem solved at less than half what most places would charge. It's nice to see someone running a business according to good old-fashioned ethical principles. Thanks, Kevin.
We have covered pickups here before so rather than running over old ground I suggest you read that article to get an understanding of the different types of pickups an electric guitar uses and how they work in greater detail. For the purpose of this article, however, all sound starts with your pickups. Pickups are essentially magnets, generally 6 small magnets wrapped in a very fine copper wire (over 7000 times), and can be better described as magnetic wire coils.
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Description: Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: White, Black, Red, Sunburst

Well... I'm researching this to since I have a Norma Accoustic. From what I have found they were only made between 1965-1970something. Most were made in japan including mine although some were made in Italy. They were made in the same factory as the Sear silvertone's. Most are considered vintage guitars especially the electrics from the 60's. From what I have seen electrics in good condition are worth a good bit of money. I'm still trying to find more info on mine though. Like what woods is it made of. and what was the exact year of manufacture. It says FG-10 on it. It plays great. Has great sound and plays prety easily except mine doesn't seem to like you using the first fret. lol... just trying to add some info here
The standard tuning, without the top E string attached. Alternative variants are easy from this tuning, but because several chords inherently omit the lowest string, it may leave some chords relatively thin or incomplete with the top string missing (the D chord, for instance, must be fretted 5-4-3-2-3 to include F#, the tone a major third above D).
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FU-Tone is very excited to welcome the amazing Zakk Wylde to our list of fine artists. Zakk, of course, needs no introduction and has a established career with Ozzy and his own band Black Label Society. Here are some photos of Zakk with Adam at a recent show with the FU equipped Dean Dimebag Razorback Vertigo guitar! Check out some of the new photos with Michael Wilton from the current Queensryche Tour with his ESP Signature model guitar featuring FU-Tone Big Block and other upgrades. Check out Nuno Bettencourt on the cover of Young Guitar Magazine with his Washbun N4 Equipped with FU Titanium saddles, 42mm Brass L Block, and EVH Dtuna! Also, FU-Tone is really excited to introduce some really cool new bridge parts and accessories for Telecaster Guitars from Vibramate and Bigsby! Enjoy!
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Johnny Thunders’ snot-nosed New York take on Keith Richards’ cool is one of the pillars on which punk rock was built. An Italian-American guy (birth name John Anthony Genzale Jr.) from Queens, he was born a little too late to be part of the Sixties rock explosion. But the bands of that era were his influences, and he put his own spin on them in the early Seventies as the New York Dolls came together with Thunders on lead guitar.
TASTING NOTES: When you add a second speaker, tones acquire texture and detail due to the phase cancellations between speakers. Tones also get more diffuse, with rounder highs and softer focus. Note how the 4x12 Marshall configuration has a muscular low-mid thump that the Fender configurations lack. That’s due in part to the closed back of the Marshall cab.
The amp has the usual basic controls: Volume, Bass, and Treble, plus a Gain knob that adjusts the amount of distortion. Once you start turning some of the Champion 20’s other knobs, all sorts of additional tonal possibilities arise. The Voice knob accesses simulations of different amps: Tweed (1950s-era Fender amps heard on early R&B records such as “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” and “In the Midnight Hour”), Blackface (mid-1960s Fenders, often used by Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan), British (reminiscent of the classic Vox amps used by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and U2), and Metal (somewhat like the sound of the Marshall amplifiers favored by rock and metal players from Jimi Hendrix to Slash). Each of these four simulations has three different variations that alter the tone a bit.

This right handed 6 string guitar is just so incredible. It is renowned to have been built in high expertise, from a brand that has been in the market for quite a long period of time. It has advanced  frets that make it unique in terms of sound and tune produced. It is quite easy to set up and operate, making it suitable for beginners. The  main reason is the price which is also relatively fair, ranging from around INR 3,999. Find more on:
I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul

Samick is a South Korean based musical instrument manufacturer, which was founded in 1958 by Hyo Ick Lee, with the goal of "enriching human life through music, the universal language". By the mid-1990s, they were the single largest guitar manufacturer in the world! Because they build under contract for many famous brand names, more likely than not, you've already played one of their guitars.

sorry this has SOLD OUT: Poor mans Authentic Blues Parlor guitar from way back. This is the real deal used over 60 years this is what some poor share cropper genuine American Blues men would have been able to afford back in the day and subsequently used throughout the south by mostly poor Black folks where the berth of the blues was born of course this is from the place where great things happen BORN in USA baby and is widely considered and is acknowledged to be by most all of our greats in US or British Rockers - Jazz players & Country too all these greats players feel that these original US Southland blues is the truest of ART FORM's PURE and RAW ....you feel it in your soul... this original sounds was not overly sophisticated at all it was RAW that was its beauty this sound from this old Stella is Authentic like that and is RAW and its woods are good - solid Burch wood and actually is an excellent tone wood in fact in those days Burch was widely used and my belief is that is a characteristic in the tone of this Original blues... Classic sound to this guitar OK it has it.... I have a few of these Stella's and love them, when you want to record and lay down an authentic REAL old school style rhythm track or play it on your porch swing and sip mint julip from a mason jar to get in the mood you can do it with this guitar its the real deal. This guitar is old did I say at least 60 likely older that being said it plays well it really kinda does... with pretty good action for what it is as good as it was 60+ years ago I recon. Tuners work, body is in good shape it aint goin anywhere its prety well made it has surface cracks and they are there and not a problem they have been there 40 years and have not gotten any worse not in the 15 years I have owned Stella! Like the movie STELLA! I could not resist the reference but I digress, Condition is Vintage good obviously not new or mint but she is 100% cool Authentic bluesman material if you want that old time Mississippi Delta to Chicago raw blues this old vintage American Icon of a Poor mans Parlor guitar, this is a classic threw & threw... I suppose I could have simply said it sounds good.... ahow ow ow ow.


Another way to apply vibrato is by way of the whammy bar, AKA the vibrato arm. This comes especially in handy when you’re fretting high on the neck in areas where it would be difficult to apply finger-based vibrato. Another instance is bending. Some players find it more comfortable as well as stable to use the bar while holding a bend steady to ensure better overall intonation.
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
Echo (also sometimes called long delay) is a natural effect as well, but it is only encountered in large open spaces such as canyons or stadiums. It sounds like when you emit a loud, sharp yelp and a second later you hear the yelp come bouncing faintly back to you from a far wall. This is a particularly fun effect to play around with by yourself. If you set the delay of the echo long enough, you can play against the notes you just played and harmonize with yourself while the rate sets up a kind of beat.
Sound also factors into this, though I'd argue equipment is less critical than playing technique. But a muffled high-impedance humbucker makes it much harder to bring out the right notes than a twangy Tele singlecoil. And in particular, distortion can quickly make an utter mess out of an only slightly muddy clean signal. So, keep the gain down when playing more chordal stuff, and treble up especially when doing delicate arpeggios etc..
• Similarly, insert the Soft Clipper into the third insert slot and click on its Edit button. For settings, try putting the Input at ‑0.0, Mix at 55, 0.0, Second at 100, and Third at 57. As with the Compressor, set the output to a high level, again stopping short of distortion. These settings are intended to get you started; you may want to tweak them depending on your guitar, pickup, playing style, and so on.
All-fifths tuning is a tuning in intervals of perfect fifths like that of a mandolin, cello or violin; other names include "perfect fifths" and "fifths".[35] It has a wide range, thus it requires an appropriate range of string gauges. A high b' string is particularly thin and taut, which can be avoided by shifting the scale down by several steps or by a fifth.
I’ll give your guitar a thorough inspection inside and out, letting you know what is correct and what may need attention now or in the near future. Frets, neck, action, bridge and bridge plate, truss rod, tuners, and internal bracing are some of the things that are assessed. This service is provided as a courtesy to my customers and there is no obligation or pressure to buy anything.
Guitar effects and the boxes that generate them have married theory and practice, history and material, content and form. Such strange logics, inherent to all of these simple devices, radiate sincerity in their transgressive sounds. Or put differently, those “unmistakable sounds,” which can enchant an entire generation, are not entirely intentional, but are born from the accidental collisions between transistors, tubes, wiring, and luck.
Other ways to reduce feedback include: playing with the bass amp's speaker cabinets in front of, rather than behind, the instrument; reducing the onstage volume; moving the bass away from other loud instruments, such as the drum kit (low toms can trigger feedback on some basses) or the rhythm guitar player's amp); signal phase reversing; using a parametric equalizer or "notch filter" EQ to turn down the frequency that is feeding back; or using "feedback eliminators", which are basically automatic notch filters that find and turn down the frequency that is "howling". Some other ways to reduce feedback are to use a plywood laminate bass rather than a carved wood bass, use a solid - body electric upright bass and/or use magnetic or optical pickups. Many of the methods used to reduce feedback (notch filters, filling the f-holes with foam) have effects on the tone of the instrument. However, these drawbacks need to be considered against the significant problems for the audience's experience caused by unwanted feedback.
Better known simply as an acoustic guitar, the “steel” strings (they come in all kinds of construction, not just steel) are louder and brighter, and a much more versatile instrument to play. Folk, rock, jazz — acoustic guitars have it all covered. Those steel strings also chew the ends off your fingers until eventually you develop hard calluses on the tips — very handy for plucking boiled eggs out of the saucepan.
One of the more common questions beginners have is why even bother with reverb pedals when most modern amps have a built-in version of this effect? To be honest, if you have a vintage tube amp with an actual spring reverb inside, there really isn’t a good reason to go with a pedal. However, most don’t. The thing that makes reverb pedals a much better solution in most cases is that you get a level of quality that can be used on stage.

Nice-4-Bass-V1.5 This is an sf2 simplified version of three different basses - all with 4 velocity layers.  It includes the 1958 Otto Rubner double bass played and mapped by Drogomir Smolken, recorded by Ludwik Zamenhof. The samples are exceptional and some percussive effects have been mapped to some high notes. Royalty-free for all commercial and non-commercial use. Copyright 2016 Karoryfer Lecolds (Karoryfer Samples). The original Meatbass sfz version for Sforzando has round-robin sampling and includes arco as well as pizzicato presets.  (http://www.karoryfer.com/karoryfer-samples).
In reality, arenas and festival grounds are the only places where anything bigger than a half stack would make sense. In smaller venues, the problem is always the same: amps can't be louder then the drums or the vocals. Listen to any good recording of your favorite bands and you'll notice that the kick drum, snare drum, and vocals are the highest in the mix. If you don't replicate this live the songs sound lost and washed out.
My 15 year old daughter recently renewed interest in the guitar she had bought a few years ago but had never really played much. She was disappointed when she noticed the strings were loose. We brought it here and Ted was so helpful and engaging. He recommended new guitar strings; normally you can buy the strings and do it yourself, or pay them to do it. He readily understood that while my daughter didn't know how to do it herself, she would like to know. He showed both my girls how to string a guitar, talking them through each step while he expertly strung the guitar and got it in perfect tune. Ted teaches guitar and his tutorial was an excellent recommendation of his teaching skills. He also threw in a cleaning cloth and gave us chocolates - how much better does it get than that?! We will definitely be coming back!
2. You have me to help you out! I’ve sorted through a bunch of the top acoustic-electric guitars and come up with a list of what I think are five of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000. I’ve been playing for almost 30 years, so I know a little bit about guitars. But just in case you don’t believe me, check around for yourself. Every one of these instruments is highly rated and top quality.
When considering the guitar from a historical perspective, the musical instrument used is as important as the musical language and style of the particular period. As an example: It is impossible to play a historically informed de Visee or Corbetta (baroque guitarist-composers) on a modern classical guitar. The reason is that the baroque guitar used courses, which are two strings close together (in unison), that are plucked together. This gives baroque guitars an unmistakable sound characteristic and tonal texture that is an integral part of an interpretation. Additionally the sound aesthetic of the baroque guitar (with its strong overtone presence) is very different from modern classical type guitars, as is shown below.
Next up is another electric guitar from Fender Standard, namely the American Special Telecaster. This one has two Texas Special Tele pickups and it’s perfect for great American genres like country, rock and blues. This American Special Telecaster has a lovely alder body and the neck is maple. Just like number one on our list, the 50’s Stratocaster, it’s vintage-looking, but the Vintage Blonde model we’re reviewing looks vintage in a cooler, less sentimental way.
When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.
Entwistle also experimented throughout his career with "bi-amplification," where the higher frequencies of the bass sound are divided from the lower frequencies, with each frequency range sent to separate amplifiers and speakers. This allows for more control over the tone, because each portion of the frequency range can then be modified (e.g., in terms of tone, added overdrive, etc.) individually. The Versatone Pan-O-Flex amplifier used a different approach to bi-amplification, with separate amplifier sections for bass and treble but a single 12-inch speaker. The Versatone was used by well-known bassists such as Jack Casady and Carol Kaye.
Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.
 This Tempo guitar combo amplifier with tremolo and reverb effects is well-used, but still delivers great retro sound. If you're looking for genuine vintage guitar sounds, the Tempo delivers in a delightfully trashy way. The sound is twangy and clear, but you can overdrive the volume a bit to get a raw lo-fi sound perfect for garage punks, mod revivalists, surf rockers, etc. and This solid state amp was made by Japanese guitar manufacturer Tempo. It has three inputs, just like you'd expect from a late '60s - early '70s model. The temolo speed is adjustable from slow to fast, and though the intensity is not adjustable, it has a nice "just right" sound that's not too mellow or too choppy. The reverb sounds like a classic spring reverberation unit, and it gets the job done well. The cabinet measures 18 inches x 13 inches x 7 inches and houses one 8-inch loudspeaker. Check out the short video below to hear the Tempo in action and examples of the tremelo and reverb, both at maximum settings. Finding all of this great stuff for you guys has left me with virtually no free time, so please do not laugh at my years-out-of-practice playing style when you hear the sloppy Link Wray and Duane Eddy riffs...
The overall design of the JS11 Dinky is a streamlined and straightforward, it is basically a less contoured version of the Dinky with cost-effective parts, assembled and built overseas. But don't count it out yet because many found it to exceed their expectations in terms of looks and tone. The 25.5" scale maple neck, flat 12" radius fingerboard and 1.6875" wide nut also makes it a pleasure to play, and have made life easier for both students and experienced players alike. The high output Jackson designed humbuckers are also good enough for high gain playing, although most got great results by switching them out.
Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.
Many of the best guitars I saw in my trip to Japan were models made for their own domestic consumption. After World War II, U.S. Armed Forces Radio blanketed Japan with American music. As a direct result, rock and roll, country, bluegrass and American popular music all took strong root in Japan creating a vibrant market for good guitars. Although Japanese players would have preferred to be able to buy genuine American Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, the supply of such instruments in Japan was extremely limited and prices were simply beyond the budget of most of the Japanese population. Japanese manufacturers produced a very wide range of instruments from low-priced student models on up to remarkably sophisticated professional-grade instruments, some of which were better reproductions of vintage American instruments than any of the American manufacturers were doing at the time. These high-end instruments are seldom encountered in the USA because they were priced high enough that wholesalers in the USA did not find them economical to import. Regardless of how good a Japanese guitar of that time might have been, if it cost anywhere near the amount of a new Martin, Fender or Gibson in the USA, there would have been no point in bringing it into this country. For example Tak Inoue, the export director of the Morris Company of Matsumoto, Japan, told me at that time that he had approached Fender to offer them Japanese-made versions of the Telecaster and Stratocaster which he proposed they could import and sell at a lower price that the standard American-made models. He told me that he gave them what he considered to be a very competitive price only to be told that Fender would not be interested since their cost at that time to make a genuine American made Telecaster or Stratocaster in their Fullerton, California, factory was actually lower than the amount quoted by Mr. Inoue. Needless to say, it would appear that CBS, the owner of Fender, had a very good profit margin at the time.
The steel guitar is unusual in that it is played horizontally across the player's lap. The steel guitar originates from Hawaii where local musicians, newly introduced to the European guitar, developed a style of playing involving alternative tunings and the use of a slide. The Hawaiian guitarists found that by laying the guitar flat across the lap they could better control the slide. In response to this new playing style some Hawaiian steel guitars were constructed with a small rectangular body which made them more suitable for laying across the lap.There are two types of steel guitar played with a steel, the solid metal bar from which the guitar takes its name, namely the lap steel guitar and the pedal steel guitar with its extra necks. The pedal steel guitar comes on its own stand with a mechanical approach similar to the harp. Pedals and knee-levers are used to alter the pitch of the strings whilst playing thereby extending the fluency of the glissandi technique.
Following the lead of Electro, which was having some success with their cast aluminum alloy bodies, Dobro – still a separate company – introduced its first cast aluminum Dobro Hawaiian electric lap steel guitar, probably in late 1934. Along with the aluminum lap, Dobro also debuted the Standard Guitar, and the Mandolin. Accompanying these was the Dobro Amplifier. All four listed for $67.50. These are all shown in the ’35 Tonk Brothers catalog.
The primary difference in tone between the solid body and hollow body guitar is the high end bite one associates with the solid body guitar. From the biting rhythm of guitarist Nile Rodgers to the supersonic leads of Eric Clapton and David Gilmour, Stratocasters have found favor with so many guitarists because of their versatility and their timeless tone.

Hollow: Although a bit more rare than the previous two, it may be exactly what you’re looking for if it fits your style. Hollow body electric guitars sound a lot like acoustic guitars, giving us that brighter sound but having trouble with higher volumes since feedback is likely to occur (especially in medium to higher volumes). It has a round and full tone with great bass response, giving jazz players a big grin when they hear it.
Recently while cruising around EBay I was able to find pretty strong evidence that the 700 and 800-series Kents were made by Kawai. Or maybe... the necks of the 700 and 800-series Kents and the Kawais were made by the same manufacturer. I don’t know if Kawai kept the factory that made Teisco operating after it was acquired. It appears that Kawai had more experience building hollow-bodied guitars than Teisco. So I call the 700 and 800-series Kents Made by Kawai. You can call them Made by Teisco if you want. Of course, the possibility exists that they were both made by an entirely different company. Who knows? The 1960’s were like a ‘wild west’ period of Japanese guitar making.
Like Kleenex for tissues or Dumpster for large garbage containers, the brand Teisco has become a kind of shorthand for “strange looking Japanese guitar from the 1960s.” When someone posts a picture on a forum of a vintage Japanese guitar that he’s trying to identify, five people will immediately shout out “Teisco!” Occasionally, they’re even right.
The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable.
Where there is more than one pickup, a switch selects between the outputs of individual pickups or some combination; two-pickup guitars have three-way switches, and three-pickup guitars have five-way switches. Further circuitry sometimes combines pickups in different ways. For instance, phase switching places one pickup out of phase with the other(s), leading to a "honky", "nasal", or "funky" sound[citation needed]. Individual pickups can also have their timbre altered by switches, typically coil tap switches that effectively short-circuit some of a dual-coil pickup's windings[vague] to produce a tone similar to a single-coil pickup (usually done with push-pull volume knobs).
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