Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.
And that’s about that. After ’93 Martin Stingers, like their previous Martin-brand cousins, started drifting off into solidbody byways of guitar history. The Stinger ST-2, basic fulcrum-vibrato Strats with pickguards and three single-coils, in black, red, and white, and the now ubiquitous droopy pointy headstock, was still listed in the 1996 Martin catalog, but these were pale reflections of the peak years.
The HeadRush Pedalboard's quad-core processor-powered DSP platform enables a faster and more guitarist-friendly user interface, reverb/delay tail spill-over between presets, the ability to load custom/third-party impulse responses, a looper with 20 minutes of record time, and more. The unit's most notable feature, however, is the seven-inch touchscreen, used to edit patches and to create new ones. In form, the Pedalboard most closely resembles Line 6’s Helix in that it has a treadle and 12 footswitches with LED ‘scribble strips’ showing each switch’s function and a colour-coded LED for each. There are several modes available for calling up sounds, easily changed by a couple of footswitch presses. In Stomp mode, the two footswitches to the left scroll through and select Rigs, while the central eight footswitches call up stompboxes within a selected Rig. Then in Rig mode, the left switches scroll through the Rig banks, while the eight select rigs. Sound-wise, there's no 'fizz' here, even on higher-gain patches, and the closer you get to a clean amp sound, the more convincing it is. If amps matter to you more than effects, the HeadRush is well worth looking into.

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Combos or extension cabs with more than one speaker might present some phasing issues when miked at a distance. Such phasing is usually heard as softness/“hollowness”/lack of low-end punch in the recorded sound – a sort of “comb filter” EQ effect like you get from a phaser or a cocked wah pedal. Some mic placements using, for example, a 2×12 speaker cab will induce time differences between the waves from one speaker hitting the mic relative to those of the other, and possibly create frequency cancellations that are deleterious to guitar tone. Even when both speakers are of the same make and model, they are likely to perform slightly differently (thanks to subtle variables of the manufacturing process) and to present ever-so-slightly different resonant frequencies, efficiencies, basic tonalities, and so forth. For all of these reasons, extra care is required when placing a microphone at a distance from any multi-speaker cab (close-miking one of the other speakers will all but eliminate such issues, but also eliminates access to the great sounds of distant miking).
While some Supros were more or less re-branded Nationals, many represented totally unique designs in the Valco line. When the Supro equivalent to the National Grand Console was introduced in 1958, it featured a radically different body design. In place of the National’s conventional all-wood construction, the Supro 1475B Console Sixteen featured two wooden necks connected by three chromed metal rods that ran all the way through each neck. It’s not obvious why this design was chosen; it doesn’t have any advantages other than its unique aesthetics, and I don’t believe it could have made construction any cheaper. The Supro was cheaper than the National – $175 vs $235 – but the difference was likely due entirely to the more “exclusive” name on the National.
That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.

At some point in this period, the pickups were changed to humbuckers with metal side covers and a see-through grey insert on top. I’ve estimated this changeover took place in about 1973 or ’74, but this is uncertain. Certainly it had been accomplished by ’76, when the next reference appears, so it could have been later (at the time of the Merson/Univox split in ’75?).
In his informative, yet relaxed style, Sean takes us on a complete guitar recording journey starting at the vibrating strings and ending at the DAW. You'll first learn how to tune and prepare a guitar for recording. Next you're off to investigate the world of the electric guitar. You'll see microphones and mic placement techniques followed by a deep look at amplifiers and what to do when you're working with combos and stacks.
While electric guitar manufacturers like this are often more expensive, they do provide a level of customization that isn’t available with several mainline models. Most companies of this size can have a casual email or phone conversation with you, take a few notes about how you want your guitar setup (probably jotting it all down with pen and paper) and then making a guitar to your exact specifications.
There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.

Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
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Since real knobs occupy space, this multi-effects processor is quite bulky, a welcome compromise that makes it easier to setup and adjust on the fly. The pedal comes with 59 effects and includes 9 amp models that feature Boss' COSM technology, the standard tech that they now employ on many of their effects and amps. You can combine up to 8 of these to craft your preferred tones, which you can then save into its 36 user presets. Other features include a built-in tuner, a 38-second looper and the ability to record your guitar sound directly to a computer via USB.
If you feel you’re ready for a new and better axe or are keen on starting your musical journey with an awesome electric guitar, check out the models we’ve reviewed below. All of these electric guitars have become fast favorites since they were released to the music-loving public. We’re sure you’ll find one or two that would meet all of your requirements and fit your budget.

With his exceptional talent, it seems that everyone wants to collaborate with Santana. What’s more, when he does join hands with another artist, it seems that his raw and authentic sound always shines through, taking the limelight. That is not to say that his tracks aren’t all different and uniquely great in their own way! There are so many manipulations that he has found and continues to find with the Latin rhythm. People say that the Grammy-winning guitarist can be identified with just one single note – now that’s an achievement!
The question here is how high to make the bridge. Well, this is personal choice. Find somewhere were the string doesn’t buzz on any fret from being too low, but low enough that you can play up and down the neck easily. There’s usually a sweet spot where you can just start to detect some buzzing and you can leave it just a tiny bit higher than that. Now do the exact same procedure for the high (thin) E string end of the bridge. Play the guitar a little bit to see if any of the other strings are buzzing. If, say, the A string is still buzzing, then raise up the end of the bridge nearest to that string a little bit ( a small amount of buzzing is often OK as long as it doesn't bother you too much and isn't heard through the amplifier - this a bit of a personal choice thing). OK, that’s step 2 finished. Your guitar should be nice and playable now. However, it may not seem to stay in tune very well. That’s because the intonation might be off.  
Nitrocellulose lacquer is prized as a coating by some guitarists as it is thinner than some other coatings, which some claim leads to a better sound (though we’re not going to wade into that argument here). It’s also easy to blend with paints, and easier to repair. It does have its downsides, however. The solvents used in the lacquer can be potentially damaging to the respiratory systems of workers applying the coating during the guitar’s manufacture, and for this reason other options were sought.
The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar Bass has major “cool” factor, and the sound holds out, too. With a P-bass style single in the neck position, and a J-bass style single in the bridge position, you’ll actually get the best of both worlds in terms of tonal options on the pickups. You have a choice between basswood (on the sunburst and crimson models) and agathis (on the black model), so there isn’t anything special about the woods they’re using in these basses. But the slim, fast-action, C contour of the maple neck will give you a nice, smooth J-bass feel that plays well above this guitar’s pay grade.

A guitar tuner pedal is an absolute must have if you’re serious about guitar as it provides accurate tuning instantly and can even allow you to tune your guitar to alternative tunings such as Drop D, open tunings and more. Check out our top 12 Best Guitar Tuners blog for more info on guitar tuners. The absolute industry standard is the BOSS TU-3 tuner pedal - a must have.
The construction of an instrument is naturally a fundamental characteristic that pertains not only to playability, but the ultimate sound of the instrument as well. Durability will be affected by this as well. Guitar construction varies from brand to brand and model to model; instrument makers utilize a wide variety of materials to build the guitar body. Wood is the most common material associated with guitars, but plastic and metal are used as well. Construction should also be given extra consideration with electric guitars, as the electrical components serve as a secondary construction within the instrument.
There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
1. Intonation: I have a brand-new Epiphone LP that will not completely intonate on the G, A, and Low E. Fretted notes remain sharp. I have replaced the factory strings with new Ernie Balls and tried every trick in the book to move the saddles as far away from the neck as possible. Many LP owners have this problem. Other than returning the guitar to Guitar World, my only other option is swap out the factory bridge with a wider one. You mention the latter option in one of your early comments, and I've decided to try it. I just bought a Gotoh one online. Hopefully, that will solve the problem. 

1975 Gibson Les Paul "Goldtop", Deluxe to Standard conversion, Electric Guitar. This is from my personal collection. I have another and mostly play my Strat and Tele for the music I'm doing now, so it's time to thin the herd (be aware that I might change my mind about selling it). Great, original Gold Top finish with nice checking. I was actually trying find one with a lot of "green" wear on the top of the body, but this one still has some good character (I hate shiny guitars). Plenty of wear to the finish on the back (see photos). Other than a pickup change and strap button change, the guitar is as I bought it used. When I purchased it there was a set of THC, PAF'S installed (don't ask, they're gone). Personally, I didn't care for them for a few reasons, so I replaced the front with a new, Gibson 490R, AlNiCo II and a Seymour Duncan, Seth Lover in the bridge.  Pots have been replaced and the selector switch appears to be original. It already had the Deluxe to Standard conversion work done (no the truss rod cover is not the original, as it should say deluxe). I believe the bridge and tailpiece are newer units as they shine too much for the rest of the guitar. The jack plate has been changed from plastic to metal. I installed the Schaller strap lock buttons. The tuning machines have been changed to sealed Grovers. The headstock has been re-fin'd in the back, from an what looks to be repairs around the tuners. In doing so, the serial was made very faint, and only somewhat readable. Appears to be "92?128". Has the 70's volute for added headstock strength. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Mahogany neck. Plays and sounds great. Original frets have normal amount of wear with plenty of years left in them. Neck and action is adjusted perfectly (for me anyway) and I did guitar set-ups for 12 years at a Fender / Gibson / Martin / Yamaha / etc dealership at $45-$150 a pop. I have sold guitars for many years and have been to "vintage" shows, so I'm fairly versed in guitar speak. This is not a "minty" show piece. If that's what you're looking for, then buy another guitar. This is a player's guitar. The guitar has not had the headstock broken off however like many used Gibsons. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. STAYS IN TUNE!!! I play it though all three of my amps, a Trace Elliot "Super Tramp", Marshall JCM-800 and a '67 Fender Super Reverb (original). Plays and sounds great for about any type of music, except the currently installed pickups are probably too hot for jazz. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. The cream colored pick guard and chrome bracket is in the case pocket, I just removed it as I don't play with them installed on any of my Pauls. It's in fine shape if you wish to install it. Guitar weighs in at 10.5 lbs, assuming our UPS scale is reasonably correct. Original Gibson, Les Paul case with the purple lining included (the lockable latch is locked "open" and we do not have a key. Case still stays closed with the other latches. It was that way when I bought it years back).

The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.


The Yamaha's top is constructed of Sitka spruce, a “strong yet elastic” wood that helps the player articulate tone and dynamics. The neck is made of Nato wood, and the back and fretboard are both made of rosewood. One of the best things about the Yamaha's neck and body is the way the two are joined together: via a hand-fitted, dovetail neck joint that uses no metal hardware. This neck-to-body cohesion is ideal for tone as well as the overall stability and durability of the physical instrument.
The first analog delay units used magnetic tape to record the original signal and play it back shortly after. The most famous tape units are the Echoplex and the Roland Space Echo. As cool sounding as these units are they require a fair amount of maintenance and they are rather large and aren’t practical for the gigging musician. But boy do they sound good!
Many newbie guitarists seek out distortion effects because they don’t like the distortion sound that comes with their amp. Analog distortion and overdrive pedals can help, but it is important to realize they are not magic bullets. Even the best distortion pedal is still at the mercy of the amp you are playing through, and the same pedal will react far differently whether played through a 100-watt tube head or a 40-watt solid-state combo.
Firmly intended to compete with Gibson's ES-335, the Starfire IV, V and VI retain plenty of Guild style, not least the more spacious cutaways and the wooden foot tune-o-matic-style bridge. Placed side-by-side with an equally new Bigsby-equipped Gibson ES-335, the Starfire V somehow looks more 'retro', more 60s. The body here is made from mahogany laminates with a distinct striped figure under the Cherry Red finish, which was introduced with the first Starfire. Then, as now, it all creates a different aesthetic to the Gibson ES-335. A major difference is the control set-up, which here augments the Gibson layout with a smaller knobbed master volume control on the treble horn, just behind the three-way toggle pickup selector. The pickups here replicate the early-60s introduced 'Anti Hum Pickups' and are period correct, along with the black plastic, chrome-tipped control knobs. It's a fairly weighty guitar for a semi, thanks to the full-length maple centre-block, and has a classic strapped-on feel. It is, of course, thinline depth and feels every bit an ES-335. It has a 'clean' sound, with low-end definition, slightly bright on the treble pickup with decent sustain and, importantly, a very respectable feedback threshold. It likes volume, and while similarly evocative of virtually all those classic styles, it's the stage version and effortlessly takes you on to early The Who, The Jam or Britpop voices, while seemingly equally at home with rootsy, strummier Americana.
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If you want to measure the fret size on existing instruments, a good way to do it is to get an inexpensive dial caliper (think Harbor Freight etc).  You can measure the width with the outer jaws (make sure to zero out the calipers for accurate measurements), but for the height (unless you are going to notch the depth rod and subtract the difference), use a piece of something of a uniform thickness and drill a hole in it to accomodate the depth rod, place it across two frets and measure thru the hole (usually near the crown) to the fingerboard and subtract your piece's thickness.  When measuring fret height, it is always good to measure a few different places on the neck as the height may vary according to leveling and wear. On many guitars (but not all) the upper frets (if there is not a neck joint area hump that was accounting for during leveling) will be a good indicator of fret height.
The original Overdrive pedals were created to mimic the sound of tube amps being cranked to 10. This will cause the tubes to be pushed to their limits, producing a crunchy and aggressive tone. The sound of overdriven tubes are certainly iconic as it gave birth to the sound of Rock ‘n’ Roll. However, the problem with bringing your volume up to 10 to overdrive your tubes is that it gets really, really loud--safety hazard loud.
Michael Bloomfield is credited with Eric Clapton for helping seed the renewed interest which compelled Gibson to return the original Les Paul to full production; both musicians began using Les Pauls at about the same time. Bloomfield first played a 1954 Les Paul goldtop (with the strings wrapped around the tailpiece rather than suspended and intonated over a bridge) while with the Butterfield Blues Band in 1966, but he swapped the guitar (plus $100) to guitar technician Dan Erlewine in exchange for a 1959 Les Paul Standard. This guitar was characterised by mismatched volume and tone control knobs (a reflector-topped “tone” knob for the bridge pickup volume, two top-hatted knobs for neck pickup volume and bridge pickup tone, and a cylindrical “speed knob” for the neck pickup tone), a missing cover on the rhythm/treble toggle switch, a truss rod cover with “Les Paul” engraved in script (this feature had originated with the early Les Paul SG models, not the original Les Paul single cutaways), and a crack in the wood behind the tailpiece. Because the guitar was lost in the 1970s (Bloomfield biographers Jan Mark Wolkin and Bill Keenom, in Michael Bloomfield: If You Love These Blues, disclosed that a Canadian venue owner claimed it as compensation after Bloomfield missed a scheduled performance and never reclaimed the instrument), Gibson used hundreds of photographs of the late blues guitarist’s instrument (and consulted with Bloomfield’s family) to produce the limited-edition Bloomfield signature. The company produced one hundred Bloomfield models with custom-aged finishes and two hundred more with the company’s Vintage Original Specifications finishing in 2009. They reproduced the tailpiece crack on the aged version, plus the mismatched volume and tone control knobs and the “Les Paul”-engraved truss rod cover on both versions, while including a toggle switch cover. The headstock was characterised by the kidney-shaped Grover tuning keys installed on the guitar before Bloomfield traded for it, and the pickups were Gibson Burstbucker 1 (at the neck) and Burstbucker 2 (at the bridge).
However much you swap your guitar’s pickups, strings, and wiring configuration, tweak your amp, or revamp your pedalboard, you will never achieve the golden tone that rings in your head if you don’t take one tip to heart: it all starts with the wood. Sure, these are electric guitars, and all the electronic components in the sound chain will affect what comes out of the speaker, but they are acoustic machines first and foremost. Hit the strings with your guitar unplugged, and it still rings and resonates, and the sound you hear—even with no electronic devices attached—still defines the core of your tone. And to make sure this is the right tone for you, or to avoid fighting a tone with endless component tweaks that never seem to satisfy, you need to understand a little bit about how all that wood sounds.
Beginners want to hear the changes in their sound and get the blues, funk, and rock genres on their guitar. The DigiTech Element XP comprises essential features that enable a beginner guitarist to get more out of their guitar while still maintaining quality. These units also have durable metal foot-switches and an inclusive power supply. Other features include:
The primary means of identifying the model number of Kent guitars is via a label on the back of the headstock. Through the years many of those labels have fallen off or been peeled off. They do not add anything to the appearance of the guitar. The 700 and 800 guitars had a round foil sticker with the model number and sometimes serial number pressed into it, kind of like Dymo tape labels. The look a lot nicer than the white paper one used on earlier models, but they still can fall off over the years, and they are harder to read.
Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
Distortion and overdrive: Distortion and overdrive units re-shape or "clip" an audio signal's wave form so that it has flattened peaks, creating "warm" sounds by adding harmonics or "gritty" sounds by adding inharmonic overtones. In tube amplifiers, distortion is created by compressing the instrument's out-going electrical signal in vacuum tubes or "valves".[52][53] Distortion pedals produce perfectly flattened peaks or "hard" clipping. Overdrive pedals produce "soft” tube-like distortion by compressing the sine wave without completely flattening it. Much like tube amps, overdrive units produce "clean" sounds at quieter volumes and distorted "warm" sounds at louder volumes. Distortion and overdrive pedals may either be transistor-based or digital.[54][55] While distortion pedals are most associated with electric guitar, they are also used with bass guitar (fuzz bass), Hammond organ and electric piano.
1961 is the sweet spot for Fender Strats IMO: the best 3-tone sunburst and tone! My 1961 Strat has been called one of the best sounding vintage Strats by Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music, who has been working on vintage guitars since 1968. This Strat is the closest thing to that incredible Strat; this is a very rare opportunity for anyone looking for the classic vintage Strat tone without equal!
Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
After the lawsuit Hoshino Gakki abandoned the strategy of copying "classic" USA electric guitar designs and moved to the popular superstrat era in the mid-1980s. The newer Ibanez models began incorporating more modern elements into their design such as radical body shapes, slimmer necks, 2-octave fingerboards, slim pointed headstocks, higher-output electronics, humbucker/single-coil/humbucker pickups, locking tremolo bridges and different finishes.
Clear and easy to follow instructions. I re-wired my Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute for new pickups after removing the easy connects and circuit board that came stock. I ended up re-using the 3 way switch that came in the guitar instead of the one in the kit since it was shorter and the guitar didn't have room for the full length switch in the kit. They were both Switchcraft so same quality. I'm very happy with the results. After shopping prices, the kit is very reasonable versus buying the components separately.

Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.


The most common overdrive will also alter the tone of the input signal by adding in a muli-processing chip within the circuitry. Such as the classic Ibanez TS-808, made in the 1980's, having the MP-D01201A multi-processing chip. Depending on the brand of the overdrive, the installed multi-processing chip and the preferences of the player, this type of overdrive is typically a go-to overdrive and is commonly the cheapest to purchase.
I own some 13 or so, high end American, Canadian and/or Japanese 6 strings 7 basses and a full studip of gear and if my opinion means FA then I can't help but not mention my Washburn Custom Shop WV548! It has Parker guitars (famous for the FLY) patented composite glass carbon fiber fretboard, EMG active PU's (81, 85) and a real Floyd with the Buzz Feiten system and it is bar none, the fastest, smoothest, and by far the nicest playing (and sounding for that matter) guitar I own or have played in my some 30 odd years plus, playing electrics.
For many people, Yamaha isn’t a brand that immediately comes to mind when they hear “electric guitar.” Yamaha’s artist roster isn’t filled with many high profile endorsers nor is the Pacifica carried by the big online retailers. This is a shame and why (in my opinion) the Pacifica is one of the most underrated electric guitars available today. It’s a guitar I wish more people knew about: the PAC112V is very well made, sounds and feels great, and is suitable for a number of styles thanks to its H-S-S pickup configuration and 5-way pickup selector.
C.F. Martin was born in 1796 in Markneukirchen, Germany and came from a long line of cabinet makers and woodworkers. His father, Johann Georg Martin, also built guitars. By the age of 15, C.F. Martin was apprenticed to Johan Stauffer, a well-known guitar maker in Vienna, Austria. Martin returned to his hometown after completing training and opened his own guitar-making shop. However, he soon became embroiled in a controversy between two guilds.
To learn how to practice correctly, you can sign up for a FREE No B.S. Guitar membership below. I’ve created this free course to teach you everything you need to know on how to practice correctly (Pit-Stop Practicing). I go much more in depth on the “how to learn” side of things, and you’ll avoid making all the same mistakes I made when I got started.
It goes to show…there is no “best” guitar players…it’s all a matter of perspective, taste, interpretation, etc….. Above all, much of it has to do with the players in question being at the right place , at the right time, playing what the audience wanted to hear from that performance at that point in time. It’s a big world full of talent undiscovered and sadly, it will remain just that: undiscovered.
If you do have lead solder, the melting temperature is much lower, making for easier connections, but remember to wash your hands after you're done, and not to touch your face while working - lead is poisonous. With lead-free solder, the rosin lets off toxic smoke, so use a small desk fan to blow it away from you while you work, and open a window if possible.
Perfect working condition Amp is an absolute beast, if you know anything about these AC30s you'll know that there tone is unbelievable. Make me an offer or trade These amps sell for close to 18k and well above that on oversees markets The amp does have some cosmetic ware but obviously does not affect the sound what so ever Gibson, fender, guitar Watssapp me 0737886874 Amp is based in Durban ...

Thinking out loud... what defines electronics then? I've always assumed that the pickups, caps, pots, etc. inside an electric guitar constituted an electronic system. The "guitar's electronics" facilitate a deliberate flow of electrons through a circuit with semi-conductors, etc. Heck, with coils and magnets (and sometimes battery packs), they also provide the electricity that's conducted through the system.

I have a problem with the way the neck bows going down from the low to high e strings. I have a Gibson les paul with the recent change in seasons I notice it on all my guitars I can adjust it out but it will some times just do the same thing, I see this on my fender and my Acoustic guitars as well when I adjust this I have a lot of problems with tuning I know this is not exactly what we were talking about but jut a question I wanted to ask I hope I made what I am saying plain enough I am pretty new to all of this. Thank you for all the great info.


Few dispute that, for tonal purity, the best distortion sounds come from cranking up a good tube amp. In particular, those with ears for tonal nuances buried even within a heap of distortion agree that a vintage-style, non-master-volume amp (or good boutique amp with the master up full to effectively take it out of the circuit) driven to the point where the output tubes are beginning to distort offers most players’ dream visions of the perfect overdrive tone.
As of 2006, many makers, including Gibson, were manufacturing resonator guitars to the original inverted-cone design. Gibson also manufactures biscuit-style resonator guitars, but reserves the Dobro name for its inverted-cone models. These “biscuit” guitars are often used for blues and are played vertically instead of horizontally like a “spider” bridge.
Portland, OR was probably the place of import, but all the Lyles were 'licensed' copies of Gibson, they weren't seconds. The acoustic guitars were built in Japan, with laminated tops and sides. Over all construction on the guitars was very good for the materials used. I gave my Humminbird copy to my son after playing it for 25 years, and he still plays it today. Unfortunated during that 25 years, I had to have the bridge reset 3 times due to the weakness of the laminated top. My luthier asked me why I didn't just buy a Gibson or a Martin for as much money as I put into repairing that Lyle...I told him the tone was worth the extra expense.
These special qualities have been used for centuries to create and build various instruments with differing levels of success. Some tone woods do it better than others so, are often more vigorously sought out and because of their growing rarity (due, primarily, to over harvesting) also vary in expense, the rarest most hard to find being the most expensive, of course.
Launch price: $2,419 / £1,943 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Bare Knuckle Johnny Marr single coils | Controls: Volume, tone, 4-way pickup selector switch, 2x 'bright' slide switches | Hardware: Jaguar bridge with Mustang saddles and vintage-style floating vibrato | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Metallic KO
This is the first defined price range that is worth talking about. Here's where you run into some pretty decent guitars that pack a lot more value for being just beyond the beginner's tier. Even so, there are also a lot of guitars here which simply aren't worth the price, no matter how good the marketing. We've tossed those out the window and are only sharing the two models we know deliver the goods.
There are tons of different online retailers and ebay stores that you can find a great deal on parts and supplies, but those were just some of the ones that I have purchased on and been satisfied with their service and parts. NOTE: Do your research when it comes to parts and the quality of the parts you buy. I like to get feedback and reviews from Harmony-Central. You might not be able to get reviews on everything, but it helps you out allot.
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Strongly influenced by Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert King, and Johnny Winter, Garrett is also a longtime fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Allen Collins. Following the path that led Collins to his biting, cutting tone, Bo plays the same type of guitar as the Skynyrd legend, and gets tremendous versatility from his Gibson Firebirds. Incidentally, Winters and King are also notorious Firebird pickers. Bo says that his Firebirds (one of which is a rare collectible) allow him to go from nasty drive flavors to cleaner, Strat-like tones when he needs them.


The first time you plug this Les Paul into an amp, the sound that comes out will put a smile on your face. It’s that vintage growl of a legit PAF that you can’t really recreate completely with anything else. We pushed a Plexi into overdrive and rolled off the volume a bit for that true rock tone. We weren’t disappointed. Gibson Les Paul Standard Heritage Cherry Sunburst brings that same epic tone which the whole series is known for.
Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.
The American David Schecter founded his company in 1976 in order to produce spare parts for guitars already available (especially Fender and Gibson). But since 1979 the brand has been manufacturing its own guitars. In the beginning they had only Fender-based models but nowadays, Schecter guitars are clearly conceived for hairy players (but not exclusively), with models like the Hellraiser or the Damien. Among their most famous users are Billy Corgan, Eddie Vedder, Pete Townshend, Mark Knopfler, Matthew Bellamy... And the brand also presented its first amps at the latest NAMM show.
And that’s exactly what reverb effects are trying to emulate: the way a single instrument sounds different in different spaces and reflecting off of different materials. Many common environments that reverb units try to emulate are halls, churches, and chambers. There are some pretty unique reverbs like a particle reverb that adds special effects to make things sound more spacey, and there’s even one that attempts to emulate what we imagine a black hole to sound like.
With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!
The Fender brand is the parent company of other good guitar brands like Jackson, Charvel, and Gretsch. While all of these are owned by Fender, they each have very unique playing styles and sounds. Fender also produces their Squire series of value guitars. These guitars are entry-level instruments, with decent sound for an incredibly reasonable price.
We all have heard that tone starts in the hands of the guitarist.  Different players can play thru the exact same amp and guitar rig and produce sounds on opposite ends of the spectrum.  I like to refer to this base sonic level as the DNA of a player.  Thanks to mad scientists tinkering in their evil laboratories of sound, we now have the ability to alter a guitarist’s tonal genetic code with effects pedals.
Also apparently still in the line in early ’64 was the SD-4L, which had adopted four of the two-tone, metal-covered pickups found on the SS-4L guitar. This still had the old, elongated Strat head. It also had the platform vibrato system found on the previous SS guitars. The SD-4L probably didn’t make it into ’65, but the shape was taken over by the more conventional TG-64.

The Epiphone Les Paul Special II Vintage Sunburst has a mahogany body and neck which gives the guitar a nice thick sound. The quality of the tuners and pickups are okay, not superb, but good enough for any beginner. If you are into metal, rock or blues the two Epiphone humbuckers do a pretty nice job, they sound really good and give you a nice fat sound. A pretty reliable and solid guitar even for live playing.
By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.

Chushin is still in operation today in Nagano, Japan and does business with guitar giant Fender. I believe that Chushin may have been a member of the Matsumoto Musical Instruments Association listed further down because both companies produced Fresher guitars during different periods....with Matsumoto beginning production and Chushin ending it (perhaps because the Association was disbanded?). During the 1960-1980 period they were responsible for badges Bambu, Cobran, El Maya and Hisonus as well as some Charvel, Fresher and Jackson badges. The company may have possibly made some guitars with the Aztec, Maya and Robin badges, but that is not verified. Guitars made by Chushin from this period are well-made and appreciated by guitar enthusiasts worldwide.
@Timothy Chew – This really depends on the specs of your effect and volume pedals. A buffer should be placed 1) before long cable runs, 2) in front of low input impedance pedals, or 3) in front of many true bypass effects. If your volume pedal has a high input impedance, I would recommend placing it near the front of your signal chain. If the Volume pedal has a low input impedance, I would recommend placing it after the buffer. Again, this really depends on how you plan on using the volume pedal and whether the one you have has the right spec for that usage.
Replacing or repairing knobs. Knobs are covers for your pots so you can easily turn them, if any of your knobs are unable to be correctly placed on try due to broken or enlarge holes, place a good amount of tape around the pot's shaft that covers it and try to keep the the knob on the tape. If you cannot do so then you may need to replace your knobs.

This guitar is of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, it is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest. We have our own factory that recreates them. Our version of Custom Shop Guitars is 95% same as the original in terms of quality and design, the parts are made and imported from China, Japan and Korea in order to manufacture the best musical instruments. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. We use the best pickups; best tuning keys and other hardware. All of our guitars are custom made guitars. The Top Guitars specializes the world’s finest custom guitars, major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. Our products are exported to Southeast Asia, North America and Europe. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!
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The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.
I have a Montclair guitar, it sounds like I have an original but I have some questions. I purcahsed this quitar about 40 years ago. It is a dark brown archtop, with two cutaways and a pick guard like in the picture. On the top of neck the only says Montclair, strait across, and on the back it says "steel reinforced neck". On the inside the only number is L 6089.
ACTION: fret low E at first fret and measure the distance from the bottom of the to the top of the 15th fret. It should be 5/64". Do the same with the high E, measurement should be 3/64". Now measure the string height at the nut; underside of the string to the top of the fret. Low E and A should measure 2/64", D and G =1.5/64" and B and high E = 1/64". If string height at nut is correct, recheck string height at 12th fret with strings open. Measurement for low and high E's should be the same as measurement taken at the 15th.
List of bass guitar brands that include the most popular and reliable models available. There is a lot to consider when looking for the perfect bass guitar for you. The body style, neck, scale length, tuning machines, intonation, fingerboard, number of frets, pickups and type of wood all make a difference in how your bass guitar sounds and feels in your hand. The most popular bass guitars include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Fender, Yamaha, Warwick and more. Use this comparison of bass guitar brands as a guide when researching the best bass makers.
The Neoclassical Speed Strategies for Guitar is another book we’d recommend more for the seasoned player. This one provides an excellent introduction into fingerpicking with helpful illustrations of exactly how to position yourself for the quickest and most efficient playing. It includes lots of helpful examples and exercises to make it easier to master.
Although I’ve spent most of my life focusing on audio journalism, I’ve been active as a musician since taking up guitar seriously in the 1970s, and I have played lots of gigs with jazz, rock, and folk groups in New York and Los Angeles. I now play mostly double bass and ukulele; I currently play in three jazz groups in Los Angeles, and I sub regularly in a couple more groups. I also conduct more-or-less weekly jazz jam sessions at my home, where I accompany numerous guitarists of widely varying skill levels, toting all sorts of axes. Having conducted innumerable multi-listener comparisons of audio products over some 25 years, I have a good idea of how to make product tests fair.
Launch price: $2,799 / £2,399 | Body: Laminated maple | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24.6" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Full'Tron humbuckers | Controls: Bridge volume, neck volume, master volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge, Gotoh locking tuners, Graph Tech TUSQ XL nut | Left-handed: | Finish: Cadillac Green
Let’s get it straight. Froo – Shawn – Tey. If you don’t know him, he’s the lead guitarist of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Frusciante is the author of the brilliant chord progression on Under the Bridge, the haunting intro to Californication and the simplistic solo and riff on Otherside. If you’re the casual listener of the Chili Peppers, then you may wonder why John has made it so far up this list. But a tad of a closer look will reveal that his simple catchy riffs are the tip of the ice berg. One can catch a glimpse at his technical skill in the Dani California solo. A bit deeper and you’ll run into Lyon 06.06.06 in one of the B Sides. John takes his influences (Page, Hendrix) and mixes his own nuances into a sound that’s pleasantly different, but melodically having the same effects on you. A track to look out for on his solo work – Ramparts – showcasing four or so guitars layered upon each other in an introspective orchestra.
Archtop-wise, the PEs apparently went into the ’62 and sometime in that year were renamed with the EP prefix, but otherwise remained the same. No detailed info on the full line is available, but the ’62 PE-8 had a bound fingerboard, small block or strip inlays, a single rounded cutaway, a rosewood pickguard, two � not one � metal-covered pickups (with one row of exposed poles along the edge), a chicken-beak selector on the upper shoulder, and four controls on the lower bout.

CostHelper Electric Guitar Guide - [New Window] - Find out how much an electric guitar should cost. Get price guidelines and shopping tips for an electric guitar. A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200 to $400 for a beginner's outfit; a better quality kit can run $500 to $2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000 to $5,000 or more for the instrument alone. 

It all began in California in 1946, when inventor Leo Fender decided he could improve on the hollow-bodied guitars that were popular at the time by introducing the world’s first production solid-bodied electric guitar. Arriving in 1951, the Telecaster soon became a commercial success, shortly followed by the release of the sleek Stratocaster in 1954.
Fuzz: A fuzz pedal or "fuzzbox" is a type of overdrive pedal that clips a sound-wave until it is nearly a squarewave, resulting in a heavily distorted or "fuzzy" sound.[53][56] Fuzzboxes may contain frequency multiplier circuitry to achieve a harsh timbre by adding complex harmonics.[57][58] The Rolling Stones' song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction", with the main riff played by Keith Richards with fuzz guitar, greatly popularized the use of fuzz effects.[23] Fuzz bass (also called "bass overdrive") is a style of playing the electric bass that produces a buzzy, overdriven sound via a tube or transistor amp or by using a fuzz or overdrive pedal.
We've already heard the story of Muddy's rise from a Mississippi planation to a Chicago blues legend but that only took his career so far, at least in his chosen style of music. Eventually, bands that were influenced by Muddy like the Rolling Stones (named after one of his songs), Animals, Yardbirds, Cream and Hendrix became big, raising Muddy's profile but not getting him the same level of success his descendants were having. Marshall Chess, son of the president of the label who worked at the company had the idea to try something different by putting Muddy's music into a psychedelic setting to appeal to a younger audience. After discussing the project with Muddy, he went for it. He wasn't forced into it as some have been led to believe.
Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE, is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009 In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately ...more on Wikipedia

As this site was founded by one of the circuit board designers from GuitarPCB.com, you can be assured that all of the homework has been done for you in selecting the appropriate parts for each circuit. Many of the kits we sell are not available from any other US supplier. Currently, we only ship to the USA, however, we plan to expand to the rest of North America in the future.

I am a lawn tennis and guitar playing trainer. I am a college lawn tennis varsity player and became a coach and a trainer of beginners and advance tennis players. I am also a band player and singer performing musical folk, pop, ballad and jazz pub Shakey's Pizza Parlor and chains. I worked with Yamaha Music Corporation as an account representative.
If you’re looking for an acoustic-electric guitar that sounds great but comes at an affordable price, then you can’t go wrong with the Oscar Schmidt OD312CE. This guitar features 12 strings for a depth and richness you couldn’t achieve with a 6-string guitar. The sound of the strings is further amplified by the select spruce top for a ‘woody’ warm tone.
it has 3 lateral braces after the soundhole, 1 before, so I guess so. the saddle makes it so the truss is the only set up option. The action is high right now for me, so I hope a decent allen wrench will turn it and its not an old peice'o'poo worn out latter brace deal. when I looked for a "belly" it could have just been straight tilted over I guess and not looked the same.
With all of the guitarists gracing our list having been connected to the world of music for several years if not decades, we are quite confident that these successful musicians are in fact deeply rooted to the music, in spite of their obvious fame. Even if you are doing a job simply to please people and to make money, it can be hard to keep up the pretense for thirty odd years, with cameras following you around 24/7!
There is a weekly newsletter that features lessons from different genres and difficulty levels. Whenever I open that newsletter I feel compelled to try out that featured lesson. I believe that this is a big reason why my guitar playing is improving so quickly. I am continuously trying out different styles and techniques and I get better overall while doing this and having fun.
Fender Super Champ X2 is a hybrid. Combining the organic sought after qualities of a valve driven amp and the dynamic technology of a modeling amp. This 15 watts combo amp with 1×10” inch speaker has two channels. Channel 1 is pure volume for the clean that starts to bite in every turn of the volume knob and modelling section that has a separate volume, gain and voicing control with 16 presets that includes the blackface, silverface, tweed, British combos and many more. The final section on the panel is shared by both channels, the EQ bass and treble, FX adjust, and FX select consisting of a delay, reverb, chorus, tremolo and vibratone.
Firebird is one of those less known, but legendary Gibson models. The 2016 version brings the core of what this bodyshape is all about, with more modern components. Even though my experience with Gibson Firebird is very limited, it’s one mighty guitar. It comes with mini humbuckers, and the sound is pretty unique. You can play anything from rock to metal on this bad boy, without being limited in any way.

Equally potent, the B.C. Rich Mockingbird is another model that is prone to stir up your interest. This device features a bolt-on body, besides, at a quick look; this guitar might remind you of the classic “NJ” style headstock. Furthermore, the guitar’s body is made from mahogany, and it comes fitted with a rock Maple Neck and a very well regarded Rosewood fretboard that is said to supply its users with a great tone, extra playability, and outstanding stability.
Now you should have all you need to assemble your first effects pedal. Make sure you have a clean, well-ventilated area to work. Wash your hands before you start. If you like, wear some conductive nitrile gloves. Avoid handling components any more than necessary. Contaminants on the components and PCB will make them harder to solder and can cause reliability problems. Certain IC’s can be damaged by static electricity from handling. Solder is hot and creates dangerous fumes so be careful. Follow the instructions carefully, in particular making sure you insert components in the correct places and the correct way around. Many components look alike and some are polarity sensitive, so take your time to get it right. Solder one pin of a component and then double-check it before soldering the rest. It’s much easier to move or remove a component with only one lead soldered to the board.
The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.
Some types of wood that were commonly used in the 1950s are close to extinct today, and can no longer be used for mass production. For instance, import and usage are restricted for certain types of Mahogany, Rosewood, and Ebony, and large guitar manufacturers in the US have been raided by the justice department on suspicion of using illegal materials.
You can think of these as distortion pedals turned up to 11. Usually, a fuzz pedal comes in as an accent for solos and intros, since its effect is so strong that it could overpower the rest of the band otherwise. You can hear an example of fuzz in the classic recording of Jimi Hendrix playing The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. This is a good type of pedal to try out as an introduction to more powerful effects.

Line 6 gets a bad rap amongst the guitar community, due to the fact that they apparently operate on a ‘quantity over quality’ business model. The truth is, however, their digital modeling tech has improved vastly since that reputation stuck and they definitely deserve renewed consideration. And that’s all the more true when it comes to beginning players. As you’d likely be learning how to play songs by your favorite artists, this amp with its massive array of presets (128 to be exact) will allow you to mimic your idols with little, if any, effort. And, honestly, it’ll sound pretty great. It even has a built-in tuner, metronome to keep you on time, and real drummer loops so you can get in the swing of playing live.
Single coil pickups are the simplest to wire because they typically have only two leads – hot and ground. Some humbuckers have their coils connected internally and are pretty much the same to wire as single coil pickups. That’s why we will call them both “two conductor pickups”. Ground leads are typically connected to a common grounding point and hot leads are switched in and out of the circuit. Let’s take a look at standard Strat-style switch.
While the Vox lineup features modern marvels such as the Valvetronix modeling amplifiers, this company is really all about smooth tube overdrive. The AC30 is a rock classic, and one of the most legendary amps ever made. It’s still going strong today, but there are many other Vox models to choose from as well, all built around that amazing Vox tone.

While the other digital amplifiers we tried (the Blackstone ID:Core Stereo 10 V2 and the Line 6 Spider Classic 15) offered a similarly wide range of good sounds, most of our panelists preferred the Champion 20 simply because it was easier to use. Lynn Shipley Sokolow preferred the simplicity of non-digital amps such as the Vox Pathfinder 10, but she said, “The Fender is the best of the digitals because it’s easy to understand the controls.”
Our guide to guitar strings, the hope and savior of beginners across the world. We're going to cover the types of guitar strings, how they're made, the best brands, the standard gauges, how to pick the right ones for your instrument and style, what to expect in terms of cost, and much more. Take a ride with me through Ledger Note's guitar string guide...
    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.
In 2000, for the anniversary of the Squier line of Stratocaster guitars, that year’s model was offered in a limited-edition green finish. The “Crafted in China” Squier Affinity Strats are different from their immediate predecessors; most have plywood bodies, larger headstock shapes, and somewhat inferior small parts. The pick guards generally now have 11 holes and screws, departing from the original ’50s style. Many people attribute the Affinity’s decline in quality to the introduction of the changes in 2000. The next major change for the Affinity line was a reduction in body thickness from 1.75″ to 1.5″, noticeable in size and weight.
At Kay, we knew this project was not just assembling parts and a Kay "Kel-von-a-tor" chevron headstock logo and calling it a Kay Vintage Reissue. The 1950's guitars of that time not only have a special look, but a special sound. To just make another mass-produced vintage looking guitar, as other companies have already done, was not enough. Only an electric guitar that could duplicate the '50s sound would be successful. To remake the products in the United States was a challenge, but it was more of a challenge to reproduce the instrument off-shore and still maintain the necessary strict quality control. The Vintage Reissue Line sat on the back burner for many years until all the components were able to come together. The Vintage Kay Reissue project came alive when Roger Fritz came into the picture.

The Orange Rocker 32 2x10" Valve Combo Amp is a great amp for those who want a serious amount of power on stage. This all valve stereo amplifier allows you to channel into that signature Orange crunch and utilise the stereo effects loop to really make use of any stereo pedals you may have (Strymon Timeline etc.)  Enjoy massive panning delays, previously only possible by using two amps at once and knock the power down using the "Half Power Mode” for home playing.


Since they entered the electric market, it didn't take long before Ibanez became the patron saint of those who appreciate a heavier sound. Their RG series won the hearts and minds of budget crowds all around the world, mainly due to its great tone and overall performance. Today we are looking at an Ibanez RG421, which follows this core policy precisely.
Acoustic guitar is the first choice of many guitar beginners. There are a lot of benefits to start with an acoustic guitar. First of first, acoustic guitars are cheaper than electric guitars. Then acoustic guitars are easy to carry, you don’t need electricity and amplifiers. The most important reason I think is a good acoustic guitar make amazing sound that different from electric guitars.

Power-tube distortion is required for amp sounds in some genres. In a standard master-volume guitar amp, as the amp's final or master volume is increased beyond the full power of the amplifier, power tube distortion is produced. The "power soak" approach places the attenuation between the power tubes and the guitar speaker. In the re-amped or "dummy load" approach, the tube power amp drives a mostly resistive dummy load while an additional low power amp drives the guitar speaker. In the isolation box approach, the guitar amplifier is used with a guitar speaker in a separate cabinet. A soundproofed isolation cabinet, isolation box, isolation booth, or isolation room can be used.
In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
You have to take into account that these are low budget guitars, so there will be compromises in terms of materials, pickups and hardware. The experienced guitar player might require a higher standard. That being said, if you have between a 100 and 300 dollars to spend and you do want to learn to play guitar than these guitars are really worth the investment.
Until the 1950s, the acoustic, nylon-stringed classical guitar was the only type of guitar favored by classical, or art music composers. In the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Luciano Berio's Nones (1954) Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gruppen (1955–57); Donald Erb's String Trio (1966), Morton Feldman's The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb's Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze's Versuch über Schweine (1968); Francis Thorne's Sonar Plexus (1968) and Liebesrock (1968–69), Michael Tippett's The Knot Garden (1965–70); Leonard Bernstein's MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen's De Staat (1972–76); Helmut Lachenmann's Fassade, für grosses Orchester (1973, rev. 1987), Valery Gavrilin Anyuta (1982), Steve Reich's Electric Counterpoint (1987), Arvo Pärt's Miserere (1989/92), György Kurtág's Grabstein für Stephan (1989), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Alfred Schnittke also used electric guitar in several works, like the "Requiem", "Concerto Grosso N°2" and "Symphony N°1".
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